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PROGRAMME HANDBOOK
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BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


DEGREE
(YEAR 3)
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JULY 2016 INTAKE


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Copyright 2016
THE MANAGEMENT COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
All rights reserved, no part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, including photocopying machines, without the written permission of the publisher
MANCOSA: BBA YEAR 3 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. WELCOME
1.1 MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL 3
1.2 MESSAGE FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN 4

2. INTRODUCTION TO MANCOSA
2.1 BRIEF HISTORY OF MANCOSA 4
2.2 PROGRAMME OFFERINGS 5
2.3 ACADEMIC MANAGEMENT 5

3. THE MANCOSA VISION 6

4. THE MANCOSA MISSION 6

5. BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BBA) PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


5.1 OVERALL PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES 7
5.2 PROGRAMME FOCUS 7
5.3 MODULE DESCRIPTIONS 8 12

6. PROGRAMME ADMINISTRATION
6.1 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT 13
6.2 FINANCE
6.2.1 FEE PAYMENT 13 15
6.2.2 PAYMENT OF FEES AND OTHER DUES 16
6.2.3 PAYMENT PLANS 16
6.2.4 ADDITIONAL FEES/CHARGES 16
6.2.5 REGISTRATION SPECIFIC/INCOMPLETE MODULES 16
6.2.6 CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION/FEE LIABILITY 17
6.2.7 MISCELLANEOUS COSTS 17
6.2.8 PAYMENTS 17
6.2.9 ACCOUNT DETAILS 17
6.2.10 FOREIGN PAYMENTS 17
6.3 ASSESSMENTS
6.3.1 METHOD OF ASSESSMENT 18
6.3.2 MARKING CRITERIA 18
6.4 STUDENT SUPPORT
6.4.1 STUDENT SUPPORT DEPARTMENT 19
6.4.2 REGIONAL OFFICES/REPRESENTATIVES 19 20
6.5 ACADEMIC SUPPORT
6.5.1 REGIONAL TUTOR SUPPORT (ACADEMIC FACULTY MEMBERS) 21
6.5.2 MODULE CO-ORDINATION AND EMAIL SUPPORT 21
6.5.3 LIBRARY SERVICES 21
6.5.4 MODULE GUIDES 21
6.5.5 WEBSITE/ONLINE LEARNING CENTRE 22
6.5.6 PRESCRIBED TEXTBOOKS 23

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6.6 IT AND WEBSITE 24


6.7 GENERAL
6.7.1 AWARD OF QUALIFICATION 24
6.7.2 GRADUATION 24
6.7.3 FREQUENTLY USED FORMS 24

7. WORKSHOPS
7.1 WORKSHOP VENUES 25
7.2 WORKSHOP DATES 26
7.3 WORKSHOP PROGRAMMES 27 28

8. ASSIGNMENTS
8.1 SUBMISSION
8.1.1 RULES REGARDING THE SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENTS 29 42
8.2 ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION DATES 44
8.3 ASSIGNMENT QUESTIONS
- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3A 45 46
- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3B 47 48
- BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3A 49 54
- BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3B 55 57
- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3C 58 59
- BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3D 60 61
- BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3C 62 64
- BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3D 65 66

9. EXAMINATIONS
9.1 EXAMINATION DATES AND TIMES 67
9.2 EXAMINATION VENUES 68

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1. WELCOME

1.1 MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL


PROF YUSUF KARODIA

Choosing a business school is certainly one of the most important decisions, made even more difficult in our
changing times where the world has lost its old equilibrium without having found new values.

The frontiers of the economy are reforming and in continuous evolution and work opportunities are emerging.
In this brave new world tertiary institutions can no longer limit itself to provide textbook knowledge and mere
academic preparation reducing itself to an 'exam house' attaching titles and empty labels, neither can it
continue to ignore the changing needs of a global employment market and the profound changes in the
environment awaiting the students beyond the campuses.

MANCOSAs mission is to prepare a new breed of leaders, courageous, sincere individuals with the intellectual
abilities, cross cultural versatility, practical skills and ethics needed to operate in today's business world. With
programmes designed to accommodate individuals with diverse needs and lifestyles, MANCOSA supported
distance education programmes are in great demand with the rigour and innovation to create reflective
practitioners. Participants are immersed in an active education that will challenge their assumptions, disrupt
their ordinary ways of doing business, and introduce them to new and unexpected ways of thinking. By
participating, you will be prepared for the next step in your career and life, demonstrating leadership skills
among your peers. Most important, you will return to your organisation with fresh ideas, new business skills,
and a greater capacity for addressing the challenges your company will face.

MANCOSA programmes promote a high level of independence through innovative learning and assessment
interventions. You can expect a carefully integrated mix of lectures; access to well designed self study materials
and online learning resources. One key feature of MANCOSA is its use of case studies, an active learning model
that teaches participants how to assess, analyse, and act upon complex business issues. Rooted in real-life
experiences, the business case method develops analytical skills, sound judgement, and the leadership
potential within each participant. This will equip you with cutting-edge skills that will position you to be a
leader in your organisation and community.

For those who are prepared to embrace the challenges of this programme, you will find unique rewards with
lasting impact for your organisation and career. We wish you well in your academic endeavours and assure you
of our continued support towards realising your goals. I wish you well in your studies.

Prof YM Karodia
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1.2 MESSAGE FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN

Welcome to the MANCOSA Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree programme. You are about to
embark upon a challenging, new journey, discovering new horizons and breaking new frontiers of knowledge.
For the duration of the programme you will be exposed to highly competent academics, who will not only
share with you their knowledge of the current practices necessary for a global, dynamic and turbulent
environment, but who will also guide you and mentor you to enable you to develop the desired graduate
attributes (knowledge, skills, attitudes and qualities), including critical-thinking and life-long learning skills.
Enjoy your journey on this road that will lead you to a higher level of knowledge, skills and abilities.

2. INTRODUCTION TO MANCOSA

2.1 BRIEF HISTORY OF MANCOSA

The Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA) is a private higher education institute registered in
terms of the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended). It was established in 1995 as a post-
apartheid empowerment institution offering affordable and accessible management education primarily to
persons previously denied access to postgraduate education. MANCOSA has 100% black ownership, i.e. it is
owned entirely by previously disadvantaged individuals in the South African context. The Master of Business
Administration (MBA) degree programme has been offered since 1995. Between 1995 and 2000 MANCOSA
provided management programmes in association with the Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College
(BCUC), a College of the University of Brunel in the United Kingdom. During this period MANCOSA was
successfully quality assured by the British Quality Assurance Agency (QAA). In 2002 MANCOSA received full
institutional accreditation from the Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC), the quality assuring
committee of the Council on Higher Education (CHE).

MANCOSA is one of the leading providers of international and local management programmes through
supported distance education in Southern Africa. Recent developments have included the introduction of
support classes which cater for those students who prefer additional support. In delivering its range of
Management Education programmes to a diverse body of students from both the public and private sectors,
MANCOSA has developed significant infrastructural, academic and intellectual capacity. As a leading provider
of management programmes by supported distance education, MANCOSA has considerable expertise in the
design and development of high quality and relevant course materials. It has developed unique teaching and
learning strategies, particularly suited for transferring knowledge and skills to adult students, the majority of
whom are in full-time employment. Through its active research focus, MANCOSA is also at the cutting-edge of
the latest management and leadership training trends.

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2.2 PROGRAMME OFFERINGS

MANCOSA programmes cover the areas of business administration, commerce, tourism management,
functional management and leadership and range from certificate programmes to masters degrees.

MANCOSA offers the following accredited and registered programmes:


1. Higher Certificate in Business Management
2. Higher Certificate in Local Government and Development Management
3. Higher Certificate in Accounting
4. Higher Certificate in Supply Chain Management
5. Higher Certificate in Information Technology
6. Higher Certificate in Public Management
7. Higher Certificate in Human Resource Management
8. Higher Certificate in Project Management
9. Higher Certificate in Marketing
10. Advanced Certificate in Management Studies
11. Advanced Certificate in Financial Planning
12. Bachelor of Business Administration degree
13. Bachelor of Public Administration degree
14. Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resource Management degree
15. Bachelor of Commerce in Marketing Management degree
16. Bachelor of Commerce in Information and Technology Management degree
17. Bachelor of Commerce Supply Chain Management degree
18. Bachelor of Commerce in Financial Management degree
19. Bachelor of Commerce Honours in Human Resource Management
20. Bachelor of Commerce Honours in Marketing Management
21. Bachelor of Public Administration Honours
22. Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Management
23. Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management
24. Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management
25. Master of Business Administration

2.3 ACADEMIC MANAGEMENT

DESIGNATION NAME
Principal Prof Y. M. Karodia
Academic Dean Prof E. J. van Rooyen
Deputy Dean Prof K. Naidoo
GSB Director Dr Z. Hamid
Undergraduate Academic Manager Mr R. Ramharack

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3. THE MANCOSA VISION

MANCOSAs vision is to be the leading distance higher education provider that is responsive to the evolving
education and training needs of dynamic economies through a commitment to people, opportunity and
quality.

4. THE MANCOSA MISSION

MANCOSA endeavours to respond to the changing education demands of both public and private sectors in
dynamic economies through the provision of innovative education.

Pursuant to the mission MANCOSA strives to:


1. Grant accessible, quality and affordable distance education.
2. Invest and conduct innovative teaching and learning.
3. Promote and conduct relevant and socially responsible research.
4. Contribute to economic and social upliftment through responsive and relevant interventions.
5. Maintain service excellence.
6. Contribute to the transformation process of higher education.
7. Promote opportunity, equality and social justice irrespective of race, colour, creed and gender.
8. Embrace ethical practice in the delivery of all its programmes.

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5. BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BBA) PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

5.1 OVERALL PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree programme, students
will be able to:
Comprehend and apply the principles of business ethics.
Obtain the quantitative skills and knowledge needed to make sound business decisions.
Acquire knowledge in the fields of business, including management, international business, marketing,
business law, accountancy, finance, economics, and knowledge management, and apply these skills to
different business environments.
Integrate the knowledge acquired in the programme to analyse a business to identify its strengths and
weaknesses and determine what changes can be made for improvement.
Conduct independent research relevant to business-related issues.
Demonstrate written and oral presentation skills expected of a business school graduate.

5.2 PROGRAMME FOCUS

From the very outset, the MANCOSA Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree programme strives to
maximise personal development, grow management and leadership skills and contribute to positive economic
change in the countries from which students are drawn.

The main focus of the programme is to ensure that students develop the ability to apply management theory in
practice.

The curriculum consists of 360 credits progressively arrayed in 24 modules over a minimum of 3 years of study.
Students must pass a particular module before proceeding to the consecutively numbered module with the
same title. Six of the modules (90 credits) are fundamental.

All students take the same (fundamental and core) modules in the all levels of the curriculum. These modules
induce the students to learn the basic skills that the programme demands, to understand the theoretical core
of the disciplines of Business Management and Administration, and to understand the context in which these
disciplines are practiced.

The modules covered in the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree programme are as follows:

STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3


Business Management 1A Business Management 2A Business Management 3A
End User Computing Business Administration 2A Business Management 3B
Business Mathematics Management Accounting Business Administration 3A
Economics 1A Business and Society Business Administration 3B
Business Management 1B Business Management 2B Business Management 3C
Business Communication Business Administration 2B Business Management 3D
Financial Accounting Business Statistics Business Administration 3C
Economics 1B Information Systems Business Administration 3D

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5.3 MODULE DESCRIPTIONS

YEAR 1

1. Business Management 1A (15 Credits) Core


Introduction to General Management
This module introduces students to the field of study of business management, focusing on the management
environment, the management process, and the evolution of management theory. At the conclusion of the
module students should be able to understand some of the theoretical content of business management and
discuss it critically in relation to certain simple selected situations that might arise in the context of managing a
business.

2. End User Computing (15 Credits) Fundamental


This course focuses on developing students business computing skills and their understanding of computing in
a business environment. Business computing skills covered in the course relate to spreadsheets, databases,
search techniques and the use of computers as a presentation medium.

3. Business Mathematics (15 Credits) Fundamental


The purpose of this module is to enable a student to become conversant with a variety of basic mathematics
and quantitative techniques, thereby providing the student with the basic tools necessary to attempt more
detailed calculations in other business applications.

4. Economics 1A (15 Credits) Core


Principles of Microeconomics
This course offers an introduction to the workings of market systems. It deals with the economic behaviour of
consumers and firms, covering analysis of demand and supply of goods, services and resources within an
economy. The framework developed is used to examine and evaluate the operation of the market mechanism
for various market structures and government policies.

5. Business Management 1B (15 Credits) Core


Functional Management
This module exposes students to an array of organisational structures and theories in relation to central and
strategic management. It also involves students in the study of functional areas of management, including
operations management, marketing management, human resource management and financial management.
At the end of the module students should be able to understand and discuss organisations and organisational
theory, and to propose solutions to a variety of more complex problems that might arise in the course of
managing a business.

6. Business Communication (15 Credits) Fundamental


This module focuses on the presentation of concepts in a concise, complete manner in memos, letters and
reports. Topics dealt with include composing, editing and revising reports and proposals, and other business-
related communications including resumes and letters of application. The module also addresses reading skills,
including the comprehension and evaluation of challenging materials. At the conclusion of the module students
will be expected to be able to read and clearly understand business communications in their fields, and to write
clear and precise business communications reports in a variety of forms.

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7. Financial Accounting (15 Credits) Fundamental


The purpose of this module is to cover the basic concepts of accounting, the recording of various elementary
transactions and the accounting cycle. This module deals with the recording and control of various assets and
liabilities and the accounting records of a sole trader and a non-trading enterprise. This module familiarises the
student with recording, classifying and interpreting financial data for a business. It includes a study of the
journals, ledgers and financial statements used by these entities. It also covers credit instruments,
depreciation of plant assets, internal control, and liabilities.

8. Economics 1B (15 Credits) Core


Principles of Macroeconomics
This course analyses aggregate economic activity in the national economy and its interrelationships with the
rest of the world. Emphasis is placed on basic principles involved in the determination of the level of national
output, the aggregate price level, and the money supply. Alternative explanations of key macroeconomic
problems and relevant economic policies are compared. The theoretical concepts are illustrated from a range
of Southern African and international examples.

YEAR 2

1. Business Management 2A (15 Credits) Core


Leadership, decision-making, groups and teams and organisational structures
This module will develop students insight into the nature of business management through consideration of
the role of leadership in management, the role of groups and teams, and ways of motivating them. It will also
briefly consider the importance of managerial communications and information technology. By the end of the
module students should be able to evaluate and critically discuss various modes of management, and display
an understanding of some of the factors essential to reaching sound managerial decisions.

2. Business Administration 2A (15 Credits) Core


Human Resource Management
The purpose of this module is to equip students with the skills necessary for effective management and
utilisation of human resources. It deals with HRM from both a strategic and operational point of view. From a
strategic perspective, it draws the link between the importance of allying HRM policies and practices to support
and reinforce more general business strategies and objectives. At operational level, HRM is concerned with the
design and implementation of procedures to optimise the day-to-day management of people in the
organisation. The central focus is on improving the students knowledge of critical areas of HRM so that they
can develop and implement effective policies for management of people.

3. Management Accounting (15 Credits) Fundamental


The purpose of this module is to provide the student with information for sound management decision-making.
The student will appreciate the value of management accounting with respect to the implementation of
forecasting, planning and control. Furthermore, it will help develop cost control systems and financial reporting
systems and ensures flexibility in response to changes in the environment. It also helps the student identify
limitations in the organisation through an effective reporting system.

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4. Business and Society (15 Credits) Fundamental


This module constitutes an introductory study of the impact of societal influences and ethical considerations on
business decision-making. Topics will include - business ethics; corporate responsibility and accountability;
income inequality; price controls and subsidies; management and labour; ethnicity and business; women in
business; non-profit organisations; business and activism. At the conclusion of the module students will be
expected to be able to analyse and evaluate current changes in work and society in a broad disciplinary and
conceptual framework, and to identify and trace in relation to business management the major forces for
change in society, with special reference to their current manifestations and trends.

5. Business Management 2B (15 Credits) Core


Entrepreneurship, Small Business Management, and Negotiation
This module expands a students knowledge of business management by focussing on issues facing small
business and management thereof. It also deals with management of conflict and diversity in an African
context. It also provides students with the foundation to negotiate effectively in a business environment.

This module will focus on the nature of entrepreneurship and issues relating to small business management in
general. Various related topics will receive attention during the course of the study. These will include topics
such as start-up, business plans, finance options, and franchises. At the conclusion of the module students
should demonstrate that they are able on paper to set up and run a small business successfully.

6. Business Administration 2B (15 Credits) Core


Marketing
This module focuses on the basic principles of marketing and introduces students to the main marketing
themes and associated theories. It presents marketing as a total system of business actions carried out by
managers in individual organisations, in the context of the larger economy, and, indeed, in society as a whole.
Marketing decisions have to be made in the light of many macro and micro-environmental factors, and it is in
this module that students examine and evaluate the impact, upon marketing theory and practice.

7. Business Statistics (15 Credits) Fundamental


The purpose of this module is to provide students with a working knowledge of quantitative analysis. It will
provide future managers with the essential quantitative basis to be effective in the business world. It will
provide an important tool in transforming raw data into meaningful, useful and usable information for
decision-making.

8. Information Systems (15 Credits) Fundamental


This module builds on the knowledge gained by students from the End user computing module. It presents a
core of Information Systems (IS) principles with which every business student should be familiar with and
outlines the changing role of the IS professional. It goes on further to emphasize the value of this discipline in
planning and decision-making in the business environment. These objectives will enable students to use
fundamental IS principles so that they will efficiently and effectively function as future business employees,
managers and employers.

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YEAR 3

1. Business Management 3A (15 Credits) Core


Managing Conflict, Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, Industrial Relations and the Legislative
framework
This module develops the students understanding of the managing of conflict, business ethics, corporate social
responsibility, industrial relations and the legislative framework within which businesses operate. The
knowledge and skills which the student will develop in this regard will aid him/her in effectively functioning in
organisations undergoing transformation.

2. Business Management 3B (15 Credits) Core


Organisational Culture, Workforce diversity and Total Quality Management
This module develops the students understanding of organisational culture and the elements that make up and
influence such a culture. It also addresses the need for workforce diversity and the promotion and monitoring
of quality in the organisation and its work.

3. Business Administration 3A (15 Credits) Core


Financial Management
Key topics include:
Financial Reporting
Financial Statement Analysis
Costs and efficiency
Setting & Achieving budgets
Operating and Capital expenditure

4. Business Administration 3B (15 Credits) Core


International Management
The objective of this module is to introduce the international task environment from a managerial viewpoint.
The course focuses on the implementation of international strategies and the development of organization
structures into multinational or global forms.

5. Business Management 3C (15 Credits) Core


Business Ethics
The module allows for a more holistic understanding of the nature of business activity. Students are made
aware of the benefits and limitations of bringing ethical theory into the managerial decision making process.
This elective gives students a basic grounding in ethical theory, as well as understanding how ethics can be
applied to various business-related topics.

6. Business Management 3D (15 Credits) Core


Strategic Management
Students are exposed to a wide range of strategic issues together with the theories, techniques and tools used
by managers to formulate, implement and evaluate strategies designed to establish and maintain competitive
advantage.

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7. Business Administration 3C (15 Credits) Core


Project Management
The purpose of this module is to provide students with a structured approach to managing projects. It outlines
the latest planning and control techniques used by industry in the management of projects. The key objective is
to develop a fully integrated information and control system to plan, instruct, monitor and control large
amounts of data, quickly and accurately to facilitate the problem-solving and decision making process.

8. Business Administration 3D (15 Credits) Core


Operations Management
Operations management is a key function in most organisations and the course is thus designed to impart a
holistic knowledge of the functioning of operations management through the study of relevant literature and
its practical application. Students will study methods to improve the productivity levels of an organisation in
order to compete more successfully in both the domestic and global markets. As the operations management
environment is dynamic, the course is designed to instil in the participants an ability to accept and react to
continuous change.

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6. PROGRAMME ADMINISTRATION

6.1 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT


The MANCOSA Management team will undertake the responsibility of administering the programme from the
point of enrolment to the point of graduation. All queries associated with programme management and
implementation should be directed to:
Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za

For all Institutional rules and procedures, please refer to the Institutional Rule Book and Student Code of
Conduct.

6.2 FINANCE
All queries relating to student accounts must be forwarded to:
Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za
6.2.1 Fee Payment
Where a student has sponsorship in respect of financial support from an employer or any other sponsoring
body in respect of fees, the student must supply proof of sponsorship at enrolment.
The student, however, is ultimately responsible for all and any payment owing to MANCOSA in the case of
default by the sponsor.
Students can pay fees in the following ways:
- Cash at MANCOSA offices in Durban and Johannesburg
- Pay on website with a credit card
- Electronic Funds Transfer
- Debit order (The Debit Order Authorisation form must be completed and sent to the Finance Department
in Durban)
Please contact the MANCOSA office if you require information on alternative payment methods.

Online Credit Card Payment Process


STEP 1
Proceed to website www.mancosa.co.za
STEP 2
Click on Online Payment, as per screen 1 below.
Screen 1:

CLICK HERE
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STEP 3
Enter all details
Screen 2

STEP 4
Once all details have been entered, click on Proceed to accept terms and conditions, as highlighted below:

CLICK HERE
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STEP 5
Ensure all card details are entered as they appear on your card on the screen below:

Screen 3
Click on Pay to finalise transaction.

Screen 4
The following screen will appear once the payment transaction has been processed successfully:

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6.2.2 Payment of Fees and Other Dues


All fees and other payments owing to MANCOSA for tuition and/or services provided must be paid by the due
dates as stipulated in the fee schedule. Penalties will be imposed on all overdue accounts.

In addition, if students have outstanding financial obligations, MANCOSA may:


withhold the results of assignments and examinations,
withhold the release of certificates,
not allow a student to register on any MANCOSA programme

6.2.3 Payment Plans


The payment of fees by instalment is available as long as the terms of such an arrangement are strictly
adhered to.
Students who fail to adhere to their chosen payment plan will automatically be moved to the payment
plan 3 option and have their accounts adjusted accordingly, thereby increasing their debt to MANCOSA.
A charge of R 1000.00 will be levied against all plan 3 payment options, if not settled in full by the due date.

A charge of R100.00 will be levied to cover administrative and bank charges in respect of:
returned cheques and/or
unpaid debit orders

6.2.5 Registration for Specific/Incomplete Modules


The re-registration fee is a modular fee. Rich distance learning is an additional cost.
After the payment of the minimum fee, the balance must be settled within a maximum of 5 consecutive
months from the initial date of registration.

6.2.4 Additional Fees/Charges


The following additional fees are levied:
Graduation fee : R 350.00 (*Subject to change at time of graduation)
Assignment re-mark fee : R 220.00 per re-mark
Assignment re-submission fee : R 220.00 per re-submission
Exam script re-mark fee : R 250.00 per re-mark
Supplementary examination : R 250.00 per module
Aegrotat examination : R 250.00 per module
Graduating in absentia : R 300.00
Transcript reprint : R 200.00 per copy
Certificate reprint : R 200.00
Certificate re-issue : R 250.00
Student card re-issue : R 100.00
Change of elective : R 600.00
Replacement of lost modules : Email dispatch1@mancosa.co.za for cost per module
Deferral fee : R 2 500.00
Student refund process : will in some instances attract an administration fee
Viewing of marked examination script : R250 per module

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6.2.6 Cancellation of Registration/Fee Liability


A student who intends cancelling his/her registration must notify MANCOSA in writing.
The student will:
be liable for a non-refundable registration fee of R 2950.00 for distance and supported distance
students and R 3500.00 for rich distance students, if the cancellation occurs within 14 days of initial
registration, or
be liable for the payment of full fees if cancellation of registration occurs beyond 14 days of initial
registration.
Refunds will not be granted for a deferred registration.
The decision of the Academic Executive Committee on recommendation of the Programme Coordinator is
final and binding.

All queries in this regard must be forwarded to:


Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za

6.2.7 Miscellaneous Costs


Students requesting additional material not included in the programme fee will be charged accordingly.
These miscellaneous costs include photocopying, postage etc.

6.2.8 Payments
The following information must accompany all payments made to MANCOSA.
full name, initials and surname
student number
Proof of payment/transfer must be faxed to Finance:
+27 31 3007298 or 086 532 5455
If all details are not accurately provided to MANCOSA, your account may not be credited.

6.2.9 Account Details


All payments should be made into ANY ONE of the following accounts:

Bank ABSA Bank


Account Holder MANCOSA (Pty) Ltd
Branch ABSA Corporate & Business Banking KZN
Account Number 40-6845-6934
Branch Code 634926

OR

Bank Standard Bank


Account Holder MANCOSA (Pty Ltd)
Branch Overport City, Durban
Account Number 05 261 572 3
Branch Code 043826

6.2.10 Foreign Payments


It is important to note that foreign payments take at least 5 days to reflect in the MANCOSA accounts. The
onus lies with the student to ensure timeous payment of fees.
The SWIFT CODE for international payments are as follows:
- ABSA Bank: ABSAZAJJ
- STANDARD Bank: SBZAZAJJ
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6.3 ASSESSMENT

Assignments
All queries relating to the submission of assignments and the assessment thereof must be directed to:
Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za

Examinations
All queries relating to examinations must be directed to:
Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za

6.3.1 Method of Assessment


The assessment method for this programme is by:
(1) Assignments and
(2) Examinations.
The contribution to the final mark is as follows:
(1) Assignment - 50% and
(2) Examination - 50%
To pass a module a sub-minimum of 30% is required in each form of assessment and a final combined mark
of 50% is required.
Entrance to the examination is dependent on meeting the sub-minimum requirements of the assignments
for each semester.

6.3.2 Marking Criteria


All assignments are marked according to the following criteria.

Demonstrates an authoritative grasp of the concepts, methodology and content


Excellent appropriate to the subject discipline. Indication of originality in the application of
A 75%+ ideas, in synthesis of material or in performance; personal insights reflecting depth
and confidence of understanding and real critical analysis. Work is well structured
and presented with full referencing.
Demonstrates a sound level of understanding based on a competent grasp of
Very Good relevant concepts, methodology and content; displays skill in interpreting and
B 70 74% analysing complex material; material well organised.
Demonstrates a good level of understanding based on a grasp of relevant
Good concepts, methodology and content; display some skill in analysing complex
C 60 69% material; material well organized.
Demonstrates a coherent response to the requirements of the assessment task;
Acceptable clear expression of ideas; uses relevant source material; demonstrates some
D 50 59% understanding of the concepts; draws relevant conclusions; appropriate
organisation of response.
Unacceptable Recognisable but limited awareness of requirements of assessment task; evidence
E 40 49% of some understanding; some attempt to draw relevant conclusions.
Fail
F 33 39% Marginal grade. Unsatisfactory but showing some evidence of understanding.
Fail
G 0 32% Little evidence of understanding or application.

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6.4 STUDENT SUPPORT

6.4.1 Student Support Department


The Student Support Department is the first point of contact for all administrative student queries. Every
attempt will be made to deal with student queries as effectively as possible. Queries will be treated in
confidence and no victimisation or discrimination of any kind will be tolerated against the complainant.
Anonymous complaints against a person or persons will NOT be considered.

All queries in this regard must be forwarded to:


Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za
Tel: +27 31 3007200

6.4.2 Regional Offices Representatives


MANCOSA has offices/representatives situated in various regions. The details of these offices/representatives
are provided below:

MANCOSA
CITY/COUNTRY REPRESENTATIVE CONTACT DETAILS
MANCOSA Campus
South Africa MANCOSA Staff 26 Samora Machel Street, Durban, 4000
(Durban) Tel: +27 31 3007200
Fax: +27 31 3007298
Email: sss@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Campus (Auckland Park)
South Africa MANCOSA Staff 1 Cedar Road, Richmond, Johannesburg, 2092
(Johannesburg) Tel: +27 11 853 3000
Fax: + 27 11 482 9072
Email: Jhb@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Campus
South Africa MANCOSA Staff First floor Stadium on Main Building
(Cape Town) 99 MAIN Road, Claremont, 7708
Tel: +27 21 6716576
Fax: +27 21 6714306
Email: CapeTown2@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Office, Edupark
South Africa MANCOSA Staff Ground Floor Block A, Edupark Campus,
(Polokwane) Webster Street, Polokwane, 0699
Tel: +27 15 2902896 or +27 15 2902899
Fax: +27 15 2902841
Email: Polokwane@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Office
South Africa MANCOSA Staff 90 Vincent Road, Vincent, East London, 5201
(East London) Tel: +27 43 7211774
Email: mancosa.eastlondon@mancosa.co.za

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Unit 3, Ground floor in Ausspann Plaza


Namibia MANCOSA Staff Dr Augustino Neto Road, Windhoek
(Windhoek) Tel: 00264 61 301354
Fax: 00264 61 301353
Fax-to-Email: 088629830
Cell: 00264 81 2332469
Email: Namibia@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Office, 47 Independence Avenue
Zambia Ms M Bham Lusaka, Zambia
(Lusaka) Tel: 00260 211 258684
Cell: 00260 979044454
Email: Zambia@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Campus
Botswana MANCOSA Staff Fair Ground Mall, Next to Motor Centre
(Gaborone) Samora Machel Drive, Plot 28502, Unit 28, Gaborone
Tel: 00267 3914587 or 00267 3932850
Fax: 00267 3914562
Email: Mancosa@info.bw
Mozambique Ms F Gani Cell: 00258 84 635 0003
(Maputo) Email: Mozambique@staff.mancosa.co.za
MANCOSA Staff Email: Zimbabwe@staff.mancosa.co.za
Zimbabwe
(Harare)
Cell : 00265 888944282
Malawi Dr WW Mkwepu Cell: 00265 999565037
(Lilongwe) Nakanga Email: Malawi@staff.mancosa.co.za
Civil Servants Langata, No.67
Kenya Prof C. Mayaka Tel: 00254722679469
(Nairobi) Cell: 00736355292
Email: rubiconsult@gmail.com.
Swaziland Mrs N Makhanya Lot 132, City Centre, Mbhamali Street, Commercial Area, Manzini
(Manzini) Cell: 00268 2505 6634
Email: Swaziland@staff.mancosa.co.za
YK Business School, Belle Terre Road, Highlands, Morc VRS,
Mauritius Mrs T Jaumally Mauritius, BRN: C06041230
(Highlands) Tel: 00230 698 9000,
Fax: 00230 698 9010
Email: registry@ykbs.ac.mu
Tel: 07 383 201 6364
Russia Ms O Savostina Email: mba@nsaem.ru

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6.5 ACADEMIC SUPPORT

6.5.1 Regional Tutor Support (Academic Faculty members)


Each region has qualified academic faculty members appointed to ensure the highest standard of academic
delivery to students. Their duties include:
Delivery of the scheduled lectures
Telephonic support
Email support

You are required to contact the relevant tutors at times as prescribed at their lecture. The details for these
tutors may be obtained at the scheduled workshops.
Note: Tutors may be changed at short notice due to unforeseen circumstances.

6.5.2 Module Co-ordination and Email Support


A Module Coordinator is appointed for each module. This module co-ordinator is a full-time MANCOSA lecturer
who is available during office hours to provide academic support to students.

These faculty members also provide email support via:


Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za
Note: Email is the preferred method of communication with academic faculty.

6.5.3 Library Services


Please refer to the library guide for a comprehensive list of library facilities and resources available across all
the regions.

6.5.4 Module Guides


On registration, all MANCOSA students are issued with a comprehensive set of module guides, which outline
the syllabus and details of content to be covered in each module for the academic year.

However, it must be noted that all study material provided must be read in conjunction with the textbooks that
are prescribed for each of the modules.

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6.5.5 Website/ Online Learning Centre


MANCOSAs website (http://www.mancosa.co.za) offers the following services to students:
Information on news and events
Photo gallery
Programme and module descriptions
Enrolment documentation
Online request for information and registration
Online payment options
Contact details (local and international)
Link to student portal (http://www.mymancosa.com/)
Social Feeds (Twitter and Facebook)
Alumni portal

Online Learning Centre (Multimedia Support)


Students can access interactive learning material through the MyMancosa portal at
http://www.mymancosa.com.

The portal amongst other features contains the following:


Important news and announcements
Programme and module information
Online journal database access eg. Emerald Online, EBSCO, Google Scholar, Informing Science, Directory of
Open Access Journal (DOAJ), etc
Programme handbooks
PowerPoint presentations
Past year examination papers
Workshop notes
Exam guidelines
Research and dissertation writing guidelines
Exam results and assignment mark details
Student details
Exam schedules, assignment due dates and personalised time tables
Buy/sell second hand textbooks

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6.5.6 Prescribed textbooks


All prescribed texts may be purchased from Shesha Books or an accredited bookseller.
You can contact Shesha Books on +27 31 3322702 or email sales@sheshabooks.co.za for further details.

A list of the prescribed texts for each module is found below:


PRESCRIBED BOOK
MODULE & AUTHOR/S ED PUBLISHER

Business Management 3A Management 4th Oxford


Hellriegel, Jackson, Slocum, Staude, Amos, RSA University Press
Klopper, Louw, and Oosthuizen
and
Business Management. A Value Chain 2nd Van Schaik
Approach
Nieman & Bennet

Business Management 3B Management 4th Oxford


Hellriegel, Jackson, Slocum, Staude, Amos, RSA University Press
Klopper, Louw, and Oosthuizen
and
Business Management. A Value Chain 2nd Van Schaik
Approach
Nieman & Bennet

Business Administration 3A Management Accounting: Information for 1st McGraw Hill


Managing and Creating Value
(Recommended)
Correia, et al

Business Administration 3B Management Principles 5th Juta and Co.


Smith and De J Cronje

Business Management 3C Ethics and the Conduct of Business 7th Pearson


Boatright Education

Business Management 3D Strategic Management: Concepts & Cases 14th/15th Pearson


Fred David Education

Business Administration 3C Effective Project Management 5th Cengage


Clements and Gido Learning

Business Administration 3D Operations Management 11th/12th McGraw Hill


Stevenson

Note: The above prescribed readings have been provided at the time of publication of this handbook.
Should an updated edition be available, students can use either version.
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6.6 IT AND WEBSITE

In the event of the student experiencing difficulty accessing any of the MANCOSA electronic facilities, queries
must be forwarded to:
Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za
Tel: +27 31 3007200

6.7 GENERAL

6.7.1 Award of Qualification


The student will be awarded the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree on completion of all
modules (Year 1, 2 and 3).

6.7.2 Graduation
On successful completion of all coursework required and on the settlement of all outstanding fees, a
student is eligible to attend a graduation ceremony where the qualification will be conferred upon the
student. In addition, the original certificate is issued to the student at the graduation ceremony.
All students graduating are liable for a fee of R 350.00. This amount does not include the cost of the
academic attire or photographs.
A separate charge will be levied per guest.
Students graduating in absentia will be liable for a fee of R 300.00. This includes the cost of postage/courier
of certificates to the student.

6.7.3 Frequently used Forms


A list of frequently used forms can be found on www.mymancosa.com.

For detailed information on procedures related to each form, refer to the Institutional Rule Book.

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7. WORKSHOPS

7.1 WORKSHOP VENUES

CITY COUNTRY VENUE

Johannesburg South Africa College of Education at Wits (formerly JCE)


27 St Andrews Road, Parktown, Johannesburg

Durban South Africa MANCOSA Lecture Hall


26 Samora Machel Street, Durban

Pretoria South Africa UNISA (Muckleneuk Campus)


Theo Van Wyk Building, Preller Street, Pretoria

Cape Town South Africa MANCOSA Campus


First floor Stadium on Main Building, 99 MAIN Road, Claremont, 7708

Polokwane South Africa Edupark Campus


Webster Street, Polokwane, 0699

Windhoek Namibia MANCOSA Office


Bachran Property Investments (BPI House), 269 Independence Avenue,
Mezzanine Floor, Office 27, Windhoek

Lusaka Zambia MANCOSA Office


47 Independence Avenue, Lusaka, Zambia

Gaborone Botswana MANCOSA Campus


Fair Grounds Mall, Next to Motor Centre, Samora Machel Street,
Plot 28502, Unit 28, Gaborone

Manzini Swaziland Regent Business School


Lot 132 City Centre, Mbhabha Street, Commercial Area, Manzini
(Near Swaziland Milling)

Note:
(1) Changes in the workshop schedule will be communicated to registered students in writing prior to the
workshop.
(2) Additional workshop venues may be considered at the discretion of the Deans office.
(3) Students are encouraged to contact us to confirm any changes in their workshop venues.

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7.2 WORKSHOP DATES

SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2

CITY COUNTRY WORKSHOP 1 WORKSHOP 1

Johannesburg South Africa 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Durban South Africa 20/21 August 2016 11/12 February 2017

Pretoria South Africa 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Cape Town South Africa 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Polokwane South Africa 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Windhoek Namibia 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Lusaka Zambia 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Gaborone Botswana 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

Manzini Swaziland 13/14 August 2016 4/5 February 2017

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7.3 WORKSHOP PROGRAMMES

JOHANNESBURG DURBAN CAPE TOWN


Time Activity/Module Activity/Module Activity/Module

WORKSHOP 1

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3A Business Administration 3A Business Management 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3B Business Administration 3B Business Management 3B

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3A Business Management 3A Business Administration 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3B Business Management 3B Business Administration 3B

WORKSHOP 2

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3C Business Management 3C Business Management 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3D Business Management 3D Business Management 3D

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3C Business Administration 3C Business Administration 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3D Business Administration 3D Business Administration 3D

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NAMIBIA ZAMBIA BOTSWANA


Time Activity/Module Activity/Module Activity/Module

WORKSHOP 1

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3A Business Management 3A Business Management 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3B Business Management 3B Business Management 3B

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3A Business Administration 3A Business Administration 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3B Business Administration 3B Business Administration 3B

WORKSHOP 2

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3C Business Management 3C Business Administration 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3D Business Management 3D Business Administration 3D

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3C Business Administration 3C Business Management 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3D Business Administration 3D Business Management 3D

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ZAMBIA BOTSWANA SWAZILAND


Time Activity/Module Activity/Module Activity/Module

WORKSHOP 1

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3A Business Management 3A Business Management 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3B Business Management 3B Business Management 3B

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3A Business Administration 3A Business Administration 3A
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3B Business Administration 3B Business Administration 3B

WORKSHOP 2

SATURDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Administration 3C Business Management 3C Business Administration 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Administration 3D Business Management 3D Business Administration 3D

SUNDAY

07h45 to 08h00 Arrival at venue Arrival at venue Arrival at venue


08h00 to 11h00 Business Management 3C Business Administration 3C Business Management 3C
11h00 to 12h00 Break Break Break
12h00 to 15h00 Business Management 3D Business Administration 3D Business Management 3D

NOTE:
(1) Due to unforseen circumstances, workshop dates, venues, times and facilitators are subject to change
without prior notice.
(2) Please call our offices if you have not received a workshop email reminder 2 days prior to the workshop.
(3) Students are reminded to carry all study material on the 1st day of the workshop.
(4) Please read all relevant modules prior to attending workshops in order participate in the discussions.
(5) Students are reminded that work on assignments should commence prior to the workshops.
(6) Students are allowed to attend second semester workshops if their first semester results are pending.
(7) While attendance at workshops is not compulsory, it is advisable that you make use of the opportunity to
interact with academic faculty and fellow students.
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ASSIGNMENTS

8.1 SUBMISSION

8.1.1 Rules regarding the submission of assignments


Refer to the Institutional Rule Book for detailed information on submission of assignments.

Should you have any queries please contact:


Student Support Services: sss@mancosa.co.za
Tel: +27313007200.

THE FOLLOWING IS A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO UPLOADING AN ASSIGNMENT

STEP 1
Log in to www.mymancosa.com

STEP 2
Login using your student number as user name and password.

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STEP 3
Go to My Information

Click on Assignment Upload

STEP 4
You will come to an Assignment Rules page. Read all the rules, go to the bottom of the page and click on the
box I acknowledge and accept the above rules then click on Proceed to Assignment Upload.

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STEP 5
You will come to the Assignment Declaration Page

Under Module Name, select the module of the assignment you are uploading.

STEP 6
Enter the number of attachments you are uploading, total number of pages in your attachments and number
of questions you have answered.

Then select the submission type, whether it is a first or re submission assignment

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STEP 7
Click on the box I hereby declare that this assignment submitted is an original piece of work produced by
myself then click on Continue.

STEP 8
Click on Browse for attachment 1 and look for your assignment and attach it. The entire assignment must be
in one attachment and must include the following:

Cover page, Contents page, Body of assignment and Bibliography.

Only one assignment submission is permitted per module in a PDF format. No other formats will be accepted.
There will be exceptions for the Information Technology and Quantitative modules where the different files
need to be zipped and uploaded as one folder. There is a detailed explanation of how to compress a folder at
the end of this guide.

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STEP 9
A box will appear asking to confirm that all of the above information is true, click on OK. Note that this is not
an error message.

The assignment will now take a minute or so to upload. Once your assignment is uploaded you will receive a
Thank You message.

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STEPS ON HOW TO APPLY FOR AN ASSIGNMENT EXTENSION ON MYMANCOSA

Step 1:
Go to www.mymancosa.com

Step 2:
Your username and password will be your student number

Step 3:
Click on My Information tab

Step 4:
Select Assignment Due Date Extension Request

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ERRORS WHEN UPLOADING ASSIGNMENTS:

Please note: All correspondance and error messages must be retained by the student. Failure to produce
evidence of system error will lead to capping/declining of assignments.

ASSIGNMENT DUE DATE OF THE MODULE IS NOT FOUND FOR THIS INTAKE

This is a registration query, please contact our MANCOSA office to rectify this.

500 INTERNAL SERVER ERROR

One of these three could be the result of the error message received:
- Your assignment file size is larger than 5MB,
- The assignment format is incorrect. The only formats we allow is Word (.doc, .docx), .pdf, .rtf, .txt and Zip
folders.
- Your Internet speed is too slow.

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MSSQL ERROR

You will receive this error if you have extra characters/symbols ( () [] & * # ? \ @ % = ) in your file name eg
Bens Project Management Assignment.pdf
Remove the from the name, resave and try to upload again, your assignment will go through.

ASSIGNMENT DECLINED AS YOU ARE NOT REGISTERED FOR EITHER SEMESTER 1 OR SEMSTER 2 OF
THE CURRENT ACADEMIC INTAKE.
This is a registration query, please contact our MANCOSA office to rectify this.

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RE SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENT DECLINED DUE TO LATE RE SUBMISSION


You have exceeded the due date of your re submission so the system will decline the upload.

ASSIGNMENT DECLINED DUE TO LATE SUBMISSION

You have exceeded the due date of submitting your assignment so the system will decline the upload.

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INVALID FILE FORMAT

This error means that one/more of your assignment attached is in the incorrect format.

The only formats we allow to be uploaded is


Word documents with the extensions .doc and/or .docx
.pdf
.rtf
.txt and
Zip folders

See below for an example (Attachment 2 is not in one of the recommended formats).

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MESSAGE FROM WEBPAGE

Kindly note that this is not an error message from mymancosa. This message is just the settings for the Internet
(Internet Explorer) on your PC which needs to be adjusted. All you need to do is just follow the instructions
given and you will be able to upload your assignment. You could also use a different browser like Firefox or
Google Chrome.

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HOW TO COMPRESS A FOLDER

Step 1:
Create a new folder (right click on the desktop, select New then click on the option Folder

Step 2:
Add all your documents in this folder (if you have more than one document to submit).

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Step 3:
Go to your desktop and right click on the folder. Select the option Send to then click on Compressed (zipped)
folder.

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Step 4:
This will create another file on the desktop with the extension .zip. You can now attach this file when uploading
your assignments.

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8.2 ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION DATES

SEMESTER 1

NO MODULE ASSIGNMENT DUE DATE

1 Business Management 3A 8 September 2016

2 Business Management 3B 14 September 2016

3 Business Administration 3A 20 September 2016

4 Business Administration 3B 27 September 2016

SEMESTER 2

5 Business Management 3C 6 March 2017

6 Business Management 3D 13 March 2017

7 Business Administration 3C 22 March 2017

8 Business Administration 3D 29 March 2017

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8.3 ASSIGNMENT QUESTIONS


ASSIGNMENT 1: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3A

SECTION A (40)
Read the article below and answer all questions that follow.

Strike cost Ceres Fruit Growers R10m, workers R7m


Oct 14 2015 15:38 byTammy Petersen

Cape Town - The six-week long strike over wage negotiations cost Ceres Fruit Growers (CFG) about R10m, the
company said on Wednesday.

CFG and the Food and Allied Workers Union (Fawu) on Tuesday evening agreed to a wage increase of 8.25%, a
move hailed by the union as a "victory.

Managing director Francois Malan said in a statement he was grateful and relieved that an agreement has been
reached, putting an end to the crippling strike action.

We have a big challenge to get our operations back on track and to get to work. Ceres workers are more than
R7m poorer [in lost wages] because of the unprotected strike and this action has also cost CFG and its growers
about R10m [loss of income and damage to buildings], he said.

We will assess the material damage caused to our business in due course, but more importantly, we need to
re-establish a good working relationship with all our staff.

Workers are expected to return to work on Thursday, Fawu general secretary Katishi Masemola told News24
on Wednesday.

After being presented with the offer, it was overwhelmingly accepted, he said. Fawu demanded a 12.5%
wage increase and a profit-sharing scheme for workers.

The company was offering 7.5% and other increased benefits. CFG had been engaging with the union in annual
wage negotiations since July this year.
Adapted from source: http://www.fin24.com/economy/labour/news/strike-cost-ceres-fruit-growers-r10m-workers-
r7m-20151014

QUESTION 1 (20)
Taking into consideration South Africas economic condition, debate the relevance of the provisions for strike
action according to the Labour Relations Act of South Africa.

QUESTION 2 (20)
If you were the Human Resources Manager within Ceres, explain how you would use the Basic Conditions of
Employment Act and other policies to reduce strike action in future.

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SECTION B (60)
QUESTION 3 (20)
Identify an ethical or moral dilemma reported in your country recently and discuss the impact it had. Using the
Ethical Models theories explain which Ethical Model best describes your identified dilemma.

QUESTION 4 (20)
Choose an organisation that you are familiar with from your country or community. Describe the stakeholders
to whom that organisation is responsible and discuss those stakeholders possible concerns about that
organisation.

QUESTION 5 (20)
Discuss the levels of Corporate Social Responsibility that organisations practice, and using practical examples,
explain which level the organisation identified in question four practices.

Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 2: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3B

SECTION A (40)
Read the extract below and answer all questions that follow.

Why diversity matters


We know intuitively that diversity matters. Its also increasingly clear that it makes sense in purely business
terms. Our latest research finds that companies in the top quartile for gender or racial and ethnic diversity are
more likely to have financial returns above their national industry medians. Companies in the bottom quartile
in these dimensions are statistically less likely to achieve above-average returns. Diversity is probably a
competitive differentiator that shifts market share toward more diverse companies over time.

While correlation does not equal causation (greater gender and ethnic diversity in corporate leadership doesnt
automatically translate into more profit), the correlation does indicate that when companies commit
themselves to diverse leadership, they are more successful. More diverse companies, we believe, are better
able to win top talent and improve their customer orientation, employee satisfaction, and decision making, and
all that leads to a virtuous cycle of increasing returns. This in turn suggests that other kinds of diversity - for
example, in age, sexual orientation, and experience - are also likely to bring some level of competitive
advantage for companies that can attract and retain such diverse talent.

Were not suggesting that achieving greater diversity is easy. Womenaccounting for an average of just 16
percent of the members of executive teams in the United States, 12 percent in the United Kingdom, and 6
percent in Brazilremain underrepresented at the top of corporations globally. The United Kingdom does
comparatively better in racial diversity, albeit at a low level: some 78 percent of UK companies have senior-
leadership teams that fail to reflect the demographic composition of the countrys labor force and population,
compared with 91 percent for Brazil and 97 percent for the United States.

These numbers underline the work that remains to be done, even as the case for greater diversity becomes
more compelling. We live in a deeply connected and global world. It should come as no surprise that more
diverse companies and institutions are achieving better performance. Most organisations must do more to take
full advantage of the opportunity that diverse leadership teams represent. Thats particularly true for their
talent pipelines: attracting, developing, mentoring, sponsoring, and retaining the next generations of global
leaders at all levels of organisations. Given the higher returns that diversity is expected to bring, we believe it is
better to invest now, since winners will pull further ahead and laggards will fall further behind.
Adapted from source: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/why_diversity_matters

QUESTION 1 (20)
Discuss the layers of diversity within organisations and the benefits of effectively managing it.

QUESTION 2 (20)
The introduction of diversity into the workplace brings with it a host of barriers and challenges. Discuss these
and suggest how organisations can manage them.

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SECTION B (60)
QUESTION 3 (20)
There are many challenges to implementing Total Quality Management (TQM) in organisations. Some of these
challenges include the lack of commitment from top managers and their resistance to TQM, limited efforts to
embed TQM into the organisational culture and workers not fully understanding TQM.
If you were a manager asked to implement TQM, explain how you would go about successfully implementing it.

QUESTION 4 (20)
Choose and describe an organisation that you are familiar with from within your country or community. Discuss
the types of organisational culture that exist in general and explain the type of culture reflected at the selected
organisation.

QUESTION 5 (20)
The organisation that you identified in question four is planning to merge with its closest competitor. Advise
the managers of these organisations of the guidelines for integrating organisational cultures for a successful
merger.

Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 3: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3A

QUESTION 1 FINANCIAL PROJECTION (20)

REQUIRED
Use the information given below to prepare the following budgets for Product Nik and Product Nak for
February 2017. Provide separate monetary columns for each product.

1.1 Sales Budget (units and Rand) (2)


1.2 Production Budget (units) (6)
1.3 Direct Labour Budget (Rand) (4)
1.4 Manufacturing Overheads Budget (Rand) (2)
1.5 Cost of Sales Budget (Rand) (6)

INFORMATION
Niknak Limited manufactures and sells two products. The following information is available to determine the
budget requirements for February 2017:

1 Projected sales for February and March 2017:

February March
30 000 units of Nik at R20 each 24 000 units of Nik at R22 each
10 000 units of Nak at R40 each 8 000 units of Nak at R42 each

2 The policy of Niknak Limited is to maintain a closing inventory equal to 40% of the budgeted sales of the
following month.

3 Labour hours required to produce one unit of each product and the rate per hour are as follows:
Nik: 0.6 hours at R4 per hour
Nak: 0.9 hours at R5 per hour

4 Manufacturing overheads for each product are projected at a rate of R0.30 per direct labour hour.

5 Total production cost per unit (including the costs above) is R7 for Nik and R20 for Nak.

PTO: QUESTION 2

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QUESTION 2 MANAGEMENT OF WORKING CAPITAL (20)

2.1 REQUIRED
Use the information given below to calculate the net value of issues to the production department for May
2016 and the value of inventory as at 31 May 2016 using the:
2.1.1 First-in-first-out method. (7)
2.1.2 Weighted average cost method. (7)

INFORMATION
The following information for May 2016 was extracted from the records of TASPA Limited, a manufacturing
company, for product Tas:

Date Transaction details


01 Opening inventory comprised 2 000 units @ R18 each.
05 Invoice received for 40 000 units @ R19 each.
06 Returned 5 000 damaged units (purchased 05 May 2016) to the supplier.
15 Invoice received for 35 000 units @ R20 each.
28 Invoice received for 15 000 units @ R19 each.
31 Transferred 69 000 units to the production department during May 2016.

TASPA Limited uses the periodic inventory system.

2.2 REQUIRED
2.2.1 Study the information given below and calculate the cost (as a percentage) to Umhlali Stores of not
accepting the discount. (5)
2.2.2 Should Umhlali Stores pay the account within 12 days? Why? (1)

INFORMATION
Warwick Wholesalers sold goods on credit to Umhlali Stores for R5 000. The credit terms to Umhlali
Stores are 30 days but Warwick Wholesalers is prepared to allow a discount of R125 if Umhlali Stores pays
the account within 12 days. The current interest rate on overdraft is 18% per annum.

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QUESTION 3 CAPITAL EXPENDITURE DECISIONS (20)


3.1 REQUIRED
Study the information given below and calculate the following in respect of the machine (answers
expressed to 2 decimal places):
3.1.1 Benefit Cost Ratio (6)
3.1.2 Internal Rate of Return, if the machine has no salvage value. (5)

INFORMATION

Africote Limited is considering the purchase of a machine. The company desires a minimum required rate
of return of 12%. The machine will cost R1 000 000 plus R200 000 for installation costs and is expected to
have a useful life of 5 years. The machine is expected to have a salvage value of R50 000. The machine is
expected to increase revenues by R400 000 per year but will require the employment of 2 new machine
operators at R50 000 per year per each operator, and it will require maintenance and repairs averaging
R20 000 per year.

3.2 REQUIRED
Study the information given below and answer the following questions:
3.2.1 Calculate the Payback Period of Project A (answer expressed in years, months and days). (3)
3.2.2 Calculate the Accounting Rate of Return (on average investment) of each project. (6)

INFORMATION
The following data relate to two investment projects, only one of which may be selected:

Project A Project B
R R
Initial capital expenditure 100 000 100 000
Net cash inflows per year:
Year 1 50 000 20 000
Year 2 40 000 22 000
Year 3 32 000 40 000
Year 4 20 000 45 000

Note:
Project B is expected to have a scrap value of R20 000 (not included in the figures above). No scrap value
is expected for Project A.
Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method.

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QUESTION 4 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (20)

REQUIRED
4.1 Use the information provided below to calculate the following ratios for 2015. Where applicable, round off
answers to two decimal places.
4.1.1 Inventory turnover (2)
4.1.2 Debtors collection period (2)
4.1.3 Creditors payment period (2)
4.1.4 Earnings per share (2)
4.1.5 Return on equity (2)
4.1.6 Debt to assets (2)
4.1.7 Acid-test ratio (2)

4.2 Comment briefly but meaningfully on the following ratios:

2015 2014
4.2.1 Gross margin 40% 30% (2)
4.2.2 Return on assets 47.67% 34.87% (2)
4.2.3 Debt to equity 30% 40% (2)

INFORMATION
Excerpts of the financial data of Virgo Limited for 2015 are as follows:

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 31 December 2015


R
Cost of sales 1 200 000
Gross profit 800 000
Operating profit 350 000
Interest expense 25 000
Profit before tax 325 000
Profit after tax 225 000

Statement of Financial Position as at 31 December 2015


R
Non-current assets 400 000
Inventories 250 000
Accounts receivable 100 000
Equity 500 000
Long-term loan 150 000
Accounts payable 80 000
Bank overdraft 20 000

Additional information
1. The ratio of credit sales to cash sales is 3:2 respectively.
2. 60% of the merchandise purchased was bought on credit.
3. Inventories on 31 December 2014 amounted to R200 000.
4. The authorised share capital consisted of 500 000 ordinary shares, of which 300 000 were issued.

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QUESTION 5 CASH BUDGET (20)


REQUIRED
Use the information provided below to prepare the following for Baxter Limited for November and December
2016 (using separate monetary columns for each month):

5.1 Debtors Collection Schedule (4)


5.2 Cash Budget (16)

INFORMATION
1. The bank balance on 31 October 2016 is expected to be R30 000 (unfavourable).
2. Sixty percent (60%) of all sales are for cash; the balance is on credit. Credit sales for October 2016 are
expected to be R300 000. Sales are expected to increase by 10% per month from November 2016.
3. Twenty percent (20%) of the sales on credit are expected to be collected in the month of the sale, for a
discount of 3%. The balance is expected to be collected in the month after the sale.
4. Baxter Limited sells its goods at cost price plus 50%. All goods that are sold each month are replaced in
the same month. All purchases are on credit and creditors are paid one month after the purchase.
5. Salaries and wages are expected to cost R81 000 for December 2016, after an 8% increase takes effect
from 01 December 2016.
6. Advertising expenses are expected to be 5% of monthly sales, and are paid one month later.
7. Equipment costing R300 000 is expected to be purchased during November 2016. A deposit of 20% will be
paid in November and the balance plus finance charges of R24 000 is payable in 12 equal instalments
commencing December 2016.
8. A long-term loan of R240 000 at 15% per annum interest is to be raised on 01 December 2016. Interest is
payable monthly with the first interest payment to be made on 31 December 2016.
9. Other expenses, including depreciation of R5 000 per month, are expected to amount to R50 000 each
month and payments are made monthly.
10. An interim dividend of 8.5 cents per share is expected to be paid on 30 November 2016. The authorised
share capital of Baxter Limited consists of 800 000 ordinary shares, of which 70% have been issued.

Assignment format
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Arial or Times New Roman (12); Spacing 1 lines. All text must be justified at each margin.
Where applicable, use formats, formulas and present value tables from your study guide.
Start each question on a new page.
Number each solution according to the numbering in the assignment handbook.
You may make use of a spreadsheet (e.g. Microsoft Excel) to assist you only with the construction of tables
and formats.
Solutions generated by software packages will not be marked.
No marks will be awarded if only the final answers are given. All relevant workings must be shown.

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ASSIGNMENT 4: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3B

SECTION A (60)
Read the case study below and answer ALL the questions to follow.

Managers without borders


Hong-Kong-based John Rice is among the most senior American businessman ever posted to one of the worlds
largest emerging markets. Number two to General Electrics chief executive Jeff Immelt, the 55-year-old heads
the conglomerates global operations, and relocated from the US last year in a move designed to accelerate
globalisation and to locate top executives close to the economies that now drive world economic growth.

At the same time, however, GE is recruiting managers who were both in emerging markets in order to draw on
the expanding pools of educated talent in China, India and other developing countries and to bring into the
group an ever-wider range of professional and human experience.

We will soon have 2,000 interns from outside the US, says Mr Rice. This is 10 times more than a few years
ago. We want to develop local talent and to give aspiring leaders in our business a shot at senior roles.
Management is always a blend of outside and insider talent. The result is a complex transformation at GE and
many other multinationals, consisting of traditional generalist executives with deeper specialised skills and a
wider range of backgrounds. The market is no longer dominated by westerners but by global citizens. They can
be of any ethnicity. But they must be mobile. Moreover, for high-flyers, emerging market postings are
increasingly compulsory. Christoph Nettesheim, Greater China managing director got Boston Consulting Group,
says: These [relocation] requests are becoming less like requests and more like instructions.

The posts are becoming more demanding in terms of personal commitment. And there is growing competition
for such jobs, from emerging markets as well as the west. In principle, promoting developing-world staff is
nothing new. Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch group, decided to train Indians to take over junior and senior
management positions instead of Europeans as long ago as 1942, and has had an Indian main board director
since 1978. Royal Dutch Shell, the energy group, and Citigroup, the US bank, are among other multinationals
that pioneered the development of top executives from emerging markets, often India.

But the scale of todays changes is unprecedented, head hunters say. Multinationals are seeking both to
localise management employing Indian managers in India, for example and to diversify global teams. At
junior levels this saves money, because young locals are cheaper than imported expats. But higher up the
corporate ladder, the cost differences have largely disappeared and the main incentive is to secure better in-
country inside knowledge. However, in the long run, demographic forces favour emerging economies.
McKinsey, the management consultancy, calculates that China and India already produce 38 per cent of the
worlds graduates and will supply 60 per cent in 2012 2030. Not all will become executives, but many will.

Bringing together western and non-western cultures is a challenge. Its an art and a science which doesnt work
the same way in every case. The big challenge is to get past cultural barriers.
(Mullins, 2013: 34)

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QUESTION 1 (20)
1.1 Making reference to the case study, critically discuss the effect of globalisation. (10)
1.2 Explain the challenges the newly appointed managers at GE may face in the global environment. (10)

QUESTION 2 (25)
Management is always a blend of outside and inside talent. The result is a complex transformation at GE and
many other multinationals, consisting of traditional generalist executives with deeper specialised skills and a
wider range of backgrounds. The market is no longer dominated by westerners but by global citizens. They can
be of any ethnicity.

2.1 In relation to the above statement, discuss the different determinants of national culture. (10)

2.2 Bringing together western and non-western cultures is a challenge. Its an art and a science which doesnt
work the same way in every case. The big challenge is to get past cultural barriers (Mullins, 2013: 34).
Describe the different social factors that are formed by culture and explain the importance of culture in
business. In addition, include examples where the culture of a society can affect management approaches
and organisational behaviour. (15)

QUESTION 3 (15)
We will soon have 2,000 interns from outside the US, says Mr Rice. This is 10 times more than a few years
ago.
In conjunction to the recruitment of talent, explain the significance of organisations embracing a global
technological environment to enhance its competitive advantage in a globalised arena.

SECTION B (40)
QUESTION 4 (20)
The result of globalisation is that nations and people become increasingly interdependent because the same
forces affect them in similar ways. The fates of people in different countries become interlinked as the worlds
markets and businesses become increasingly interconnected. And as nations become more interdependent,
they become more similar to one another in the sense that people develop a similar liking for products as
diverse as cell phones, iPods, blue jeans, soft drinks, sports teams, Japanese cars, and foods such as curry,
green tea and Colombian coffee. One outcome of globalisation is that the world is becoming a global village.
(Jones and George, 2014: 178).

In light of the above statement, select an organisation that has gone global and evaluate each step taken in
this process.

QUESTION 5 (20)
One of the main factors that has speeded globalisation by freeing the movement of capital has been the
decline in barriers to trade and investment. During the 1920s and 1930s many countries erected formidable
barriers to international trade and investment in the belief that this was the best way to promote their
economic well-being. Many of these barriers were high tariff on imports of manufactured goods (Jones and
George, 2014: 180 181).

In relation to the above statement, provide a detailed discussion of the global-legal environment, making
reference to the methods that can be adopted to resolve international business disputes.

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Assignment Format
Word Limit: Your assignment (excluding index, cover page, list of references and appendices) must not
exceed 4000 words.
Your assignment must include a table of contents page
Text: Arial or Times New Roman, Font Size: 12, Spacing: 1.5 lines. All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include theories, charts, tables, appendices or exhibits necessary to support your
analysis and recommendations.
References at least 6 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your list of references. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
You MUST use theory/ literature to support your discussion/ observation and opinions.
Ensure that readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments and
views.
Students should proof read and edit their work prior to submission. Assignments must be free from errors
and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 5: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3C

SECTION A (40)
Read the extract below and answer all questions that follow.

Learning from the financial crisis


Climate change is where short-term thinking and long-term consequences collide for businesses and
governments alike. Meeting the challenge of climate change calls on both to assess the risks and act before the
economic and environmental consequences of failure are irreversible. As someone who has spent a good deal
of time assessing risk and dealing with crises, Im struck by the similarities between the climate crisis and the
financial crisis of 2008.

Today, were making the same mistakes when it comes to climate change that we made in the lead-up to the
financial crisis. Were building up excesses (debt in 2008; heat-trapping greenhouse-gas emissions now). Our
government policies are flawed (providing incentives for borrowing too much to finance homes then; providing
incentives for the use of fossil fuels now).

The greenhouse-gas crisis, however, wont suddenly manifest itself with a burst, like that of a financial bubble.
Climate change is more subtle and cruel. Its cumulative. And our current actions dont just exacerbate the
situationthey compound it. Indeed, our failure to make decisions today to avert climate disaster tomorrow is
even more serious than our failure to avert the credit crisis in 2008. The carbon dioxide and other greenhouse
gases that we emit into the atmosphere today will remain there for centuries, and government will not be able
to avert catastrophe at the last minute.

Were already feeling the impact. For example, the higher sea levels off the coast of New York Citysea levels
that led to a storm surge that devastated parts of the city during Hurricane Sandyare the result of public- and
private-sector decisions made decades ago.

So what does this mean for businesses and investors trying to plan for the future? It means that even as were
spending money to adapt to the current state of our climate, were also making decisions today that risk
locking us into long-term consequences that well certainly have to adapt to, at far greater cost, far into the
future.
Adapted from Source:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/strategy/shorttermism_and_the_threat_from_climate_change

QUESTION 1 (20)
Discuss strategies that organisations can implement when considering the natural environment as a
stakeholder and for competitive advantages.

QUESTION 2 (20)
Explain how capitalism and self-interest have resulted in natural environment crises.

SECTION B (60)
QUESTION 3 (20)
Using relevant theory and practical examples, explain why you would hold either a relativist or a non-relativist
belief regarding moral or ethical situations.

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QUESTION 4 (20)
Identify reports from within your country regarding inexplicably high CEO compensation levels and debate if
this compensation is acceptable and fair.

QUESTION 5 (20)
Analyse the Code of Ethics of an organisation of your choice. Discuss if the code is an effective code and what
factors could be improved on.

Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 6: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3D

SECTION A (40)
Read the extract below and answer all questions that follow.

Innovation imperatives
An aging population, rising debt, and declining returns on investment mean that a country must promote
innovation to secure a high-growth future.

Traditional approaches to assessing innovation involve evaluating the innovative capacity of nations and
organisationsnumbers of PhDs, patents, and technical papers published, for example. A study carried out by
the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) used an alternate method that captures the actual impact of innovation.
The MGI model looks at four archetypes of innovation and identifies the factors needed to innovate in different
archetype industries. They began by examining more than 30 industries to understand how innovation occurs
in them, its drivers, and how it determines the success of companies. In this analysis, they looked at all kinds of
innovations that have been commercialised successfully, from pure scientific discoveries to engineering
breakthroughs to new business models to efficiency improvements. Each of the four archetypes of innovation
they identified requires a different degree of R&D intensity, understanding of customer needs, and capital
labor intensity:

Customer-focused innovation involves solving the problems of consumers through novel products and
business models. Industries in this category include appliances, mobile phones and smartphones, Internet
retailing, and consumer packaged goods. These are characterised by high marketing intensity (typically
about 3 to 10 percent of sales) and short development cycles of less than a year or two.
Efficiency-driven innovation mostly involves process improvements to reduce costs and production times
and to enhance quality. Efficiency-driven industries include textiles, electrical equipment, and solar panels,
which tend to have high capital and labor intensity.
Engineering-based innovation is about designing and engineering new products by integrating
technologies from suppliers and partners. Industries that rely on this kind of innovation include aerospace,
automotive, and telecom equipment. These have moderate to high R&D intensity, typically spend 3 to 14
percent of sales on R&D, and can have product life cycles of five to ten years or longer.
Science-based innovation involves developing new products through the commercial application of basic
research. Industries such as pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and semiconductor design rely on this
approach. They may spend 16 to 33 percent of their revenues on R&D and devote 10 to 15 years of effort
to bring an invention to market.

By better understanding the way innovation works, business leaders, academics, and policy makers can more
effectively focus their efforts to promote it. Building on the success of todays innovators, they can create
policies that support innovation in each of the four archetypes. In this way, countries can continue to evolve
into more mature, productive, and innovation-based economies around the world.
Adapted from source: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/strategy/chinas_innovation_imperative

QUESTION 1 (20)
Discuss the importance of research and development strategies within high innovation industries.

QUESTION 2 (20)
Using relevant tools, analyse the competitiveness in any industry that is customer focused, as per the extract.

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SECTION B (60)
QUESTION 3 (20)
Organisations expanding their operations across borders do not necessarily experience success. Discuss the
various advantages and disadvantages of international operations.

QUESTION 4 (20)
Select an organisation from within your country or community and analyse the external forces currently
impacting that organisation.

QUESTION 5 (20)
Utilising the SWOT/TOWS matrix, perform a SWOT analysis on the organisation you identified in question four.

Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 7: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3C

QUESTION 1 (20)
Read the case study and answer the questions that follow.

The morning project team meeting promised to be an interesting one. Tensions between the representative
from marketing, Susan Scott, and finance, Neil Schein, have been building for several weeks now, in fact, since
the project team was formed. As the project manager, you have been aware that Susan and Neil do not see eye
to eye, but you figured that over time they would begin to appreciate each others perspective and start
cooperating. So far, unfortunately, that has not happened. In fact, it seems that hardly a day goes by when you
do not receive a complaint from one or the other regarding the other team members behavior, lack of
commitment or cooperation, or general shoddy performance.

As the team gathers for the regular project status meeting, you start with an update on the project tasks, any
problems the team members are having, and their assessment of the projects performance to date. Before
you get too far into the meeting, Susan interrupts: John, Im going to be out of town for the next 10 days
visiting clients so I cant make the status meetings either of the next two Fridays.

That figures, Neil mutters loud enough for all to hear.

Susan whirls around. I have another job around here, you know, and it involves selling. It maybe convenient
for you to drop everything and come to these meetings but some of us has other responsibilities.

Neil shoots back, Thats been your excuse for missing half of the meetings so far. Just out of curiosity, he
continues sarcastically, how many more do you figure on blowing off while hanging out poolside on your little
out-of-towners?

Susan turns bright red. I dont need to put up with that from you. You bean counters have no clue how this
business works or who delivers value. Youve so busy analyzing every penny that you have permanent
eyestrain!

Maybe I could pay attention if I didnt have to constantly stay on the backs of you cowboys in sales, counters
Neil. I swear you would give our products away if it would let you make your quarterly numbers, even if it
does drive us into the ground! You sit back, amazed as the argument between Neil and Susan flares up into
full-scale hostility and threaten to spin out of control. The other team members are looking at you for your
response. George, from engineering, has a funny expression on his face, as if to say, OK, you got us to this
point. Now, what are you going to do about it?

People, you rap the table, thats enough. We are done for today. I want to meet Susan and Neil in my office
in half hour. As everyone files out, you lean back in your seat and consider how are you going to handle this
one.
Source: J.K. Pinto, Project Management

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QUESTION 1 (20)
Critically discuss this case study with reference to basic negotiation strategies, approach and bargaining in order
to resolve the conflict between Neil and Susan.

QUESTION 2 (20)
The cost of quality is the sum of costs a project will spend to prevent poor quality and any other costs incurred
as a result of outputs of poor quality. Poor quality is the waste, errors, or failure to meet stakeholder needs and
project requirements.

Critically discuss this statement and differentiate between the categories of the cost of quality and the three
aspects of project quality management.

QUESTION 3 (20)
A project consists of only eight activities with the data as in the table below. Duration is recorded in terms of
days and resources are the number of employees required for each activity.

Activity Resources Predecessors

A 4 None
B 2 A
C 3 A
D 2 B, C
E 3 B
F 1 D
G 3 C
H 2 E, F, G

3.1 Construct an AON network for the activities of this contract. (8)
3.2 Determine the critical path. (2)
3.3 Draw a Gantt chart and construct a resource histogram. (10)

QUESTION 4 (20)
Projects operate in an environment composed of uncertainty. There is uncertainty regarding project funding,
availability of resources and potential technical problems.

4.1 Critically discuss this statement with reference to the types of risk response. (8)
4.2 Differentiate between the different categories of risks. (12)

QUESTION 5 (20)
A project team is a group of individuals working independently to accomplish the project objective. True
teamwork implies participation and empowerment to give the team sufficient authority and autonomy to make
their own decisions on a day-to- day basis.

Critically discuss this statement with reference to the Tuckman team development model.

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Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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ASSIGNMENT 8: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3D

QUESTION 1 (25)
Read the case study and answer the question that follows.

John Wolf, president of Wolf Motors, just returned to his office after visiting the companys newly acquired
automotive dealership. It was the fourth Wolf Motors dealership in a network that served a metropolitan area
of 400 000 people. Beyond the metropolitan area, but within a 45 minute drive, were another 500 000 people.
Each of the dealerships in the network marked a different make of automobile and historically had operated
autonomously. Wolf was particularly excited about this new dealership because it was the first auto
supermarket in the network. Auto supermarkets differ from traditional auto dealerships in that they sell
multiple makes of automobiles at the same location. The new dealership sold a full line of Chevrolets, Nissans
and Volkswagens. Starting 15 years ago with the purchase of a bankrupt Dodge dealership, Wolf Motors had
grown steadily in size and in reputation. Wolf attributed this success to three highly interdependent factors.
The first was volume. By maintaining a high volume of sales and turning over inventory rapidly, economies of
scale could be achieved, which reduced costs and provided customers with a large selection. The second factor
was a marketing approach called the hassle-free buying experience. Listed on each automobile was the one
price-lowest price. Customers came in, browsed, and compared prices without being approached by pushy
salespeople. If they had questions or were ready to buy, a walk to a customer service desk produced a
knowledgeable salesperson to assist them. Finally, and Wolf thought perhaps most important, was the after-
sales service. Wolf Motors established a solid reputation for servicing, diagnosing and repairing vehicles
correctly and in a timely manner the first time.

High-quality service after the sale depended on three essential components. First was the presence of a highly
qualified, well-trained staff of service technicians. Second was the use of the latest tools and technologies to
support diagnosis and repair activities. Third was the availability of the full range of parts and materials
necessary to complete the service and repairs without delay. Wolf invested in training and equipment to
ensure that the trained personnel and technology were provided. What he worried about, as Wolf Motors
grew, was the continued availability of the right parts and materials. This concern caused him to focus on the
supplier relationship process and management of the service parts and materials flows in the supply chain.

Wolf thought back on the stories in the newspapers business pages describing the failure of companies that
had not planned appropriately for growth. These companies outgrew their existing policies, procedures and
control systems. Lacking a plan to update their systems, the companies experienced myriad problems that led
to inefficiencies and an inability to compete effectively. He did not want that to happen to Wolf Motors.

Each of the four dealerships purchased its own service parts and materials. Purchases were based on forecasts
derived from historical demand data, which accounted for factors such as seasonality. Batteries and alternators
had a high failure rate in the winter and air conditioner parts were in great demand during the summer.
Similarly, coolant was needed in the spring to service air conditioners for the summer months, where
antifreeze was needed in the fall to winterize automobiles. Forecasts also were adjusted for special vehicle
sales and service promotions, which increased the need for materials used to prep new cars and service other
cars.

One thing that made the purchase of service parts and materials so difficult was the tremendous number of
different parts that had to be kept on hand. Some of these parts would be used to service customer
automobiles and others would be sold over the counter. Some had to be purchased from the automobile
manufacturers or their certified wholesalers and to support, for example, the guaranteed G parts promotion.

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Still, other parts and materials such as oils, lubricants and fan belts could be purchased from any number of
suppliers. The purchasing department had to remember that the success of the dealership depended on (1)
lowering costs to support the hassle-free, one price-lower price concept and (2) providing the right parts at the
right time to support fast, reliable after-sale service.

As Wolf thought about the purchasing of parts and materials, two things kept going through his mind: the
amount of space available for parts storage and the level of financial resources available to invest in parts and
materials. The acquisition of the auto supermarket dealership put an increased strain on both finances and
space, with the need to support three different automobile lines at the same facility. Investment dollars were
becoming scarce and space was at a premium. Wolf wondered what could be done in the purchasing area to
address some of these concerns and alleviate some of the pressures.

QUESTION 1 (25)
Critically discuss the different SCM strategies and how it will improve Wolf Motors competitiveness whilst
maintaining excellent service levels.

QUESTION 2 (25)
2.1 A manufacturing company has the following 7 items in inventory. Categorise these items into the ABC
classification, clearly stating your assumptions. (10)

Stock Number Annual demand Cost per unit $


1 5000 1.5
2 1500 8
3 10000 10.5
4 6000 2
5 7500 0.5
6 6000 13.6
7 5000 0.75
8 4500 1.25
9 7000 2.5
10 3000 2

2.2 A distributor for a cellular telephone company expects to sell approximately 10 600 iPhones next year. The
annual carrying cost is $28 per phone and the ordering cost is $95. The distributor operates 290 days a year.
2.2.1 Calculate the EOQ. (5)
2.2.2 How many times per year does the distributor reorder (2)
2.2.3 What is the length of an order cycle in workdays (3)
2.2.4 What is the total annual cost if the EOQ quantity is ordered (5)

QUESTION 3 (25)
Competitiveness is a measure of how, effectively and rapidly, the wants and needs of the customer relative to
others doing similar things are met. The implementation of Just In Time (JIT) is imperative for achieving a
competitive advantage.

Critically discuss this statement with reference to what JIT is, the techniques and approach that organizations
should follow with converting to a JIT system.

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QUESTION 4 (25)
The management process consists of four core activities namely: Planning, Organising, Leading and
Controlling. Operation Managers are required to apply this management process to the decisions required in
the Operations Management domain.

Discuss this statement with reference to the critical decisions of Operations Management.

Assignment Guidelines
Word limit: Approximately 3500 - 4000 words
The length of your answers to each question should be in line with the mark allocation.
Your assignment should include a Table of Contents page.
Text: Font: Arial or Times New Roman (12), Spacing: 1.5 lines
All text must be justified at each margin.
Your answers must include any theories, charts, tables or exhibits necessary to support your analysis and
recommendations.
Ensure that the readings are not merely reproduced in the assignment without original critical comments
and views. Cohesive and logical arguments reflecting original thinking is encouraged.
You MUST use theory/literature to support your discussion/observation and opinions. Do not merely extract
information from the Case Study.
References - At least 5 sources of reference (textbooks, journals, press reports, internet, etc.) must be
included in your bibliography. Information quoted/paraphrased from sources listed in your bibliography
must be referenced in-text. The Harvard system of referencing must be used.
Students will be penalised up to 10% for poor referencing.
It is imperative that students proof read and edit their assignments prior to submitting them. Assignments
must be free from errors and of a professional standard.

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9. EXAMINATIONS

9.1 EXAMINATION DATES AND TIMES


NO MODULE EXAMINATION DATE DAY TIME

SEMESTER 1

FINAL 7 November 2016 Monday 09h00 12h00


1 Business Management 3A
SUPPLEMENTARY 9 January 2017 Monday 09h00 12h00

FINAL 8 November 2016 Tuesday 09h00 12h00


2 Business Management 3B
SUPPLEMENTARY 10 January 2017 Tuesday 09h00 12h00

FINAL 10 November 2016 Thursday 09h00 12h00


3 Business Administration 3A
SUPPLEMENTARY 11 January 2017 Wednesday 09h00 12h00

FINAL 11 November 2016 Friday 09h00 12h00


4 Business Administration 3B
SUPPLEMENTARY 12 January 2017 Thursday 09h00 12h00

SEMESTER 2

FINAL 29 May 2017 Monday 14h00 17h00


5 Business Management 3C
SUPPLEMENTARY 10 July 2017 Monday 14h00 17h00

FINAL 31 May 2017 Wednesday 14h00 17h00


6 Business Management 3D
SUPPLEMENTARY 11 July 2017 Tuesday 14h00 17h00

FINAL 2 June 2017 Friday 14h00 17h00


7 Business Administration 3C
SUPPLEMENTARY 12 July 2017 Wednesday 14h00 17h00

FINAL 3 June 2017 Saturday 14h00 17h00


8 Business Administration 3D
SUPPLEMENTARY 13 July 2017 Thursday 14h00 17h00

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9.2 EXAMINATION VENUES


All students are required to register at one examination venue as per the table below two months prior to the
commencement of the examination. Any changes to the registered examination venue must be completed one
month prior to the examination sitting.
The examination venues listed below are provisional. All examination venues will be confirmed in writing via
the examination guidelines which are issued at least 1 month prior to an examination session. The confirmed
venues will be available on the MyMancosa portal.

EXAMINATION CENTRE
CITY COUNTRY VENUE ADDRESS
Johannesburg South Africa TBC TBC
Durban South Africa Mancosa Campus 26 Samora Machel Street, Durban
Pretoria South Africa TBC TBC
East London South Africa Mancosa Office 90 Vincent Road, Vincent, East London
Cape Town South Africa Mancosa Office First Floor, Stadium on Main building,
99 Main Road, Claremont
Polokwane South Africa Edupark Webster Street, Polokwane
Bloemfontein South Africa Bohmer Secondary School Walter Sisulu Road, Universitas
Nelspruit South Africa SAVF 35 Murray Street, Nelspruit
Mafikeng South Africa Molopo Executive Country Lodge Corner Nelson Mandela Drive and
North Street
Kimberley South Africa Hotel Savoy 19 De Beers Road, Kimberley 8301
Port Elizabeth South Africa Kwantu Towers 8th Floor, Vuyisile Mini Square
Mthatha South Africa Hotel Savoy and Conference 912 Nelson Mandela Dr, Mthatha,
Centre 5148
Richards Bay South Africa Bayshore Inn 4 The Gully (off Hibberd drive),
Meerensee Richards Bay, 3901
Pietermaritzburg South Africa Ascot Wedding & Conference 210 Woodhouse Road, Scotsville, PMB
Centre
Windhoek Namibia Mancosa Office Unit 3, Ground floor Ausspann Plaza,
Dr Augustino Neto Road, Windhoek
Lusaka Zambia Mancosa Office 47 Independence Avenue, Civic Centre
Area, Lusaka, Zambia
Gaborone Botswana Mancosa Campus Unit 28, Plot 28502, Fair Grounds Mall,
Next to Motor Centre, Samora Machel
Street, Gaborone
Manzini Swaziland Regent Business School Lot 132, City Centre, Mbhabha Street,
Commercial Area (Near Swazi Milling)
Maputo Mozambique Instituto Superior de Relacoes Edifico Jat V Rua dos Desportistas no
Internacionais (ISRI) 883, 2nd Floor
Harare Zimbabwe Tel One Centre for Learning Corner Samora Machel West and
Hampden Street, Belvedere, Harare
Lilongwe Malawi Bridgeview Hotel Kamuzu Procession Road, Lilongwe (old
town, behind the Game Complex
Blantyre Malawi MPC Conference Centre Kasungu Conference Centre, Blantyre 8
Nairobi Kenya AMREF International Training Along Langlata Road, Opposite Wilson
Centre Airport
Maseru Lesotho Examinations Council of Lesotho 50 Constitution Road, Maseru
Juba South Sudan Regency Hotel Juba, South Sudan
Reduit Mauritius Mauritius Examinations Syndicate Reduit, Mauritius

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