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Edition 1.0
March 2010
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Table of Contents

Overview ...........................................................................................................................................................1-1
R12.x Oracle E-Business Essentials for Implementers: Overview .................................................................1-3
Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................1-4
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Course Purpose .............................................................................................................................................1-5
What Is Included in the Course? ....................................................................................................................1-6
E-Business Suite: Documentation ..................................................................................................................1-8
Other Resources ............................................................................................................................................1-9
Oracle University Courses .............................................................................................................................1-11
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................1-13

Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications .......................................................................................................2-1
Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications ........................................................................................................2-3
Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................2-4

a
Logging In to Oracle Applications...................................................................................................................2-6
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Navigating from Personal Home Page to Applications ..................................................................................2-7
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Creating Favorites and Setting Preferences ..................................................................................................2-8
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Choosing a Responsibility ..............................................................................................................................2-10

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Responsibility Relationships: Many to One ....................................................................................................2-11

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Responsibility Relationships ..........................................................................................................................2-12
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Navigator ........................................................................................................................................................2-13
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Expanding or Collapsing the Navigation List ..................................................................................................2-15
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Expanding or Collapsing Several Items .........................................................................................................2-16
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Logging Out of Oracle Applications ................................................................................................................2-17
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Using Forms and Menus ................................................................................................................................2-18
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Navigating to a Form ......................................................................................................................................2-19
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Data Flow Across Oracle Applications ...........................................................................................................2-20
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Form Terminology ..........................................................................................................................................2-21
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Field Colors ....................................................................................................................................................2-24
Creating and Saving a New Record ...............................................................................................................2-25

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Editing and Deleting a Record........................................................................................................................2-26
Using a List of Values ....................................................................................................................................2-27
LOV: Shortcuts ...............................................................................................................................................2-28
Using Calendar ..............................................................................................................................................2-29
Clearing Data .................................................................................................................................................2-30
Copying Data from a Record ..........................................................................................................................2-31
Searching for Information ...............................................................................................................................2-32
Query Versus Find .........................................................................................................................................2-33
Using Find Mode ............................................................................................................................................2-34
Using Query Mode .........................................................................................................................................2-35
Query Operators ............................................................................................................................................2-36
Folder Forms ..................................................................................................................................................2-37
Personalized Searches in OA Framework .....................................................................................................2-38
Accessing Online Help ...................................................................................................................................2-40
Using Window Help ........................................................................................................................................2-41
Error Messages ..............................................................................................................................................2-43
Running Reports and Programs .....................................................................................................................2-45
Using Concurrent Processing.........................................................................................................................2-46
Copyright © 2010, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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Running Reports and Programs .....................................................................................................................2-47
Business Intelligence (BI) Publisher ...............................................................................................................2-49
Integration with Oracle Secure Enterprise Search .........................................................................................2-51
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................2-53
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................2-57

Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x .....................................................................................................3-1
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Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x ......................................................................................................3-3
Course Objectives ..........................................................................................................................................3-4
Complete E-Business Suite from Oracle ........................................................................................................3-5
Integrated, Yet Modular ..................................................................................................................................3-6
Benefits of Oracle E-Business Suite ..............................................................................................................3-7
Information-Driven Applications .....................................................................................................................3-8
Major Oracle Application Product Families ....................................................................................................3-9
R12.x E-Business Suite Footprint ..................................................................................................................3-10
Oracle Applications R12.x Architecture ..........................................................................................................3-16
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Understanding the Oracle Applications R12.x Architecture ...........................................................................3-17
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Business Architecture: Oracle Applications R12.x .........................................................................................3-18
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Technical Architecture: Oracle Applications R12.x.........................................................................................3-20
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Basic Technical Architecture of Oracle Applications R12.x ...........................................................................3-22
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Desktop/Client Tier.........................................................................................................................................3-23
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Applications Tier.............................................................................................................................................3-25
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Database Tier.................................................................................................................................................3-27
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The Network ...................................................................................................................................................3-28

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Oracle Applications Technology Layer ...........................................................................................................3-29

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E-Business Suite Architecture ........................................................................................................................3-30
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E-Business Suite Product Directories ............................................................................................................3-32
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Oracle Applications Manager .........................................................................................................................3-34
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Service-Oriented Architecture ........................................................................................................................3-35
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Oracle E Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway ........................................................................................3-36
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Quiz................................................................................................................................................................3-37
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................3-41

non of System Administration ......................................................................................................4-1
Fundamentals
Fundamentals of System Administration ........................................................................................................4-3
Course Objectives ..........................................................................................................................................4-4
Introduction to Application Security ................................................................................................................4-5
Successive Layers of Access Control ............................................................................................................4-6
Increasing Flexibility and Scalability ...............................................................................................................4-7
Function Security ...........................................................................................................................................4-9
Data Security..................................................................................................................................................4-10
Oracle User Management Layers of Access Control ....................................................................................4-11
Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) ..............................................................................................................4-12
Delegated Administration ...............................................................................................................................4-14
Registration Processes ..................................................................................................................................4-16
Self-Service and Approvals ............................................................................................................................4-18
Function Security ...........................................................................................................................................4-19
Application Security: Overview .......................................................................................................................4-21
Use of Menu and Function Security to Modify Responsibilities .....................................................................4-23
Importance of Responsibilities .......................................................................................................................4-24

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R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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Defining a New Responsibility ........................................................................................................................4-25
Defining a New Application User ....................................................................................................................4-27
Function Security ...........................................................................................................................................4-28
Data Security..................................................................................................................................................4-29
Data Security Components: Objects ..............................................................................................................4-32
Grants ............................................................................................................................................................4-33
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Permissions and Permission Sets ..................................................................................................................4-34
Set Profile Options .........................................................................................................................................4-35
Profile Hierarchy Types ..................................................................................................................................4-37
Profile Hierarchy Levels: Security ..................................................................................................................4-38
Profile Hierarchy Levels: Organization ...........................................................................................................4-39
Profile Hierarchy Levels: Server .....................................................................................................................4-40
Personal Profile Values ..................................................................................................................................4-41
System Profile Options ...................................................................................................................................4-42
Profile Categories...........................................................................................................................................4-43
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................4-44
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Summary ........................................................................................................................................................4-49
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Overview of Flexfields ....................................................................................................................................5-6
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Using Flexfields to Configure Applications .....................................................................................................5-7

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Benefits of Flexfields ......................................................................................................................................5-8

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Key and Descriptive Flexfields .......................................................................................................................5-9
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Key Flexfields .................................................................................................................................................5-10
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Key Flexfield: Examples z le
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Segment Prompts and Value Descriptions .....................................................................................................5-17
General Steps to Implement a Flexfield .........................................................................................................5-18
Creating Value Sets .......................................................................................................................................5-19
Planning a Value Set......................................................................................................................................5-20
Validating Input Using Value Sets ..................................................................................................................5-21
Value Set Attributes .......................................................................................................................................5-22
Types of Value Sets .......................................................................................................................................5-24
Planning Data Format Validation....................................................................................................................5-26
Defining Value Sets........................................................................................................................................5-27
Defining the Key Flexfield Structure ...............................................................................................................5-28
Planning a Key Flexfield .................................................................................................................................5-29
Designing the Key Flexfield Layout ................................................................................................................5-30
Key Flexfield Structure ...................................................................................................................................5-31
Storing Code Combinations ...........................................................................................................................5-32
Key Flexfield Qualifiers ..................................................................................................................................5-33
Types of Key Flexfield Qualifiers ....................................................................................................................5-34
Key Flexfield Qualifiers Identify Key Flexfield Segments ..............................................................................5-35
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R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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Identifying Values in Flexfield Segments with Segment Qualifiers .................................................................5-36
Defining Flexfield Qualifiers ...........................................................................................................................5-37
Segment Defaults: Examples .........................................................................................................................5-38
Other Key Flexfield Features .........................................................................................................................5-40
Allowing Dynamic Insertion ............................................................................................................................5-41
Cross-Validating Values .................................................................................................................................5-42
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Using Value Set Security ...............................................................................................................................5-43
Using Shorthand Aliases ................................................................................................................................5-44
Planning Decisions.........................................................................................................................................5-45
Freezing and Compiling the Definition ...........................................................................................................5-47
Defining the Descriptive Flexfield Structure ...................................................................................................5-48
Identifying a Descriptive Flexfield ...................................................................................................................5-49
Determining the Descriptive Flexfield Name ..................................................................................................5-50
Determining Available Resources ..................................................................................................................5-51
Identifying Your Information Needs ................................................................................................................5-52
Identifying the Necessary Information ............................................................................................................5-53
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Grouping Information by Usage .....................................................................................................................5-54
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Isolate Common Information ..........................................................................................................................5-55
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Descriptive Flexfield Components ..................................................................................................................5-57

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Using Global Segments .................................................................................................................................5-58
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Context-Sensitive Segments ..........................................................................................................................5-59
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Distinguishing Between Contexts ...................................................................................................................5-60

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Using Reference and Context Fields..............................................................................................................5-61

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Using Reference Fields ..................................................................................................................................5-62

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Identifying Referenceable Columns ...............................................................................................................5-63
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Using Context Fields ......................................................................................................................................5-64

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Locating the Flexfield Definition .....................................................................................................................5-65
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Quiz................................................................................................................................................................5-68

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Summary ........................................................................................................................................................5-73
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Shared Entities and Integration ......................................................................................................................6-1
Shared Entities and Integration ......................................................................................................................6-3
Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................6-4
What Are Shared Entities? .............................................................................................................................6-5
Shared Entities in E-Business: Examples ......................................................................................................6-6
Application Object Library (AOL) ....................................................................................................................6-7
Ledger ............................................................................................................................................................6-8
Units of Measure ............................................................................................................................................6-10
Items ..............................................................................................................................................................6-11
Suppliers ........................................................................................................................................................6-12
Customers ......................................................................................................................................................6-13
Sales Force ....................................................................................................................................................6-14
Employees .....................................................................................................................................................6-15
Banks .............................................................................................................................................................6-16
Locations ........................................................................................................................................................6-17
Organizations .................................................................................................................................................6-18
Key Business Flows .......................................................................................................................................6-19
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R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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Forecast to Plan .............................................................................................................................................6-20
Procure to Pay ...............................................................................................................................................6-21
Demand to Build.............................................................................................................................................6-23
Order to Cash.................................................................................................................................................6-25
Contract to Renewal.......................................................................................................................................6-26
Request to Resolution ....................................................................................................................................6-28
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Plan to Replenish ...........................................................................................................................................6-30
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................6-31
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................6-35

Fundamentals of Multi-Org .............................................................................................................................7-1
Fundamentals of Multi-Org .............................................................................................................................7-3
Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................7-4
What Is Multi-Org? .........................................................................................................................................7-5
Basic Business Needs ...................................................................................................................................7-6
Organization Types Supported in the Multi-Org Model .................................................................................7-7
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Types of Organizations Supported in the Multi-Org Model ............................................................................7-8
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Legal Entity ....................................................................................................................................................7-11
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Operating Unit ................................................................................................................................................7-12
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Balancing Entity .............................................................................................................................................7-13
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Balancing Entity: Examples ............................................................................................................................7-14
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Inventory Organization ...................................................................................................................................7-16

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Sample Organization Structure ......................................................................................................................7-17

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Define the Organization Structure ..................................................................................................................7-18
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Adding to the Organization Structure .............................................................................................................7-20
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How Multi-Org Secures Data .........................................................................................................................7-21
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Security Model ...............................................................................................................................................7-22
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Data Security by Application ..........................................................................................................................7-23
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Global Registries ............................................................................................................................................7-24
Organization Naming Considerations .............................................................................................................7-25

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Define Multi-Org Access Control (MOAC) ......................................................................................................7-27
Features of MOAC .........................................................................................................................................7-28
Benefits of MOAC ..........................................................................................................................................7-30
MOAC: Setup and Process ............................................................................................................................7-32
Accounting Setup Manager (ASM) .................................................................................................................7-33
MOAC Setup: Create an Operating Unit ........................................................................................................7-34
Dependencies and Interactions of MOAC ......................................................................................................7-35
Multi-Org Preferences: Description ................................................................................................................7-37
Enhanced Multi-Org Reporting: Setup and Process.......................................................................................7-38
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................7-39
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................7-43

Fundamentals of Workflow and Alerts ...........................................................................................................8-1
Fundamentals of Workflow and Alerts............................................................................................................8-3
Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................8-4
Workflow Processes.......................................................................................................................................8-5
Enabling E-Business ......................................................................................................................................8-6
Workflow Activities: Examples........................................................................................................................8-7

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R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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Workflow Processes.......................................................................................................................................8-8
Oracle Workflow Availability ...........................................................................................................................8-10
Traditional Workflow Versus Event-Based Workflow ....................................................................................8-11
Integrating Business Processes .....................................................................................................................8-13
Benefits of Workflow ......................................................................................................................................8-14
Workflow-Driven Business Processes ............................................................................................................8-15
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Oracle Workflow Home Pages .......................................................................................................................8-17
Worklist Web Pages .......................................................................................................................................8-19
Email Notifications..........................................................................................................................................8-20
Notification Worklist........................................................................................................................................8-21
Workflow Monitor Web Pages ........................................................................................................................8-22
Business Event System .................................................................................................................................8-23
System Integration with Workflow ..................................................................................................................8-24
Subscription-Based Processing .....................................................................................................................8-25
Business Event System: Example..................................................................................................................8-26
Supported System Integration Types .............................................................................................................8-27
Overview of Alerts ..........................................................................................................................................8-28
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Alert Process Overview ..................................................................................................................................8-29
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Event Alerts: Examples ..................................................................................................................................8-30
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Periodic Alerts: Examples ..............................................................................................................................8-31
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What Is an Exception? ...................................................................................................................................8-32
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Action Types ..................................................................................................................................................8-33
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Action Levels ..................................................................................................................................................8-34
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Differences Between Alert and Workflow .......................................................................................................8-35
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................8-36
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Summary ........................................................................................................................................................8-40

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Oracle Business Intelligence Applications:
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Oracle BI n - tran Multisource
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Oracle Overview ...................................................................................................................9-6

n o Applications: Analytics ................................................................................................9-7
Financial Analytics .........................................................................................................................................9-8
Procurement and Spend Analytics .................................................................................................................9-9
Supply Chain and Order Management Analytics............................................................................................9-10
Sales Analytics ...............................................................................................................................................9-11
Human Resource Analytics ............................................................................................................................9-12
Service Analytics ............................................................................................................................................9-14
Contact Center Telephony Analytics ..............................................................................................................9-15
Marketing Analytics ........................................................................................................................................9-16
Oracle BI Applications Components...............................................................................................................9-17
Common Enterprise Information Model..........................................................................................................9-19
Analytic Workflows .........................................................................................................................................9-21
Speeds Time to Value and Lowers TCO ........................................................................................................9-23
Application Integration: Security .....................................................................................................................9-24
Application Integration: Action Links ..............................................................................................................9-25
Guided Navigation..........................................................................................................................................9-26
Deployment Options.......................................................................................................................................9-27
Quiz................................................................................................................................................................9-28
Summary ........................................................................................................................................................9-32
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R12.x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents
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.............................................................................................................. R12....................................................................10-9 Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013................................................................................ Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ Benefits to Payroll ............................................................................. All rights reserved..................10-6 Project to Profit.....................................................................10-1 Additional Business Flows ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................10-4 Click to Order ..............10-3 Campaign to Order.................................................................................................................................................... Oracle and/or its affiliates......................................10-8 People to Paycheck ............10-10 s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010........... Additional Business Flows ........x Oracle E-Business Suite Essentials for Implementers Table of Contents vii .............................

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Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide a i l ฺ Overview otm ent G @ h tud z a 1 is S Chapter n u w th h e ( s ha to us m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Page 1 . Overview Chapter 1 .

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 2 .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Overview Chapter 1 . All rights reserved.

Overview Chapter 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.x Oracle E-Business Essentials for Implementers: Overview Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. R12.Page 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.

All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 4 . Overview Chapter 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Objectives Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

x E-Business Suite • Explain Flexfield concepts such as defining. you will be able to: • Recognize the shared entities within R12.x E-Business Suite • Recognize the features of Oracle Fusion Business Intelligence for Oracle Applications Copyright © 2010.Page 5 . and discussing enhancements to the flexfields • Explore the Multi-Org Access Control (MOAC) feature. its key components that provide better benefits and solutions to Enterprises • Obtain an overview of Oracle Workflow. Course Purpose Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.tra o Afterncompleting this course.x E-Business Suite architecture and the user Course hncoversnsmajor The h a course s interface. creating. and how to monitor a process in the workflow monitor • Explain how alerts are used in R12. All rights reserved. n .x E-Business Suite and the key business flows and integration points between products in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Overview Chapter 1 . the components that comprise workflow. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Purpose of the a fer components of the R12.

Introduction to EBS Product Footprint and Architecture • The course communicates information about functionalities in the specified release of the Oracle E-Business Suite. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sinfether Course? What Is Included h a sh -tinrathe Navigating n R12. Copyright © 2010. • Oracle Applications Architecture is a framework for multitiered. distributed computing that supports Oracle Applications products. • Oracle E-Business Suite is a fully integrated.x User Interface onuser interface • The nBusiness Suite. Oracle and/or its affiliates. What Is Included in the Course? Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. various servers or services are distributed among three levels or tiers. All rights reserved. comprehensive suite of business applications for the enterprise. • The user interface is a subclass of Browser Look and Feel (BLAF). Overview Chapter 1 .Page 6 . (UI) significantly enhances usability and productivity of Oracle E- • The UI brings together some of the best UI concepts from a host of Oracle Applications. • In this model.

Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x E-Business Suite. • Explain Multi-Org Preferences. Fundamentals of Multiple Organizations (Multi-Org) and MOAC • Define Multi-Org. o h tudt • Enter values. m )h ฺ i l ฺ co uide ma ent G • Define key flexfields. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ • Discuss the types of organizations supported in the Multi-Org model. a z @ S u w h i s a h n se t Fundamentals of System Administration ( s h to u • Understand the layers of access control in Oracle. m ah e lice • Define Data Security. a sh -tran • Understand the components that comprise Workflow. Fundamentals of Flexfields a • Discuss Flexfields. ad nse • Define Function Security. • Explain Enhanced Multi-Org Reporting. • Get an overview of the Oracle Alert process. a s • Define value sets. Overview of Shared Entities and Integration • This recognizes the shared entities within R12.Page 7 . All rights reserved. • Identify key implementation considerations. action-driven analytics • Delivered integration with E-Business Suite transactional applications • Lower total cost of ownership and rapid deployment • Extensibility and scalability Copyright © 2010. Overview of Oracle Business Intelligence Products Oracle Business Intelligence Products provides: • Role-based dashboards with preconfigured. • Explain Multi-Org Access Control.x E-Business Suite and the key business flows and integration points between products in R12. • Define descriptive flexfields. non • Learn how to monitor a process on the Workflow monitor. • Explain the Multi-Org entities. Oracle and/or its affiliates. • Explain how Multi-Org secures data. z a abl Fundamentals of Oracle Workflow and Oracle Alert w h a n sfer • Get an overview of Oracle Workflow. Overview Chapter 1 .

Overview Chapter 1 . E-Business Suite: Documentation Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl E-Business h a f er nSuite:sDocumentation You a shcan obtain n aadditional information for the topics in the slide from the following links: . Oracle and/or its affiliates.com/docs/cd/B53825_02/current/html/docset.Page 8 . All rights reserved.oracle.t r non http://download.html Copyright © 2010.

com/technology/community/apps/index.Page 9 . you can: Using o My n • Log.com/ for more information. Navigate to http://www. and monitor Service Requests (SRs) online • Search a global repository of technical knowledge • Get automatic skill-based routing of your SRs • Query the bug database for known issues • Download patches and patch sets Navigate to http://metalink. and education. Other Resources Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.oracle. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Other Resources h My a an (formerly MetaLink) shOracle-tSupport r n Oracle Support.html for more information. Open World Open World is a hands-on learning environment full of innovative technology.oracle. view.oracle.html for more information. Navigate to http://www. Copyright © 2010. training. access. Appsnet Appsnet is an online community for users and implementers of Oracle Applications. All rights reserved. Overview Chapter 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. strategy.com/openworld/index. solutions.

Oracle Technology Network It is a comprehensive technical resource. All rights reserved.oracle.html for more information. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 10 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates.com/technology/index. Navigate to http://www. Overview Chapter 1 .

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sCourses Oracle University h f er a shmain siteraforninformation regarding Oracle University and a host of Oracle education The resourcesnis-thttp://www.Page 11 . Overview Chapter 1 . who can be trained together.oracle. keeping the travel to a minimum. For more information.com/pls/web_prod-plq-dad/show_desc. Oracle and/or its affiliates. or other technology groups. All rights reserved. see the following Web site: http://education.com/pls/web_prod-plq- dad/show_desc. Oracle University Instructor-Led Training provides a dynamic learning environment. From in-class demonstrations to hands-on labs. go to http://education. Copyright © 2010.redirect?redir_type=37.redirect?redir_type=33 Instructor-Led Training: Private ILT Private events are designed to maximize the learning experience and suit the specific needs of any implementation team. ILT provides students with hands- on experience to match job requirements and to prepare students for Oracle Certification exams. Oracle University Courses Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.oracle. IT department. no Instructor-Led Training (ILT) Oracle’s most popular and comprehensive learning format. Oracle private events are the ideal solution for a team of employees needing the same kind of training.oracle.com/education/. For more information about ILTs.

and hands-on labs.com/pls/web_prod-plq- dad/db_pages. whereas others expand on general and special topics. see h a n sfer http://education. Oracle and/or its affiliates. cutting-edge curriculum. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ For more information about LVCs. All rights reserved. go to a )h ฺ m co uide http://education. Some titles cover the same content as the ILTs and can be used to reinforce classroom learning. at any time and place.oracle. top-rated instructors. a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. i l ฺ Self-Study CD-ROM (SSCD) o t ma ent G h tud For training at your own pace.oracle. With world-class technology. engaging lessons use the latest multimedia and instructional design to provide ad nse hands-on training. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.com/pls/web_prod-plq-dad/db_pages. iLearning (Oracle University Knowledge Center) OUKC offers on-demand access to self-paced courses with topics covering Oracle technologies.oracle.Page 12 . ( s h to u Comprehensive. go to http://education.getpage?page_id=160.com/pls/web_prod-plq-dad/show_desc. z ah e lice w a abl For more information about SSCD training options. Overview Chapter 1 . Students can use the Knowledge Center to: • Prepare to become an Oracle Certified Professional • Explore advanced technology topics • Get implementation expertise • Get trained to use Oracle E-Business Suite Applications s a For more information about courses available in OUKC. Oracle University’s Self-Study CD- @ z S ROMs (SSCD) are available as individual courses.getpage?page_id=233. Live Virtual Class (LVC) Oracle University’s Live Virtual Class is comparable to the traditional in-class training— without the need to incur travel expenses.redirect?redir_type=35. it offers an exciting combination of traditional content and interactive learning. The collection of titles covers Oracle a s u w h i a h n se t products as well as related IT topics. SSCDs are an ideal way to train if you cannot attend class or prefer to learn m on your own.

Overview Chapter 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.Page 13 . Summary Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 1 . All rights reserved.x n G Applications @ h tude a z s S u w h i a h nChapterse2 t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Navigating in R12.Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ a t Oracle Navigatingotin mR12.

x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 2 . All rights reserved. Navigating in R12.

Navigating in R12. Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 3 . All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Objectives Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice Objectives aw a abl a h n sfer s h tfrom Navigating r a nPersonal Home Page to Applications n o n. You learn to enter. significantly enhancing usability and productivity.discusses how to access and navigate within Oracle Applications Release 12. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . and search for information in the form of a query. retrieve.Page 4 . Copyright © 2010. Navigating in R12.1 by This lesson using the “SWAN” user interface (UI). and JD Edwards applications. Oracle E-Business Suite will use only the “SWAN” look and feel starting from R12. The “SWAN” UI brings together some of the best UI concepts from Oracle E-Business Suite. All rights reserved. access online Help. and run Reports and Programs. Look and Feel of the “SWAN” UI Overview: The “SWAN” UI greatly improves the look and feel of Oracle E-Business Suite. This look and feel applies to the whole Oracle E-Business Suite. PeopleSoft. create and set Favorites and Preferences. Features: It is a subclass of Browser Look and Feel (BLAF) and replaces the former look and feel.

The key features of the technology layer for OAF products can be summarized as follows: • The overall color usage is contemporary and compelling. • The font is Tahoma 9 pt. are applicable to individual products and to sh -tran the position or layout of any field within forms. therefore. As noted previously. This makes better use of the available screen area. s a )h ฺ • The entire icon suite has a sophisticated style that integrates visually with the overall interface design. • The button text and overall shape have been designed to reduce the amount of space required for their display. these features have been h a incorporated in the technology layer and. which reduces eye strain and Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. s S u w h i a with associated subtabs.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . o t ma ent G • The page footer background is designed to make it more readily distinguishable from @ h tud a z • The Navigator is styled to be consistent with the other UI components. Field values are set to normal weight. providing further consistency between products. • Buttons are standard HTML buttons instead of images. a • Background colors of page elements ensure better visual separation of screen elements. • The login screen complements the updates to the overall look and feel. Oracle Application Framework (OAF) Applications Because the relevant changes are made in the underlying technology layer. and reducing the visual complexity of w a abl a n sfer application screens. • All buttons and tabs have a gradient background to increase their visibility on the screen as clickable elements. non Copyright © 2010. for OAF products.Page 5 . m co uide i l ฺ other page elements. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ provides a more pleasant look and feel. Oracle and/or its affiliates. most products do not require any direct changes to be made. Navigating in R12.h n se t • Page tabs are placed to the left of the screen for better scanning and a clearer relationship ( s h to u Forms Applications m ad nse z ah e lice The forms color scheme is consistent with the OAF products.

which control your access to applications. reports.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . the first window you see is the login window. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Logging In to Oracle Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. If you are not sure of your Oracle Applications username and password. After starting Oracle Applications. which is most likely different from the username and password you use to log in to your computer. Oracle Applications security is based on your Oracle Applications username. Your username connects you to your responsibilities. All rights reserved.t r The firstnstep in starting Oracle Applications is to enter the appropriate URL for your site in an noApplications–certified Oracle browser. Copyright © 2010. functions.Page 6 . and data. You need an Oracle Applications username and password to log in to Oracle Applications. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a r Logging Innto OracleeApplications h f a s anApplications sh Oracle Starting . Navigating in R12. consult your system administrator.

From here. Navigating in R12. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Navigatingnfrom Personal h f er Home Page to Applications a s shyou log After . Navigating from Personal Home Page to Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. To submit an expense report. sometimes referred to as “Self-Service Applications. For example. Two Types of Interfaces Oracle E-Business Suite applications are either forms based or HTML based.Logging In to and Navigating Oracle Applications (Professional and Self-Service Interface) (Required). Copyright © 2010. E-Business Suite provides an HTML based application. to enter a batch of journals.” are optimized for ease of first-time use.Page 7 . your E-Business Suite Home page is displayed.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . HTML based applications. Oracle and/or its affiliates. youncan: o • nAccess E-Business Suite Applications (professional or self-service) • View and respond to notifications • Set personal user preferences • Navigate to other frequently used functions or Web pages Note: The exact appearance of your windows may vary depending on which interface you use and how it is configured at your site.trainnto Oracle Applications. Refer to the guided demonstration . E-Business Suite provides a forms based application. Forms based applications are optimized for processing a large volume of transactions.

time zone.Page 8 . Optionally. and such URL links open in a new browser window. select the Edit Favorites option. notification style. specify a Start page for all future Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates. You can also reset your password from the Preferences page. From this . you can: • nCreate Favorites • Set Preferences • Use Worklists • Access E-Business Suite functions from the Navigator Create Favorites Customize your Favorites by adding links to frequently used functions and Web sites. Navigating in R12. Options include language. end users can also define Favorites in the Oracle E-Business Suite as links to Web sites outside the Oracle E-Business Suite. In R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Set Preferences Select Preferences to set personal options. territory. the original browser window remains showing the Oracle E-Business Suite session. and formats for dates and numbers. accessibility setting. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfand Creating Favorites h er Setting Preferences a shE-Business The anSuite Home page is your entry point to Oracle E-Business Suite. Creating Favorites and Setting Preferences Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.t r on page. Thus. To add or remove links.x.

You can have one or more responsibilities.Page 9 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. Navigating in R12. To access a function: • Select a responsibility to view its menu of functions • Select the function to launch s a a )h ฺ Refer to the guided demonstration . It enables your access to those functions and data appropriate for your enterprise role. Select the Subject to respond to or select Full List to see all your notifications. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ Note: The Use Worklist option may not be available by default on the Personal Home Page. Note: A responsibility is a level of authority in Oracle E-Business Suite.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. sessions from available pages (organized by responsibility). Use Worklists The Worklist displays your notifications. m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Access E-Business Suite Functions Use the Navigator to access Oracle E-Business Suite functions grouped by responsibility. Set additional preferences by using user profile options.Creating Favorites (Required).

Note: The exact appearance of your window may vary depending on which interface you are using and how it is configured at your site. such as HRMS. Click the link in the Application section to select your responsibility. Choosing a Responsibility Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. shuser has Each .Page 10 . based on the responsibility you are using. You can access either Professional Applications or Self-Service Applications. Copyright © 2010.t r n o n Your system administrator can assign you any of the standard responsibilities or create custom responsibilities as per the business requirements. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Choosing a h a nResponsibility f er a s aatnleast one responsibility and several users can share the same responsibility. General Ledger. Each responsibility would be associated with a single application. and then click the underlined link to open a specific function. but not both. Oracle and/or its affiliates. and so on. Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .

menus. Navigating in R12. so the controller would want access to both accounts payable and payroll information. All rights reserved.t r aused n o n type of access you will be using. and forms that define your particular level of authority when you use the system. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Responsibility h a f er n Relationships: Many to One a s n the login form to begin the login process. Copyright © 2010. A responsibility is a set of data. you would want the Accounts Payable department of your company to access the invoice forms of the system. Responsibility Relationships: Many to One Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . For example.Page 11 . you must tell the system what shyou have After . Oracle and/or its affiliates. but you would not want them to be able to access any payroll information. Another example is that the controller of a department would want to have access to all the data that his or her employees can use.

two responsibilities may have access to the same window. so the responsibility you select determines the reports that you can submit. Oracle and/or its affiliates. used for financial reporting which is made up of the Chart of Accounts.Page 12 .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . a responsibility may allow certain Oracle Financials users to enter invoices. Responsibility Relationships Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Currency. • A restricted list of functions you can perform. and Accounting Convention • An organization. Copyright © 2010. Navigating in R12. Calendar. Your system administrator can assign groups of reports to one or more responsibilities. • Reports in a specific application. such as Oracle General Ledger • A Ledger. For example. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Responsibility h f er n Relationships a s sh -tran Properties noinn Oracle The following defined is a list of the types of responsibilities and their particular properties that can be Applications by your system administrator: • A specific application (or applications). such as Vision Services or Vision Distribution • A restricted list of windows to which you can navigate. For example. but not to enter names of suppliers (vendors) or customers. such as Vision Operations. All rights reserved. but the window of one responsibility may have additional functional buttons.

It allows you to model and execute complex business processes through an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The Navigator’s Document feature allows you to create as many links as you want and save them in the Documents region of the Navigator window. Oracle Applications opens the document in the appropriate form window. All rights reserved. invoice. Navigating in R12.t r awindow n o n this window to navigate to a form. You can click the tabs to access the different regions. If you have a document.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . you can create a link to the document by using the Navigator’s Document feature. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Navigator n h a f er a s n displays the name of the responsibility you select in the title bar. You can access the Document region using the tab control. Copyright © 2010.Page 13 . so you can perform a specific business flow. Oracle and/or its affiliates. The Processes region of the Navigator (the “Process Navigator”) automates business flows across Oracle Applications forms. When you use a link to open a document. You can navigate to the forms that are displayed in a navigation list at the left of the Navigator window. or sales order that you want to access later. Use shNavigator The . The business processes enabled through the Process Navigator can cross product boundaries and include complete business cycles. Navigator Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Navigator Region Tabs The Functions tab displays all the applications functions that you can access for the responsibility selected. such as a particular purchase order.

In addition to providing a visual map of a business process. The Process Navigator guides you step by step through each required function in a business process. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 14 . Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . the Process Navigator can launch the appropriate Oracle Applications forms or standard reports at each step.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Expandingnor Collapsing h f er the Navigation List a s n the Oracle Applications forms in several ways so that they can use the shuser can Each .t r aaccess n o n system quickly. Navigating in R12. Copyright © 2010.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Use the various buttons in the Navigator to manipulate the list items.Page 15 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Expanding or Collapsing the Navigation List Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. according to their own computer style. All rights reserved.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Expanding or Collapsing Several Items Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Use the various buttons in the Navigator to manipulate the list items. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.t r aaccess n o n the system quickly. according to his or her own computer style.Page 16 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Expandingnor Collapsing h f er Several Items a s n the Oracle Applications forms in several ways so that he or she can use shuser can Each . Navigating in R12.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Logging Out h a n of Oracle f er Applications a s atonexit the system in this manner to ensure that your username is cleared from shimportant It is .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . All rights reserved. can also close the multiple-document interface (MDI) window or use the [F4] function key. Oracle and/or its affiliates.t r You n on system access. Logging Out of Oracle Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Navigating in R12.Page 17 . You can log out of Personal Home page completely by clicking the Logout link. Copyright © 2010.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Using Forms and Menus Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Navigating in R12. All rights reserved.Page 18 .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .

Oracle and/or its affiliates. n window is always open during your forms session of Oracle no and displays the name of your current responsibility on its title bar. Navigating in R12. Navigating to a Form Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .Page 19 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice a a Form rab w l Navigating to a hn nswindow fe to navigate to a form that allows you to perform a specific business Use h a the Navigator a s The-trNavigator activity. All rights reserved. Applications Copyright © 2010.

All rights reserved. check boxes. buttons. An Oracle Applications “form” is a user’s interface to business data stored in the database. Navigating in R12. pop-up lists. you can access all the n o functions necessary to manage your business information. or tabs. You navigate between and within forms to enter information to and access information from the database.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Copyright © 2010.traUsing look andnfeel. Data Flow Across Oracle Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Data Flow n h a er Applications Across Oracle f a s n is a tightly integrated suite of application products that share a common sh Applications Oracle . You use your mouse or keyboard to operate graphical controls such as pull-down menus. You may have called it a “screen” in other applications. Oracle Applications software is highly responsive to users by providing full point-and-click capability. the menus and windows of Oracle Applications.Page 20 . Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Page 21 .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .t r n terminology of the components within an Oracle Applications form: understand the n o • Menu Bar: Use pull-down menus from this menu bar to navigate to other forms or perform actions within a form. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Form Terminology h a an Release 12.1 works in a Web-enabled environment. • Window: It is an area where the user interacts with an application. and application windows. • MDI window: It is a master container window that houses all windows. toolbars. • Check box: It is a box in which you can toggle between an “on/off” or “yes/no” state for a particular value. • Record or row: It is a set of one or more related data items from a table or view that are grouped for processing. Oracle and/or its affiliates.) • Window title: The text in the title bar that indicates the name of the window and usually gives context information pertinent to the information in that window. Copyright © 2010. (Many windows can be open at one time and you can access these “overlapping” windows to perform data entry or data search activities. Form Terminology Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Navigating in R12. It is important to sh Applications Oracle . • Tool tip: It is an iconic bubble help that you can use to determine the function of a button on the toolbar. All rights reserved.

• Scrolling region: It is a region containing a scroll bar. in which to view other fields. • LOV icon: It is an icon that you can click to display a list of values (LOV) for the current field. All rights reserved. Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 22 .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . • Pop-up list: It is a pop-up list that lets you select a single value from a short list. • Block: It is an area of information relative to a specific business function or entity. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

• Field: It is an area in a window that displays data or enables you to enter data.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Refer to the practice . Navigating in R12. Closing a Form (Required).Page 23 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a er n sf(continued) Form Terminology h a •shRegion: a Itn is a logical grouping of fields set apart from other fields by an outline. All rights reserved.Logging In to Oracle Applications. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Copyright © 2010. Form Terminology Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Refer to the practice . where region can be displayed at a time. Navigating through Responsibilities and Menus. • Button: It is a graphic element that initiates a predefined action when you click it.Switch Responsibility (Required).t r on onetab: • Region nonly It is a collection of regions that occupy the same space in a window. .

Navigating in R12. All rights reserved. an option group. or a pop-up list. indicate a mandatory field • Grey fields: Do not allow data entry and usually default to preset values depending on the form • Blue fields: Indicate fields to use in “Query-Enter” mode The term “field” generally refers to a text field. view. an area in a window that either displays data or allows you to enter data. Copyright © 2010. Field Colors Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. update. or delete information.Page 24 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Field Colors h a n sfer a n fields you use to enter. a field can also include a button.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . However. a check box. A field prompt shblock-tcontains Each rafield describesneach by telling you what kind of information appears in the field or what kind of n o information you should enter in the field. Fields are color coded to indicate their type as follows: • White fields: Allow data entry • Yellow fields: Require data entry.

Creating and Saving a New Record Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Selecting “Save and Proceed” automatically advances you to the next record.Page 25 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Copyright © 2010. select Save or “Save and Proceed” from the File menu to save the record to the database. Refer to the guided demonstration . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Creating and h a n Saving f ear New Record a h atrRecord TosCreate an s Select o - n from the File menu or use the New toolbar icon.Creating and Saving a Record (Required). Navigating in R12. After you enter data for your new n New record.

Copyright © 2010. Those records which cannot be deleted need to be end dated and such end-dated records cannot be used further. Note: All records cannot be deleted in this manner. Refer to the guided demonstration . Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Retrieving and Deleting a Record (Required). To Save Your Deletion from the Database Select Save or “Save and Proceed” from the File menu.t r n from the Edit menu. All rights reserved. To Delete a Record Select Delete from the Edit menu. This action allows any change to be made to the selected Select o n Record record from your editable screen. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Editing and h a nDeleting f ear Record a h a Record TosEdit an s .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . This erases the current record from your screen and returns your cursor to the first field of the next record.Page 26 . Editing and Deleting a Record Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Note: Fields protected against any update cannot be edited.

enter the initial characters of a value to autoreduce the list to those items matching the characters entered. the list window closes and inserts the value into the field.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . This will match all records. you are prompted to enter a Find n o string to limit the list. Do not enter a wildcard character by itself.ravalues.Page 27 . Using a List of Values Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. To Select a Value from a List Select a value or reduce the list using one of the following methods: Without placing your cursor over the Find field. Note: Use the wildcard character (%) to represent any number of characters and the underscore (_) to represent a single character. All rights reserved. the validnfield If a list contains more than 100 values. Note: Lists that require a Find string do not use the autoreduce feature. If your entry reduces the list to a single value. enter any group of characters in the Find field and click the Find button. Press Backspace to reexpand the list. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Navigating in R12. Click this icon to view As field . In the list window. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Using a List h a n of Valuesf er(LOV) a h that thas s anpredefined list of valid values displays an LOV icon.

All rights reserved. Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . • Select a value directly from the list by using the mouse to scroll through the list and then double-click the value to choose it. This is also known as AutoSelection. LOV: Shortcuts Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl LOV: Shortcuts h a n sfer a h a value Tosselect . • Search for a value by clicking in the Find field. To close a list window without choosing a value. To Use Power List Power List enables you to enter a search string or partial value in an LOV field without opening the list window. Enter the initial characters of a value in the field and press Tab. • After you select a value. Power List completes the entry for you. a list window appears containing those values. click the LOV icon in the field to display a list. enter the first character or characters of a value to reduce the list to only those values that match the characters you enter. or click the value once and then click OK to select it. click Cancel.tranfrom the valuendirectly a list for a field. Copyright © 2010. Your entry can include wildcard characters. then enter your search criteria in the Find field. Select from the list by using some of the methods described below: o • nWithout clicking in the Find field. If more than one value matches the characters you specify. and click the Find button. the list window closes and inserts the value into the current field.Page 28 .

4. Using Calendar Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Click a date. 2. Navigating in R12. Copyright © 2010. you can also use n o the Calendar window to select a valid time with the date. Click OK to accept the selected date and close the window. 5. but you cannot change the date shown on the calendar. the default value of the field. Oracle and/or its affiliates. 3. 1. which is either the value already in the field. you can display the Calendar window for the field. or the current system date. if you want to close the window without selecting a date. if a date field is display-only. Place your cursor in a date field. Similarly. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Using Calendar h a n sfer a sh in a-date Values anfield can be entered directly or you can use a calendar to enter a valid value in n a date field t if rthe field displays the List icon. Click the list of values associated with a date field to display the Calendar window. All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . which cannot be selected. Note: Disabled buttons represent invalid days.Page 29 . If your date field supports time. Click Cancel. The date value that appears below the calendar is called the selected date.

block. Oracle and/or its affiliates. (M) Edit > Clear and then select the appropriate option. Clearing Data Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Copyright © 2010.Page 30 . Note: If the data is new and has never been saved to the database.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . or form. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Clearing Data h a n sfer a shcan clear You n from the screen at almost any time. All rights reserved. adata . record. The data you clear is simply erased from the screen and not deleted from the database. You can also clear some or all data from a field by highlighting the data and selecting Edit > Cut. mind. to clear a field. Navigating in R12. it will be lost permanently when you clear it from the screen.t r nonyou will use this feature when you start to enter data in a field and then change your Typically. Oracle Applications will think you are in the middle of processing a record and will not allow you to proceed with the next task until you clear the field.

All rights reserved. 2. Copying All Field Values from the Previous Record 1. you can duplicate data from a previous record if much of the h timetrduring Tossave o - n repeated again in the new record. Select Edit > Duplicate Field Above to copy the field value from the previous record into the current record. not all fields may be copied when you use this feature. Copying Data from a Record Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Follow steps 1 and 2 mentioned above. and Paste from the data needs to be n Edit menu or you can use the following techniques: Copying a Field Value from the Previous Record 1. Note: Depending on the record storage in the database and relevant database tables. 2. Select File > New or click the New icon to insert a new record after the existing record. You can use Cut. Place your cursor in the field whose value you want to duplicate. Enter a new record or query an existing record in your form. Select Edit > Duplicate Record Above to copy all field values from the previous record into the current record. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n from Copying Data fa r eRecord a s an data entry. 3.Page 31 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Copy.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Navigating in R12. 4.

you can simply run a search to obtain the information you want. Instead. and then review the data online in the same window you used to enter the data. Searching for Information Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. • Search for a specific record or for a group of records based on the criteria you enter. Oracle . You can retrieve this information directly. By using the query function in Oracle Applications. online access to all your application information. or your database n o without having to print lengthy reports to see the data. Oracle and/or its affiliates. you can satisfy the following information the search needs: • Gain instant. • Search for information using criteria of different types or lengths. or a group of characters. All rights reserved. You can find information quickly and easily.Page 32 . or anything else you want to enter. without having to review all the information in your application database.t r n without having to remember the information displayed in the windows. • Find out how much information is available that matches your search criteria before a search for a single piece of information yields 10. Navigating in R12.000 results. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Searching n h a er for Information f In s a s an you can quickly retrieve and review all the available information in h Applications. a single word. including a single letter. Copyright © 2010.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . without having to use complex query language.

or you can press F11 to enter • In Query naoquery and press and hold Ctrl + F11 to execute a query. You can enter specific information in any field to narrow your search.t r n mode. • In query mode. or you click the icon on the toolbar. the Find window.Page 33 . Navigating in R12. to prepare your search criteria. you can check to see how many records match your criteria even before retrieving the data that matches your query. • The list of values is available in many fields in Find mode. Copyright © 2010. • You use the existing window to prepare your search criteria for the query. All rights reserved. you can use the menu bar to access a query. • The Query Count feature is not available in Find mode. Oracle and/or its affiliates. • You use a new window. • When using wildcards to prepare your search criteria. Query Versus Find Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. you can use all query operators to narrow your search. you use the menu bar to access the Find window.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Query Versus h a n Findsfer a sh Mode Query an . Find Mode • In Find mode.

use the Find window. The Find window contains n o - fields for entering search criteria. 1. 2. Enter your search criteria in the appropriate fields of the Find window. Click the Find button to find any matching records. You cannot. Navigating in R12. All rights reserved. a Find window is displayed for those blocks that have many records or for those blocks that can be best searched using criteria in more than one field.Page 34 . Click the Clear button to clear the current search criteria from the Find window. Generally. 3. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Using FindnMode er f hahfortrrecords Tossearch n s a in your current block or window. use query operators (such as >. Copyright © 2010. If a field does not provide a list of values for you to choose from. Using Find Mode Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. 4.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . so you can enter new search criteria. These fields are specific to the current block and n often validate the search criteria you enter against a list of valid values. you can enter wildcard characters (% and -) in the search phrase. <. Oracle and/or its affiliates. How to Use Find Mode Select View > Find or click the Find icon on the toolbar. Click the New button to enter a new record in your current block if your search finds no matching records. and so on) in a Find window. however. Not all windows support Find.

Select View > Query By Example > Run to perform the search.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Saving. Navigating in R12. using wildcard characters and query operators as necessary. 3. Enter the search criteria in any of the fields (indicated by blue) that can be queried. Using Query Mode Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. How to Obtain a Query Count 1. Select View > Query By Example > Count Matching Records to display the number of records a Query By Example search retrieves. 2. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Using Query h a n Modesfer a an Mode shto Use-trQuery How on View > Query By Example > Enter. You can also select View > Query By Example > Show Last Criteria to display the search criteria used in your last search. Select View > Query By Example > Cancel to cancel from Enter Query mode. All rights reserved. Editing.Page 35 . 1. if you performed one. and Deleting a Record (Required) Copyright © 2010. 4.Creating. Perform steps 1 and 2 mentioned above. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Refer to the practice . Select n 2. Searching.

Navigating in R12. You can also use shcan use-tany You r n (%) wildcard character to represent any character or group of characters. Copyright © 2010. For the percentage n o example. Manufacturer. You can also use the underscore (_) character to represent any single character. and so on. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 36 . All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Query Operators h a anof the query operators listed in the table shown in the slide. Query Operators Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. use “Manuf%” to represent Manufacturing.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . For example. “Product_” can represent ProductA or Product1.

All rights reserved.Page 37 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Folder Forms h a n sfer a sh allow Folders aforna user to include. Folder Forms Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. it is linked to a responsibility so that when the user logs in to that responsibility. You can save and load these block. After a folder is created and saved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. and also modify the size of the columns. or order fields in a multirow . such that n o definitions for later use.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Navigating in R12. never and ask each time for using these queries. the folder is available. Many standard forms include this functionality and it is a handy tool that users can easily manipulate so that they can create their own custom criteria. Using the Folder Tools options in Folders. Users can define their search criteria in a query and also select options such as. rename. always. resize. whereas other users may want to access asset books particular only to certain regions.t r n it is more suitable for specific user needs. exclude. Copyright © 2010. the Assets manager needs to view all the assets pertaining to the Primary Corporate book. change their order of display. For example. move. the user can also select the fields to be displayed.

Personalized Searches in OA Framework Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Unlike Administrators. layout. All rights reserved. or visibility of the page content to suit a business need or a particular user preference. Extensibility. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 38 . and administrators. Personalization examples include customizing: • The color scheme of the UI • The order in which table columns are displayed • A query result The built-in personalization UI facilitates a variety of personalization features at a number of different levels within the different user groups. Personalization. such as developers. Navigating in R12. users can create and save several personalized views that can be retrieved conveniently at a later time. where each layer encapsulates the maximum sh Applications set-tof features without creating dependencies on higher layers. That said. end users.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . This enhances no of functionality and makes possible global customizations. The task of customizing reusability an Oracle Application can fall into any one of the following categories: Configuration. end-user personalized views are limited in Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Personalized h a n Searches f er in OA Framework a s Oracle reusablen ran has a layered architecture. and Interoperability Personalization refers to declaratively customizing the user interface (UI) look and feel.

x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ (order of results table columns are a popular example). • Enable totals for table columns. it will support user-personalizable searches that you can save as ( s h to u Views.Page 39 . • Hide or show regions and items (results table columns are a popular example). • Define up to three sorting levels for tabulated data. non Search mappings can now be personalized to add more search criteria fields that correspond with columns in search results tables. m z ah e lice An LOV Choice List is a hybrid between a pop-up list and a List of Values. • Change the layout order of regions and items within the boundaries of the parent region Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. If the LOV Choice List is implemented with a Personalize button. end users can personalize any of the following features: • Change the number of rows displayed in a table. • Change item labels and region headers. when applicable. The a )h ฺ region above the table generally contains the search panel where you specify the search m co uide criteria. removing. • Filter (restrict query) tabular data. In Oracle Applications. You may see any one of these possible search panels above a table: i l ฺ o t ma ent G • Simple Search: Allows you to specify simple search criteria h tud • Simple Search or Advanced Search: Buttons allow you to toggle between a simple @ z S search panel and an advanced search panel to specify search criteria. the following page elements may be end-user personalized: • Views panel of a Search page • LOV Choice List s a In OA Framework-based applications. you can personalize the LOV Choice List by w a abl a n sfer adding. scope to Query regions with search results tables. tables are used to display results from a search. Administrators can now personalize the Save Search button in search regions. or reordering values in the list.x. Navigating in R12. For these regions. which you access using the ad nse Views button on the main search page. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010. Search (Query) regions have been enhanced to allow additional upgrade safe personalizations. The saved views can be selected from the Views panel. h a sh -tran In R12. a s u w h i a h n se t If a table is personalizable. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

All rights reserved.Page 40 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Navigating in R12. Accessing Online Help Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

and then click the Go button to perform a simple search. Click a product name to display the list of top-level topics in that product’s online documentation. For more search options. Copyright © 2010. For more search options.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . click the Advanced Search link. or press tWindow o + H to display help for the current window nCtrl • Navigate to the Contents tab to display online Help for any of the Oracle Applications products Note: You can also choose Oracle Applications Library from the Help menu. click the Advanced Search link. Using Window Help Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Enter your search criteria in the text field and click the Go button. • Navigate to the Search tab. Navigating in R12. All rights reserved. Navigate to the Search tab to find specific Oracle Applications information. Searching for Help You can perform a search to find the Oracle Applications help information you want: • Select Window Help from the Help menu or click the Help button on the toolbar. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a Help rab l Using Window a hn nsfe h To getahelp: s n • Select. Click a topic of interest. ra Help from the Help menu.Page 41 . click the Help button on the toolbar. enter your search criteria in the text field. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates. How to Display Version Information for Oracle Applications Select Help > About Oracle Applications. is returned from your search. All rights reserved. Click whichever title seems to best answer your needs to display the complete document. This information is useful if you have an error message and need assistance from your system administrator or Oracle support representative when you report a problem. Refer to the practice .Page 42 . click the browser’s Back button to return to the list of titles and try another one. Tip: If the selected document does not fully answer your questions. ranked by relevance and linked to the documents. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ You can obtain details about the version of Oracle Applications you are using. A list of titles. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Click OK to close this window when done. and details about the current form you are using with the About Oracle Applications window. your login information.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .Reviewing the Help Menu Item (Required). About Oracle Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

• Codes that are prefixed by APP arise from Oracle Applications. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Error Messages h a n sfer a sh -messages Generally. Error Messages Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Record History is now available for Oracle Application Framework–based pages. Oracle and/or its affiliates. • Codes that contain the prefix ORA arise from the Oracle database. Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . an and errors are preceded by a message or error code: t r on that are prefixed by FRM arise from Oracle forms. Record history displays the following information about the record that has been previously saved: • Who created the record • Date of creation • Database table or view where the record resides • Who last changed the record using Oracle Applications Copyright © 2010. These codes help your system administrator or Oracle support representative diagnose the errors that you may encounter. such as who created the record and when. the underlying product that • Codes nprovides Oracle Applications with its graphical user interface. All rights reserved. Record History: A feature that allows a user to view data about a particular record. and who most recently updated the record and when.Page 43 .

Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 44 . • Date of the last change • User’s login How to Learn About the Current Record Select Help > Record History. A dialog box appears that shows you information about the current record. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Navigating in R12. All rights reserved. Click OK to close the window.

All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Navigating in R12.Page 45 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Running Reports and Programs Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Page 46 . your terminal is still available for you to continue doing other work in Oracle Applications. After you specify the journal batches to post and click Post. Copyright © 2010.t simultaneously r online operations. Concurrent Processing provides hooks to call other routines at various stages of a concurrent request’s life cycle. With concurrent processing. Meanwhile. An example of concurrent processing occurs when you use the Post Journals window in your Oracle General Ledger application. or using a product-specific submission window. All rights reserved. f Youh a can n s awith s . Oracle Applications runs all of its reports and programs as concurrent processes whether you submit them using the Submit Requests window. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a Processing a b l a Using Concurrent er data-dependent function such as a report or program hrunn a noninteractive. the application uses concurrent processing to post the journal batch entries without further involvement from you. you can complete non tasks without interfering with the interactive work that you perform at your noninteractive terminal. Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x. Using Concurrent Processing Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . In R12. Your system administrator can customize concurrent processing to optimize the performance of Oracle Applications. Concurrent Processing allows for registration of business events to be fired at various stages of a request life cycle.

reports.Page 47 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. or request sets at specific time intervals • View a log file that summarizes the completion information about all the reports and programs in a request set Request Sets Reports and concurrent programs can be assembled into request sets. Running Reports and Programs Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . for a collection of reports or concurrent programs. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sand Running Reports h f erPrograms a an sh -trProcessing Concurrent and Standard Request Submission on processing helps you satisfy the following business needs: Concurrent n • Continue working at your computer when running data-dependent reports and programs. parameter values. • Fully use the capacity of your hardware by executing many application tasks at once. You can: • Use a standard interface to run your programs and reports • Control access to different reports and programs • View report output online • Automatically run programs. Request sets define run and print options. and possibly. Standard Request Submission lets you satisfy a related set of business needs.

Refer to the guided demonstration .Page 48 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Request sets are a quick and convenient way to run several reports and concurrent programs with predefined print options and parameter values. Refer to the Practice . End users. All rights reserved.Running a Single Request Report (Required). Navigating in R12.Running Reports and Programs (Required). with the appropriate privileges. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ status of previous stages. A system administrator has request set privileges beyond those of an end user. Request sets can be run from forms based applications and HTML based applications. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Request sets group requests into stages that are submitted by the set. The order in which the stages are submitted is determined by the Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. and system administrators can define request sets.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .

These reports can be viewed online or scheduled for delivery to a wide range of destinations. and deliver all types of highly formatted documents no the need for costly point solutions. Copyright © 2010. This means that while the technical team can define the data sources.Page 49 . This helps end users easily design report layouts using familiar desktop tools. BI Publisher supports scheduling. including email. formerly XML Publisher) is an enterprise to author. Business Intelligence (BI) Publisher Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. and delivery via many channels. Oracle and/or its affiliates. functional end users can specify the report layout using tools such as Microsoft Word. Technical developers can create data models against practically any data source and use BI Publisher APIs to build custom applications leveraging existing data sources and infrastructure. The defined reports are stored in a report repository (in the file system or in a database). BI Publisher can generate thousands of documents per hour with minimal impact to transactional systems. eliminating It is built on open standards. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer(BI) Publisher Business Intelligence h a . Navigating in R12.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .tranIntelligence sh Business Oracle reportingnsolution Publisher (BI Publisher. manage. archiving of report output. All rights reserved. dramatically reducing the time and cost needed to develop and maintain reports. The same data source can be used by multiple report templates. A key feature of BI Publisher is that it separates the data from the presentation.

Page 50 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Running a Business Intelligence (BI) Publisher Report (Required). All rights reserved. Refer to the guided demonstration . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Navigating in R12.

x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . intuitive search interface leading to an excellent user experience • Excellent search quality. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Integrationnwith Oracle h f er Secure Enterprise Search a n s sh Secure Oracle . Navigating in R12. n o n high quality. Integration with Oracle Secure Enterprise Search Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.t r aEnterprise Search is a stand-alone product from Oracle. applications. and portals • Highly secure crawling. Key features include: • The ability to search and locate public. Traditional searching in E-Business Suite required the user to ask the following questions: • What product do I want to access? • What form should I access? Copyright © 2010. which enables secure. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. document management systems.x includes the integration with Secure Enterprise Search. with the most relevant items for a query shown first. IMAP email. files on local disk or on file servers. even when the query spans diverse public or private data sources • Analytics on search results and understanding of usage patterns • Sub second query performance • Ease of administration and maintenance leveraging your existing IT expertise R12. and searching • A simple. and shared content across Intranet Web servers. databases.Page 51 . indexing. easy-to-use search across all enterprise information assets. private.

Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . • Using Query by Example. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. The user can select “All” objects or specific objects for the search. the user can simply enter the search text.Page 52 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Navigating in R12. what field shall I search on? • What information am I seeking? Under the new search. All rights reserved. The list of searchable objects is configurable.

You should first select the Menu option Query By QuizsSpecifications: . Navigating in R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: b n h a f er a s h tran This statement is False. All rights reserved. n Copyright © 2010.to enter a search criteria and then select the Menu option Query By Example > Example >nEnter o Run.Page 53 .x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Navigating in R12. QuizsSpecifications: - non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: b n h a f er a s h tran Yellow color fields require you to enter data in them. All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 54 . Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

the original browser window remains showing the Oracle E-Business Suite session. Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. In R12. Copyright © 2010. and those URL Oracle E-Business links open in a new browser window. Navigating in R12.Page 55 . Thus.Suite as links to Web sites outside Oracle E-Business Suite. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: b n h a f er a s h tran This statement is False.x. Oracle and/or its affiliates. end users can also define “Favorites” in QuizsSpecifications: n o n. All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .

x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 .Page 56 . Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.without interfering with the interactive work that you perform at your terminal. interactiventasks no Copyright © 2010. you can complete non- QuizsSpecifications: . Oracle and/or its affiliates. With concurrent processing. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: a n h a f er a s h tran This statement is True. All rights reserved. Navigating in R12.

Navigating in R12. Summary Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved.x Oracle Applications Chapter 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 57 .

Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non .

All rights reserved.x u de a z s S u w h i a h nChapterse3 t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ Introduction o t mtoa Oracle n t G Applications @ h tR12.x Chapter 3 .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved.Page 2 .x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

All rights reserved.x Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.Page 3 .x Chapter 3 .

x Chapter 3 . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Course Objectives Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Page 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a Suite a b l from Oracle a n sfer Complete E-Business h h Oracle s aE-Business a n Suite is a comprehensive set of enterprisewide business applications that n. Complete E-Business Suite from Oracle Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. your customers can easily configure. forecasts. you have the choice to either implement one module or the nosuite. entire Oracle E-Business Suite (EBS) helps an enterprise make smarter decisions with better information. Collaboration enables you to include your customers and suppliers early on—in product development. suppliers can get self-service access to orders. Oracle EBS extends support for internal processes beyond enterprise boundaries to include customers. Linking your enterprise with your customers and suppliers offers global visibility and enables bidirectional flow of business information. You can easily share real-time information with partners. Similarly. and delivery status. and enable businesses to run more efficiently. share unified information across the enterprise.on run entirely t r the Internet. procurement. and order products in real-time on a Web store. Connecting enterprises enables you to rapidly respond to dynamic market conditions while improving your ability to meet customer commitments. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. For instance. and other trading partners. Copyright © 2010. planning. reduce Information Technology (IT) expenses. suppliers.Page 5 . Here. and the order information flows seamlessly to order management and shipping for fulfillment. and other business processes. which is accessible through a simple Web browser. Oracle and/or its affiliates. price.x Chapter 3 . and payment status on their personalized portal. such as designs. order fulfillment. schedules. orders.

Oracle EBS is engineered to work as an integrated system on a common IT infrastructure. they are also modular. you can directly pass information from one application to another without incurring incremental integration costs. Oracle’s applications are not only integrated. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Therefore. several modules. Yet Modular Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.nYet Modular h f er a an s sh -and Managing a heterogeneous t r environment with multiple connections between solutions is expensive n o n complex. you must go back and review all the integration points and potentially update the integration software itself.Page 6 . Whenever you update a point solution. Copyright © 2010. Based on your business needs. Oracle’s open. Oracle and/or its affiliates. you can implement one module. enabling you to fully leverage your investment in existing applications. standards-based architecture allows you to easily integrate into a heterogeneous environment. Integrated. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Integrated. All rights reserved. or the entire suite.x Chapter 3 .

suppliers.S. • Oracle EBS extends internal process support beyond enterprise boundaries to include customers. and many regulatory . all currencies. The single. There is no separate version of the EBS for the U.t r on Trading partnersdatabase. and all business entities across the enterprise. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. All rights reserved. in a single You can install all languages in the same Unicode can receive business documents in a language of their choice. You can create a single. employees. suppliers. • Oracle EBS is the first and only comprehensive set of enterprise applications that is integrated around a single. Benefits of Oracle E-Business Suite Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. users can view and enter dates.Page 7 . and allows a consistent definition of customers. Linking your enterprise with your customers and suppliers offers global visibility and enables bidirectional flow of business information.x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. and currencies in a format they prefer. common data model ensures that accurate and consistent information and transaction flows across all applications. Copyright © 2010. common data model. and other trading partners. or France. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a f er Benefits ofnOracle E-Business Suite a an s •shOracle E-Business Suite supports multiple languages. numbers. partners. The unified information architecture of Oracle EBS enables consolidation of data from Oracle and non-Oracle applications. requirements ninstance. global definition that allows everyone (worldwide) to have access to the same data.. Japan.

Page 8 . Information-Driven Applications Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.x Chapter 3 . All rights reserved.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. Major Oracle Application Product Families Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 9 .x Chapter 3 . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.

Page 10 .x E-Business haccess Youh s a can a n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle the t r n.com/applications/financials/intro.html (Oracle Financials) Copyright © 2010.com/applications/e-business-suite. Oracle and/or its affiliates.products (listed in parenthesis): Applications n o • http://www.html (E-Business Suite Applications) . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x Chapter 3 .http://www. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w b l a SuiteaFootprint a n sfer R12.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.oracle. R12.oracle. All rights reserved.

oracle. All rights reserved. R12.Page 11 .html (Projects) Copyright © 2010.x E-Business h f er Footprint (continued) a shcan access You n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle athe n - Applicationst r products (listed in parenthesis): n o • http://www. Oracle and/or its affiliates.com/applications/projects/intro.x Chapter 3 .com/applications/human_resources/intro. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.html (Human Resources Management System) • http://www.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sSuite R12.oracle.

x E-Business h f er Footprint (continued) a shcan access You n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle athe n - Applicationst r products (listed in parenthesis): n o • http://www.html (Order Management) Copyright © 2010. R12.html (Supply Chain Planning) • http://www. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sSuite R12. All rights reserved.Page 12 .oracle.com/applications/scm/index. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x Chapter 3 .oracle.com/applications/order_mgmt/intro.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.oracle.oracle.html (Manufacturing) Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sSuite R12.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.html (Asset Lifecycle Management) • http://www.com/applications/maintenance/eam.x E-Business h f er Footprint (continued) a shcan access You n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle athe n - Applicationst r products (listed in parenthesis): n o • http://www. All rights reserved.Page 13 .oracle.x Chapter 3 .com/applications/scm/index.html (Procurement) • http://www.com/applications/manufacturing/intro. R12.

html (Logistics) • http://www. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sSuite R12.html (Master Data Management) Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.com/applications/logistics/intro.oracle.com/master-data-management/index.html (Product Lifecycle Management) • http://www.com/applications/plm/intro. Oracle and/or its affiliates.oracle.x E-Business h f er Footprint (continued) a shcan access You n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle athe n - Applicationst r products (listed in parenthesis): n o • http://www.oracle. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. R12.Page 14 .x Chapter 3 .

com/applications/crm/index.html (Customer Relationship Management including Marketing. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sSuite R12. R12. Sales. Oracle and/or its affiliates. and Interaction Center Technology) Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.oracle.x E-Business Suite Footprint Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 15 .x Chapter 3 .x E-Business h f er Footprint (continued) a shcan access You n following URLs for more information about the specific Oracle athe n - Applicationst r products (listed in parenthesis): n o • http://www. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Service.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 16 .x Chapter 3 .x Architecture Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications R12. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.

x Chapter 3 . Copyright © 2010. in an integrated E-Business Suite. But.x architecture do just that. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x Architecture Understanding a r the Oracle htontalk nabout fethe It is h a easy a s technical architecture of R12. In most cases. your technical architecture will dictate the business needs that you can fulfill. the technical architecture is important to needs of R12. Understanding the Oracle Applications R12. If you do not use this engineering approach.x Architecture Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x E-Business Suite. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a ablApplications R12. the software must support the business needs by being engineered to do so from the start. in fact. It is only after the business needs have been addressed that the technical architecture can be determined. the business architecture that supports the business needs of the company. All rights reserved. It is. the technical architecture will be dictated by the business needs. most s t r n-business presentations nothe support on R12. Though it may seem to be just a marketing issue.Page 17 . In fact. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x EBS at the very first.

R12. sales and service processes. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x E-Business Suite provides a comprehensive solution through an integrated architecture. The R12. JavaScript (JSP).x EBS is a complete e-business system. marketing.x EBS is built on a “modern foundation.x’s integration is engineered into the product. Crucial to the Oracle Applications R12. These standards include using Java/J2EE.x E-Business Suite is accessible via global networks. 4.x Business Architecture: h a sh EBS has n principles that drive its business architecture.x Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. nR12. HTML. R12. R12.x architecture. 3. such as flexible date formats and multiple radix support.Page 18 . thereby providing a 360-degree view of the company. R12. All rights reserved. scalable standards. supports international features. 2. Business Architecture: Oracle Applications R12. human resource management.x follows: n-t rafive o 1. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Oracle Applications R12. Copyright © 2010. Internet-accessibility.x development into open.” Oracle has embedded all of its new R12. financial.x E-Business Suite is fully globalized. and has accounting and business localizations built into it.x E-Business Suite provides a comprehensive solution for manufacturing. supports data in the Unicode Character Set (UTF-8). Oracle and/or its affiliates. R12.x Chapter 3 . The principles are as R12. project. It accommodates multiple languages and currencies. thereby providing a fully integrated package—one that is not realized through system integrations and customizations. supply chain management. and centralized management.

All these tools help to significantly reduce implementation time. R12.x Chapter 3 . and a host of configuration files and customizable Help files to allow the customer to configure the system to meet their needs. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 19 .x E-Business Suite brings considerable tools to the implementation task. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. 5. All rights reserved. These tools include a rapid installation tool. patch application tools. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

The architectural modes equate to common classes of users. They are full-time users who need and demand a robust. network-connected computer.x-these The an architecture is a direct response to the business needs of the customer.x has developed four architectural modes for users that support of n o are accessed and controlled through the Personal Home Page (PHP) or Portal. Thus. If they are familiar with browsing. Technical Architecture: Oracle Applications R12. In technical t r n business needs.x Chapter 3 . All rights reserved.x to be as simple and as quick as possible. mobile users cover a surprisingly large range of users whose jobs are likely to keep them away from a readily available. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x administrative tasks are simplified while operations costs are reduced. the business intelligence products eliminate the need for users to learn a new system.Page 20 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Oracle Applications R12. Forms based users are typically people involved in the transactional operations of an organization. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. PHP becomes the gateway through which the user has rights to access all the information to which they have been granted access. they know the basics of the business intelligence interface. These users can range from Copyright © 2010.x Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. By using a browser. full-featured interface. Self-service users are infrequent users who want their interface with R12. Most users fall in this category.x Technical Architecture: h a shR12. Finally. R12. Business intelligence users are senior executives who want an easy-to-use interface that can be used to reveal critical business information. R12.

they are able to send and receive information at points where it is important and convenient for them. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. By utilizing the mobile interface. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.Page 21 . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. sales representatives through inventory users.

• Application tier sometimes referred to as the middle-tier. laptops.x As a his a logical tier s angrouping of services.t r Suite consists of a three-tier architecture.x Chapter 3 . or mobile devices (such as PDAs). requiring less network traffic reduces the telecommunications costs and improves response times for users.x E-Business Suite. • Database tier supports and manages the Oracle database and is responsible for storing and retrieving application data. field value comparison differences. Oracle n E-Business . The diagram in the slide represents the n o basic technical architecture of R12. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Note: The connection between the application tier and desktop tier can operate successfully over a wide area network (WAN). Its purpose is to capture and/or display information to the user.Page 22 . All rights reserved. is responsible for holding the application logic that supports and manages the various Applications components. In a global operation that has users at various locations. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.x Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. spread across more than one physical machine. • Desktop/Client tier provides the user interface that could comprise desktop computers. Copyright © 2010. because the desktop and application tiers exchange a minimum amount of information—for example. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Basic Technical h a f er n Architecture of Oracle Applications R12. Basic Technical Architecture of Oracle Applications R12.

where they are cached. Desktop/Client Tier Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Therefore. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Subsequently. the browser is inherently capable of handling the HTML and JavaScript. No additional downloads are necessary. or mobile access). you must open the connection. each time you communicate with the server. The first time these files are required. Note: The Forms based mode can communicate to the forms server using sockets.t r n o n via a Java in a Web browser for the traditional Forms based interface. Copyright © 2010. and shclient applet The interface .x session because these files need to be downloaded. they are not as efficient as sockets. HTTP or HTTPS is also used for the other modes.Page 23 . business intelligence. However. For any of the additional modes. The Web listener will download many Java Archive files (. You will need to download the JAR files again only when they have been updated and the copy in the cache is no longer valid. They can be displayed using Java (Forms based access) or HTML/JavaScript (self-service. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Desktop/Client h a n Tier f er a s an is provided through HTML for the newer HTML based applications. All rights reserved.jar files) to your computer.x Chapter 3 . the cache will greatly increase the speed of the startup. This allows the Forms based mode to be deployed in a number of circumstances. • HTTP is a nonpersistent protocol that is the basis for a vast majority of Internet traffic. The desktop tier is responsible for forms. HTTP. it will take longer to start the R12. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. or HTTPS protocols.

and then close the connection. the performance challenges may be further increased. communicate. All rights reserved.Page 24 . This nonpersistent protocol is the source for many HTTP-related performance challenges. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ open until the session ends. However. HTTP/HTTPS may be preferred over sockets when sending traffic over a public network such as the Internet.x Chapter 3 . • Sockets is a persistent protocol in which a connection is opened for a session and stays Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. whereas Sockets may be the preferred protocol for Forms based traffic. Oracle and/or its affiliates. • Hypertext transfer protocol secure (HTTPS) adds encryption to HTTP and helps to secure information traffic. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. because encryption is added. especially over the Internet. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. communication can occur between a desktop and server without going through the OPEN/CLOSE steps each time. Therefore.

x. It also provides all the nondatabase services required in an R12. It is simpler to state that all components that are not part of either the desktop tier (that is.Java Servlet Engine .x Chapter 3 . and so on). Prominently. Reports servers.JavaServer Pages (JSP) The Web Listener component of the Oracle HTTP Server accepts incoming HTTP requests (for particular URLs) from client browsers. Copyright © 2010.Web Listener . Applications Tier Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 25 . six servers comprise the application tier for Oracle Applications: • Web server: The Oracle HTTP Server (powered by Apache) acts as the Web server.t r n R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Applications h a n Tiersfer a shapplications The antier is responsible for storing and executing most of the business logic . and includes additional components such as: . All rights reserved. Forms display) or the database tier are assigned to the applications tier. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Concurrent Processing.x architecture. It processes the requests received over the network from the desktop clients. The application tier is the key tier consisting of a host of services within the R12. Web listeners. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Forms servers.x associated with n o instance (for example.

there are reporting programs and data update programs that need m z ah e lice to run either periodically. may contain a large number of w a abl a n sfer data-intensive computations. when scrolling through multiple order lines that exceed the limitations of a Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Upgrading Oracle Applications . It also o h tud allows users to perform projections based on possible changes to the business @ a z environment or other strategic factors. • Forms server: The Forms server hosts the Oracle Applications forms and associated run- time engine that supports the professional interface. and run using the concurrent processing architecture. You perform the following operations from this server: . or on an ad hoc basis. s S u w h i a h n se t • Concurrent Processing server: User interactions with Oracle Applications data are ( s h to u conducted via HTML based Applications or the more traditional Forms based ad nse Applications.Applying database patches to Oracle Applications . they are run on a specialized server. the Concurrent Processing non server. It caches data and provides it to the client as required—for example. m co uide i l ฺ • Discoverer server (optional): The Discoverer server complements the Reports server by t ma ent G allowing performance of ad hoc queries and analysis of the resulting query output. It s a dynamically selects the language of the report at run time. It is a component of the Oracle Developer 6i. displaying client screens and initiating changes in the database according to user actions. These programs that operate in the background while users continue to work on other tasks. However.Secure HTTPS network connection .Standard HTTP network connection . • Administration server: The Administration server is located on the node on which you maintain the data model and the data in your Oracle Applications database.Page 26 . and its reports are contained in the same directory as the concurrent processing reports. However. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. To h aensure that resource-intensive concurrent processing operations do not interfere with sh -tran interactive operations. All rights reserved.Maintaining Oracle Applications data Note: The Oracle HTML based (formerly known as Self-Service) Applications: • Do not use Oracle Forms for the interface • Are designed in pure HTML and JavaScript • Dynamically generate HTML pages by executing Java code • Use a metadata dictionary for flexible layout • Operate by direct connection to the Web server Copyright © 2010.TCP/IP connection • Reports server: The Reports server is automatically installed on the same node as the Concurrent Processing server. reports generated by the Reports server are a monitored and administered separately from the concurrent processing reports. which mediates the communication between the desktop client and the Oracle database server. The Forms server communicates with the desktop client using these protocols: . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ single screen. so that users see the reports in )h ฺ the language they prefer.x Chapter 3 . Processes that run on the concurrent processing server are called concurrent requests.

Database Tier Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. which stores all the data maintained by tier n . the database server does not communicate directly with the desktop clients. In general. by spreading the database activity across a cluster of machines. updated. and other database objects for your system. All rights reserved.t r Oracle Applications. retrieval. inserted. The database tier can now significantly benefit from Oracle’s clustering technology. regardless of the mode.Page 27 . because. but with the servers on the application tier. as well as the online Help information. Copyright © 2010. The database tier is responsible for the storage.x Chapter 3 . all data is queried. indexes. or deleted on the database tier. The database tier is involved in almost everything.x instance. and management of all the data associated with your R12. More specifically. the database tier n o contains the Oracle data server files and Oracle Applications database executables that physically store the tables. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Database Tier h a n sfer a shdatabase The ancontains the Oracle database server. which mediates the communications between the database server and the clients. Oracle and/or its affiliates. This means that any SQL or PL/SQL will ultimately be executed on the database tier machine.

Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl The Network h a n sfer a shdiscussions Most anabout architecture make little.x instance with a good applications tier and a clustered database tier. if any. you can have a fast PC running on an R12. it can n - have a great t r impact on your performance. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. you can experience poor performance. And yet. This problem cannot be attributed to a tier because it is a network-related issue.Page 28 . reference to the network. a dial-up connection) or a shared connection with considerable traffic (a corporate T-1 line that already has considerable bandwidth usage). The network is the most important but the least n o visible component of the R12. The connection links themselves can vary from slow-speed dial-up connections to high-speed fiber optic channels. If you are using a slow connection either directly from that machine (for example. For example.x Chapter 3 .x architecture. but still end up with bad results. The Network Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 29 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Oracle Applications h r n sfeTechnology Layer a an shOracle-Applications The technology layer is an integrated collection of components whose n t functionality r is applicable to all Oracle Applications modules. All rights reserved. Components in the Oracle n o Applications technology layer include: • Applications DBA (AD) • Application Object Library (FND) • Applications Utilities (AU) • Common Modules (AK) • Workflow (WF) • Alert (ALR) • OA Framework (FWK) • Oracle XML Publisher (XDO) Copyright © 2010. Oracle Applications Technology Layer Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.

x Chapter 3 . All rights reserved.3.1.1 utilizes the latest 11gR1 database version (11. There o n • Database Oracle Home: Release 12.1 uses Oracle Application Services 10gR3 (Oracle AS 10. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl E-Business h a f er nSuitesArchitecture a sh Homes Oracle an . • Tools Oracle Home (10.1.Page 30 .1. as well as Java SE Development Kit (JDK) 6.4).7).3): Release 12.1.1 still utilizes Oracle Forms and other older Oracle technologies to deliver some functionality. including the following: • The apps/apps_st/appl (APPL_TOP) directory contains the product directories and files for Oracle Applications. E-Business Suite Architecture Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x instance. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Copyright © 2010.4): Release 12. The product files are stored in several top-level directories.1. • Web Oracle Home (10.0.4 for Web-based OA Framework applications. Oracle JDeveloper 10.0. Oracle and/or its affiliates.t r arenthree Oracle Homes to consider in an E-Business Suite R12. E-Business Suite File System: Application Tier Oracle Applications uses components from different Oracle products.2. • The apps/apps_st/comn or (COMMON_TOP or COMN_TOP) directory contains directories and files used across products.3.3.

data tablespaces. including the following: • The db/apps_st/data (DATA_TOP) directory is located on the database node machine. The product files are stored in several top-level directories. and contains the system tablespaces. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ E-Business Suite uses components from different Oracle products. Oracle and/or its affiliates.1.1.Page 31 .0 directory is located on the database node machine. and contains the ORACLE_HOME for Oracle Database 10g. • The apps/tech_st/10. • The apps/tech_st/10. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.3 directory contains ORACLE_HOME used for the Applications Technology stack Web and Java components. • The db/tech_st/11.x Chapter 3 . index tablespaces. and the database files.1.2 directory contains ORACLE_HOME used for the Applications Technology stack tools components. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. redo log files. E-Business Suite File System: Database Tier Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved.

x Chapter 3 . All rights reserved.0. The individual APPL_TOP and <PROD>_TOP directories are initially established during installation. For example. and inv. the paths to these product directories would be specified in the APPS<CONTEXT_NAME>.Page 32 . are installed in the database and the file system.0 • FND_TOP =/d01/prodappl/fnd/12.0 • INV_TOP=/d01/prodappl/inv/12. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Files for unlicensed products should not be removed. the base release is 12. E-Business Suite Product Directories Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.env file as follows: • APPL_TOP=/d01/prodappl • AU_TOP=/d01/prodappl/au/12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl E-Business h a f er Directories nSuitesProduct a sh -tSuite APPL_TOP annenvironment variable that points to the top level of the file system tree for the isa n E-Business r product directories. n o and the E-Business Suite base release is typically reflected in the name of the subdirectory.0. regardless of the license status. Each product has its own subdirectory under APPL_TOP. au. fnd. the slide displays three product directories. If the directory path to APPL_TOP is /d01/prodappl. For R12. Copyright © 2010. where <PROD> is the short name of the product schema. Oracle and/or its affiliates.x.0. The directory path for a particular product is defined by the value of the environment variable <PROD>_TOP.0.0.0 All E-Business Suite products.

x Chapter 3 . multiple APPL_TOPs are not supported within the same file system. It is acceptable for multiple servers to share a single APPL_TOP. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Finally. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. But.Page 33 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. multiple releases and product versions must not be installed in a single APPL_TOP directory. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a r n sfeManager Oracle Applications h a an Manager (OAM) is a sophisticated tool that supports managing and sh Applications Oracle .t r n an Oracle Applications system from an HTML based central control console. Oracle Applications Manager Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.Page 34 . monitoring of n o Among other tasks. Copyright © 2010. Oracle Applications Manager can help you to: • Configure and administer your system • Diagnose and correct problems • Manage patches • Monitor and tune performance • Monitor system security OAM is built into Oracle Applications and complements the features of Oracle Enterprise Manager.x Chapter 3 .

The function provided by a service is a unit of work performed by a service provider to achieve desired end results for a service consumer. SOA is a collection of services that communicate with each other using standards- based technology. Essentially. Services A service can be defined as a well-defined. All rights reserved. Service-Oriented Architecture Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Loose coupling is possible by using standards-based technology that enable platform independence and interaction based on the request-response architecture provided by the Internet.Page 35 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a Service-Oriented h f er n sArchitecture a shWorld-Wide The anWeb Consortium (W3C) defines Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) as: “a n t r set of components which can be invoked. and whose interface descriptions can be published n o and discovered. The provider and consumer roles are implemented through software components. Several standards from the W3C have come together to enable SOA to be realized.x Chapter 3 . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. self-contained business function executed through a set of standard protocols and technologies that: • Operate independently from the context or state of other services • Represent a unit of work performed by a component or part of an automated subprocess Copyright © 2010.” SOA is an architectural style designed to integrate loosely coupled services.

Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. reusable business services and service-oriented components. Oracle E-Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway is a complete set of service infrastructure. r E-Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway (ISG) provides a customer- n o focused robust communication and integration infrastructure between independently managed components and loosely coupled applications. With this prebuilt. Oracle E- Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway provides a powerful framework that accelerates dynamic business processes and service integration between applications over the Web.Page 36 . This infrastructure not only allows greater and effective business integration between heterogeneous applications. Oracle E-Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway provides a capability of allowing various users to perform different tasks and to monitor and manage service integration throughout the entire service deployment life cycle. All rights reserved. With this standardized and interoperable Web service platform. Oracle E Business Suite Integrated SOA Gateway Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfSuite Oracle E-Business h er Integrated SOA Gateway a anof Oracle Fusion Middleware and service-oriented architecture (SOA) sh on-tOracle Building top n technology. It supports almost all integration interface types and services invoked within Oracle E-Business Suites no matter if they are native packaged interfaces or the services that are orchestrated using native services. but also facilitates the development and execution of complex business processes into highly flexible and reusable Web services.x Chapter 3 . Copyright © 2010.

Based on your business needs. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.Page 37 . you can implement QuizsSpecifications: -several modules. or the entire suite. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: b n h a f er a s h tran This statement is False.x Chapter 3 . non one module. Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12.

Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 38 . no Copyright © 2010. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. This is because the desktop and application tiers QuizsSpecifications: - exchange anminimum amount of information. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: a n h a f er a s h tran This statement is True.x Chapter 3 .

holding the application logic that supports and manages the various Applications responsiblenfor o n components. Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answer: c n h a f er a s h tran The Application tier. Copyright © 2010. is QuizsSpecifications: .Page 39 . All rights reserved. sometimes referred to as the middle-tier.

x Chapter 3 . se fer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Answers: a. c.Page 40 . h a n b. Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. Quiz Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Summary Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.x Chapter 3 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 41 . Introduction to Oracle Applications R12. All rights reserved.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 1 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ Fundamentals o t maofeSystem n tG Administration @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h nChapterse4 t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .

All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 2 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved.Page 3 . Fundamentals of System Administration Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Course Objectives Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 4 .

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Introduction to Application Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .Page 5 .

There are six layers of access control. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a of Access a b l Control a n sfer Successive Layers h s h Access aControl a n Oracle User Management is implemented in successive layers and each with t r n.upon on layer builds the one that precedes it. Organizations can. Oracle and/or its affiliates. The Core Security layers include: • Function Security • Data Security The next four layers are part of Oracle User Management: • Role-Based Access Control • Delegated Administration • Registration Processes • Self-Service and Approvals Copyright © 2010. uptake the various nodepending layers the degree of automation and scalability they want to build upon the existing Function and Data Security models. Successive Layers of Access Control Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 6 . All rights reserved. optionally.

administration n o ultimately enabling users to perform some basic. optionally. and then progresses to more distributed. Details of the various levels of access control. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a IncreasingnFlexibility h f erand Scalability In s a h access general.Page 7 . Organizations can. All rights reserved. By themselves. Increasing Flexibility and Scalability Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Function Security and Data Security limit the scope of Oracle User Management to basic system administration by granting access to specific menus and to the data accessed from within those menus. the following general guidelines may be considered for now: System Administrator Oracle’s Function Security and Data Security mechanisms constitute the base layers of the security system. add more layers to the system depending on the degree of flexibility they want.t r n tasks. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Copyright © 2010. However. predefined registration tasks on their own. and the increasing level of flexibility and automation that they provide are discussed later in the lesson. and contain the traditional system administration capabilities. s ancontrol with Oracle User Management begins with basic system . local modes of administration.

Page 8 . End Users Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Local Administrators When Role-Based Access Control and Delegated Administration are added to the Data Security and Function Security layers. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ Registration Processes and Self-Service and Approvals distribute system administration further by automating some registration tasks so that end users can perform them. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates. system administration tasks can be distributed to local administrators who manage a subset of the organization’s users. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.

Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Function Security h a sh Security Function . an organization can use Function Security to provide its sales representatives with the required menus and menu options for querying customers. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 9 . All rights reserved. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . It restricts user and menu options within the system. It can also control access to specific components of those pages such as a button on a sales forecasting page.tran is menus access tonindividual the base layer of access control in Oracle Applications. but does not restrict access to n o the data contained within those menus. Copyright © 2010. For example. Function Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

within Oracle Applications. inventory items). A specific instance is generally identified by a primary key value for the object. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Data Security Policies restrict the actions or operations that can be performed on a specific business object (for example. Data Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Data Security h a n sfer a anrepresents Data Security. Using your example. an instance set can be constructed to include all inventory items with a shelf life of seven days. For example.Page 10 . This returns only one inventory item from the database. Creating a data security policy for all instances of your object results in providing access to every single inventory item that you have catalogued in the database. Working in conjunction with Function Security. • An Instance Set: An instance set is a related set of instances of an object. Data Security Policies can reflect access to: • All Instances: All instances of an object represent all rows in the database object. This corresponds to a set of rows for the database object. • A Specific Instance: A specific instance generally corresponds to a single row in the database. you can enter a unique serial number for the inventory item. All rights reserved. shsecond-tlayer The r n provides additional access control on the data a user can see and what actions a Data Security n o user can perform on that data. you have an “inventory item” object in the database. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Using your object example.

t r alayers non component in the implementation of Oracle Applications. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .Page 11 . All rights reserved. Oracle User Management Layers of Access Control Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. an optional shnext four The . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Oracle User h a n Management f er Layers of Access Control a s n of access control are used in Oracle User Management.

Page 12 . responsibilities. With role inheritance hierarchies. function security and o n - data security polices users require to perform a specific function. Copyright © 2010. Role Inheritance Hierarchies Roles can be included in role inheritance hierarchies that can contain multiple subroles and superior roles. and other roles are assigned to the role. Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Users are not required to be assigned the lower level permissions directly because permissions are implicitly inherited based on the roles assigned to the user. a superior role inherits all the properties of its subrole and any of its subroles. in which permissions. This is accomplished with a n one-time setup. The users assigned that role subsequently inherit the new set of permissions. For example. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Role-Based h a nAccess f r eControl (RBAC) As a an s h can betrconfigured role to consolidate the responsibilities. Role Categories Administrators can create role categories to bundle roles and responsibilities to simplify the process of searching for roles and responsibilities. all the roles related to sales and marketing can be included in the Sales & Marketing category. Oracle and/or its affiliates. When making a mass update in a production system an organization simply changes the permissions or role inheritance hierarchy defined for a role. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . permissions. All rights reserved.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. which is interpreted by the security system at run time. an organization can create an “Employee” role and assign that role to its employees.” “Sales Rep. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ the scope of their job functions.” In these examples. For example.Page 13 . s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. each role contains a specific level of access privileges that restricts its assignees to Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved.” and “Sales Managers. Example Organizations can define roles that closely mirror their business situation. It can also create an “External” role and assign that role to customers and suppliers. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Roles and role assignments are stored in the workflow directory. and Sales Manager roles. Sales Representative. Further examples may include specific roles such as “Support Agent. A sales representative is assigned the Employee and Sales Representative roles and a Sales Manager is assigned the Employee. Some members of the organization are probably assigned more than one role.

t r aadministration. Copyright © 2010. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . an organization can create local administrators with sufficient privileges to manage a specific subset of the organization’s users and roles. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 14 . This provides organizations with a tighter. Local administrators cannot query users for whom they do not have administration privileges. roles. Administration Privileges Administration Privileges determine the users. For example. User Administration Privileges A local administrator must be granted User Administration Privileges to determine the users and people that the local administrator can manage. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Delegated n h a Administration f er a n s shdelegated With . a local administrator can be granted privileges only to query one set of users. and organization information that delegated administrators (local administrators) can manage. instead of exclusively relying on a centralized administrator to n o n manage all the users. yet the three work in conjunction to provide the complete set of abilities for the delegated administrator. and full privileges (including update and reset password) for another set. Local administrators can be granted different privileges for different subsets of users. Delegated Administration Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Each privilege is granted separately. more granular level of security and the ability to easily scale their administrative capabilities.

Role Administration Privileges Role Administration Privileges define the roles that local administrators can directly assign to and revoke from the set of users they manage. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ in the system. The set of data policies defined as part of delegated administration are known as Administration Privileges. s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Organization Administration Privileges Organization Administration Privileges define the organizations a local administrator can view Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Example Organizations can internally designate administrators at division or even department levels. Depending on the user administration privileges.Page 15 . All rights reserved. These delegation policies are defined as Data Security Policies. an administrator may have the ability to register new people for that organization. This privilege enables an administrator to search for people based on their organization. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . if the local administrator has additionally been granted access to view the people in that organization (User Administration Privileges). and then delegate administration of external users to people within those (external) organizations.

Registration Processes of this type are geared toward administrators. Each account creation registration process can be made Copyright © 2010. self-service account requests provide a method for persons to request a new user account.Page 16 . Registration Processes Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Consider the case where customers may need to register before they can purchase an item from an online store. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Registration h a n Processes f er a an s sh User-tManagement Oracle r contains the following registration processes: on Account Requests Self-Service n Commonly referred to as Self-Service Registration. After the customer has completed the registration process. Requests for Additional Access Users can request for additional access through the Oracle User Management Access Request Tool (ART) available in the global preferences menu. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. especially delegated administrators. Account Creation By Administrators Administrators can benefit from existing registration processes designed to streamline the process of creating and maintaining user access. All rights reserved. Requests for Additional Access uses the same Oracle User Management infrastructure and processing logic as Self-Service Account Requests. the customer obtains both a user account and the necessary role or roles to access some portion of the Web site on which they registered. to ensure consistent application of the client’s user security policies.

available to select local administrators. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates.Page 17 . All rights reserved. Local administrators can perform these tasks for users within their own organizations. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.

Copyright © 2010. must first provide their approval. individuals can subsequently tasks such as obtaining new user accounts or requesting for n o additional access to the system. In addition. to create customized approval routing for these requests. a manager and a vice president.Page 18 . Example An organization may enable users to request a particularly sensitive role. Oracle and/or its affiliates. the organization can specify that two approvers. before the user is granted the role. organizations can use the Oracle Approvals Management engine. All rights reserved. however. Self-Service and Approvals Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .tran registration shtheself-service registration processes have been configured as required. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Self-Service h a f er n and Approvals a s After perform n .

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Function Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . All rights reserved.Page 19 .

Function Security. responsibilities. It allows you to define a user and assign one or more no responsibilities to the user. Copyright © 2010.Page 20 . All rights reserved. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . restricts access to various functions. ornwidgets within an application. with each responsibility having an associated menu. Oracle and/or its affiliates. and menus. but it does not restrict access to the data that a user can see or the actions that a user can perform on the data. Function Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. This lesson discusses the definition of users.t r pages. such as forms. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Function Security h h a Function s Security a n restricts user access to individual menus of functions. by itself. HTML .

Copyright © 2010. User Security You authorize a user to sign-on to Oracle Applications by defining an application user with one or more responsibilities assigned. In s the System Administrator manages security by creating user sign-ons n - and assigningt r them to one or more responsibilities. or create new custom responsibilities as required. functions. and several users can share the same responsibility. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Responsibility Security A responsibility is a collection of authorizations that allow access to: • A specific application or applications • A Ledger • A restricted list of windows. A System Administrator can assign users any of the standard responsibilities provided with Oracle Applications. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Application h a nSecurity: f erOverview a an s anhOracle Application. and reports Each user has one or more responsibilities. Users then have access to all the n o functionalities associated with that responsibility. Application Security: Overview Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.Page 21 . All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

You authorize a user to sign-on to Oracle Applications by defining an application user with one or more responsibilities assigned. These attributes are defined in the Web Application Dictionary. rows. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. or intelligent autonomous agents. All rights reserved. Table columns represent “attributes” assigned to a responsibility. Users Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. networks. Although the concept of a user can be extended to include machines.Page 22 . s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Self-Service Applications Security Oracle Self-Service Web Applications use columns. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ A user is defined as a human being. the definition is limited to a person here. and values in database tables to define the information that users can access.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Page 23 . Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Use of Menu and Function Security to Modify Responsibilities Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Copyright © 2010. Importance of Responsibilities Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Self-Service Web Applications. or Mobile s the-tuser no In addition. use. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .Page 24 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Importance of a feisrassigned at least one responsibility. and the data that those reports and concurrent programs can access. a responsibility determines the application functions that a user can Applications. All rights reserved. the reports and concurrent programs that the user can run. A responsibility determines Responsibilities hn nuser a Eachhapplication s whether n ra accesses Oracle Applications.

the reports and Copyright © 2010. Oracle Application Framework functionality does not support data groups. the application functions that a user can use. Defining a New Responsibility Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Defining a n h a er New Responsibility f a •shAssemble s n components of application privileges to create a responsibility. For almost all cases.Page 25 . concurrent programs. you should accept the default value in defining a responsibility. and reports connect to. • Define n You must assign the following to your new responsibility: • A data group. Oracle and/or its affiliates. A data group determines which Oracle database accounts a responsibility’s forms. athe . Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . All rights reserved. It defines the mapping between Oracle Applications products and Oracle database IDs. Note: Data groups are used for backward compatibility only.t r on the responsibility by assembling a menu and defining any function security. You can assign the following: • Any function or menu exclusions to control access to the functionality of the application • A report security group to control access to reports and concurrent programs Note: These features are for backward compatibility only. A responsibility determines whether the user accesses Oracle Applications or Oracle Self- Service Web Applications. It supplies access to forms within an application. • A menu.

Page 26 . and the data that those reports and concurrent programs can access. you can customize an existing responsibility or create new responsibilities to accommodate the needs of different users or different categories of users. Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. However. Generally. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. you relate new application users to predefined responsibilities. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . concurrent programs that the user can run.

Refer to the practice . Defining a New Application User Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. The user will be able to access functions and reports by using the assigned responsibilities. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Though defining user accounts may be the last task you complete when setting up function security for your installation.Creating a New User (Required). Define an authorized user of Oracle Applications by specifying a username and password.Page 27 . All rights reserved. Copyright © 2010. unless otherwise specified. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Defining a n h a er New Application f User (N) s a h >trUser Security s an > Define - nAllnnavigation paths. this task is covered first here for you to complete the following sections by logging in to Oracle Applications with your own user account. Grant application privileges by assigning one or more responsibilities to the user. are from the System Administrator Note: o responsibility.

Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . t r n o About Functions • A function is a set of code in Oracle Applications that is executed only if the name of the function is present in a list maintained on a responsibility-by-responsibility basis. All rights reserved. A subfunction represents a securable subset of a form’s functionality. Roles control the level of access to the various data and functions within an application. • There are two types of functions: a form function or form. and a nonform function or subfunction. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Function Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl a n sfer Function Security h a shcan manage You ansecurity by controlling access to individual functions through menu n - definitions. instead of the traditional responsibility.Page 28 . Note: Oracle User Management uses the concept of role.

All rights reserved.Page 29 . Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010. Data Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 .

Using your object example. Oracle and/or its affiliates. Data Security hn is nthesfnext a DatahSecurity s access providesn . Data Security Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. “inventory item. For example. Data Security restricts the set of users that a local administrator can access within Oracle User Management.” in the database. an instance set can be constructed to include all inventory items with a shelf life of seven days. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Data Security a er layer of access control and builds on Function Security.Page 30 . Data Security Policies can only be defined for applications that have been written to utilize the Data Security Framework. Data Security Policies restrict the actions or operations that can be performed on a specific business object (for example. Using your Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. Oracle Applications restricts access to individual data actions that is displayed on the screen after the user has selected a menu or menu option. Data Security Policies can reflect access to: • All Instances: All instances of an object represent all the rows in the database table or view. This corresponds to a set of rows in the database. and the noa user can perform on that data. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . For example. and is generally identified by a primary key value for the object. • An Instance Set: An instance set is a related set of instances of an object. • A Specific Instance: A specific instance generally corresponds to a single row in the database.tracontrol within Oracle Applications on the data a user can access. Creating a Data Security Policy for all instances of the object results in providing access to every inventory item that you have catalogued in the database. you have an object. inventory items).

Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. All rights reserved. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a a )h ฺ m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl h a n sfer a sh -tran non Copyright © 2010.Page 31 . Oracle and/or its affiliates. example. you can enter a unique serial number for the inventory item. This returns only one inventory item from the database.

Examples of operations include: Create. such as Project Number 123 or User JDOE. Escalate. and a file. All rights reserved. Related object instances can be grouped together into an object instance set. and Query Customers. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Data Security h a n Components: f er Objects a n s shFunctional (N) . In Oracle Applications.t r aDeveloper responsibility > Objects onis a system entity on which an operation can be performed. and UI widgets. and Reject. an object typically maps to records in relational tables or views. Update Order. Invoke Service Request Form. Permission is defined as an operation on an object—for example.Page 32 . An object instance is a specific example of an object. An object n In Oracle Applications. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Copyright © 2010. operations are implied by a permission definition. Examples in Oracle Applications include: a person. and is identified by a set of one or more primary key values as defined by the object. a machine. Data Security Components: Objects Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. An object instance generally corresponds to a row in the database. Update. Approve Expense Report. Approve. Forms or HTML pages. Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. Grantsoare n Grants which handle business objects are called Data Security Policies. For example. Grants can also be used to control access to an application’s functionality. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺ a m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Grants h a n sfer (N) a shFunctional n aAdministrator Responsibility > Grants . The grantee defines who is granted access. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . The grantee can be one of three types: • A group of users • A specific user—for example.Page 33 . Grants Unauthorized reproduction or distribution prohibitedฺ Copyright© 2013. except the Guest account Copyright © 2010. or other widget within the application. For example. you can use a grant to secure an aspect of a menu. All rights reserved.t r n used to provide specified users with access to specific objects or functions. you want to provide access to a set of administrative menus to a select group of users. Joe Smith • All users (global)—all the users of the system. page.

Oracle and/or its affiliates. which can be granted to functions users or roles. Fundamentals of System Administration Chapter 4 . Permissions can be grouped into permission sets. or Grants. All rights reserved. reflect the access granted to users through roles. Copyright © 2010. Oracle and/or its affiliatesฺ s a )h ฺa m co uide i l ฺ o t ma ent G @ h tud a z s S u w h i a h n se t ( s h to u m ad nse z ah e lice w a abl Permissions h a f er n and sPermission Sets