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APRIL 2017

More than
MEDICINE
Granite Bay doctor
opens kid-friendly
neurology practice
PAGE 6

Former Giants pitcher
enjoys retirement
in Granite Bay
PAGE 14

Local groups team up to
protect 27 acres of delicate
habitat in Granite Bay
PAGE 26

2017_04_April GBV.indd 1 3/17/17 3:34 PM
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2017_04_April GBV.indd 2 3/17/17 3:34 PM
A VIEW INSIDE
10 MEET FOLFAN
Local nonprofit brings events,
spring cleaning to community waterways

14 WISDOM FROM THE MOUND
Former Giants pitcher Jim Barr
enjoys retirement in Granite Bay.

20 LEARNING UNDER LEHRER
Rookie coach takes over Grizzlies
program after record-setting season.

26 HERE TO STAY
Local groups team up to protect 27 acres
of delicate habitat in Granite Bay.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Wine View 38
Senior View 40
Fitness View 41
Financial View 42

16
Things to Do 44
CALIFORNIA AIR
ON THE COVER
WITH EUROPEAN FLAIR
Ashutosh Raina M.D. and his staff.
Cos du Lac brings a taste of
(Left-Right) Dr. Ashutosh Raina, Office
Southern France to Granite Bay
Administrator Sangeeta Tilak and Medical
Assistant Brenda Baranda.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL KIRBY

APRIL 2017
Volume 27 • Number 4

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2017_04_April GBV.indd 5 3/17/17 3:35 PM
FRO M THE C OVER

More than
MEDICINE
BY MACKENZIE MYERS

Granite Bay doctor
opens kid-friendly
neurology practice

hen Granite Bay resident Dr.
Ashutosh Raina ran his pediatric
neurology practice in Sacramen-
to, he found himself envisioning some- Dr. Raina greets a new patient
thing different. In a field that often involves and his family in a family friendly
scary, chronic illnesses, the 43-year-old waiting room. The room has
many toys and children’s furniture
doctor and father pictured an environ-
to help a young patient feel
ment for patients that was more about fun comfortable before a exam.
and less about fear. It wasn’t good enough PHOTO BY MICHAEL KIRBY

to have a waiting room with toys in it. He
wanted a designated room for toys — no
talk of EEGs or diagnoses allowed.
On March 1, with the help of his wife Dr.
Reetu Sharma, a cardiologist in Roseville, ward, he spent another four years special- pointment, read it at home and bring it
Raina opened the doors to a new kind of izing in pediatric neurology and complet- back in exchange for another at the next
practice at 5800 Stanford Ranch Road, in ing an epilepsy fellowship at Wayne State checkup. They can come in between ap-
Rocklin. University in Michigan. Many of his pa- pointments for more books as well.
“A lot of parents and children come in tients have epilepsy, but he also sees kids “Instead of giving stickers or candy af-
to the office being anxious,” Raina says. with autism, headaches, concussions and ter an appointment, why not give back
“That’s why we tried to pick a place that developmental disorders. knowledge?” Raina says, opening up a
looks less like a doctor’s office.” Unfortunately, extensive hospital vis- cupboard full of children’s titles, some of
its come with many of these illnesses. which discuss autism and other condi-
KEEPING UP THE PACE Some of Raina’s patients are in hospitals tions affecting patients.
Raina, originally from India, came to the more than the classroom, and that’s one The reading room has colorful places
U.S. in 2000 and completed a three-year reason the clinic has a lending library. to sit, cupboards of books and even a
pediatrics residency in New York. After- Patients can select a book after an ap- kid-sized leather armchair. Many of the

6 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 6 3/17/17 3:35 PM
Center of Excellence
in Pediatric Neurology
WHERE: 5800 Stanford Ranch
Road, Rocklin
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday
INFO: (916) 259-1099 or mycepn.com

“ Kids carry their own anxiety
and the anxiety of their parents,
so we try to keep the child at the
center of their care.

Dr. Ashutosh Raina, Center of Excellence
in Pediatric Neurology

items in Raina’s clinic were donated at go to the toy room down the hall near “Kids carry their own anxiety and the
a drive at the end of February. About 70 the exam rooms. Though it contains anxiety of their parents,” Raina says, “so
families brought stuffed animals, toys things like stuffed animals, a dollhouse we try to keep the child at the center of
and over 200 books. Even then, since so and a colorful rug of a globe, some of its their care.” He hopes that patients will be
many patients have to miss school due elements are similar to parts of the exam able to come back to the doctor’s office
to their illnesses, Raina says he’s always rooms. For instance, the same globe rug without the fear that typically accompa-
looking to expand the library. appears in the exam room next door. This nies those visits.
repetition of elements makes an easier Sometimes, play is more than what it
PLAY BY DESIGN transition from play to procedure. When seems. Joyful expression is integral to any
Playtime is tends to be carefree by na- a child is done with the exam, the doctor patient’s experience at the clinic, but Raina
ture, but Raina was deliberate in setting encourages him or her to head back to the recalls one appointment where play was
up this space. If patients don’t want to toy room or reading room before leaving not only enjoyable, but part of the exam.
read before their appointment, they can the clinic, allowing them to decompress. CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 7

2017_04_April GBV.indd 7 3/17/17 3:35 PM
continued from page 7 Dr. Raina and his
staff maintain a
library for children
The patient, who had a brain tumor, also with appointments
played piano. Her parents were worried to check out and
that the tumor was affecting her memory. return on their
next visit.
“So I asked her to sit down at this,”
PHOTO BY
Raina says, pointing to a battery-operat- MICHAEL KIRBY
ed keyboard donated in the toy drive. “I
thought ‘Why don’t we use this as part of
the exam?’”
When she successfully played the notes,
not only did Raina have an observation to
work with, but it brought relaxation to the
patient and relief to her family.

GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND
As Raina and his staff continue to get
settled in their new office, he wants to
set up a music therapy room in coming them to have empathy and compassion program to help treat athletic concussions
months, to provide yet another outlet for their peers struggling with neurolog- on the field when they happen.
for patients. Community members and ical illnesses. It all comes together as part of Raina’s
even his own second-grade daughter He also aims to set up support groups for driving philosophy:
have expressed interest in playing for his patients with autism and even socially “The biggest vision,” he says, “is to
patients. Raina hopes that when kids awkward teens without autism. Another create a place where you get more than
visit the clinic to play music, it will teach project he’s working on is a telemedicine medicine.”

8 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 8 3/17/17 3:35 PM
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G IV ING BAC K

Meet
FOLFAN
BY MACKENZIE MYERS

Local nonprofit
B
etween helping handle a recent activities like guided hikes, habitat resto-
rockslide along the Lake Natoma ration, removing invasive species, edu-
brings events, bike trail, removing trees downed cational programs and two river clean-

spring cleaning
in storms and ramping up their spring ups, one on Earth Day and one in the
schedule, the Friends of Lakes Folsom fall, which is part of a larger, global effort
to community and Natoma — FOLFAN for short — have
their work cut out for them in coming
called Coastal Cleanup.
Co-founder Crystal Tobias of Folsom
waterways months. Other things on the schedule? An said that even though the lake’s ecosys-
amateur photography contest, wildflower tem can feel small, they pull some sur-
hikes and kayak-guided river cleanups. prising things out of the water, including
Though the nonprofit’s presence is per- computers and even mannequins.
haps most visible through the sponsored “It’s fun to get groups of people togeth-
Adopt-a-Parkway signs along the bike er to work on a project like that,” she said.
trail and the Kids Don’t Float initiative, “You see the trash pile up and it’s so cool
which allows parents to borrow lifejack- to have that immediate gratification, to
ets for their children, FOLFAN works on see the fruits of your labors so quickly.”
several other projects within the Folsom In fact, clearing piles of garbage out of
Lake State Recreation Area. Its six board the region’s main water resource was an
members, roughly 100 paid members impetus for the organization. The non-
and many more volunteers participate in profit got its start in 2009 after Tobias no-

10 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 10 3/17/17 3:35 PM
Know and go
SATURDAY, APRIL 22:
Invasive species removal and
cleanup at Negro Bar. Time
and location TBA.
SUNDAY, APRIL 23:
American River Kayak Kleanup.
Time and location TBA.
Info: folfan.org.

tion about upcoming service events, gath-
erings and fundraisers. Though much of
the group’s funding comes from member-
ships and the Adopt-a-Parkway program,
where sponsors can pay for a sign along
the trail with their name on it, FOLFAN

“ That’s a lot of trash, and I would
do it every week. People would
has two main fundraisers throughout the
year: a dinner at Pete’s Brewhouse in Fol-
come down to the lake and party, som and an online Giving Day in May. The
breaking bottles. A lot of times money goes toward expenses like
when things are free, people insurance, event materials and


don’t respect it as much. bike trail improvements.
However, the group’s
Crystal Tobias, Friends of Lakes
Folsom and Natoma co-founder main resource is the
time and effort of local
community members
“It sees about 1.5 million who come out to help,
visitors a year and it didn’t making a noticeable
have a coordinating organi- impact in just one af-
zation,” McDonald said. “It’s ternoon.
a great recreational resource “We want people to
ticed significant litter buildup within the and one of the most heavily get excited and get in-
Folsom Lake SRA in the late 90s. Tobias, used state parks.” volved,” Tobias said.
58, said that on any given weekend, she McDonald, now 56, has since “Everything we’re about
would fill two to four large trash bags just stopped working for state parks is making the park better
by herself. but continues to carry her love of for everybody, and that
“That’s a lot of trash, and I would do natural resources with her. includes the flora and
it every week,” she said. “People would “Any time you see wildlife or fauna that live there. And
come down to the lake and party, break- wildflowers, it’s an opportunity for after all this rain, the whole
ing bottles. A lot of times when things are inspiration,” she said. “That’s what area is just bursting.”
free, people don’t respect it as much.” keeps me motivated.”
Tobias continued to pick up trash both Folsom Lake SRA serves Placer, Sac- Top right:
on her own and as a part of larger vol- ramento and El Dorado counties, reach- Crystal Tobias
unteer cleanup efforts. Eventually she ing into the forks of the American River, (left) and Linda
McDonald working
met Fair Oaks resident Linda McDonald, as far north as Auburn. Such a massive
a registration
another Adopt-the-Parkway volunteer. watershed calls for a group effort when tent during a
Though McDonald had been all over it comes to caring for the resource. cleanup day.
California thanks to her father’s state Fortunately, since its inception, FOLFAN Top left:
Kids are welcome
park job, her own 22-year career for state has gathered a sizeable group. Around 280
to help clean
parks headquarters in Sacramento gave people now subscribe to the organiza- waterways as well.
her an affinity for the Folsom Lake area. tion’s mailing list, which releases informa- COURTESY PHOTOS

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 11

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PEO PLE

the mound
Wisdom from

BY GRAHAM WOMACK

Former Giants pitcher
Jim Barr enjoys
retirement in Granite Bay

S
ix days a week during baseball sea- an unbelievable curve ball and he’s very ball a little bit harder’ or ‘I need to throw it
son, Jim Barr makes his way to Gran- competitive,” Barr said of Daniels. “He’s a little bit harder,’ and therefore you start
ite Bay High School. going to do very well.” to lose a little bit of control,” Barr said.
Seven years ago, Granite Bay coach Pat But there’s one thing about Daniels’ In time, Barr became a control artist,
Esposito talked Barr into helping coach style of pitching that Barr and other Gran- never striking out more than 100 batters
the school’s baseball team, not long af- ite Bay coaches are working to change. in a season, but keeping the number of
ter Barr finished a 16-year stint as pitch- “He wants to throw every pitch as hard bases on balls he issued to opposing hit-
ing coach for Sacramento State. Prior to as he can,” Barr said. “When we get him ters down to a respectable two walks per
this, Barr pitched a dozen years of Major away from throwing every pitch as hard as nine innings pitched.
League Baseball, including 10 seasons he can and just be firm … he’s going to be Barr became one of the better pitchers
with the San Francisco Giants between real good.” of the 1970s by sabermetrics, with his 14.0
1971 and 1983. Barr has been in Daniels’ place, coast- Wins Above Average tied with Andy Mess-
At 69, Barr has wisdom to pass on to ing on raw ability as a young pitcher. Like ersmith for 20th-best in the decade. Barr
young ballplayers like Granite Bay High Daniels, he went through a stretch of had a losing record in the ‘70s — 91-102,
pitcher Chris Daniels, who will play col- throwing too hard. with a 3.48 ERA — only because he played
lege baseball for the Hornets. “You get to a point where you feel real the majority of his seasons for the Giants,
“He has a very good fastball, he’s got good and you think, ‘I’m going to throw the one of baseball’s worst teams in those years.

14 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 14 3/17/17 3:35 PM
“ I came up with saying, ‘You gotta
throw a shutout to tie.’ Because we
weren’t scoring very many runs.
They said, ‘That doesn’t make sense.’
I go, ‘Yeah, it does, because if I give
up a run, we’re losing.’ You had to
figure things out on your own.

Jim Barr, former San Francisco Giants pitcher

Barr couldn’t pitch for 10 days. Alston
told Giants coach Joey Amalfitano that if
Barr were healthy, he’d take him on the
All Star team. But Barr attempted to pitch
against the Dodgers shortly before the All
Star game, got through two batters before
deciding his back was acting up, and that
was that.
The most famous players sometimes go
into commentating or coaching when their
playing careers end. In the next tier down,
Barr — good, but never great — focused on
business after retiring as a player during an
abbreviated Triple-A season in 1984.
He moved to Granite Bay in 1987 with
his wife, Susie, and daughters Emmy and
Betsy, both athletes who went on to play
women’s professional soccer. Growing up,
Emmy played softball, while her younger
sister Betsy opted for baseball.
“(Betsy) was pretty good,” Barr said.
“She made the All Star team as a catcher,
and she could catch. I could throw to her
full speed.”
Meanwhile, Barr coached one of Betsy’s
teams, taking four other girls on the team
because he knew them from his daugh-
“I came up with saying, ‘You gotta that has to figure it out and implement it ters’ soccer teams and that they were
throw a shutout to tie.’ Because we weren’t and do the job.’” good athletes.
scoring very many runs. They said, ‘That Barr faced tough hitters like Richie Zisk, “All the boys would go (nonchalantly),
doesn’t make sense.’ I go, ‘Yeah, it does, Rusty Staub and Pete Rose. ‘Oh, they got the girls on their team,’”
because if I give up a run, we’re losing.’ “He’d use the whole field,” Barr said of Barr said. “After we played them one
You had to figure things out on your own,” Rose. “If I put it outside, he hit it to left. If time, next time they’d go, ‘Oh, the girls
Barr said. I put it inside, he’d pull it. He had a good are up. Get back.’”
He pitched in Candlestick Park, where eye. He’d walk. Guys like that were tough.” Today, Betsy lives in Folsom and Emmy
winds would swirl in different directions Recognition remained illusive through- in the Bay Area, while Barr has five young
depending on their orientation in the out Barr’s career. He never made an All grandkids. Is this it for Barr, or do other
park, Barr said. Winds carried most in the Star team, though he said Los Angeles challenges lie ahead?
right-center gap. Dodgers manager Walter Alston nearly “I’d love to be a roving pitching instruc-
“You did fight your own battles,” he brought him as a reserve in 1975. Howev- tor at the minor league level,” Barr said.
said. “You tried to figure things out. I try to er, a couple weeks before the game, Barr “To me, that would be fun, to go around
tell kids nowadays, when (I’m) coaching, dove trying to catch a ball in the infield and be able to talk to all the different guys
‘Guys, I can give you direction. I can tell and collided with Willie Montanez, injur- and teach ’em a little bit of this, a little bit
you things. But basically, you’re the one ing his back. of that.”

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 15

2017_04_April GBV.indd 15 3/17/17 3:35 PM
NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE | Clos Du Lac

California air
with a European flair BY MACKENZIE MYERS

Clos du Lac
G
eographically, southeastern France groves of olives pepper the rolling hills.
and Northern California are 5,840 And then there’s the wine — lots of it.
brings a taste of miles apart. But in terms of ag- Not just in bottles at the gated commu-

Southern France
riculture, architecture and fine wines, nity’s many gatherings, but on more than
they’re closer than you might imagine. 20 acres of vines, waiting to be harvested,

to Granite Bay Like Provençal villas, the homes in
Granite Bay’s Clos du Lac neighborhood
processed, bottled and served on the ta-
bles of the residents who helped grow it.
have earthy tones, clay-tiled roofs and “You don’t have to love wine to live in
Mediterranean architecture. They settle Clos du Lac,” says 13-year resident Jamie
Editor’s note: This is the second into a comfortable continuity without be- Susslin, “but it certainly helps.”
of a series profiling the unique ing cookie-cutter. Rosemary spills over the Susslin, who is a Realtor in the area,
historical and aesthetic identities walls of terraced gardens. Mediterranean says the neighborhood grows varieties of
of Granite Bay’s neighborhoods. trees like Italian cypress, citrus and silvery grapes cultivated in France’s Rhone Val-

16 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 16 3/17/17 3:35 PM
Jamie Susslin says that every
resident has a slightly different
view of the community, whether it’s
of the vineyards, the olive groves or
one of the ponds, pictured here.
PHOTO BY MACKENZIE MYERS

Clos du Lac,
established in
1994, is a gated
community along
the northern edge
of Granite Bay.
PHOTO BY
MACKENZIE MYERS

2014 best-of-show in Placer County for
his Mourvedre.
Koch has been responsible for manag-
ing Clos du Lac’s vines for 10 years, and
“ A lot of people don’t like that and
think that they should have walls to
protect their privacy,” he says. “But
he serves on the vineyard committee, having no walls attracts a really open


just one of the many community-orga- friendly type of person.
nized groups that keep the neighborhood
Grant Koch, Clos Du Lac resident
running. There’s an entertainment com-
mittee, an olive oil committee, an archi-
ley: Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Petite tectural review committee — the latter of Today, the neighborhood is filling the
Syrah and Mourvedre. The homeown- which his wife, Yoka, has been a part of for last of its 88 lots. Though Susslin admits
er’s association manages all the vines, in nine years. Clos du Lac regulates what residents can
both the common areas and in residents’ “Everybody gets involved,” says Koch, grow in their yards, what changes they
front yards. All the homeowner has to do “and it’s a lot of fun that way.” can make to their homes or what kinds
is water them and keep them alive. From The neighborhood became established of lights can go on their houses, she said
there, grapes are harvested and crushed in 1994 when Hardie Setzer, part of the that it’s not as strict as it sounds.
at a fall festival, then sent off to processors family who started Setzer Forest Prod- “If you want to live here, it’s not prohibi-
who bottle the wine and send it back. Res- ucts, Inc. in Sacramento, wanted to build tive at all because you like it,” she says.
idents can then buy the wine at a fraction a community inspired by the Provence re- Given the neighborhood’s proximi-
of the typical cost. gion in Southeastern France. An architect ty to Folsom Lake and the North Fork
Some even make it themselves, like from San Francisco, Henrik Bull, designed American River, the French term clos du
16-year resident Grant Koch, who won the community. CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 17

2017_04_April GBV.indd 17 3/17/17 3:35 PM
Above: Though
continued from page 17 the vines are empty
now, come late
lac—meaning “walled vineyard close to summer and early
the lake”, according to Susslin—is fitting. fall, they’ll be full
of grapes.
The community, arranged in a three-cir- At left: This 2012
cle trefoil, has an eight-foot wall around bottle of Cabernet
the perimeter. It’s not there to keep peo- Franc is a product
ple out, but deer, who like to eat the ros- of Clos du Lac’s
vineyards. The
es, grapes and various other things that community also
grow in the rocky soil. makes olive oil.
But inside the main gates, walls aren’t PHOTOS BY
MACKENZIE MYERS
allowed — at least, that’s Grant Koch’s
theory.
“A lot of people don’t like that and
think that they should have walls to pro-
tect their privacy,” he says. “But having
no walls attracts a really open friendly
type of person.”
He, Yoka and Susslin all agree that
the best part of the neighborhood is the winemaking brings to mind adults-only egg hunt and the harvest party. They
neighbors themselves. events, the neighborhood’s population hold a school supply drive in the fall and
“The residents are really great,” Sus- runs the gamut, from young families a toy drive around Christmas. They even
slin says. As she is walking on a path by with small children all the way up to re- host a Bastille Day party, where everyone
one of the community’s three ponds, she tirees like the Kochs. Careers and former gathers in the community park—bench-
approaches a home near the path and careers are diverse here too: doctors, es, a grill and a pagoda nestled under
a neighbor on the back deck waves and lawyers, law enforcement, technology scrub oaks and olive trees—to celebrate
shouts hello to her. professionals and business owners all France’s national holiday.
“This is not a neighborhood where you call this place home. And on the more frequent rotation of
don’t know your neighbors and never Despite the variety of backgrounds, events put together by the entertainment
talk to them,” she says. the community comes together for hol- committee?
Though Clos du Lac’s penchant for iday celebrations, like the annual Easter Happy hour, of course.

18 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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2017_04_April GBV.indd 19 3/17/17 3:35 PM
ATH LETICS | Lacrosse

Learning
under
Lehner BY STEVEN WILSON

Rookie coach takes over
Grizzlies program after
record-setting season

First-year varsity
coach Allie Lehner
takes over the
reigns of the
Granite Bay girls
lacrosse program
this season after
the Grizzlies set a
school record by
reaching the North
Coast Section
semifinals last year.
PHOTO BY
CHRIS COSTIGAN

20 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 20 3/17/17 3:35 PM
S
tu Brokowsky can honestly say he
went out on top.
The longtime Granite Bay High girls
lacrosse coach took the program to new
heights in 2015 with the school’s first 18-
win season and again in 2016 as the Griz-
zlies reached the North Coast Section
semifinals for the first time in school his-
tory. That team ended their season just
two wins away from a coveted section
title, after dropped a one-score game to
Monte Vista, 12-11, in the semifinals.
That offseason, Brokowsky decided it
was time to hang it up and retire.
Filling his void this year is UC Davis
graduate Allie Lehner, a passionate first-
year instructor with a successful track re-
cord as a club coach in the Sacramento
region and Bay Area.
“I’m certainly excited about the energy
Allie brings to the program, even though
it seems more physically demanding for
the kids,” Granite Bay’s Athletic Direc- plement her offensive approach, Lehner Lauryn Hardoy scored the game-winning
tor Tim Healy said. “The kids are run- took the first few months of the season goal earlier this year against Carondelet
to win in double-overtime, 12-11.
ning more, tryouts were more vigorous to install a few sets. But the rookie coach
PHOTO BY CHRIS COSTIGAN
in terms of conditioning, but I think the knows some of the best plays come from
kids are learning that it’s OK to have high from her players’ own intuition.
expectations and then meet those goals.” “I want the girls to think for themselves
Lehner spent last season instructing rather than just sending in a play that
at St. Francis as the girls lacrosse junior I think will be successful,” Lehner ex- Granite Bay
varsity coach before making the jump to plained. “They have to be able to see and Girls Lacrosse
Granite Bay. feel what’s going to work and what’s not.”
Originally from Southern California, The payoff has come slowly.
HEAD COACH:
Lehner grew up playing lacrosse in Or- Granite Bay has had a few slow starts,
Allie Lehner
ange County, where she was a four-time but managed a few impressive wins. The 2016:
All-Pacific Coast League honoree, and team will start a game slow, feeling out 17-7, 3-2 SVLC
her team’s and league’s most valuable an opponent before attacking hard. TOP RETURNING PLAYERS:
player as a junior and senior. Although The strong start has the administration Autumn Mannsfeld (Sr.)
she switched to defender in college, Leh- believing they’ve made the right choice. Lauryn Hardoy (Sr.)
ner racked up 95 goals and 42 assists as a “I certainly don’t see a drop-off in the McKenzie Blackwell (Sr.)
senior in high school, leading to a four- program,” Healy said. “In fact, I think the Kaley Stunz (Sr.)
year career at UC Davis where she start- new coaching staff is eagerly expecting Lainie Kastner (Jr.)
ed nearly every game at defender in her a similar run this year and that’s the es- Avonna Usher (So.)
last three seasons. tablished expectation. The girls certainly Miriam Lebastchi (So.)
Now, she brings that knowledge to the feel confident. I know they think they’re Victoria Macres (So.)
Grizzlies. capable and they’d like to at least equal TOP NEWCOMERS:
“It’s been an absolute blast and I’ve last year’s success.” Skyy Jackson (Jr.)
loved getting to know the girls,” Lehner Kiana Perez (Fr.)
admitted. “The amount of talent that we DUPLICATING SUCCESS Cami Kappos (Fr.)
have on this team is unbelievable. If we The Grizzlies’ 18-win, 2-loss record KEY DEPARTURES:
can work together as a team, offensively from 2015 leaves one in awe. Gianni Cannon
and defensively, then I’m confident we’re The team posted blowout wins over 15 Alaigra Usher
Carly Arfsten
going to achieve our goals.” opponents and lost to just one team all
Carlin Isaacson
Although she didn’t get a lot of time year — Novato, a Bay Area powerhouse
with her new team in the offseason to im- CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 21

2017_04_April GBV.indd 21 3/17/17 3:35 PM
same players coming back,” Lehner point- Hardoy, who is committed to play col-
ed out. “Our core is similar, and I think legiate lacrosse at the University of In-
their experience at that level definitely fac- dianapolis next fall, was one of Lehner’s
continued from page 21 tors into their mindset this year. But in or- standout club players prior to her coach-
der to get to the championship, we’re going ing change at Granite Bay.
program that has captured each of the last to have to put in a lot more work.” Lehner was familiar with the Grizzlies’
two North Coast Section Division I cham- Last year’s team MVP Lauryn Hardoy ferocious attacker after coaching her and
pionships. If it wasn’t for a second-round is one of those returners Lehner will be a handful of the girls on her club team, Te-
matchup with Novato in the NCS playoffs, counting on all season long. nacity Sacramento Elite. That’s made the
that team may have reached the finals. As the team’s leading attacker, Hardoy transition this offseason a little easier.
The returning players proved their was named the Grizzlies MVP, earned “We’ve really embraced all of the new
worth a year later by reaching the semi- first team All-Sacramento Valley Lacrosse things we could learn from a new coach,”
finals of that same tournament despite Conference (SVLC) honors and became she admitted. “We loved having Stu and
falling to Oak Ridge in the league cham- the second Northern California All Ameri- we love having Allie, and I can honestly say
pionship game. can in school history in 2016. that both of them have really impacted my
Three players from last year’s squad She returns for her senior season with life. They have different coaching styles,
are still playing competitive lacrosse high expectations. but both have helped this program.”
as Alaigra Usher (Central Connecticut “I feel confident that we’ll make it back A self-described competitive coach,
State), Carlin Isaacson (Villanova Uni- (to the NCS playoffs) just because we Lehner is constantly looking for im-
versity) and Gianni Cannon (University have so much talent on this team and provement, after wins or losses, after ev-
of Colorado, Colorado Springs) all signed we have a great coaching staff,” Hardoy ery practice, every repetition.
collegiate National Letters of Intent with said. “I’ve been fortunate to have great “She’s always pushing you to do bet-
big-time programs. coaches throughout my high school ca- ter — she lets you make your own deci-
“We graduated a few talented players reer, and I’m excited to see where we go sions but makes you think in a different
from that team, but we still have a lot of the this year.” way,” Hardoy explained. “You chose your

22 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 22 3/17/17 3:35 PM

Hardoy helped seal the victory with a
We lost a lot of great players
late goal as she beat the defense with her
from last year, three of whom went on
speed and found the top of the net with
to play collegiate lacrosse, but I think a swift shot.
we’ll be just as good this year to be “I was just lucky, but really anyone
honest. It’s taken a little time to get could have gotten that last goal, that’s
used to playing together, because we kind of the beauty with our team,” Har-
have a lot of new players, but we’ve doy said. “I was just in the right place at
kicked it off really well.

Lauryn Hardoy, Granite Bay High School senior
the right time. But going to double-over-
time was exciting.”
That win gave the team confidence
going into two more tough preseason
Usher also promises to provide a spark in matches against Navato and Cal High. But
the middle for the Grizzlies. it’s games like that, against programs that
“She’s super speedy and has a great continue to collect championships, that
stick,” Lehner said. “Avonna was on the will make the team better in the playoffs.
team last year with her older sister, who’s In league play, the Grizzlies’ toughest
playing D1 lacrosse right now, and I know competition will come from last year’s
they work hard together every offseason undefeated champions from Oak Ridge.
and they come in ready to play.” The two rivals are very familiar with each
Usher, Hardoy, Stunz, Mannsfeld and other and Granite Bay’s new coach.
Blackwell all stepped up their games last “We all play together during club sea-
month against three-time NCS cham- son, so we’re extremely competitive, but it’s
pion Carondelet as the Grizzlies earned a little ironic playing against your friends,”
a one-goal win in double-overtime on Hardoy explained. “So it’s always a great
their home field. game because both teams are so talented,
but we’re going to give them a run for
their money this year.”
The girls program has won
three league titles over the past
move, and if it didn’t work then she wants five seasons and the team is
you to think of something you could have hungry for another one
done differently, but if it worked then she this year.
seeks out a way to do that again or make
it better. I think, in the end, she really
coaches well-rounded players.”

ON THE ATTACK
Hardoy has led the Grizzlies in scoring
for three straight years. She’s a master of
the spin move and can attack any angle
at will, sometimes luring her opponent to
Far Left: Granite Bay’s
sleep before striking and finding the net.
sophomore midfielder
Under her new coach, Allie Lehner, Avonna Usher has the speed
Hardoy could blossom even more. and skill to impact games for the
“She works the crease and always has Grizzlies this season.
Top center: Lauryn Hardoy
the ability to put the ball in the back of
and her team celebration
the net,” Lehner said. “But the great thing the double-overtime,
about Lauryn is that she’s very dynamic. sudden victory at home
She does a lot more for us than just putting back on March 7.
At left: 2016 team MVP
the ball in the net — she’s very versatile.”
and First Team All-League
Helping Hardoy on the offense end this selection Lauryn Hardoy
year will be seniors Autumn Mannsfeld, returns to the lineup to
McKenzie Blackwell, Kaley Stunz and ju- lead the Grizzlies attack.
PHOTOS BY CHRIS COSTIGAN
nior Lainie Kastner. Sophomore Avonna

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 23

2017_04_April GBV.indd 23 3/17/17 3:35 PM
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EN V IRO NMENT

Here to
STAY
Area organizations BY MACKENZIE MYERS

team up to protect
27 acres of delicate
habitat in Granite Bay

At left: Placer
Land Trust has set
up a conservation
easement for 27
acres of Granite
Bay wetlands that
will remain parking
lot-, plaza- and
population-free
forever.
Top right: Like
much of the other
protected areas in
the foothill region,
Odayan Preserve
contains trees
like valley oak,
interior live oak
and blue oak.
COURTESY PHOTOS

26 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 26 3/17/17 3:35 PM
“ It would not have been very long
before we saw rooftops here.

Jeff Darlington, Placer Land Trust Executive Director

I
t’s no secret, especially for long-term ra College Boulevard in Granite Bay. Vice CARING FOR WHAT’S LEFT
residents, that Granite Bay has seen President of Finance Allen Hrenyk said The project took about a year to set up,
a growth spurt in the last 20-some the group purchased 75 acres of proper- according to Placer Land Trust Executive
years. What used to be a meadow or a ty 12 years ago. It has since been raising Director Jeff Darlington. He said Amaz-
rolling hillside now might be a parking funds to build office space and a 1,400- ing Facts gave the nonprofit $220,000 to
lot or shopping plaza. Homes for families seat church on 12 acres of land within the help them take care of Odayan Preserve.
wishing to live in a beautiful communi- entire property. Though the Corps has designated the
ty close to Folsom Lake have gobbled up Hrenyk said the remaining acreage property as private land, Darlington said
much of the available land. Green spac- may be developed for housing in the fu- this is atypical of Placer Land Trust pre-
es, and the creatures that occupy them, ture, but in accordance with United States serves.
seem to be drying up. Army Corps of Engineers land-use regu- “It’s common for the Corps to restrict
But at the beginning of February, the lations, a portion was set aside as a pre- public access on properties where wet-
Placer Land Trust sealed the deal on 27 serve. The Corps required the ministry to land habitats are sensitive,” he said. “But
acres of wetlands that will remain park- mitigate the impact of the church project for the Placer Land Trust ... many of our
ing lot-, plaza- and population-free for- because of the sensitive wetland habitat preserves are open to the public.”
ever. The land is called Odayan Preserve, some of the property contained. Hrenyk said if it was ever an option,
to honor the Nisenan people who inhab- Auburn-based Placer Land Trust, act- they would be open to putting in trails.
ited the area. ing as a third party, set up a conservation Darlington said the Land Trust will man-
easement for the 27 acres. This desig- age the property, rather than contracting
WORKING TOGETHER nation will remain in the books forever scientists to take water samples, catalogue
The landowner, Rocklin faith-based — the easement is part of the property’s species and conduct other maintenance
organization Amazing Facts Ministries, deed now, so any future owners will have involved with preservations. The money
wanted to build on property next to Sier- to abide by the same terms. CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 27

2017_04_April GBV.indd 27 3/17/17 3:35 PM
The pond inside
Odayan Preserve
provides vital
riparian habitat
for species that
depend on
an ample
water supply.
COURTESY PHOTO

continued from page 27 being a wetland, is an oak woodland typ- ilar ecosystems accommodate animals
ical of the foothills region. It contains val- like muskrat, beaver and river otters.
provided by Amazing Facts will also help ley oak, blue oak and interior live oak, but Raptors such as red-tailed hawks and
fund any possible legal action, in case any- likely has riparian, water-loving trees like great horned owls could also inhabit the
one is caught misusing the land. cottonwood and willow as well. preserve. The western pond turtle might
Both Darlington and Hrenyk agree that Sierra College botanist and biology be an especially exciting resident — the
the land would have likely become hous- professor Shawna Martinez said that it’s threatened species has experienced hab-
ing developments if not for the preserve. vital to protect wetlands in order to ben- itat loss due to human developments up
“It would not have been very long before efit the species that haven’t yet adapted and down the west coast.
we saw rooftops here,” Darlington said. to drought. In any case, whichever species live
“Most of the species we have out here there now are there to stay. Odayan Pre-
PROTECTING THE NEIGHBORS can live six to eight months without wa- serve, thanks to the combined efforts
Instead, the Odayan Preserve will pro- ter,” she said. “But the riparian species of the Placer Land Trust, Amazing Facts
tect a habitat rich in biodiversity, and one near open bodies of water have to have it.” Ministries and the United States Army
that is often lacking within drought-prone Though Martinez had not seen the Corps of Engineers, has ensured a habitat
California. The ecosystem, in addition to specific section of property, she said sim- of peace, in perpetuity.

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H HAdvertise H
H

Your
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H
Pr H
H
Here !
Contact JoAnn Stuck

H Advertising Sales Consultant
916-774-7934
joanns@goldcountrymedia.com H
2017_04_April GBV.indd 29 3/17/17 3:36 PM
REAL ESTATE

Recent Transactions
The following are all of the recent real estate transactions that took
place with all real estate agents in Granite Bay between Feb. 1-28, 2017.
Data provided by CoreLogic.

1 4723 Abbey Hill, Granite Bay 95746-6631 $630,000
2 361 Allenwood Court, Granite Bay 95746-6624 $639,000
3 3030 Daggett Drive, Granite Bay 95746-6436 $650,000
4 8101 East Hidden Lakes Drive, Granite Bay 95746-9538 $740,000
5 5895 Granite Lake Drive, Granite Bay v95746-6817 $1,099,100
6 7100 Itchy Acres Road, Granite Bay 95746-8603 $875,000
7 8132 Joe Rodgers Road Granite Bay 95746-9330 $478,500
8 6865 Leibinger Lane, Granite Bay 95746-9365 $1,015,000
9 9912 Villa Granito Lane, Granite Bay 95746-6481 $450,000
10 4872 Waterbury Way, Granite Bay 95746-6423 $610,000
11 310 Whetstone Court, Granite Bay 95746-6450 $455,000
12 531 Woburn Court, Granite Bay 95746-6448 $538,500
13 7607 Woodridge Way, Granite Bay 95746-9561 $750,000

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This month’s Recent Real Estate Transactions page is sponsored by:

Debbie Sax.com
Re/Max Gold

2998 Douglas Boulevard #125 Roseville, CA 95661
(916) 947-4729
CalBRE# 01444853

2017_04_April GBV.indd 30 3/17/17 3:36 PM
8
6
7 13 4

5

11
12 1

10 9

It would be my honor and privilege to earn your business in 2016.

2017_04_April GBV.indd 31 3/17/17 3:36 PM
REAL ESTATE

New Listings
The following are all of the new real estate listings in Granite Bay
between March 1-16, 2017. Data provided by MetroList.

1 611 Davenwood Court, Granite Bay 95746 549,900
2 8425 Auburn Folsom Road, Granite Bay 95746 550,800
3 6012 Oak View Drive, Granite Bay 95746 629,000
4 8220 Parus Way, Granite Bay 95746 649,990
5 8665 Woodrock Way, Granite Bay 95746 669,000
6 8290 Auburn Folsom Road, Granite Bay 95746 675,000
7 8692 Pendleton Drive, Granite Bay 95746 679,000
8 9320 Crocker Road, Granite Bay 95746 764,900
9 8142 W Granite Drive, Granite Bay 95746 765,000
10 9686 Swan Lake Drive, Granite Bay 95746 768,500
11 5952 Del Oro Road, Granite Bay 95746 775,000
12 9435 Treelake Road, Granite Bay 95746 799,900
13 5627 Gibson Place, Granite Bay 95746 820,000
14 6020 Poplar Court, Granite Bay 95746 899,999
15 6000 Knightswood Way, Granite Bay 95746 998,000
16 6100 Oak Hill Drive, Granite Bay 95746 1,088,000
17 8140 Woodland Grove Place, Granite Bay 95746 1,149,500
18 8820 Los Lagos Circle, Granite Bay 95746 1,199,000
19 7772 Lakeshore Drive, Granite Bay 95746 1,299,000
20 5866 Valle Vista Court, Granite Bay 95746 1,367,500
21 5006 Tiffany Point Granite Bay 95746 1,495,000

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This month’s New Real Estate Listings page is sponsored by:

Debbie Austin
CalBRE #01429175

DebbieAustinGroup.com | 916.223.8144

2017_04_April GBV.indd 32 3/17/17 3:36 PM
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Specializing in homeS SaleS in granite Bay, loomiS, rocklin, roSeville & FolSom
I have purchased 10 homes in my lifetime, Debbie was my
Realtor for the last two. She is the most knowledgeable, patient

and professional of any real estate person I have ever worked
with. ~ Don Sams

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 33

2017_04_April GBV.indd 33 3/17/17 3:36 PM
REAL ESTATE Pulse on the Granite Bay Real Estate Market
Pulse on the
Number of Homes For Sale vs. Sold vs. Pended (Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017)
Number of Homes For Sale vs. Sold vs. Pended Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017

Real Estate Market
These graphs are published by
Trend Vision for all properties in
the zip code 95746. All reports are
published March 2017, based on data
available at the end of February 2017.
All reports presented are based on
data supplied by the MetroList MLS.

Average Price per a square foot Sold Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017 Average Price of For Sale and Sold Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017
Average Price per SQ FT (Sold) (Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017) Average Price of For Sale and Sold (Dec. 2015 - Feb. 2017)

This month’s
Information Pulse by:
provided onCheryl
the Real Estate
Harding Market
– Contact page
Cheryl is sponsored
with any questionsby:

PROPERTY MARKETING THAT WORKS 1034 Hutley Way, Granite Bay $750,000
I am proud to deliver exceptional marketing programs that
help produce results. They are designed to help your home
sell fast and for the desired price. I ensure that from concept
to completion, your home is uniquely cared for by me and my
expert marketing team.

Mobile
Cheryl Harding Boost It Magazine ads Brochures
916.223.9685 And much more…
Cal BRE #01463180
www.cherylharding.com TV Spots
Call for details on my aggressive
marketing strategies.
Featured Listing

2017_04_April GBV.indd 34 3/17/17 3:36 PM
2017_04_April GBV.indd 35 3/17/17 3:36 PM
N !
S OO
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MI
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9784 WEDDINGTON CIRCLE • GRANITE BAY • Call for Pricing

E D!
ST
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9435 TREELAKE ROAD • GRANITE BAY

D !
OSE
CL
ST
JU

6532 EATON COuRT • GRANITE BAY

Debbie Austin
SpeciAlizinG in homeS SAleS in GrAnite BAy,
loomiS, rocklin, roSeville & FolSom

DebbieAustinGroup.com | 916.223.8144 CalBRE# 01429175

2017_04_April GBV.indd 36 3/17/17 3:36 PM
EXPERTS IN LUXURY LISTINGS

,000 D
SOL
$775 ,000
$599

5952 Del Oro Road • Granite Bay 5695 Lions Cross Circle • Granite Bay Whispering Canyon
505 Bristol Community
Court • RosevilleLots
MIKE LUTZKER, REALTOR® BETH BRYANT CHRIS SHEFFER
916.531.8804 916.996.1268 cell: 916.300.5835
www.homesalesplacercounty.com bethbryanthomes.com www.sheffersells.com
Cal BRE #01914042 Cal BRE #00903372 Cal BRE#01495862

on!
in g So LIST
ED
Com JUST

To advertise
here call
JoAnn Stuck
916.774.7934 Debbie Austin, Selling Agent

Whispering Canyon
504 Bristol Community
Court • RosevilleLots or email: 9435 Treelake Road • Granite Bay
CHRIS SHEFFER joanns@goldcountrymedia.com DEBBIE AUSTIN I REALTOR
Specializing in Granite Bay, Loomis,
cell: 916.300.5835 Rocklin, Roseville & Folsom
www.sheffersells.com 916.223.8144
debbieaustingroup.com
Cal BRE#01495862 Cal BRE #01429175

2017_04_April GBV.indd 37 3/17/17 3:36 PM
Did you know?
Fun wine facts
WIN E VIEW | Erik Loigom

2. THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF GRAPES IT TAKES TO
MAKE A BOTTLE OF WINE IS 736. But that can
vary widely depending on things like grape variety and

1. THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 49 MILLION BUBBLES
in a bottle of Champagne.
condition when picked – for example, plump berries
from rain or small ones from a dry growing season.

3. THE WORLD’S OLDEST
BOTTLE OF WINE dates
back to A.D. 325 and was
4. ROMANS DISCOVERED
THAT MIXING LEAD
WITH WINE not only helped
5. THE LARGEST CORK
TREE IN THE WORLD,
the Whistler, is in Portugal. It
found near the town of Speyer, preserve wine, but also gave it a averages over one ton of raw cork
Germany, inside one of two sweet taste and succulent texture. per harvest every nine years. That’s
Roman sarcophagi. It is on Chronic lead poisoning has often enough to cork 100,000 bottles.
display at the town’s Historisches been cited as one of the causes of
Museum der Pfalz. the decline of Rome.

6. A BARREL HOLDS 59
GALLONS, which equals
to 225 liters or 300 bottles to
7. SINCE WINE TASTING IS ESSENTIALLY WINE
SMELLING, women tend to be better wine testers
because women have a better sense of smell than men.
fill 25 cases.

8. 2½ POUNDS OF GRAPES
are in one bottle of wine. 9. 2-6 TONS OF
GRAPES ARE
HARVESTED PER
10. WINE
GRAPES
RANK NUMBER ONE
ACRE (depending on among the world’s
many factors) This fruit crops in terms
equals 720 bottles or of acres planted.

11. NOT ALL WINES 13.5 barrels per acre.
IMPROVE WITH TIME.
In fact, a vast majority of wines
produced are ready to drink and
do not have much potential for
aging. Only a rare few will last
longer than a decade.

Erik Loigom, with his wife, Crickett, owns and operates UnWined in Folsom.
Born in Australia, he has visited most of the wineries in Australia and has
traveled to many wine regions around the world.

38 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 38 3/17/17 3:36 PM
Spend Easter in Your New Home!
ALMOST 5 ACRES!

MUSIC

Saturday,
6705 Shady Lake Lane
Granite Bay
FOOD

$429,000 $459,000

April 29th WINE

1 - 5 PM PENDING PENDING
1225 Red Dog Lane 649 Farridge Drive
Auburn Roseville
Tickets $35 in advance
I Can Make Your Real Estate Dreams Come True!

$40 at the door Call me to buy or sell
www.lincolnwinefest.org Cera Hinkey
BEERMANN PLAZA, LINCOLN Cal BRE #01714028
916.849.2372

JEFF SESSIONS
916.768.7475
Jeff@JeffSessionsRE.com
BRE License 01218764

6049 Douglas Blvd., Suite 25
LIC 01312653 Granite Bay, CA 95746

5800 Appaloosa Place, Rocklin
It's a great time to sell! 2310sf prox .269ac prox 4 bedrooms 3 bathrooms Home with
Detached Accessory Structure located in a fantastic Rocklin
neighborhood. Beautiful interiors and luscious landscaping with
a large covered patio. Move-in ready, don’t pass this one by.
We have buyers Other upgrades include Custom wood flooring, granite counters,
extensive landscaping.
for all price ranges. Offered at $549,000
SALE PENDING

Call me Today!
916-768-7475

2017_04_April GBV.indd 39 3/17/17 3:36 PM
team member and no more trips to the emergency room make
this difficult time more manageable. I do encounter the common
Live until you die: misconception, though, that a home care aide will be bedside
routinely, providing personal care. In hospice care, the most typ-
The truth about Hospice ical service of a home health aide is for bath visits two to three
times per week. Only occasionally and temporarily will hospice
provide continuous care over several hours. When more dedi-
SEN IOR VIEW | Susan Feldman
cated and ongoing hands-on care is needed, families frequently
engage the services of BrightStar or other in-home care agencies

M
any folks think that starting hospice means they’ve given to provide caregivers for personal care, safe transfers, ambulation
up on life, when in reality they are making the most of the and household assistance, day or night. The benefits of having
life they have left. Hospice is a service that focuses on the a loved one at home, in familiar surroundings, with the peace-
quality of life instead of continuing with treatment to prolong it. fulness a clinical setting can’t provide, is immeasurable. Studies
Quality versus quantity. Let’s explore hospice as a valuable mem- have actually shown that hospice patients live, on average, 29
ber of a seniors’ care team. days longer than those that do not have these services.
In previous articles, I’ve highlighted professionals that help Various diagnoses and illnesses can lead to hospice as long
seniors and their families continue to thrive, heal and improve, as a physician declares a life expectancy of six months or less.
but there often comes a time when treatments or interventions Although the diagnosis of “failure to thrive” is no longer a cri-
become more exhausting and challenging than the benefits they teria for hospice admission, according to Walters, significant
provide. When curative treatment is no longer available and a pa- weight loss, frequent falls and emergency room visits, advanced
tient’s physician determines the individual has a life expectancy Alzheimer’s and pneumonia in an already compromised condi-
of six months or less, hospice services may be appropriate. tion often precipitate a discussion about hospice services. It is
Hospice is a Medicare, Medi-Cal or insurance-covered benefit interesting and important to note that patients may “graduate”
that provides medical, pharmaceutical, social and spiritual sup- from hospice if their condition improves and life expectancy is
port. As Mary Kay Walters, MSW, Executive Director of Bristol extended. Hospice is a temporary service for many and may be
Hospice Sacramento notes, hospice services usually include: reengaged at a future, appropriate time.
• Basic medical care with a focus on pain In Atul Gawande’s thought-provoking book, “Being Mortal:
and symptom control Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End,” Gawande says,
• Access to a member of your hospice team “We’ve been wrong about what our job is in medicine. We think
24 hours a day, seven days a week our job is to ensure health and survival. But really it is larger
• Home Health Aide to provide bath visits than that. It is to enable well-being.” After all, quality of life and
• Medical supplies and equipment as needed comfort are hospice goals to be proud of.
• Counseling and social support to help you and your family
with psychological, emotional and spiritual issues
• Grief counseling and support for loved ones Susan Feldman is the community relations coordinator for BrightStar
In my experience with families receiving hospice support at Care in Roseville, www.brightstarcare.com/roseville. She can be
home, medication management with phone access to a hospice reached at susan.feldman@brightstarcare.com or (916) 919-0063.

40 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 40 3/17/17 3:36 PM
Try this trending
fitness meal
FITN ESS VIEW | Debra Skelton

hat you eat will make or break your fitness results, so
if you aren’t happy with your current body, then I’ll bet
your diet could use some improvement.
I realize that finding the time to cook and eat healthy meals is
a challenge for many of my clients, so I’d like to introduce you
to the Nourish Bowl.
What is a Nourish Bowl? It’s a simple meal that consists of
greens, protein, healthy fat, veggies, healthy carbs and various
flavor adds.
A Nourish Bowl could be enjoyed for any meal of the day, is Add Veggies: Colorful, vibrant, organic, seasonal vegetables
quick to assemble, and is the perfect alternative to high-calorie become the star of this meal. Take time to chop or dice your
takeout meals. fresh veggies into a pleasing size before adding to your bowl.
Choose from:
BUILD YOUR OWN NOURISH BOWL • Zucchini • Snap peas
Below are the ingredient categories that make up a successful • Bell peppers • Cabbage
Nourish Bowl. Select one item from each category to customize • Cucumber • Carrots
your very own meal. • Tomatoes • Parsnips
• Cauliflower • Any other veggie
Start with Greens: A healthy serving of daily greens is essen- • Radish of your choice
tial for good health, and so our Nourish Bowl always begins here.
Your greens may be cooked or raw, whichever you are in the Add Healthy Carbohydrates: Wholesome carbohydrates are
mood for. Choose from: important for maintaining that pep of energy in your step, so
• Spinach • Micro Greens be sure to include a serving of one of the following in your bowl.
• Kale • Sprouts Choose from:
• Collards • Mustard Greens • Quinoa • Beans
• Arugula • Swiss Chard • Sweet Potato • Corn
• Romaine • Brown or Wild Rice • Peas

Add Protein: Protein is important for supporting your fitness Finish with Flavor Add-Ons: Here’s where you could really
progress, in addition to providing you with usable energy to pow- let your creativity shine by adding your favorite fresh herbs or
er your day. Be sure to vary the protein that you choose from time dressings to increase the flavor and enjoy-ability of the bowl.
to time. Choose from: Choose from:
• Egg • Chicken • Chopped fresh herbs • Vinegar
• Beans • Beef • Dried herbs • Hummus
• Lentils • Pork • Homemade dressing • Lemon juice
• Fish • Homemade sauce

Add Healthy Fat: It’s vital that your diet be rich in healthy Get your creative juices flowing as you begin to design and
fats, so don’t skip this category! Healthy fats help to keep you enjoy your Nourish Bowls of your own creation.
satiated, a benefit that will pay off in fewer calories consumed Don’t forget to get your fitness on by exercising 3-5 times each
over the long haul. No more energy crashes in the afternoon! week. Remember that for your workout to be effective, it must
Choose from: be challenging, progressive and consistent.
• Avocado • Olive oil
• Nuts • Olives
• Seeds Debra Skelton is a certified fitness consultant, a licensed nurse and owner of
Motivative Health & Fitness. She can be reached at MHF4life@gmail.com

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 41

2017_04_April GBV.indd 41 3/17/17 3:36 PM
2. DONATE IT
What do you do with If you are anticipating higher income in 2017 versus what you
earned in 2016, consider donating it to a nonprofit organization
for a tax write-off when you file taxes in 2018. Plus, it feels good
your tax refund? to support worthy causes you care about. (Insert shameless plug
for Sierra Passport Rotary here.)

FINA NCIAL VIEW | Garrett Konrad
3. PAY OFF HIGH-INTEREST DEBT
Please don’t pay down your mortgage with your tax refund.

F
irst let’s talk about what a refund is, just to get some per- Do consider paying down high-interest debt, like maybe a credit
spective. Everyone I talk to gets excited that they have a card or a car loan. Start with the highest interest rate debt, not
huge refund coming their way. “Huge” is relative, by the necessarily the smallest balance owed.
way. Maybe the refund is $500, maybe $5,000, or maybe $10,000.
The average refund is about $3,000. Many people receive this In closing, let’s talk about how to maximize your deduction
check in the mail and view it as free money, delivered from heav- next year. And by maximize, of course I mean minimize! Rather
en by the mail gods. Let me just remind you that a tax refunds is than setting yourself up to have a massive refund each year,
money the IRS is returning to you that you pre-paid, in excess, consider working through (or hiring a tax professional) to cal-
throughout the year. In other words, the federal government got culate your write-offs and adjust your withholdings on your
to use your money throughout the year above and beyond what W2 so that you have more cash flow all year long. My goal is to
was due to them, and now they are giving it back to you. That is always have the smallest refund possible. I don’t know about
the mentality with which to look at your tax return. you, but I like my money, and I like it working for me all year
So, what do we do with it? Here are some ideas: long more than lending it to the federal government for free
all year.
1. VACATION
This is a very common option and I put it first because, let’s
be real, this is the most fun. Tax refunds do go far toward a The author, Garrett Konrad, has lived in Placer County his whole life and has
well-deserved vacation. Check out discount sites like Groupon been a trusted voice in local written publications, seminars and radio, and is
and their air-inclusive travel deals. There are real discounts on president-elect of the Sierra Passport Rotary Club in Auburn. Konrad and his
flight/all-inclusive hotel packages. I personally want to book company IFC are Registered Investment Advisors, Member FINRA. This is not a
that trip to Paris and Spain for $799 in November. solicitation for the sale of securities.

42 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 42 3/17/17 3:36 PM
FREE PUBLIC
EVENT
11th
Annual
Specializing in Residential & Commercial Window Tinting
ART
Stop 99% of UV Rays • Reduce Solar Heat Gain • Block Unwanted Glare &
20 years of experience • Family owned and operated
CHOCOLATE
Call 916-899-7338 Today! Sat & Sun April 29 & 30 10am-5pm
Passport Maps & Artist’s Information
www.efficienttint.com www.artStudioTrek.com

Timberbrooke Construction
Turns your Remodeling Dreams Into Reality!
We also do...
• Kitchen and Bath Remodels • Decks and Patio Covers
• Dry Rot and Termite Repairs • Doors and Windows
GROW YOUR BUSINESS! • Siding and Siding Repairs • Patio Covers
ADVERTISE IN THE GRANITE BAY COMMUNITY • Fire and Water Restoration

John Love
Advertising Sales Manager
(916) 774-7908 or
Local since 1980
916-765-9384 Lic #979284

johnl@goldcountrymedia.com www.timberbrookeconstruction.com
nathan@timberbrookeconstruction.com

M c G r at h C on s t r u c t ion

CCL #802229
916.945.8059
ken@mcgrathconstruct.com
www.mcgrathconstruct.com

2017_04_April GBV.indd 43 3/17/17 3:36 PM
TH ING S TO DO | April
Submit an event to Granite Bay View’s Things to Do.
Email jamieh@goldcountrymedia.com

6TH ANNUAL LINCOLN WINE FEST
Sample Placer wines without driving all over
the county. Lincoln Rotary sponsors this
very popular walk-about wine tasting event
featuring local wines paired with local food.
Stroll around the shops and retail locations
including the Art League and Archive
Museum. Beermann Plaza will host a live
band and vendors. Take notes on the order
sheet while sampling wine to buy the wine
by the bottle at the Bottle Shop.
11th Annual Art Studio Trek When: 1-5 p.m. April 29
Where: Downtown Lincoln

29APRIL
South Placer artists will show their work, and provide demonstrations in
their studios. See mixed media, sculpture, jewelry, wood, stone, painting,
gourds and more from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, April 29-30 at
Cost: $35 in advance or $40 on the day.
Must be 21 years to purchase. Children may
accompany adults. Designated Driver tickets
art studios throughout Granite Bay, Roseville and Rocklin. For more information, visit available on the day.
ArtStudioTrek.com Info: lincolnwinefest.org

Ongoing events
ACCORDION SOCIETY MEETS COMPUTER BASICS HELP
Northern California Accordion Society meets from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Adults, bring your own device for help accessing e-books, social
Wednesdays at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection 6365 Douglas media, internet searching, email account set up. 4-5 p.m. Thursdays
Boulevard in Granite Bay. Cost is $2 for members and $3 for guests. at the Granite Bay Library, 6475 Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay.
For more information, call David at (916) 806-6927. For more information call (916) 791-5590 to reserve a spot.

GLOVES AND SHOVELS GARDEN CLUB FOOD TRUCK MANIA!
Meets 10 a.m. the third Thursday of each month at From 5-8 p.m. the second Thursday of the month year-round.
Bushnell’s Garden Nursery, 5255 Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay. Enjoy live music, food trucks including Squeeze Inn Roseville,
Free. For more information, email gloveandshovels@yahoo.com. Volkswaffle, Krush Burger, Chando’s Tacos, OMG Yogurt, Simply
Southern Food, Cajun Wagon, An Honest Pie, Cowtown Creamery,
FARMERS MARKETS Hefty Gyros, Wandering Boba and Drewski’s Hot Rod on Vernon
Foothill Farmers’ Market is year round from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Street in downtown Roseville. For more information visit
Tuesdays at Whole foods Market at the Fountains, Galleria Boulevard sactomofo.com
and East Roseville Parkway in Roseville. For more information, visit
foothillfarmersmarket.com. Kaiser Permanente Farmers Markets are OUTDOOR PICKER’S MARKET
year round from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays at Kaiser Clinic, The market is every fourth Sunday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. rain or
1001 Riverside Avenue, in Roseville and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays shine at Hand Pickin’ Emporium, 4155 Rocklin Road in Rocklin. Event
at 1600 Eureka Road in Roseville. For more information, visit includes antique, vintage, upcycle, crafts, arts, garden food and fun.
hicksvilleacres@sbcglobal.net. Historic Folsom Farmers Market from Food provided by Dave’s Dawgs. For more information, email Barb or
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at the Railroad Turntable and Public Plaza Bob Pratt at handpickin@aol.com.
in Historic Folsom. For more information, visit historicfolsom.org.

44 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 44 3/17/17 3:36 PM
DELICATE BALANCE” AND STUDENT ADVANCED DIGITAL ART EXHIBITS
Painter Irene Belknap, mixed-media artist Marsha Balian and sculptor Jennifer Johnson will
balance tight rope walkers, stunt girls on horseback, clowns, jugglers, and brightly costumed
Harris Center
10 College Parkway, Folsom
performers in a circus of imagery 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through Friday and 6-8 p.m. (916) 608-6888, harriscenter.net
Tuesday and Wednesday through May 4 at the Community Gallery at 48 Natoma in
Folsom. For more information (916) 355-7285 or cabraham@folsom.ca.us. Let It Be: A Celebration of
the Music of the Beetles
THEATRE AT GRANITE BAY PRESENTS: THE UNFORTUNATES Presented by the Harris Center
The Unfortunates is a unhinged anti-war parable steeped in the lyrics of folk classics. Tickets are $39-$75
This simultaneously soulful, bleak and comedic musical follows prisoner of war “Big Joe” 2 p.m. Saturday, April 1
McKinney as he faces a firing squad. Joe falls into a fever-dream and learns through music, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 1
community, and love to find the courage he needs to face his final moments. Show times are 2 p.m. Sunday, April 2
7 p.m. April 1, 6-8 at Granite Bay High School, 1 Grizzly Way in Granite Bay. Tickets are $12, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 2
$10 for students. For more information visit theunfortunates.brownpapertickets.com. Ballroom, Latin,
Theatrical Dance Showcase
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Presented by Malko Dance Academy
7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, April 7, 8, 21, 22; and 2 p.m. Sundays, April 9 and Tickets are $25
23 at Del Oro High School Performing Arts Center, 3301 Taylor Road in Loomis. $15 general; 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 1
$10 seniors (55 and over), and youth 18 and under; special group pricing available. For more Louie Anderson with
information visit dramacompany.org. Keith Lowell Jensen
Presented by Carrera Productions
THE ANTIQUE AND VINTAGE MARKET Tickets are $20-$40
Over 200 vendors will selling merchandise on the closed street. Event is rain or shine. Open 8 p.m. Thursday, April 6
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 8 at Sutter Street in Historic Downtown Folsom.

PHOTO BY KEVIN THOMAS GARCIA
Park at 905 Leidesdorff Street. For more information visit historicfolsom.org.
BINGO ROUND-UP
Proceeds benefit the Philanthropic Programs of the Assistance League of Greater Placer.
Event features cash prizes, raffle, silent auction. Food and beverages, including wine and beer,
available for purchase. Must be 18 to attend with a valid ID to claim a prize. 12:30 p.m. and
6 p.m. Wednesday, April 12 Doors open prior to each session at the Blue Goose Event
Mamma Mia! Farewell Tour
Center, 3550 Taylor Road in Loomis. Tickets, per session: $25 advance, $30 at the door. Presented by the Harris Center
Tickets are $49-$89
WINE DOWN WEDNESDAYS
7:30 p.m. Friday, April 7
Wednesdays just got better. Enjoy live music and wine tastings in partnership with local 2 p.m. Saturday, April 8
vintners. Bring the 2017 seasonal souvenir glass back to each event for an additional 1oz 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 8
tasting. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays April 12 through May 17 at the Vernon Street 1 p.m. Sunday, April 9
Town Square, 311 Vernon Street in Roseville. Entrance fee is $10 and includes five tastings. 6:30 p.m. Sunday, April 9
Cabana rentals and season passes available. For more information visit roseville.ca.us/events.
Organ Symphony
Presented by the Folsom Lake Symphony
NIGHT OUT AT THE MUSEUM
Tickets are $20-$59
Seeing West Mountain: Concow Histories of California During the Great Depression, presentation 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 22
by the author and professor William Bauer. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, April 15 at 1970 Johnson
Ranch Drive in Roseville. For more information call (916) 774-5934 or visit roseville.ca.us/events. Mary Poppins
Presented by El Dorado Musical Theatre
Tickets are $21-$39
7 p.m. Friday, April 28
2 p.m. Saturday, April 29
7 p.m. Saturday, April 29
Thunder Valley 1200 Athens Avenue, Lincoln
(877) 468-8777, thundervalleyresort.com
2 p.m. Sunday, April 30
Cyrano
Presented by Falcon’s Eye Theatre
at Folsom Lake College
Carlos Mencia: Delve into Bog Bad Voodoo Daddy: Swing Tickets are $12-$18
the ‘Mind of Mencia’ Revival Band Rocks It In Style 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 28
Tickets are $39.95-$54.95 Tickets are $34.95-$47.95 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 29
7:30 p.m. Friday, April 7 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 28 2 p.m. Sunday, April 30
AbbaFab: The Premier Life In The Fast Lane: An Evening with Marc Cohn
Abba Experience Songs Of The Eagles Presented by Carrera Productions
Tickets are $24.95-$34.95 Tickets are $40-$50 Tickets are $25-$45
7:30 p.m. Friday, April 21 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 29 8 p.m. Sunday, April 30

GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 2017 45

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TH ING S TO DO | April

ROLLER DERBY AT THE
PLACER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS
Come watch Flood Water Roller Derby
play full contact, female flat track roller
derby at the Placer County Fairgrounds.
Now in their fourth season, the Flood is
making their hometown debut. Don’t miss
the action as the Flood takes on Port City
Roller Girls. Beer, food and raffle tickets

17th Annual Folsom Garden Tour
available for purchase.

When: 1 p.m. Saturday, April 8
Doors open at noon.

29APRIL
The Folsom Garden Club will feature six gardens plus a bonus garden at the
San Juan Water District in the 17th Annual Garden Tour, “Gardens of Folsom”
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30. Master Gardeners will
Where: Placer County Fairgrounds, 800 All
America City Boulevard in Roseville
Cost: Tickets are $10 each. VIP tickets are
be present to answer questions. View artists painting in the garden. Plants and baked $25 and include prime seating, waitress
goods will be available for purchase. Event is rain or shine. Tickets are $20 each. Children and bout expert to explain the game.
under 16 are free. Tickets can be purchased at Bushnell Gardens Nursery in Granite Tickets are limited and can be purchased at
Bay. Pick up tickets purchased online at Garden #1, 324 Marsh hawk Drive in Folsom. brownpapertickets.com
For more information, call (916) 205-3720 or visit folsomgarden.org. Info: floodwaterrollerderby.org

CAMPFIRE LOOMIS COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT
Sit under the stars at the outdoor amphitheater and enjoy native Grab your basket! Children of all ages are invited to search for eggs
stories around the campfire. Roasting sticks and marshmallows from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 16 at H. Clarke Powers School,
provided. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Friday, April 21 at 1970 Johnson Ranch 3296 Humphrey Road in Loomis. The hunt begins at noon sharp.
Drive in Roseville. $5 per a person. $16 for a family of 4. Children For more information visit loomischamber.com.
under 2 are free. Call ahead for groups of 10 or more For more
BIG TROUBLE BAND LIVE AT GB ALE HOUSE
information visit (916) 774-5934 or roseville.ca.us/events.
Big Trouble band will be playing all your favorite country hits.
FRIDAY FLICKS: SECRET LIFE OF PETS Come out and enjoy food, drinks, and maybe even some line
Grab a blanket, lawn chair and the family for a movie under the dancing. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday April 27 at GB Ale House,
stars, weather permitting. 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 21 at Vernon 5540 Douglas Boulevard in Granite Bay. For more information visit
Street Town Square, 311 Vernon Street in Roseville. Free. Concessions granitebayalehouse.eat24hour.com
available for purchase. For more information visit roseville.ca.us/events.
YOMEN: A SPRING CELEBRATION
“JOHN MUIR” WITH LEE STETSON Celebrate and experience California Indian culture. See tribal dancer
Proceeds benefit the Sierra College Natural History Museum. 7:30 groups, traditional art and craft demonstrations, guided trail tours,
p.m. Friday, April 21 at Sierra College, Dietrich Theatre, 5000 native storytelling, children’s activities, food and craft fair 10 a.m.
Rocklin Road in Rocklin Cost: $5 general, $2 students and seniors, to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 29 at the Maidu Museum and Historic
museum members free. For more information visit (916) 660-7926. Site, 1970 Johnson Ranch Drive in Roseville. Free event. For more
information visit roseville.ca.us/events.
CELEBRATE THE EARTH FESTIVAL
The 10th annual event will feature live entertainment, music, food, GOLD COUNTRY PRO RODEO
mobile food trucks, electric vehicles, local green vendors, a scavenger From 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday April 29; from noon to 8 p.m.
hunt and more 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 22 at Mahany Sunday April 30 at the Gold Country Fair Grounds, 209 Fairgate
Regional Park, 1545 Pleasant Grove Boulevard in Roseville. Free. For Road in Auburn. $16-$26. For more information call (916) 726-7404
more information visit roseville.ca.us/events/earth_day_festival.asp. ext. 306, or visit goldcountryprorodeo.com.

46 APRIL 2017 • GRANITE BAY VIEW

2017_04_April GBV.indd 46 3/17/17 3:36 PM
6168 Shadowbrook Dr., Granite Bay $1,175,000 6176 Reservoir Ct., Granite Bay $1,080,000

PENDING

6750 Woodchase Dr., Granite Bay 8940 Camino Del Avion, Granite Bay 6085 Seven Cedars, Granite Bay
$1,025,000 $1,200,000 $1,275,000

PENDING IN 2 DAYS

7140 Starkview Pl., Loomis 4520 Old Eureka Pl., Granite Bay 125 Wickenby Ct., Roseville
$869,000 $697,000 $785,000

5530 Douglas Blvd. Suite 140,
Granite Bay, CA 95746
(916) 791-6761
www.GraniteBayProp.com
Eve Fenstermaker and Team Top Producer in Placer County
CalBRE# 00341600

2017_04_April GBV.indd 47 3/17/17 3:36 PM
PENDING SALE NEW LISTING

5312 Pine Grove Place, Granite Bay $1,399,000 4010 Shadybrook Ct., Granite Bay $995,000 2041 Kilpatrick Way, Granite Bay $734,950
Single story beautifully 6 Bdrm/4 baths, 4470 sf. 4 Bdrm/3 baths, built-in pool
appointed Contemporary- Greyhawk beauty backs to greenbelt. in coveted gated Hillsborough
Mediterranean with Casita. Pool/spa, built-in BBQ & firepit. North. Eureka Schools.
Private cul-de-sac in Eureka Schools.
ZAC BACON 916.677.9813 Cal BRE #01385370 KAY FLAJOLE 916.747.4587 Cal BRE #01323265 KAY FLAJOLE 916.747.4587 Cal BRE #01323265

PENDING-MULTIPLE OFFERS PENDING-MULTIPLE OFFERS SOLD-MULTIPLE OFFERS

3618 Delmar Ave., Loomis $850,000 6650 Crown Point Vista, Granite Bay $1,025,000 7607 Woodridge Way, Granite Bay $750,000
One story, 4 Bdrm/3 baths, Million Dollar Beautifully Appointed
2772 sf. 6.8 Irrigated acres, View of Folsom Lake. Single Story in Lakeland.
pool/spa, barns, fenced.

MICHAEL ANN DEES 916.390.1445 Cal BRE #01138911 PEARL HUBRED 916.474.1246 Cal BRE #01873727 PEARL HUBRED 916.474.1246 Cal BRE #01873727

NEW LISTING

5062 Millstone Way, Granite Bay $1,375,000 9959 Camberly Ct., Granite Bay $750,000 5866 Valle Vista Ct., Granite Bay $1,367,500
5 Bdrm, 5 baths (Master downstairs) Gorgeous 3/4 Bdrm, 3 baths, Los Lagos, One Story, 1+ acre,
4888 sf Gorgeous 1/2 acre greenbelt lot. 2663 sf, pool, sports court. 3 Bdrm, office, stunning kitchen,
Pool & spa. Coveted Treelake custom on cul-de-sac. infinity pool, backs to greenbelt.

TAD THOMPSON 916.765.2200 Cal BRE #01034942 ROBYN COPPER 916.531.7442 Cal BRE #00902980 TAD THOMPSON 916.765.2200 Cal BRE #01034942

9257 Sierra College Boulevard, Suite A • Granite Bay, CA 95746
windermeregranitebayrealtors.com Broker BRE# 01841288

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