Reading Lesson

“Making Predictions”

Readiness
I. Goals/Objectives/Standards
a. Goal- Students will develop new vocabulary words and use details in a text to
make predictions.
b. Objective-
1. During the lesson, students will identify new vocabulary words and
discuss their definitions to complete sentences and matching
activities.
2. During the lesson, students will use details in a text to make
predictions.
c. Standard(s)-
2.RL.2.4- Make predictions about the content of text using prior
knowledge of text features, explaining whether they were confirmed or not
confirmed and why.
2.RV.3.2- Determine the meanings of words and phrases in a nonfiction
text relevant to a second-grade topic or subject area.

II. Materials
*Students are expected to know how to pick up the materials at the end of each
station and put them where they found them. They are expected to keep materials
at each station and to use them appropriately. Students not using materials
correctly will lose a block or be asked to come and read from the book basket by
my station.
Minilesson= printed definition sheet
Station 1 (Guided Reading) = leveled mystery stories; highlighters; pencils
Station 2 (Vocabulary)= folders for each challenge, vocabulary booklets,
pencils, sentence strips, vocabulary and definition cut-outs
Station 3 (Predicting Activity)=clothespins, prediction situation cards,
brown bag, lined paper, pencils, and short scenario cards
Station 4 (Spelling City) = I-Pads and headphones
*Book baskets at each station
*Computer with visual timer

III. Management
Time: Anticipatory Set (5 Minutes); Mini-lesson and station instructions (10
minutes); Stations (12 minutes each; 50 total with transitions); Closure and Clean-
Up (5 minutes) TOTAL LESSON= 70 minutes
Rotation Strategies: Each student will be given a colored circle or square. This
will help them in understanding what group they are supposed to be with, and
allow them to follow the rotations easily. When everyone is quiet after our
response call, I will remind them where to go next and then say ‘Rotate!’
There will be a chart at each station to make sure the students are where they are
supposed to be. (see attached sheet for chart).
Behavior: Students are expected to follow the normal classroom rules. If
they are not following the specific station rules, then they must take a
block away. If they take away two blocks, they will be called to sit on the floor
behind my station and read a provided basket of books. My station set up will
allow me to fully monitor the class and call students back when they are not
staying on track or being a distraction to others. During each station’s
instructions, the students will be reminded what behavior I am expecting
from them.

Space:
*Minilesson—Students will be at their seats and I will be at the
front of the room.
*Station One— We will meet at the back green table. I will be
sitting where I can see the rest of the class at their stations. My
students in that group will be sitting facing me, back
towards the other groups. (This station will include all students
from that color)
*Station Two—This station will be meeting at two different
locations. The circles will meet at table 1 in the front of the room.
The squares will meet at table two in the front of the room.
*Station Three— This station will have two locations in the room.
The circle group will meet at the yellow table in the classroom.
The squares will meet at table three in the back of the
room.
*Station Four- This station will meet at the couches. They will be
expected to sit on the couches or in front of the couches, but not
behind them. The circle and square group will be combined
for this lesson.

IV. Anticipatory Set (5 minutes)
Today we are going to start with a short game. I am going to start
describing something in this classroom, and I want you to guess what I am
describing. You must raise your hand quietly and wait to be called on. The first
object I am thinking of is white, rectangular and has a light inside of it. Who can
tell me what they think I am describing? (microwave) The next object I am
thinking of is brown, fluffy, and rather big. Who can tell me what I am
describing? (couch) Alright this last one is going to be more tricky! I am thinking
of an object that is blue, has white lettering and is a rectangle. Who can tell me
what I am describing? (recycling bin)
V. Purpose
Today we are going to be learning how to make predictions based on clues that
we find in pictures or text as we read. Making predictions based off evidence in a
story can help us solve problems and answer questions. When you built your
boats in science, you had to predict what materials would hold the pennies and
keep the boat from sinking.
Plan for Instruction
VI. Adaption to Diverse Students-
 Visual Aides will be given with the vocabulary terms.
 Reading Pointers will be available for students to use during the guided
reading station.
 Pre-cut vocabulary booklets will be offered for students who need extra
assistance.
 Guide sheets will be posted with visuals at each station to assist ELL
students and my students with learning disabilities.
 Texts chosen for each station will match the groups reading abilities.
VII. Lesson Presentation- (60 minutes total)

a. Minilesson (Whole Group) (10 minutes)
A few minutes ago we played a short game where I described an object and
you had to guess what I was describing. Today, I am going to be teaching you
how to make predictions using different details in a story. Just like you could
guess what I was describing earlier, making predictions allows you to guess
what might happen next in a story or why something already happened in a
story. (Post the word Predictions on the board with its definition.) A
prediction is a guess you make using text or picture clues to help you. When
you are making a prediction, you may say…”I think….because… “ As you
continue to read something, you should stop and use clues in the text to
predict what might happen next. For example, if I read…Michael was in a
hurry for school! He ran out the door and forgot to tie his shoes. After reading
that, what do you think would happen next? Michael would probably trip
because he was running and did not tie his shoes. Although we make a
prediction in hopes that we will be right, often our predictions our wrong. As
readers, it is okay to make a wrong prediction. When I am reading a good
book, I get more out of the story when I don’t know what is going to happen
next. Our prediction is just a guess at what we think might happen next. Raise
your hand if you remember the math lesson and the science lesson I taught
you? In both of those lessons, we had to use problem solving skills to find the
hidden treasure and make our boats float. When we were decoding the map,
many of you predicted where you thought the treasure was hidden. As we built
boats, who made several predictions on what materials you thought would
hold the pennies based off the tests you did and the experiences you had.
When we are reading today, we will be using the same skills to solve some
mystery stories and make predictions on who is guilty.

*Go into explaining what each station will be like and my behavior
expectations for them. Books will be at each station for them to read if they
finish the provided activities and it is not time to rotate. (They can read the
books in the baskets provided, their AR book, or their wax museum chapter
book).
b. Station 1= Guided Reading with Ms. Groen
*Students will meet at the green table for a guided reading lesson
If you are at station one, you will come to the green table with me. You will
need to bring a pencil with you to this station. At this station, we will be
reading a short mystery story and making predictions to solve the mystery.
(See attached stories for the breakdown of the Guided Reading lessons---they
vary based on reading level!)

c. Station 2= Vocabulary Game
*Students in a circle group will meet at table one. Students in a square
group will meet at table two. At station two you will be participating in a
vocabulary challenge. On the table, you will find four different folders labeled
Challenge 1, Challenge 2, and Challenge 3. During the twelve minutes, you need
to try and complete as many challenges as possible. You will start with Challenge
1. Challenge 1 involves creating a booklet with your weekly vocabulary words.
This book can be used later to help you with the other challenges and to help you
study throughout the week. Challenge 2 is a matching game. In the folder, you
will find a bag of definitions and a bag of the vocabulary words. With your group,
you must match the definitions to the correct words. My assistant (one of my
peers) will be monitoring your progress and let you know when you have them all
correct. You cannot move onto Challenge 3 until they are all matched correctly.
Challenge three is a sentence fill in. In the folder, you will find sentence strips and
a bag of vocabulary words. With your group, you must put the vocabulary words
in the correct sentence. When you have finished, my assistant will check your
work. If you get through all three challenges and there is still time left, you may
practice your vocabulary words by reading the book you made during challenge
one, or silently reading a book from the station basket. If you have any questions
during this station, please ask my assistant.

d. Station 3= Predicting Activity
*Students in a circle group will meet at table three. Students in a square
group with meet at the yellow table.
When you are at station three, you will be completing two predicting
activities. The first activity is to be done individually. It includes a mini situation
and three options. After you read the short situation, you will predict what will
happen next by putting a clothes pin on one of the options. Once you complete
each situation in your bag, you can check your answers on the sheet in the folder.
Remember, our predictions our just guesses of what we think will happen next
based off details in a text or our prior knowledge. We will not always be right…
and that is okay! After everyone finishes the clothespin activity, you get to take
turns being the teacher at your station. To decide who gets to be teacher first, you
will go by your classroom numbers. The smallest number will start. If you are the
teacher for that round, you will pull out a card from the brown bag. You will read
the first part of the card and stop at the black line. Then read the question on the
black line which will say, “What do you predict will happen next?” The students
for that round will write down their prediction on the lined paper setting out next
to the bag. Once everybody has a prediction written down, the ‘teacher’ for that
round will continue reading the rest of the card (below the black line!). When they
are done reading the card, the next number in your group gets to be the ‘teacher’.
You can continue playing this game until the timer goes off. At the end of this
station, you will turn this paper into the black tray. If I notice that you are off task
or not listening to one another, you will not get to do this activity and must read
books from the basket for the remainder of the station time. Please give me a
thumb up if you understand!

e. Station 4= Spelling City
*Students at this station will be in the couch area
If you are at station four, you will be doing Spelling City on your I-Pads and only
Spelling City. You may do any Spelling City activity, but cannot be on any other
app. When you are at this station, you will meet at the couches. Please sit on the
couch or in front of it. I do not want any of you sitting behind it. You must have
your headphones on always or put your volume on mute. Please give me a thumbs
up if you understand my directions... If your I-pad is not charged or you forgot it
today, you can choose a book from the crate by the couches or read your AR
book. You should be working by yourself at this station and staying quiet.

VIII. Check for Understanding-
During the lesson I will be asking questions:
- What details in the text support your prediction? Why or Why not?
- What other areas in life have you made predictions? Were they right or
wrong?
- How can we use that vocabulary word in a sentence?
- Have you heard that vocabulary word before? Where?
*Along with asking questions that guide their thought processes and lead to
discussions, I will be walking around to each station (when my guided reading
group is re-reading a designated section and changing or confirming their first
prediction).
*If students are struggling at the vocabulary station with one of the challenges,
my peer assistant will be re-directing them and giving them hints. If students are
struggling at my guided reading station, I will have them re-read more than the
first section of the text before we finalize our predictions.

IX. Review learning outcomes/ Closure (5 minutes)- Class Class! (Response: Yes
Yes!) You have all gone to every station and we are going to just take a few
minutes to review what we learned today. Can I please have someone tell me what
a prediction is? (call on student) Now let’s see if we can come up with five of our
vocabulary words and what they mean. I am going to call on the quietest students
for help! (call on students until we come up with five different words and
definitions). Today we learned new words and how to make predictions. Thank-
you for working well at each station! Silent applause for all your hard work this
morning!!!
Plan for Assessment
Formative- Asking questions throughout the lesson and observing students at stations to
ensure they are engaged. Giving my assistant a notebook to jot down students who are
struggling with understanding concepts at the vocabulary or predicting station. Having a
class list with me at the guided reading station and making check marks by the students
who meet the objective.
Summative- Students will complete a vocabulary quiz at the end of the week. Making
predictions will be a part of their unit test and I will be collecting their prediction sheets
`from their station work.

Reflection and Post-Lesson Analysis
1. How many students achieved the lesson objective (s)? For those who did not, why not?
2. What were my strengths and weaknesses?
3. How should I alter this lesson?
4. How would I pace it differently?
5. Were all students actively participating? If not, why not?
6. What adjustments did I make to reach varied learning styles and ability levels?
a. Bloom’s Taxonomy
b. Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences
7. Did the students have enough support at the Predicting station?
8. Was there enough material at each station or did they always have extra time?
9. Did the text I chose for the guided reading lessons enhance student’s abilities to make
predictions? Why or why not?
10. Was my placement in the room a good spot to teach guided reading and observe the rest
of the class’s behaviors?
-Grouping and Rotations-
Students Group Level Start Rotation 1 Rotation 2 Last Station
Name Reading

Blue Low Green Table 1- Table 3- Couches-
CIRCLCE Table Vocabulary Predicting Spelling City
Games Activity on I-Pads
Blue Low Green Table 2- Yellow Couches-
SQUARE Table Vocabulary Table- Spelling City
Games Predicting on I-Pads
Activity
Orange Average Couches- Green Table Table 1- Table 3-
CIRCLCE Spelling Vocabulary Predicting
City on I- Games Activity
Pads
Orange Average Couches- Green Table Table 2- Yellow Table-
SQUARE Spelling Vocab Games Predicting
City on I- Activity
Pads
Red High Table 1- Table 3- Couches- Green Table
CIRCLE Vocabulary Predicting Spelling City
Games Activity on I-Pads
Red High Table 2- Yellow Table- Couches- Green Table
SQUARE Vocab Predicting Spelling City
Games Activity on I-Pads
Green High Table 3- Couches- Green Table Table 1-
CIRCLE Predicting Spelling City on Vocabulary
Activity I-Pads Games
Green High Yellow Couches- Green Table Table 2- Vocab
SQUARE Table- Spelling City on Games
Predicting I-Pads
Activity

*** Visual Timer will be set for twelve minutes on the board. When the timer goes off, students
stop everything and we will do a response call. ME: “Class Class” Students: “Yes, Yes!” Once
they are quiet, I will call out the group names and the station they are going to. Students will be
given their shape and color on a piece of paper so they don’t forget what group they are in.

(This visual will be used in my whole group instruction and posted at the ‘prediction’ stations. I
want to remind the students and emphasize that our predictions may not always be correct, and
that’s okay. Predictions are just guesses that we make based on images or details in a text.)
Guided Reading Lessons (Station 1)

Group: Blue

Title of Text: ‘The Case of the Missing Grading Book’ (by http://kids.mysterynet.com)

Text Type: Mystery

Target Strategy: Predicting

Pre-reading: Before we read our story, let’s review what it means to make a prediction. A
prediction is a guess that we make about what will happen next. We can use details in a text or
picture clues to make a prediction. The story we are reading is a mystery called ‘The Case of the
Missing Grade Book. As we read, we are going to stop and highlight different parts. As we read
the first section, I want you to think about where the story is taking place and what characters
are involved. (Read the first section of the story; it introduces the characters involved and the
setting. We will read this section and then highlight the characters and setting.)

Reading: The remainder of the text will be chunked by each character’s statement of what they
were doing when the grade book was stolen. Before each section I will ask, As we read this
section, I want you to think about what reason that person would have for taking the grade book.

Responding: After reading the story and looking at the details we highlighted, who do you
predict stole the grade book? What details in the story support your prediction? (Discuss their
responses) Before we find out who stole the grade book, I want to remind you that our
predictions are not always right, and that is okay. When I read this mystery, I made a prediction
and got it wrong! So, before we find out who stole the gradebook, let’s go back and re-read some
parts of the mystery to help us discover who stole the gradebook.

Exploring: (Re-reading the first section that tells the reader what was not allowed in the gym that
day…this hint will help the students understand who stole the book when I reveal the answer) As
we reread this section, I want you to think about what is not allowed to happen on the gym floor.
After reading this section, has your prediction changed at all? Why? (Discuss this) The person
who actually stole the gradebook was….Hank! (discuss what details in the story support this and
re-emphasis that it is okay if they didn’t make the correct prediction; walk around to other
stations while students silently re-read designated sections)

Applying: What are some other times in school that you have had to make predictions? In our
science lesson, what predictions did you have to make when building your boat?
Group: Orange

Title of Text: ‘The Case of the Missing Shamrock’ (by http://kids.mysterynet.com)

Text Type: Mystery

Target Strategy: Predicting

Pre-reading: Before we read our story, let’s review what it means to make a prediction. A
prediction is a guess that we make about what will happen next. We can use details in a text or
picture clues to make a prediction. The story we are reading is a mystery called ‘The Case of the
Missing Shamrock’. As we read, we are going to stop and highlight different parts. As we read
the first section, I want you to think about where the story is taking place and what characters
are involved. (Read the first section of the story; it introduces the characters involved and the
setting. We will read this section and then highlight the characters and setting.)

Reading: The remainder of the text will be chunked by each character’s statement of what they
were doing when the grade book was stolen. Before each section I will ask, as we read this
section, I want you to think about what reason that person would have for taking the shamrock
plant. What details should we highlight to support that?

Responding: After reading the story and looking at the details we highlighted, who do you
predict stole the grade book? What details in the story support your prediction? (Discuss their
responses) Before we find out who stole the grade book, I want to remind you that our
predictions are not always right, and that is okay. When I read this mystery, I made a prediction
and got it wrong! So, before we find out who stole the shamrock, let’s go back and re-read some
parts of the mystery to help us discover who stole the shamrock.

Exploring: (Re-reading the first section that tells the reader what was not allowed in the gym that
day…this hint will help the students understand who stole the book when I reveal the answer) As
we reread this section, I want you to think about why someone would want to take Mrs.
Flanagan’s shamrock plant. After reading this section, has your prediction changed at all? Why?
(Discuss this) The person who stole the Shamrock plant was Maria (discuss what details in the
story support this and re-emphasis that it is okay if they didn’t make the correct prediction; walk
around to other stations while students silently re-read designated sections)

Applying: What are some other times in school that you have had to make predictions? In our
science lesson, what predictions did you have to make when building your boat?
Group: Red and Green

Title of Text: ‘The Case of the Missing Music’ (by http://kids.mysterynet.com)

Text Type: Mystery

Target Strategy: Predicting

Pre-reading: Before we read our story, let’s review what it means to make a prediction. A
prediction is a guess that we make about what will happen next. We can use details in a text or
picture clues to make a prediction. The story we are reading is a mystery called ‘The Case of the
Missing Music’. As we read, we are going to stop and highlight different parts. As we read the
first section, I want you to think about where the story is taking place and what characters are
involved. (Read the first section of the story; it introduces the characters involved and the setting.
We will read this section and then highlight the characters and setting.)

Reading: The remainder of the text will be chunked by each character’s statement of what they
were doing when the grade book was stolen. Before each section I will ask, as we read this
section, I want you to think about what reason that person would have for taking the music.
What details should we highlight to support that?

Responding: After reading the story and looking at the details we highlighted, who do you
predict stole the music? What details in the story support your prediction? (Discuss their
responses) Before we find out who stole the music, I want to remind you that our predictions are
not always right, and that is okay. When I read this mystery, I made a prediction and got it
wrong! So, before we find out who stole the music, let’s go back and re-read some parts of the
mystery to help us discover who stole the music.

Exploring: (Re-reading the first section that tells the reader what was not allowed in the gym that
day…this hint will help the students understand who stole the book when I reveal the answer) As
we reread this section, I want you to think about why someone would want to steal the music
sheets. After reading this section, has your prediction changed at all? Why? (Discuss this) The
person who stole the music was Ron (discuss what details in the story support this and re-
emphasis that it is okay if they didn’t make the correct prediction; walk around to other stations
while students silently re-read designated sections)

Applying: What are some other times in school that you have had to make predictions? In our
science lesson, what predictions did you have to make when building your boat?