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TECHNICAL WORKING COMMITTEE

PROGRAM/ INVITATION/ CERTIFICATES
JENSEN RYAN T. LIM
JOEL D. CAMINO
ALONA E. CAMINO

REFRESHMENTS
AIRA CRESSELE C. ANDES
RICHELDA S. LOPEZ
MARIDEN L. VILLANUEVA

REGISTRATION / MASTERS OF CEREMONIES
KAREN A. TARCENA
BLESILDA A. INOY

RESEARCHERS/CONTRIBUTORS
JOEL D. CAMINO
ALONA E. CAMINO
PURISIMA H. DARILAG
MARIA JEANNETTE H. DARILAG
KAREN A. TARCENA
BLESILDA A. INOY
AIRA CRESSELE C. ANDES
RICHELDA S. LOPEZ
MARIDEN L. VILLANUEVA
JENSEN RYAN T. LIM

Theodore Sizer-He stressed the concept of “less is more” when applied to the curricular scope of schools. It means more is to be gained by committing the school and its resources to the task of cultivating the intellect through academic disciplines. Education During the Ancient Period Education in Ancient Asia Education in Ancient Greece Education in Ancient Rome Medieval Education .HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS PERIODS AND INFLUENCES 5.

but it was from contributions to society or to the ideal state. EDUCATION IN ANCIENT GREECE b. Hutchins.  The Early Period (5th Century . explanation.He averred that education should be based on the  At 20-30. To learn ordinary skills and trades of life  Knowledge.) He is best known for his bookCultural Literacy:  At seven boys and girls were gathered in the barracks for physical What Every American Needs to Know and another one entitled. logic. He said that we should not allow  Physical training for the girls were also rigorous to bear healthy children students to think that the purpose of education is simply to get better jobs.C.4th Century B. Athenian Education 2. Hirsch. Spartan Education opportunities for all. scientific inquiry.Essential Tools of a Teacher 2. He advocated that being culturally literate means understanding the  Memorizing the laws of Lycurgus – the Spartan lawgiver and the epics of necessary information (shared symbols) to communicate in the national Homer.-(1928. genuine education is intellectual education.Imitation and apprenticeship  Skills. This is known as teleological the Minoans. required philosophy and ideas from the Modern World. use metals.  Dispositions. 1. and to build and sail ships. toward the learner. About people and social organizations. Aristotle. the Mosaic Law of the Jews etc. Memorizing the contents of the Confucian classics. to knowledge. Plato – Ideas are perfect paradigms and universal. Toward self.The civil service examination. communication and Methods of teaching and learning: language. epistemology. He stressed that the SPARTAN EDUCATION function of education is to provide sound training in the fundamental ways of  It is controlled by the state and exercised the right to expose sickly thinking. Present-Day Proponents of Perennialism and Essentialism 1. specific disciplines. Assessment. and research on effective learning and teaching. planning. Socrates. cultures. to trade. mathematics. From the Egyptians – Pictographic & Hieroglyphic writing a. babies on the mountainside to die 3.) Philosophers and their 2. evaluation. natural science. (The Paideia Proposal) 2.Explained organisms in terms of their The Greeks were the first people in Europe to develop civilization. “Iliad” and the “Odyssey” community. social behavior 2. definite training in the use of arms and warfare began 4. Arthur Bestor-(1908-1994) For him. and role modeling. Rote learning and memorization management. From the Assyrians – Cuneiform writing philosophy: 3. toward teaching. and this is the only education that has worth.D. and toward the Content: profession. at 20  Agoge – state training . Mortimer Adler-(1902-2001) Known for his proposal for an educational There are two contrasting types of education in Greece: system that would fulfill the democratic promise of equal educational 1.  At 18. The Schools We training Need. rhetoric. Jr. human growth and development. 1. the Vedas. the Tripitaka. instruction. CONNECTING PHILOSOPHY TO THEORY AND PRACTICE Contributions: 1. Robert M. service in the army and guarding the borders of the state were classical disciplines of grammar. c. From the Chinese . E.Knowledge is virtue and all virtuous actions are based on Egyptians and the Phoenician traders that the Greeks learned how to write.

useful.  Grammalist – grammar teacher 2.  Palaestrae – public gymnasiums 3. Unilateral internationalism  The first state in the world’s history where human capacities were 2. mind and New Standards for Teacher Education spirit. Social regard for learning. the most effective of its kind. . no doubt necessary. Frequency. This involved a long process of conditioning. school and societal goals. 1. boys can be sent to the palaestra for physical training  Introduced Holistic education – the development of perfect citizens.  Styles of internationalism ATHENIAN EDUCATION 1. To Plato and Aristotle. and actions and subsequently make decisions that lead to the  They approached their problem in a scientific way.  The Spartan education system ensured that the citizens were reared in INTERNATIONALISM such a way that they neither would . Curriculum.1987)  Education is the making of man. asking what a man was. by examining accomplishment of classroom. one which makes a thing 2.  Paidogogus– once a slave but very learned and was in-charge with 5. Bilateral internationalism allowed to develop freely 3. Planning. nations are held to be equal as opposed to national chauvinism and racism. the best.  Paedotribe – gymnastics teacher 3. but not education. (NCBTS. not training men to make things What is good teaching? (technicism). principles governing human life . Aim: To foster social change specially in the field of science and technology to  Paidonomus – a barracks commander meet the needs of the changing society. Community linkages teaching the boys with the intricacies of manner and morals 7.  Arete’ – a virtue or excellence. Teaching someone the skills of using a computer or a What are the seven domains? mobile phone is not education. Nature/Quality. nor could live by themselves one  Ethical belief or scientific approach where in which people of different with the public good.  Didaskaleon – music school 4.  Heterae – cultured women who participated in social life and intellectual discussions of the upper class males Important dimensions of good teaching:  Kitharist – music teacher 1. knowledge.awareness. Personal growth and development. beginning at birth where deemed much less the children of their parents  It encourages an active partnership between teachers and students than the wards of the state. body. Learning environment. Self. 6. moral goodness. consistency and appropriateness. and reporting. 2. Why study Educational Philosophy? knowing both how to rule and to be ruled on the basis of justice (Plato & It provides a means of systematic inquiry by which teachers can examine their Aristotle) values. assessing. it is not a true culture of the whole person. Social Experimentalism a hero. Multilateral internationalism  They believed that the greatest work of art was the human form  Man should be molded in the ideals of the “arête” or chivalrous honor EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THE  School attendance was voluntary ROLE OF THE TEACHER  At seven. Diversity of teachers. moving from awareness and analysis of issues to action.

Three major activities: practical. a treatise founded on the aristocratic ideals to unfold the natural capacities of the child which can be enhanced or retarded by that education must be controlled by the state.  It emphasized a practical training for the military life and citizenship acquired 7. field of cognitive development.wrote De Oratore. providing the ideals of education in the Middle Ages 2. sensory 2. This leading movement in education is attributed to John Dewey. He viewed education as a process of social activity and the school was related to the society which it ROMAN EDUCATION served.schoolmaster he called as the social function of education. the methods used in the school. JOHN DEWEY.known for his highly structured methodology of teaching (Herbartian Method) Two categories of curriculum: 4. Socrates – developed the question-and. traditions of Rome. JOHANN FRIEDRICH HERBART. Ephebi. not 6.  Protagoras – one of the leading Sophists who wrote extensive 2. “wise men” . emphasized that an orator must be a man of integrity and character.  Grammaticus – teacher of language and literature Two points of View:  Rhetor – teacher of rhetoric  Schola – secondary school 1. Plato – wrote the Republic.answer method of inquiry known DEVELOPMENTALISM as the “Socratic Method”.wrote Instituto de Oratore. Quintillian. Aristotle – developed the first scientific argument based on human Noted Developmentalists: nature. JOHANN HEINRICH PESTALOZZI –He believed that pedagogical reform  Sophists – Gr. The focus is on  Ludus – primary school the contribution of education to the preservation and progress of the society. FREIDRICH WILHELM AUGUST FROEBEL. a good citizen. . C. gymnastike. Mousike.  It is concerned with the development of a vir bonus.known for his description of Greek education. Cicero.  The aim of Roman education was utilitarian.MARIA MONTESSORI.physical training and athletics needed in war and and muscular. law of exercise and the law of effect.known for his contribution to early childhood education in the learning but practice. EDWARD L. 1. Children should not be thought why they don’t understand. A psychological movement advocating a child-centered point of view which aimed B. 3. not theory but application. language and literature which offered early childhood education. and formal. competitions.  Ephebus – a young man at 18.known internationally because of her Casa de Bambini 1. THORNDIKE. JEAN PIAGET. a man endowed with the SOCIOLOGICAL MOVEMENT highest virtues.a scientific educator known for his laws of learning through memorization of the Laws of the Twelve Tables and the historical such as: the law of readiness. enters military training and join the Introduce the role of play in the school program.known for his philosophy of pragmatism.Social Traditionalism Aim: To give pupils insight into their traditions to arouse sympathy toward social Two most influential Roman teachers and thinkers: service 1. scholars who teach for fees would lead to social reform. Learning come through the senses. 5. “kindergarten”.Contributions:  Ladder system of education Great Athenian philosophers:  Free and absolute education for all A. what  Ludi magister.includes music.

Catechetical schools.the greatest schoolmaster of this time Contribution: Aims: Preservation of the state.“Psycho-physical parallelism—series of phenomena church pertaining to extension are parallel to those pertaining to thought”. Aim: Preservation of natural goodness and virtue of the individual MONASTICISM Type/Content Aims: Democratic and universal type of education 1. Principle of growth a. Pestalozzian b. infidelity.theological training schools under the direct EDUCATION IN THE 20TH CENTURY instruction of the bishops. Upheld the right of an individual to his own opinion. 1. Salvation of individual souls Informal exercises of the senses 2. Benedict Spinoza. Catechumenal schools – for those who desire to become members of the 2. MEDIEVAL EDUCATION Old moral values were replaced by sexual laxity. immodesty. Intellectual disciplineTypes: 2. liberty of conscience. Religious and moral 2. Rene Descartes – “Cogito ergo sum” –”I think. economic protection. secondary and Colleges) 2. and b.for the training of church leaders c. Conceptualists (Abelard) . Scholastic Realists (Anselm) Public and private schools (Elementary. therefore I exist” a. Aim: Moral regeneration of man Types of education: Implication a. Physical education SCHOLASTICISM 3. poverty and obedience) Methods Type/Content: 1. Textbook was dwelt on “Robinson Crusoe” (Dafoe) and “Emile” (Rousseau). unity. and identity The principle of self-abnegation or organized asceticism as those in seminaries Types/Content and monasteries. Principle of individualization Rule of Benedict b. Worldly renunciation for the sake of moral improvement ( thru vows of chastity. and EARLY CHRISTIAN EDUCATION extravagance. Religious trainingSchools: freedom of thought Rationalist Thinkers 1. Literacy activities and manual training based on The 2. The Seven Liberal Arts ( Trivium and Quadrivium) Schools: Contribution Monastic schools were established by Charlemagne and supervised by a missi Education should consider the nature of the child dominici NATIONALISM Alcuin. Moral and. Principle of pupil activity 3. Support the church doctrines by rational arguments 1. Herbartian Agencies 1. Vocational training Aims: Methods a. Cathedral or Episcopal schools. b. NATURALISM Contribution: The spread of Christianity all over the world.

Rabelais and Milton) Medieval universities – Pope. king Palace schools . grammar to enhance memorizing.Germany Examination Contribution: Lycees.France Knowledge on how to organize our own schools Tutorial System Methods CHIVALRIC EDUCATION Locke’s three steps of learning: Sensation.To prepare aristocratic youth for the life of a gentleman in the world affairs ( Michael de Montaigne) Organization: 3. Sense realists Agencies: Monastic schools . memory and reasoning Aim: Teach the best ideals for entrance into aristocracy The use of corporal punishment in case of obstinacy (stubbornness) Type/Content: Taught young nobles to manage their estate and acquire the class consciousness Contribution: The value of drill subjects such as spelling. Social realists Thomas Aquinas 3.England Gymnasium. and the fields of battle Contribution: Aim: To develop an individual capable of controlling all aspects of his life by Training for effective warfare reason.Bishop 1.  Universitas Magistrorum et Scholarium or universitas. suppressing passions and feelings. then court schools. social.Knowledge and understanding human society through the study of literature ( Vives.student body FORMAL DISCIPLINE  Nation – group of students according to place of origin Aim: Formation of character or habits through exercises of the mind. Summa Theologicae. to live in a highly artificial world.official doctrine of the church by papal decree written by St. mathematics and of superiority over the lower class.Abbot Aims: Cathedral schools . To develop a harmonious society working in accordance with natural and  Chancellor-given authority to issue a teaching license. universal law (Bacon. moral and intellectual development through mastery of linguistics and  Rector – chief executive officer of the university mathematics  Methods: Lecture  Repetition Agencies  Disputation Grammar schools. emperor.King 2. Agency RATIONALISM Home.a corporation of Comenius. reasoning. 2. analyzing and problem solving Consisted of physical. Content THE GUILD SYSTEM OF EDUCATION Results to the creation of a group of intellectual aristocrats called illuminati Aim: Vocational training Types/Content: . military and religious activities. body and self-control  Councilor – head of the nations  Facultas – group of teachers teaching the same subject Types/Content  Dean – head of the facultas Physical. Mulcaster and Ratke) teachers and students  Studium Generale. skills.

doing it well and making RENAISSANCE EDUCATION sure it is retained A. Jansenists-Nothing is to be memorized unless Types/Content understood Literary Physical Education Contribution: Aesthetic Social training Discipline among Catholic schools was firm but free from brutality. journeymen Types/Content 3. NORTHERN OR SOCIAL HUMANISM Aim: Eliminate the ignorance of the common people and the hypocrisy of the Stages of development as craftsman: social leaders. apprentice 2. Literary education Agencies: SARACENIC APPROACH TO EDUCATION Court schools French lycees Aim: Search for knowledge and the application of scientific facts to the affairs of German gymnasium Universitas Methods: daily life. 1. master craftsmen 1. Agencies: Adapting the work of an individual to his needs and capacities 1. Classical Art Literature Agencies: Home and court schools REALISTIC MOVEMENT Contribution: ( From Vittorino da Feltre) Three Groups Developing the power to think 1. Jesuits-Doing small amount of work at a time. Financial aid was given to needy Ascham: Double translation in teaching language. chantry schools 3. Scholarship Religious and moral education Agencies/Methods: a. Moral education 4. Christian Brothers-Grade pupils according to abilities Aim: To develop personality through music and the arts. students Contribution Muslim curriculum was the most complete. guild schools Organization: B. COUNTER-REFORMATION MOVEMENT Contribution: Aim: Religious moralism to develop an unquestioning obedience to the authority 1.Reading and writing in the vernacular for commerce and industry. Classical literature Contribution: 2. 3. they made Type/Content: 2. Biblical literature Mercantilism and industrial knowledge. c. Improved strategies in teaching subjects like science because of the inventions of the church. Humanistic or literary realists . Social education 5. education of women  Memorizing the Koran Strum: Memorization and imitation  Elementary education was open to all. Erasmus: Individualized instruction Type/Content: Vives: Use of the vernacular. Agencies: Early caliphs founded elementary schools including universities. Leading figure was Guarino Veronese who designed a curriculum consisting of physical and intellectual education. burgher schools Inclusion of play in the curricula 2. INDIVIDUALISTIC HUMANISM b.