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Brewery Design Modules

Sponsor : PP&C – Engineering Policy Manager © Copyright
Authors : Mr. M. Dennebos, Mr. H.E. Hopman, Mr. A.M.Th. Warmerdam
Document manager : PS - ED&DS
Issue : 02 – Final
Date : April 2001
Approval Committe : BDM Steering Committee
Approval : PP&C Director
Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.30.70.010
Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 2 of 32

Brewery Design Modules

“UTILITIES CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM

FOR BREWERIES”

CONTENTS
Page:
1. SUMMARY 5

2. INTRODUCTION 7
2.1 AVERAGE CONSUMPTION IN DIFFERENT AREAS OF A BREWERY 7
3. DEFINITIONS 8
3.1 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM [UCMS] 8
3.2 UTILITY MONITORING SYSTEM [UMS] 8
3.3 UTILITY MANAGEMENT 8
4. OBJECTIVES OF A UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM (UCMS) 9
4.1 BREWERY COMPARISON SYSTEM [BCS] 9
4.2 REDUCTION OF UTILITY CONSUMPTION AND UTILITY COST 9
5. MEASURING PHILOSOPHY 10
5.1 IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT LEVELS FOR MEASURING ACCORDING TO A UCMS 10
5.1.1 Site Consumption (level 0 UCMS) 10
5.1.2 Area Consumption (level I UCMS) 10
5.1.3 Individual large consumers (level II UCMS) 10
5.1.4 Individual small consumers (UCMS level III) 11
5.2 UCMS AND COMMON COST CENTRE STRUCTURE [CCCS] 12
6. METERING 14
6.1 INSTALLATION 14
6.2 ACCURACY AND RELIABILITY OF A UCMS 14
7. TYPE OF METERING 17
7.1 REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION 17
7.2 TYPES OF METERS 17
8. WATER 19
8.1 REQUIRED METERING POINTS 19
8.2 WATER TYPES 19
8.3 LEVEL 0 AND 1 20
8.3.1 Level II and III 21

9. ELECTRICITY 24
9.1 STARTING POINTS 24
9.2 OVERVIEW METERING POINTS PER LEVEL 24
9.3 NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENTS COSTS PER LEVEL 26

Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.30.70.010
Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 3 of 32

Brewery Design Modules
9.4 AVERAGE ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN THE DIFFERENT AREA’S 26
10. OTHER UTILITIES : FUEL, STEAM, CO2, COMPRESSED AIR AND COOLING 27
10.1 IDENTIFICATION OF CONSUMERS 27
10.2 PRIMARY UTILITY FLOWS : FUEL AND CO2 27
10.3 SECONDARY FLOWS : STEAM, COMPRESSED AIR, COOLING 28
10.4 SUMMARY: NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENT COST PER LEVEL (OTHER UTILITIES) 30
11. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: 31
11.1 NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENT COSTS: 31
11.2 POSSIBLE SAVINGS: 32

Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.30.70.010
Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 4 of 32

CONDITIONS OF USE
CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION

1. The standardised information contained in this manual is the sole property of Heineken International
B.V. It reflects the Heineken knowledge and experience, which contents should not be revealed to 3rd
parties.

2. Eligibility for use of the manual is determined by function and geographical location of the user and
issue is authorised by the Corporate Production Policy & Control Director.

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confidentiality of its contents. This manual is for personal use only; no part of this manual may be
copied or distributed without the prior written consent of Heineken.

4. In some cases, more than one copy of the manual may be issued to a single user for onward
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6. Users should ensure that only the latest issue is in use by replacing amended sections with the new
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THE MANAGEMENT
HEINEKEN INTERNATIONAL B.V.

Issue : 02 HMESC : 03.11.10.002
Date : Dec. 2000 Page : 1 of 1

SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT Document type : HMESC Code : Issue date : Chapter : Page : Suggestion(s) : Please return this form to the PP&C Quality Systems Manager. “Corporate Packaging Specifications (EPS)”.001 Date : Apr 2001 Page : 1 of 1 .10. : (+31)715456032 Fax. MODIFICATION REQUEST FORM INTRODUCTION. “BDM Manuals”. : (+31)715457450 Issue : 04 HMESC : 03. The suggestions will be handled according to our standard procedures as quickly as possible and you will be informed about the outcome.11. “Laboratory Instructions”.121 PO Box 510 2380 BB Zoeterwoude The Netherlands Tel. such as: “General Process Instructions”. This form is a means of communication to indicate your suggestions for improvement of Corporate PP&C Documents. etc. Address: Corporate Production Policy & Control Room: 2. “Production Automation & Information Technology Instructions”. “SHE Manual”. who will forward it to the secretary of the relevant Approval Committee.

Decision Corp. Observed shortcoming :  Process conditions  Product specifications 2.10. PP&C : Approval: Authorisation: Name : Corp. Analysis of shortcoming : 3.004 Date : Dec. Doc. Non Conforming Production Process request Brewery : Originator : Procedure: No. 2000 Page : 1 of 1 . Proposal for acceptance Non-conforming process conditions or specifications : Duration : 4.11. Advice RTM/EPCM : 5. PP&C audit  Customer input  Other 1.: Date : Source :  RTM Request  Corp. : Refer. PP&C Director Date/initials : Date/initials : Issue : 02 HMESC : 03.

FRAMEWORK OF BDM 4 3.3 EXECUTION OF ENGINEERING PROJECTS 2 1. CORPORATE POLICY 2 1. CE MARKING 5 5.2 BREWERY ENGINEERING &AUTOMATION MODULES (BEAMS). 2 1.30. 2002 INTRODUCTION Page : 1 of 5 . 5 Issue : 05 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES HMESC : 01. SEE ALSO CE-MARKING POLICY OF CORPORATE PP&C.6 PROCEDURES FOR IMPROVEMENT OF THE BDMS AND BEAMS 3 1.4 SEPARATING 'POTS & PANS' TENDER FROM 'AUTOMATION' TENDER.7 AMENDMENTS TO THE BDM BEFORE THE NEXT VERSION IS RELEASED 4 2.5 PROCEDURES FOR NON-CONFORMING PRODUCTION PROCESS 3 1. 3 1. Brewery Design Modules BREWERY DESIGN MODULES INTRODUCTION CONTENTS Page: 1.011 Date : Mar.1 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES (BDM) 2 1.00. HYGIENIC DESIGN MANUAL 5 4.

). process control). Below is an abstract of relevant Corporate Rules & Guidelines.2 BREWERY ENGINEERING &AUTOMATION MODULES (BEAMS). For ‘learning from experience’ reasons. 1. process descriptions and control procedures. Brewery Design Modules 1. stirring. which includes responsibilities of the various parties involved. based on the best available engineering expertise and know-how.3 EXECUTION OF ENGINEERING PROJECTS A joint decision by Operating Companies. projects and investment applications Brewery Design Modules (BDM) have to be used. GPI and “Brewery Set-up according to ISA S88”. a process flow has been developed by HTS for the management of projects. pumping. Standardisation of conceptual design of brewery installations is established through Brewery Design Modules.30.1 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES (BDM) Investments should be based on common standards in order to allow breweries to focus on business improvement and innovation. which are owned by Corporate Production Policy & Control (PP&C). Issue : 05 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES HMESC : 01. 2002 INTRODUCTION Page : 2 of 5 . heating up etc. 1.011 Date : Mar. These rules apply for Green field as well as Brown field breweries. packaging lines. To ensure the use of our collective know-how. especially implementation of new technologies and techniques. a process control solution based on BEAMs is already available and no tender for ‘process control’ is required. RTM’s) and HTS is required on the management of engineering projects (e. rather than re-designing / re-establishing known concepts and solutions.g. Only these documents should be used for the tender procedure. brewhouse. General Process Instructions and SHE instructions are input to the making of the BDM. Brewery Design Modules are approved by the Steering Committee BDM and authorised by the Director of Corporate PP&C. even if not involved directly in the management of a project. Consequently during a project: • From the BEAM library project specific engineering diagrams (P&IDs) should be generated for the ‘pots & pans’ tender. The BEAMs are based on the BDMs. These are manuals. The BEAMs (in combination with BDMs) is a standardization tool for HTS and Opcos to optimise the project specification and execution process and to make it ‘specialist’ independent. In any case.g. while ensuring cost effectiveness. it is preferred to have HTS execute projects. HTS should always be involved in the conceptual phase to centralise the learning experience. Guideline: The content of the Brewery Design Modules (BDM) are guideline. Rule: For all Master Plans. The lowest level of detail is Equipment Modules and Phases (e. In some cases the applicability in brown field situations might be restricted. CORPORATE POLICY The use of the Brewery Design Modules by breweries and the management and execution of engineering projects are subject to certain rules & guidelines. Note: In case a strategic alliance solution (e. Guideline: For every project the standard solutions of the BEAM library of HTS shall be used by generating project specific engineering diagrams and process descriptions for ‘pots & pans’ and ‘process control’ part of the project. 1. Rockwell) is applied. • From the BEAM library project specific control / process descriptions should be generated for the ‘process control’ tender.00. Brewery Engineering & Automation Modules (BEAMs) comprise detailed engineering diagrams. PP&C (EPCM.g.

g. Brewery Manager.) are to be applied. the brewery has to give feedback whether there is a need to amend or change the BDMs or Issue : 05 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES HMESC : 01. piping. Consequently the chance on a successful FAT and commissioning is much bigger. 1. Within 3 weeks the response to the request for ‘derogation of Non-conforming production process’ will be issued by the Director of Corporate PP&C. that have less ‘automation solution’ abilities (e.4 SEPARATING 'POTS & PANS' TENDER FROM 'AUTOMATION' TENDER. but before communication with suppliers starts. vessels) as well as the ‘process control’ system.11. Consequently this will ensure a critical view of the applicability of corporate standards. If the proposed change or addition to the BDM or BEAM is accepted by the Steering Committee. Tendering and awarding of the ‘pots & pans’ part should take place first. tanks. The following issues highlight the benefits: • Prevention that ‘pots & pans’ suppliers will offer an higher price for 'pots & pans' in favour of a complete offer including 'automation'. lies with ‘automation suppliers’.5 PROCEDURES FOR NON-CONFORMING PRODUCTION PROCESS Rule: If breweries wish to deviate from the BEAMs or BDMs and implement different solutions other than described in the BEAM or BDM. This rule applies for HTS as well as for brewery-managed projects. If parties involved in a project (HTS. Separation means that first the tender for the ‘pots & pans’ is done and the project awarded. ISA S88). Guideline: Not later than 8 weeks after the official SAT (Site Acceptance Test) of a project. • To enlarge the ‘pots & pans’ suppliers pool in order to get the best price for ‘pots & pans’ by including 'pots & pans' suppliers. After that the tender of ‘process control’ part commences. they should summarise and argue their proposal on a “Modification Request Form” and submit it to the Quality Systems Manager of PP&C. PP&C (EPCM or RTM’s) and HTS must in an early phase of the project (i. central control rooms).g. quality and sustainability) to separate the tender for ‘pots & pans’ and ‘process control’. Strategic Alliance etc.04. meaning that one supplier both provides the ‘pots & pans’ (e. BEAMs. agree upon the management of projects and how & which corporate standards (e.00. At the same time a decision needs to be made whether specifications should be laid down in a Project Data Book 1. Guideline: Projects of the size ‘process cell’ (or larger) have to be separated in a ‘pots & pans’ tender and ‘process control’ tender with different pools of suppliers. alliance partner Rockwell). Brewery Design Modules Guideline: The Operating Company. Landaluse. it is more beneficial (in terms of cost. which includes integration aspects (e. 2002 INTRODUCTION Page : 3 of 5 .011 Date : Mar. BDM. Some projects are being executed ‘turn-key’. The relevant Steering Committee will evaluate the proposal according to ISO 9000 procedures of Corporate PP&C (03.) • Expertise of large ‘process control’ solutions. • Sustainability of the solution of an ‘automation supplier’ if better (e. ref.g. an application for “derogation of Non-conforming production process” need to be forwarded to Corporate PP&C.402). 1.e. Chief Engineer. Holvrika etc.30.g. after which the tender for ‘process control’ can start. However for ‘bigger’ projects (at least a process cell. etc…) come to the conclusion that a change or addition is recommendable. Technical Management of the brewery should summarise and argue their application on a “Non conforming production process request” form and submit it to the Quality Systems Manager of Corporate PP&C. it will be issued for approval to the Director of Corporate PP&C. conceptual phase).g.6 PROCEDURES FOR IMPROVEMENT OF THE BDMS AND BEAMS It is of great importance to continuously improve the BDM and BEAMs solutions.

2002 INTRODUCTION Page : 4 of 5 . the "best value for money" execution is chosen. Issues that are considered unquestionable or without alternatives are grouped in the column “Design standards”. CHAPTER 3: Process Alternatives Deals with and compares alternative processes. complemented with input from the breweries (through HTS Support). Issue : 05 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES HMESC : 01. MRF). Chapter 6 contains engineering diagrams and specification. which signifies the best balance of relevant criteria (investment costs. FRAMEWORK OF BDM The most important part of the BDM is the Quickflow in the Chapter Summary. which describes low cost design at minimum requirements. CHAPTER 5: Design Variant Deals in detail with the selected process equipment.011 Date : Mar. a separate amendment will be attached in the KIPP and WB PP&C Engineering (Lotus Notes). Since an update of that BDM might take some time. This does not necessarily result in the minimum investment at given technological demands. design variants are mentioned and compared. Brewery Design Modules BEAMs. In most BDMs a “Low Cost Execution” chapter is included. ‘Modification Request Form should be filled in and submitted to the Quality Systems Manager of Corporate PP&C. the framework of the BDM and feedback procedures. Corporate Rules & Guidelines. which in most cases refer to "General Process Instructions". which are not project specific (they can be considered an example).). if applicable. before applying it. 4 and 5 together create the final BDM execution which are summarized in the Quickflow. Executive en Chief Engineers in Europe will be informed by email. technological performance. Comparison and proposed selection of alternative executions is done on the basis of "Pros and Cons". However users of the BDM CD-ROM will not have access to the latest changes to the BDM. etc. Quick flows indicate agreed options and variants as well as the selected alternative and preferred variants of the BDM execution. For the BDMs a uniform presentation has been pursued by means of a fixed set-up. The Quickflow is the decision support tool for determining the scope of any project. which can be described as follows: CHAPTER 1: Introduction Deals with Confidentiality.30. maintainability. CHAPTER 2: Summary Deals with a quick flow and process flow of the BDM. which are not incorporated in the latest version of the BDM yet.g. 2. The selected options in the Quickflow result from the experiences of members of the HTS BE&UT department.00. They have to always consult their HTS account manager to ascertain the latest status of the BDM.7 AMENDMENTS TO THE BDM BEFORE THE NEXT VERSION IS RELEASED Guideline: Amendments are approved changes or comments (through e. Where alternative executions or design variations have been compared. It also describes all relevant process data. CHAPTER 4: Equipment Alternatives Alternative equipment or alternative concepts of the installation is described and compared on the basis of criteria relevant for the installation. 1. CHAPTER 6: Engineering documents The selected alternatives from chapters 3. masterplan or investment application. operating costs.

` 3. but at the lowest possible investment cost. Equipment of poor hygienic design needs more cleaning and des-infection. which is a guideline for Purchasing. Some practices are expected to be implemented as normal practices in the brewery in order to comply with GPI instructions. The Hygienic Design Manual can be found in the standard set of Maintenance Policy Documents issued by Corporate PP&C. Purchasing and Engineering departments of HTS or Opco’s are responsible to take up all relevant Machine Directive aspects in the negotiation. CE MARKING Manufactures and suppliers (Original Equipment Manufacturer. install. One of the most important factors related to the prevention of infections and consumer health risks is the design and condition of process equipment and associated pipelines. Lay-out and make-up of the BDM.011 Date : Mar. the relevant documentation or data available. Operating Companies have to make sure that delivered machines and installations are according to the EC Machinery Directive. Heineken (HTS and Opcos) require the least effort to comply with CE-Marking. The Hygienic Design Manual contains 'best practices' for hygienic design and maintenance. as described in the “Heineken Machinery Directive” manual.00. distribution. 2002 INTRODUCTION Page : 5 of 5 . 5. contracting and execution phase of projects in order to assure that CE marking of machines or installations can be achieved. assemble. including choice of materials. check. Operating Companies are obliged to keep the machines and installations in good and safe condition and shall have for each machine or installation. Engineering departments and Owners of machines and installations to specify. We will automatically arrive at this design when we opt for the cheapest solution from all alternatives mentioned in chapters 4 and 5. Other practices can be classified as best available techniques (at higher cost) which are not applicable for every brewery. Starting point remains compliance with technological demands. etc. Issue : 05 BREWERY DESIGN MODULES HMESC : 01. It should be clear that if 3rd parties design and assemble installations and equipment (including modifications of it). HTS or Opco’s) that assemble installations or equipment in the European Economic Area (EEA). After handing-over of the machines or installations.30. SEE ALSO CE-MARKING POLICY OF CORPORATE PP&C. are obliged to supply it in accordance with the EC Machinery Directive. modify and maintain machines and installations in accordance with the EC Machinery Directive. tendering. “The Heineken Machinery Directive” manual has been developed. modification and maintenance of any installation or equipment. order. HYGIENIC DESIGN MANUAL It is strongly advised to consult the HTS Hygienic Design Manual during design. transport. the Operating Company has been made owner and thus responsible. revision. have been assigned to the “Document Manager BDM” of HTS Project Services section ME&S. During execution of a project and the operational phase of a machine or installation all parties involved have to comply with roles & responsibilities as described in the EC Machine Directive. HACCP and Maintenance Policy standards. Brewery Design Modules CHAPTER 7: Low Cost Execution (if applicable) This chapter includes a L(ow) C(ost) E(xecution) of the same installation. 4. In order to facilitate the obligation to adhere to legal requirements.

For all utility types these levels are detailed out worked out with regard to where meters need to be placed to get the required data (see example for water consumption below for Packaging). When one meter is not functioning this has to be indicated as quickly as possible.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 5 of 32 . In general it can be concluded that a Minimally Required UCMS consists of between 55-60 meters (depending on brewery size) and that no general UCMS configuration for all breweries exists. Only level I and II of the UCMS match with the different cost centres as they are defined in the Common Cost Centre Structure (CCCS). but the increase in number of meters.70. whereas the last two levels are far more detailed but different from “process cell” and “unit” of ISA S88. The UCMS is split-up into four levels. The latter option could optionally be extended with level III.30. This is caused by differences in layout and distribution systems of different breweries. The first two levels are identical to “site” and “area” level in accordance with ISA S88. The objectives of a UCMS are to generate the proper input for the Brewery Comparison System (BCS) as well as sufficient and relevant data to aid in the reduction of utility consumption and cost and hence enable the management of a brewery to set up an effective utility reduction programme. especially at the most detailed levels of metering could cause and Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. SUMMARY A set of minimally required metering points for a Utility Consumption Measuring System (UCMS) has been developed and will be presented in this report. For this reason meter balancing is required. A UCMS needs to be reliable (information must be trusted first hand) and a check on the operation/function of individual meters must be warranted. Brewery Design Modules 1. WATER CONSUMPTION UCMS LEVEL I RECOMMENDED LAYOUT OF METERING POINTS AREA: PACKAGING PACKAGING UCMS LEVEL II PACKAGING LINE 1 PACKAGING LINE 2 PACKAGING OTHERS PACKAGING LINE n CRATE WASHER BOTTLE WASHER BOTTLE/CAN RINSER BOTTLE/CAN PASTEURIZER UCMS LEVEL III CONVEYOR BELT LUBRICATION FILLER UCMS on level 0 and I is sufficient for the BCS while at least a level II UCMS is needed for a utilities consumption reduction programme.

utility savings should not be the only reason for the installation of a UCMS in a brewery.000 1. e. Table 1: Simple payback period for a UCMS Brewery size Annual savings (NLG/year) Investment4 cost for Payback average UCMS period (NLG): (years): NLG/hl1 NLG/hl2 NLG/hl3 0.9 300.000 (hl/year) 55.450.7 Notes : 1 ): From “Gap to fill” analyses: lowest possible savings potential for utilities 2 ): From “Gap to fill” analyses: average possible savings potential for utilities 3 ): From “Gap to fill” analyses: highest possible savings potential for utilities 4 ): Above pay-back periods are related to investment costs for meters only which do not include cost for a data transmission network. II.000. and III are provided.5 3.000 435.000 466.350.48 2.000 (hl/year) 165.6-16 1.000 0.000 610. Savings of aproximately 25% in utility consumption can be reached after installation of a proper UCMS.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 6 of 32 .000 240.000 (hl/year) 16. Meter balancing (by measuring all flows) is required only for the levels 0 and I.000 720.000 4.1-3.30. Payback periods of the investment costs for UCMS can range form three years for a small brewery and one year for a big brewery (see table 1).70. In this document approximate prices for the different meters at Level 0.g.11 0.000.000 268.500 72. The achievable savings however strongly depend on the consumption level from which a utility savings programme is started. I.000 0. UCMS should also be used as a tool to help monitor the cause of abnormally high utility consumption quickly. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.000 0.3-8. reporting software and – hardware. a brewery where a utility savings programme is already in operation will not be able to obtain additional savings of 25% on top of the already achieved savings. Brewery Design Modules unacceptable increase in investment costs. However. provided that based on the acquired data a brewery starts with full commitment an utility savings programme.

0 hl/hl average 6.5 kWh/hl • Air 0.1. In chapters 8.0-18.4 and Table 11.30.3 – 1.3. Brewery Design Modules 2.5 kWh/hl 1.4 kWh/hl • WWTP 0. • Cooling 1.8 hl/hl • Water total brewery 4.steam 0.0. 9 and 10.5 kWh/hl • Water Treatment 0.2 hl/hl • Water consumption brewing and cellars average 2.6 kWh/hl • CO2 0. Generating data for the Brewery Comparison System.g. 2. This report deals with the minimally required number of metering points for the registration of the water and utility consumption of a brewery.3 – 1.5 kWh/hl 1.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 7 of 32 .5 .15 kWh/N.1 AVERAGE CONSUMPTION IN DIFFERENT AREAS OF A BREWERY An indication of the specific consumption for the various utilities is given below.3 hl/hl • Water consumption packaging average 2.0 – 1.5 .4 – 1.5 – 2.5 kWh/hl produced 2.5 kWh/hl • Packaging 2.CO2 0.5 – 3.3 hl/hl For details of the consumption at lower levels. Generating data to aid in reduction of utility consumption and utility cost.m³ 1. INTRODUCTION A set of minimally required metering points for a Utility Consumption Measuring System (UCMS) has been developed and presented in this report.09 . see: Table 7.0 kWh/hl • Water consumption utilities average 1.5 kWh/hl • Brewing and cellars 1. Two objectives are to be reached with a UCMS: 1. electricity and the other utilities.0 kWh/m³ 0. including the detection of excessive consumptions (e.18 kWh/kg. 9. Monitoring of utility installations for the purpose of operation and control are excluded (see definitions).5 – 3.3 – 4.0 kWh/hl 0. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. 2.25 . a detailed overview of UCMS level 0 – III is given for water.70.5 kWh/hl • General 0.5 kWh/kgCOD removed 0.5 kWh/hl • Steam 10 kWh/ton.3. leaking underground water distribution systems).

This includes monitoring and measuring of flows and optimisation (minimisation) of utility consumption/utility cost. DEFINITIONS 3.alarm registration. control and optimisation.status registration of equipment including starting and stopping of equipment.visualisation.2 UTILITY MONITORING SYSTEM [UMS] The purpose of a UMS is to measure and analyse. Utility Consumption Measuring and Utility Monitoring are tools for Utility Management. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 8 of 32 .70.trend charting. . 3.1 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM [UCMS] Utility measuring is achieved by collecting data on the consumption of utilities using consumption meters in the brewery. . reporting of flows/consumption as in a UCMS. The collected data are then produced into utility consumption reports.3 UTILITY MANAGEMENT Utility management is an overall definition of the process of optimisation of the consumption of utilities and utility installations. by means of dedicated software. Brewery Design Modules 3. utility installations and processes for the purpose of operation.30. . Such a system is specific for the Utilities Area and may be used as follows: . Production reports are generated elsewhere and are outside the scope of this policy. 3.

.Adequate information on consumption by end users. see the handbook on BCS definitions.Supplies of drinking water or electricity to local inhabitants.Consumption for Softdrinks production. Consumption data for BCS must be production related only. the following consumption figures should be available in a brewery: water.70. carbon dioxide.Involvement of the brewery staff and employees. compressed air from electricity or brew water from raw water). Brewery Design Modules 4. Some examples of data that should not be reported in BCS are: . For more details of data used in BCS. OBJECTIVES OF A UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM (UCMS) The primary objective of a UCMS is to obtain suitable data for a utility management programme.30. electricity. water. Utilities which are produced from “Primary” utilities are considered as “Secondary utilities” (eg steam produced from fuel-oil or natural gas.1 BREWERY COMPARISON SYSTEM [BCS] In order to collect the necessary data for BCS.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 9 of 32 . best practices and benchmarks or theoretical values. Energy and water reduction policies are a starting point (pre-requisite) for a programme to reduce utilities consumption. a successful conservation programme is possible. Only if the above-mentioned conditions are met. fuel. Targets are set according to practical experience. Marketing/sales etc).Consumption in Maltings. . Such utilities are considered as “Primary utilities”. This programme can only be successful under the following two conditions: . these figures can be compared with set targets. . fuel. If these targets are exceeded (or a trend-wise increase is noticed) plans can be developed to reduce utilities consumption.Consumption of offices not related to beer production (Headoffice. 4. Involvement of the brewery staff means that consumers of utilities must feel responsible for their consumption and be commended for achieving targets/reductions. The secondary objective is to generate the required consumption data mandatory for BCS. By collecting data on the consumption of utilities (steam. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. both the primary and secondary utility flows would have to be measured. This means that utilities that are supplied for other purposes (eg third parties) must be measured and reported separately. electricity. compressed air and cooling).2 REDUCTION OF UTILITY CONSUMPTION AND UTILITY COST For this purpose. 4. . and CO2 balance.

Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. . After installing a system with Level II metering. At UCMS levels 0 and I (see below) of metering. different levels of detailed metering are required and shown below. At one end is the total brewery consumption (relevant for BCS) and at the other end is a large number of small individual consumers. is very important.Packaging.3 INDIVIDUAL LARGE CONSUMERS (LEVEL II UCMS) At this level of detailed metering. 5. Brewery Design Modules 5.1.1. For these reasons. In due time sufficiently detailed information will become available through BCS to compare the production- related consumption of breweries world-wide. Only the overall (brewery/site) consumption is measured.1 IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT LEVELS FOR MEASURING ACCORDING TO A UCMS Four levels of UCMS detailing are considered (in line with the physical distribution system of most breweries and the most important cost allocation centres).1 SITE CONSUMPTION (LEVEL 0 UCMS) This is the minimum level of metering currently existing at all breweries for billing and generation of data. In between are the consumption of the different areas.Distribution and logistics.70.30. offices and deliveries to third parties) are included in the overall figure. information will become available with which it is possible to decide which parts of Level III are required. which require more meters.2 AREA CONSUMPTION (LEVEL I UCMS) Area Consumption (level I UCMS) includes the following brewery areas: . In some cases.Beer production: . then the data acquired at this level would not be sufficient for BCS use [see 4. 5.Brewery general (separate headquarters/offices only) 5. 5. if the consumption of non-beer production related parts of the brewery (eg for softdrinks production. sufficient information is available to start utility conservation programmes.1]. . which are distributed over the various departments of a brewery. The identification of large consumers. .010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 10 of 32 . MEASURING PHILOSOPHY The utility consumption of a brewery consists of the sum of various smaller consumers.Utilities.1. The choice can be found chapters 8 and 10 of this policy. the consumption of different production areas and third parties as well as non-production related consumption can be compared.

4 INDIVIDUAL SMALL CONSUMERS (UCMS LEVEL III) This level of detailed measurement of utility consumption for minimising utility consumption is normally applied in certain situations. the various equipment have to be measured separately to find which is the high consumer. measurement of consumption at this level will monitor the operating efficiency and assist in the optimisation of the system.70.monitoring COP of the cooling installation.If electricity consumption at the Utilities area is higher than the set target. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. Brewery Design Modules 5.30. .efficiency of steam boilers : fuel consumption per ton steam.1.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 11 of 32 . . .For conversion processes like steam boilers and cooling plants.efficiency of air compressors : electricity consumption per Nm3 air. Some examples are as follows: . Examples are: .

Maintenance. Energy & Water etc.general – finance & support. This to enable linking cost centre responsibility (of a person) to utility consumption.technical services. . . .production – general.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 12 of 32 . area level of the CCCS is level I of UCMS. 9-Central Technical Service Cost centres (LEVEL 1) 8-Distribution&Logistics 4-General Production Who is responsible? 5-Beer Production 6-Packaging 7-Utilities Common Chart of Account For what responsible? 1 Personnel costs 2 Maintenance costs X 3 Energy&water costs 4 Depreciation costs 5 Other fixed costs The first objective of a UCMS is to generate data for analysing and reducing utility consumption of various consumers in the brewery. The objective of the CCCS. Personnel. Brewery Design Modules 5.2 UCMS AND COMMON COST CENTRE STRUCTURE [CCCS] In this chapter the relationship between cost allocation and the Utility Consumption Measuring System is explained. is to introduce a cost allocation system in which all costs can be assigned to various operations e. These measurements can also be used to capture the cost of utility consumption under the respective cost centres provided in a brewery. .production – packaging. . The site (Brewery is level 0) has nine areas: .distribution & logistics. The structure of the CCCS is common for levels 0 and I of the UCMS.production .production – (beer) production. . .30.sales.production – utilities.g. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. . Therefore the information from a UCMS has to be as much as is practically identical to the cost coding structure of the brewery.e.marketing. which is common for all breweries and is based on ISA S88 structure.70. i.

30. Sales only offices and Production General 5 Production .Beer Production Yes 6 Production – Packaging Yes 7 Production – Utilities Yes 8 Production – Distribution & Yes Miscellaneous or Logistics offices 9 Production . Although e. However levels II and III of the UCMS are not similar to the Process Cell and Train level (ISA S88 standard) of the CCCS. air-conditioning in the tropics can consume substantial power and is part of the fixed cost in the brewery. The reduction of this type of consumption is considered part of good housekeeping (operation based on time clocks or on presence of staff). Table 2: Relation of the subdivisions between CCCS and a UCMS Division in: To be measured in: Differences between CCCS and Common Cost Centre Structure: Utility Consumption BCS/UCMS: Measuring System: CCCS Area or level : Area or UCMS level 0 and I: Remarks (CCCS): Remarks (UCMS/BCS): Third parties Yes Not mentioned 0 Brewery General – Finance Yes/No Yes for electricity Miscellaneous or and Support. This consumption however is required for BCS purposes and therefor has to be measured in UCMS. marketing. 2.g. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. 1 of teamleader X).g.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 13 of 32 . etc) are covered in CCCS. but levels II and III of UCMS strongly differ.) is not covered by a UCMS for reasons already explained (negligible consumption and finely distributed end-users). Third parties (maltings.g. cost of water consumption to cost centre of One Way Packaging line no. Brewery Design Modules This means that if utility consumption is measured for e. softdrinks production. but as part of Production – Beer Production (other). the structure and level of detailing between level II and III of UCMS and CCCS differ.g. Production-Packaging.70. Due to the fact that large consumption (cost) of utilities takes place in different parts of the brewery than other cost (e. cost related to this consumption can be allocated directly to the corresponding cost centre for that same area. Problems will arise during allocating cost based on UCMS level II and III measurements. So level 0 and 1 of UCMS basically coincide with CCCS. these types of consumers consists of a large number of small consumers distributed over the site and therefore it is impractical to monitor individually.Technical No Yes for electricity Miscellaneous or Services only offices Notes: 1. an office has primary cost for personnel but negligible consumption of utilities). Brewery General (in CCCS consisting of: finance. etc. Marketing. support. This means that every brewery needs to identify how they can properly allocate the cost of measured utility consumption at level II and III to the right cost centres of the different budget responsibles (e.

2 ACCURACY AND RELIABILITY OF A UCMS A UCMS needs to be reliable (information must be trusted first hand) and a check on the operation/function of individual meters must be straightforward.The distribution system of the various utilities on the brewery .The number of meters is influenced by: . When one meter is not functioning this has to be indicated as quickly as possible.The required accuracy . However if one meter fails. The cost of individual meters depends on: .Location of meters (pipe bridge.The local labour costs . This is easily revealed if all data collected is put in a spreadsheet and a monthly trend of consumption may be compared.70.The type of meter selected (see section 7. A faulty meter reading will throw up figures which are way off. Experience has shown that a field accuracy of 1-2 % is achievable.The number of meters already available . The installation costs are influenced by: .30. Although individual meters with an accuracy of < 1 % are normally used it will be impossible to achieve the same accuracy for a complete UCMS. If E is also provided with a meter and if one of the meters fails or gives a wrong reading. the calculated consumption would be in error. Brewery Design Modules 6.Bypasses of meters where required .010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 14 of 32 . 6.1 INSTALLATION The number of meters required and the investment cost of a UCMS are very much dependent on the following: . it will be relatively easy to detect the malfunction (this can even be automated). B C A D E Item E is not measured physically with a meter but may be calculated as: E = A – [B + C+ D] This saves the cost of installing one meter. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. METERING 6.2) The use of meters could be minimised in some situations as shown in the schematic. etc) . When the differences between flow balances deviates > 3 % the source of this difference has to be traced (usually a meter has failed).

but only for levels 0 and I. it is not recommended that the brewery invest in additional meters to cross check the readings. the monthly report will show a relatively small difference of 1/31 x monthly consumption). 2. Disadvantage: Cost of increased number of meters. In a UCMS spreadsheet. but this increases the number of meters especially at the most detailed levels of metering and results in an unacceptable higher investment cost. For critical Level 0 meters such as those used for billing of water usage. 3. readings for UCMS should be taken weekly or even daily. The sum of the downstream distribution meters can be used for this (meter balancing required). Meter balancing: What goes in must come out. . Brewery Design Modules When a flowmeter fails. Comparing actual with budget consumption: When comparing consumption to budget and targets (eg running hours) and large differences are noticed. this can be an indication of malfunctioning meters. Recommendations: . they should be used as deemed suitable for the application it is intended for.Meter balancing (by measuring all flows) is required. a cross-check sheet is useful. For better control of utilities consumption. Only when the next completed reporting period has ended.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 15 of 32 .30. In the following recommendations for a reliable UCMS are presented: 1. Advantage: Quick and reliable. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.Although all three methods described above have their disadvantages.70. the difference would be noticed (in this case a month in which no consumption would be reported). Conclusion: Meter balancing is preferred. This is only possible by measuring all individual flows. this would only be noticed when large enough differences appear in a report (eg if a meter fails on the last day of the month. This provides a quick check on the monthly trend. Checking individual meters with a portable meter: Monthly checking will have to be performed on all meters.

If however meter 4 does not exist. 2. the sum of meters 1. From this comparison it can then be concluded that meter no 4 is defective. Brewery Design Modules Recommended setup Supply Meter 1 a: 100 a: 20 Meter 2 a: 25 Meter 3 a: 15 Meter 4 a: 40 From this diagram it can be seen that when e. meter No 4 becomes defective. the result is that meter 3 will indicate no consumption and meter 4 will indicate a consumption of 55 units.g. will indicate a difference of 40 units. If meter 3 becomes defective. the consumption is calculated as follows: Supply – (sum of meters 1.2 and 3) = 40 units.30. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. 3 and 4 = 60 units (20 + 25 + 15 + 0) when compared to the supply of 100 units.70.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 16 of 32 .

Table 3a: Type of meters.5 1 Note: .010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 17 of 32 .5 Steam mass (central or decentral p/T Vortex/Orifice 1 2 correction) Air [volume] Vortex/Orifice 1 2 Carbon dioxide mass (central or decentral p/T Vortex 1 2 correction) Secondary cooling medium Magnetic flow meter 0.5 1 Wastewater meters. Divided per area.70.5 1 Electricity supply Electronic Class 0. 7. which can be generated: .2 0.5 Electricity distribution Electronic Class 0.Mechanical (water) meters are an acceptable alternative if already present.30.5 1 Steam volume Vortex 1 1.Consumption per: Day. It is preferred. . Application: Measuring principle: Meter Application Accuracy accuracy (%) (%) Water supply meters [volume] Magnetic flow meter 0. Brewery Design Modules 7.1 REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION Data on consumption could be collected either manually or automatically. The following is an example of the reports. Year. mounting.5 1 Water distribution meters [volume] Magnetic flow meter 0. For this report however automatic data collection.Mechanical meters to be equiped with electrical outputs for future automatic data collection.5 1 Wastewater meters. pipeline [volume] Magnetic flow meter 0. Week. The difference in accuracy between meters when installed is due to the fact that the conditions in the field differ from those under which the meters have been tested (turbulence. TYPE OF METERING 7. Month. and monthly going average (13 months). In order to give an indication of the cost for the different meters involved the table below has been produced. at least for the most important consumers (see: “meters required”). process cell and consumer (cost centre) and compared with a set target.2 TYPES OF METERS Below is a table showing the recommended types and accuracy of meters typically applied for measuring flows for different utilities. transmission and reporting are not considered. open canal [volume] Ultrasonic level 0. etc). Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. to collect the data automatically (including the generation of reports).

meter in open channel excluding 3000 civil works. 0.2 % 15000 Electrical supply acc.30. meter in pipe 3600 4000 5000 Magnetic flow meter Waste water. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. Brewery Design Modules Table 4b: Meter cost.70. 0. Ultrasonor Flow meter Steam volume Vortex meter 3900 3600 4200 4700 Steam mass p/T compensation Vortex meter 8300 8000 8700 9200 Steam mass p/T compensation Orifice meter 8000 8100 8200 10200 CO2 volume Vortex meter 3900 3600 4200 4700 CO2 p/T compensation Vortex meter 8300 8000 8700 9200 CO2 p/T compensation Orifice meter 8000 8100 8200 10200 Secondary cooling agent 6000 6000 6400 6600 7000 Magnetic flow meter + 2 xPt100 Air volume Vortex meter 3900 3600 4200 4700 Fuel PD meter DN 25 5750 7100 Natural Gas p/T compensation Turbine meter 10000 10500 11000 Natural Gas p/T compensation PD meter 11500 12000 15000 Electrical supply acc. excluding piping.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 18 of 32 .5 % 2500 Note: The prices are in NLG and based on net prices (Heineken-supplier agreements) including local mechanical installation. electrical supply. DN40 DN50 DN80 DN100 DN150 DN200 Water supply magnetic flow meter 3000 3000 3400 3600 4000 Water distribution magnetic flow meter 3000 3000 3400 3600 4000 Waste water.

30. Some only use one type for all applications.and general purpose water On Site and Area level (Level 0 and I) all these water types have to be metered at all relevant locations. 8.1 REQUIRED METERING POINTS The calculations of the different consumption are based on the report “Feasibility Study . softdrinks. this would cover approximately 70% of the total site consumption. product water for brewing and softened water. Brewery Design Modules 8. maltings.the Packaging area uses mainly softened. Table 5: Area water types Water type produced/used: Area General purpose Softened Product/brewing Brewery general (offices) Yes No No Utilities Yes Yes Yes Packaging Yes Yes No Brewing and cellars Yes No Yes Distribution & logistics Yes No No Technical services Yes No No Others (third parties. Not all breweries use all these types of water.2 WATER TYPES The utilities department normally supplies different types of water to the various parts of the brewery.and some general purpose water .the Brewhouse and Cellars are using brewing. The types of water supplied in a typical brewery are: general purpose for sanitary use. others use two or more types of water.”. Condensate recovery is only used within the utility department for boiler feed water. WATER 8.70.Cost-effective Reduction of Water Usage for Hatay Brewery Ltd. When large consumers of water in the brewery are measured [>3% of total brewery consumption]. etc) Yes Yes Yes Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.and general purpose water . Different areas use different water types: .010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 19 of 32 . standardisation. See the table Table 5: Area water types. These consumption figures are then used to decide if a meter is required on an installation.the Beerfiltration is using brewing-.

. ± 0.. .9 68 Yes 1 ): Including others: Brewery general.. WELL 3.5 hl/hl). A typical brewery using three water types and divided into six areas (exclude third parties) requires thirteen meters for level I (see Table 5: Area water types and Table 6: Area consumptions) MEASURING WATER CONSUMPTION Recommended layout of metering points SURFACE WATER SUPPLY CITY WATER SUPPLY WELLWATER SUPPLY LINE 1 LINE 1 WELL 1 LINE 2 LINE 2 WELL 2 LINE 3. Brewery Design Modules 8. SERVICES GENERAL PRODUCTION All boxes are measuring points. & AREA: PACKAGING AREA: UTILITIES LOGISTICS AREA: TECH..3 97 4.4. This can vary between two and eight units (on average 5 meters are installed). LINE 3. technical services and offices (need separate measurement for BCS purposes. The different water types are summed up for each consumer.2 100 31 Yes Site brewery 6. UMS LEVEL 0 = SITE SITE CONSUMPTION THIRD PARTIES UMS LEVEL I = AREA AREA: BREWERY AREA: BEER AREA: DISTR.2 31 2.. The number of meters for level 0 depends on the number of incoming raw water supplies (number of city water lines. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.3 LEVEL 0 AND 1 The following table shows the calculation of individual (departmental and third parties) water consumption of a typical brewery.8 48 1. wells or other supplies).70.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 20 of 32 . evaporative condensers) and product treatment..30. Table 6: Area consumptions Area: Water consumption: Water discharge (to sewer): Metering required Hl/hl % of brewery Hl/hl % of department % of brewery total total total Utilities1 1.4..4 88 19 Yes cellars1 Packaging1 2..3 18 1.4.3 100 18 Yes Brewing and 2. distribution & logistics. The difference between total brewery Water consumption and Discharge to sewer are losses through evaporation (wort boiling..

02 0.2 100 33 Yes Water Losses 0.21 9 3 No Showers 0. .9 -.9 No CIP installations 0.53 53 8 Yes Cellars total 1.12 0.3 23 5 Yes CO2 treatment 0. Table 7: Water consumption of individual consumers. .32 18 4 No Miscellaneous 0. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.1 12 Yes Wort/beer3 0.27 20 4 No Production Utilities total 1. . 74 1 ) Depending on type of compressor cooling. 2 ) Quantity of boiler feedwater make-up gives important information concerning condensate return (and subsequently of losses) of production areas. .30.2 . Brewery Design Modules 8. Yes Spent grains/trub 0. When all large (individual consumers > 5 % of the brewery total) are measured then 67 % of the total water consumption will be known (measured) and 33 % remains unknown (smallest and diffuse consumers).06 0.05 5 0.8 1. Consumer: Consumption Losses (to sewer): Hl/hl Hl/hl % of % of brewery Metering department total required Bottle washer 0.3 100 20 Yes Standardisation water 0. .07 0.28 13 4 No Production Packaging total 2.15 .03 1 0. a decision may be made to install a meter for level II.0 0.A.3 4.21 0.1 LEVEL II AND III In the following table.6 33 9 Yes Production Beer total 2.53 0.6 46 9 Yes Boiler feedwater make-up2 0.6 0.02 0. approximately another 14 meters are required. No Beer filtration & PVPP 0.3 1.3 0.3.35 0.08 hl/hl will later be added during standardisation.49 0.27 0.35 16 5 Yes Filler 0.3 No Cleaning and Disinfection 0. the consumption of the various large individual consumers is calculated. . .28 0. This is independent from the water types distributed but depends more on the distribution system and the number of users like CIP installations and miscellaneous. 0.32 0. 3 ) Quantity of product water used for wort cooling and subsequently for wort preparation (another 0.7 No Miscellaneous 0. Depending on the percentage of the total brewery consumption (> 5 %). .02 N. an estimated 12 meters (12 flows are > 3 % of the brewery total) are required for level II. No Chase water 0.2 0. As can be seen from this table.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 21 of 32 .12 9 2 No 1) Air compression 0 0 see 0 See 1) Miscellaneous 0.05 0.1 .92 .3 Yes Cooling 0.2 2.07 3 1 No Pasteurizer 0.70.8 0.83 37 13 Yes Crate washer 0.8 78.1 0.25 0. No Wort vapour 0.2 20 3 No Chase water 0.49 22 7 Yes Conveyor belt lubrication 0.02 0. For level III.25 14 4 No Brewhouse total 1.83 0.4 50 21 Yes Total Brewery Consumption 6.

30.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 22 of 32 . Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. Brewery Design Modules Conclusion: MEASURING WATER CONSUMPTION RECOMMENDED LAYOUT OF METERING POINTS AREA: UTILITIES (WATER LOSSES) UMS LEVEL I AREA: UTILITIES UMS LEVEL II PROCESS CELL CONDENSATE RETURN (FROM SITE) BOILER FEEDWATER MAKUP UMS LEVEL III PROCES CELL COOLIING CARBON DIOXIDE INSTALLATION COMPRESSED AIR INSTALLATION OTHERS MEASURING WATER CONSUMPTION RECOMMENDED LAYOUT OF METERING POINTS AREA: BEER PRODUCTION UMS LEVEL I AREA: BEER PRODUCTION UMS LEVEL I CELLARS YEAST CELLAR (PROCESS CELL) (PROCESS CELL) BREWHOUSE SERVICE BLOCK (PROCESS CELL) (PROCESS YEAST CELLAR CELL) (PROCESS CELL)CELLAR (PROCESS CELL) UMS LEVEL II FILTRATION (PROCESS CELL) WORT COOLING OTHERS STANDARDISATION WATER OTHERS UMS LEVEL III SPENT GRAINS/TRUB CIP INSTALLATIONS CHASE WATER KIESELGUHR FILTRATION CHASE WATER CIP INSTALLATIONS PVPP STABILISATION All boxes are measuring points.70.

The figure under “typical” is valid for a brewery size of 1. etc) required for a UCMS for the various Levels is presented in the following table: Table 8: Number of water meters Number of meters: Investment cost (NLG x 1.000 hl/year). Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.000 hl/year and those in the higher range is for a brewery size of 3.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 23 of 32 . installation.000 hl/year.000.000): Range: Typical: Range: Typical: Level 0 2-8 meters 5 7-28 18 Level I 8-16 meters. 12 28-56 40 Level II 20-30 meters 24 70-105 84 Level III 40-47 meters 45 140-165 160 The quantity in the lower range is valid for small breweries (approximately 300. Brewery Design Modules WATER CONSUMPTION UCMS LEVEL I RECOMMENDED LAYOUT OF METERING POINTS AREA: PACKAGING PACKAGING UCMS LEVEL II PACKAGING LINE 1 PACKAGING LINE 2 PACKAGING OTHERS PACKAGING LINE n CRATE WASHER BOTTLE WASHER BOTTLE/CAN RINSER BOTTLE/CAN PASTEURIZER UCMS LEVEL III CONVEYOR BELT LUBRICATION FILLER All boxes are measuring points.30.000. transmission.70. An estimate of water meters and costs (excluded are data cabling.

. CO2 COMPR. there is primary supply and secondary supply. Brewery Design Modules 9. while the secondary electricity supply is generated by the brewery’s generator sets. COMPRESSOR ….. 9. PUMPS ………………. 2 ………………. UNIT 1 COMPRESSOR 1 WWT COMPRESSOR 2 STEAMBOILER 3 COMPR.1 STARTING POINTS For electricity. COMPRESSOR 1 STEAMBOILER 2 COMPR.30.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 24 of 32 .2 OVERVIEW METERING POINTS PER LEVEL Electricity Flow 1 TRANSFORMERS GENERATORS TRANSFORMER 1 GENERATOR 1 Level 0 TRANSFORMER 2 GENERATOR 2 TRANSFORMER 3 GENERATOR 3 // See electricity Flow 2 COOLING UNIT STEAM CO2 AIR WATER UTILITIES CONTROLPANEL STEAMBOILER 1 CONTROLPANEL CONTROLPANEL WATERTREATM. ELECTRICITY 9. 1 ………. UNIT …. ……………. FREON COMPR. ……………. The Electricity Company supplies the primary electricity. UNIT 2 COMPRESSOR 2 WELL WATER Level 2 COMPRESSOR… COMPR...70. CONDENSORS CO2 COMPR. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. 3 ………………. 2 Level 3 EVAPORATORS FREON COMPR..

& LOGIST..70.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 25 of 32 . Brewery Design Modules Electricity Flow 2 See Electricity Flow 1 // // See Electricity Flow 3 PRODUCTION (BEER) Level 1 RAW MATERIALS BREWHOUSE SERVICE BLOCK MALT PRODUCTION SOFTDRINK GLASS PRODUCTION PRODUCTION Level 2 MALT INTAKE BREWHOUSE 1 FILTER MALT TREATMENT BREWHOUSE 2 CIP MILLING BREWHOUSE 3 CELLARS …………… …………… Level 3 Electricity Flow 3 See Electricity Flow 2 // TECHNICAL PRODUCTION Level 1 DISTR.30. MEDICAL CENTRE MEDICAL CENTRE STORES Level 3 Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. PACKING GENERAL SERVICES GENERAL LINE 1 ………. LINE 2 LINE … Level 2 GARAGE PER MACHINE WORKSHOP OFFICES HEAD QUATERS FORKLIFTS …………….

The investment costs of the other levels is based on one kWh meter per measuring point. -.500 35-50 50-90 90-125 Level III > 50 > 80 > 100 2.6 and 18 kWh/hl. 2.5 -- Packaging -.25 1. The meters have to be read locally and have a pulse output for collecting data in the future.5 Water treatment 0.09 0. -. KWh/kg 0. -.000.000 hl/yr. -. NLG hl/yr. 1.3 4.000 1. Brewery Design Modules 9. Per brewery size one meter for billing has been included.500 12-20 15-30 25-40 Level II 15-20 20-35 35-50 2.5 2. KWh/Ton 0.30.5 kWh/kg CODremoved 0. 0. kVAr meter and a max demand metering system per measuring point.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 26 of 32 . hl/yr.4 Wastewater treatment 0. -. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.3 NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENTS COSTS PER LEVEL An estimate of the number of meters and investments costs required for a minimal required UCMS depends strongly on the local situation.3 1. -.500 > 125 > 200 > 250 1 ): Electricity meters for billing are more expensive than meters for Utility Monitoring (the required accuracy is higher). Table 9: Number of electricity meters. -.5 Steam 10 -. The investment costs for level 0 depends on the requirements of the Electricity company and is based on a kWh meter.0 1.5 plant Brewing/Cellars -. Number of meters: Investment cost x 1000 NLG 300. Level 0 1-2 5-6 10-15 15.0 Notes: 1 ): Average Electricity consumption: The average electricity consumption will be somewhere between 8.5 3.000.000.000. -. 9.0001 17. 1.4 AVERAGE ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN THE DIFFERENT AREA’S Table 10: Average electricity consumption in the different areas Specific brewery consumption Performance Performance Unit kWh/hl kWh/hl indicator (low indicator (high (low range) (high range) range) range) Cooling -.000 1.000 3.5 3.5 25 50 Level I 5-8 6-12 10-20 2.5 General -.70.18 -.4 1.15 KWh/Nm3 1. hl/yr.0 KWh/m3 0. 2 ): The electricity consumption of a cooling installation depends also on the place of the brewery (eg Tropics) and on the temperature of the incoming water. hl/yr.000 Per meter: 300.6 -- Carbon dioxide 0. hl/yr. 3 ): The electricity consumption of the WWTP depends on the degree of pollution of the wastewater and if an aerobic or anaerobic system is installed.000 3.5 -- Air 0.

A general overview of the consumers is shown in the following table: Table 11:.2 PRIMARY UTILITY FLOWS : FUEL AND CO2 Measuring points are schematically shown below. .30. 0-10 . COMPRESSED AIR AND COOLING 10. FUEL Number of meters Investment cost (NLG x 1. Specific values of consumption: Indicative and average values. - .brewhouse % . 35-45 10-20 25 .number of meters on level II depends on the number of boilers.tankroom/service block % . BOILER …….000) Level 0 1-2 5-10 Level I 3-4 15-20 Level II 4-81 20-40 Level III depending on local situation - 1 ): Depending on local situation Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. . .1 IDENTIFICATION OF CONSUMERS Various utilities are used throughout the brewery. GENERATOR SET … Comments: . STEAM..010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 27 of 32 . . Unit Fuel CO2 Steam Compressed air Cooling Brewing and cellars: % . CO2.SET 1 OFFICES Level 2 BOILER 2 GENERATOR SET 2 …………. generator-sets etc. OTHER UTILITIES : FUEL. Table 12: Number and investment cost of fuel meters.70. 40 30-40 50-60 0-10 Utilities % 90-100 10 5-10 5-10 10 Brewery general % 0-10 . 40 10-20 5-10 50 Packaging % . - 10. Brewery Design Modules 10. Fuel measurement BREWERY FUEL INTAKE Level 0 Utilities Level 1 STEAM PLANT GENERATOR PLANT BREWERY GENERAL OTHER (eg softdrink) BOILER 1 GENERATOR.

softdrink) Level 1 BREWHOUSE TANK ROOM/SERVICE BLOCK INDIVIDUAL PACKAGING LINES HEATING OF BUILDINGS Level 2 WORT PRODUCTION CIP INDIVIDUAL CONSUMER E. COOLING Measuring points are schematically shown below.000) Level 0 1 10 Level I 4-5 40-50 Level II 4-6 40-60 Level III depending on local situation - Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. --> consumption CO2 measurement L BREWERY INCOMING CO2 PURCHASE BREWERY OUTGOING CO 2 SOLD L RECUPERATION FST’S BEER PRODUCTION PACKAGING OTHER (eg.000) Level 0 1-2 8.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 28 of 32 . Steam Number of meters Investment cost (NLG x 1. CO2 Number of meters Investment cost (NLG x 1. Steam measurement BREWERY INCOMING ( IF NOT PRODUCED BY BREWERY BOILERS ) Level 0 UTILITIES BEER PRODUCTION PACKAGING BREWERY GENERAL OTHER (eg.70.5-17 Level I 2-4 17-34 Level II 4-6 34-51 Level III depending on local situation - 10.3 SECONDARY FLOWS : STEAM.G. BOTTLE WASHER Level 3 HOT WATER/ CIP DAW-PLANT ( WHEN THERMAL ) Table 14: Number and investment cost of steam meters. COMPRESSED AIR. softdrink) DEAERATED WATER PLANT INDIVIDUAL PACKAGING LINES L BRIGHT BEER TANKS ETCETERA KIESELGUHR FILTER INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS L Table 13: Number and investment cost of CO2 meters.30. Brewery Design Modules recuperation <-.

ENGINE ROOM ETCETERA Level 3 Table 15: Number and investment cost of air meters. WASTE WATERTREATMENT INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS TANK ROOM/ SERVICE BLOCK E.G.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 29 of 32 . LINES BREWHOUSE TANK ROOM/SERVICE INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS BLOCK Level 2 INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS E.70. WORT COOLING E. Brewery Design Modules Compressed air measurement Level 0 NONE BREWERY TOTAL DRY AIR BREWHOUSE SPENT GRAINS OTHER (eg. .000) Level 0 0 - Level I 1 if applicable 6 Level II 3 18 Level III Depending on local situation - Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01. PASTEURISER Level 3 E. Cooling Number of meters Investment cost (NLG x 1.G.G.000) Level 0 0 - Level I 2-3 8-12 Level II 3 12 Level III depending on local situation - Cooling measurement NONE level 0 PACKAGING BEER PRODUCTION OTHER (eg.30.softdrink) BREWERY GENERAL Level 1 INDIVIDUAL PACK. softdrink) Level 1 PACKAGING BREWHOUSE UTILITIES Level 2 PACKAGING LINES BREWHOUSE E.G. FST’S E.G.G. DAW PLANT Table 16: Number and investment cost of cooling meters. Compressed air Number of meters Investment cost (NLG x 1.

or more depending on N.4 SUMMARY: NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENT COST PER LEVEL (OTHER UTILITIES) An estimate of the number of meters and investment cost required for FUEL.70.000) Level O 3-5 24-37 Level I: 12-17 86-122 Level II 18-26 124-181 Level III: 25-50. STEAM.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 30 of 32 . CO2. Number of meters: Investment cost per level (NLG x 1. Brewery Design Modules 10. local situation Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.30. COMPRESSED AIR AND COOLING are as follows: Table 17: Number and investment cost of “Other utilities” meters.A.

a UCMS with level II should be considered (optionally level III only when cost / benefits is clear). With a Minimally Required UCMS. 4. 5.000 hl per year: Total investment cost (per level) Water: Electricity: Other Utilities: Total (NLG x 1. 6.000. a UCMS with levels 0 and I detailing is sufficient. 3. differences in cost of utilities and presence or absence of existing flowmeters. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Conclusions and recommendations: 1.000 hl per year: Total investment cost (per level) Water: Electricity: Other Utilities: Total (NLG x 1. For a proper programme for the reduction of Energy and Water consumption.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 31 of 32 . Brewery size 1. Brewery size 300.30. local cabling based on Dutch price levels) required for a “Utility Consumption Measuring System” for the various Levels and for each brewery size is presented in the following tables: Note: Not included are costs for data transmission to a centralized data collection and reporting computer. For BCS purposes. I. No general UCMS configuration for different1 breweries exists because of the different brewery layouts. adequate brewery management support savings of approximately 10-25 % on the consumption of Energy and Water can be achieved. 11.000): Number of meters Number of meters Number of meters Number Cost Level 0 2 2 3 7 50 Level I: 8 6 12 26 129 Level II 20 18 18 56 239 Level III: 40 < 50 >25 > 100 > 500 Table 19 Total number of meters and investment cost of a Utility Consumption Measurement System. It is recommended to design a UCMS for the brewery into four levels of increasing detail (level 0. Remark: 1 ): These differences are caused by: differences in distribution systems. 2. II and III).000): Number of meters Number of meters Number of meters Number Cost Level O 5 5 5 15 80 Level I: 12 9 13 34 160 Level II 24 28 22 74 306 Level III: 45 > 80 35 > 150 > 600 Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.1 NUMBER OF METERS AND INVESTMENT COSTS: An estimate of the number of meters and investment cost (included are: mounting.70. Balancing of meters (system reliability) is only practicable for levels 0 and I of a UCMS. Table 18: Total number of meters and investment cost of a Utility Consumption Measurement System. Brewery Design Modules 11.

from NLG/hl 0.070.000 13. For this calculation the investment cost of a UCMS and the savings in Utilities cost have to be estimated. It will be clear that the potential savings strongly depend on the results of utility reduction programmes already present.000 hl per year: Total investment cost (per level) Water: Electricity: Other Utilities: Total (NLG x 1.128 Others 5 3.842 Caribean 5 602.000 or NLG/hl 0.400 0.000 1.735.30.000 0.480 Saving potential/payback period: As can be seen from the following table.000 968.522.748 Asia Pacific 15 6.000 2. Table 21: Possible regional utility savings Possible savings: Number of Hl produced (1998): Gap to fill: Region: breweries: hl/year NLG/year NLG/hl Africa & Middle East 17 7.115 (France.721.000 5. brewery layout and distribution system). The Netherlands and Italy) to NLG/hl 2.115 Europe 2 5 7. To establish the payback period (if any) of a UCMS an estimated payback period has to be calculated. These factors have to be considered when a decision has to be made if a UCMS would be implemented for a specific brewery.363 Total 62 52.000 2.286.552. different types and number of utilities.000 1.577. The investment cost of a UCMS strongly depends on the number of required meters and much less Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.200. the payback period of a UCMS strongly depends on the size of the brewery and the cost of utilities.48.000 25.760.000.560.000): Number of meters Number of meters Number of meters Number Cost Level 0 8 12 5 25 110 Level I: 16 15 17 48 216 Level II 30 43 26 99 394 Level III: 47 > 100 50 > 200 > 750 The total number (and subsequently the investment cost) of meters can vary ± 30 % according to the local situation (number of meters already present.400 0.115.000 1. Brewery size 3.924 (Caribean). Brewery Design Modules Table 20: Total number of meters and investment cost of a Utility Consumption Measurement System.70. It can be seen that the total savings potential amounts to NLG 25.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 32 of 32 .000 0.286.600. The cost of Utilities and the savings potential: From the “Gap to fill” analyses (year 2000) the data in Table 21 have been summarised. 11. However there are large regional differences.800 0.924 Europe 1 15 23.2 POSSIBLE SAVINGS: Experience has shown (Zoeterwoude) that a UCMS with level II detailing and management support can result in savings on consumption of Energy and Water of approximately 25 %.

A utilities saving programme is in place.5 3. Cost for a data transmission network.000 466.30. Some assumptions have been made: . The actual savings and the speed with which they are achieved depend strongly on the input of the brewery staff.000.000 0. reporting software and hardware are not included. A UCMS with level 0 is already present on all breweries.450.000 (hl/year) 165. Table 22: Simple payback period for a UCMS Brewery size Annual savings (NLG/year)* Investment cost for Payback average UCMS period (NLG): (years): NLG/hl NLG/hl NLG/hl 0.11 0.000 435.000 610.010 Date : April 2001 FOR BREWERIES Page : 33 of 32 .000 0.000 0.350. Issue : 02 UTILITY CONSUMPTION MEASURING SYSTEM HMESC : 01.000 (hl/year) 16.7 Note : Above pay-back periods are related to investment costs (including installation) for meters only.000 720.000 (hl/year) 55.70. to reach the required level (level II) additional investments are required. .000.Assuming that 50% of the achievable savings are attributable to the implementation of a UCMS .000 4. The following table shows a simple estimate of the returns for the installation of a UCMS for different brewery sizes.6-16 1. From this table it can be seen that the payback period covers a very wide range (0.1-16 years).000 240. Brewery Design Modules on the brewery size.9 300.3-8. It is therefore necessary to determine the possible savings for each individual brewery before a decision is made if a UCMS is feasible.The remaining 50% to be achieved with additional investments in process optimisation and equipment. To get from level 0 to level II the sum of the investments for level I and II are required.000 268.48 2.000 1. It is clear that the annual savings would not be reached in one year (following the investment in a UCMS).500 72.1-3.

Address: Heineken Technical Services PO Box 510 2380 BB Zoeterwoude The Netherlands Attn. etc.P. such as “Production Automation & Information Technology Instructions”. Vergunst. “SHE Policies & Instructions”.003 Date : Mar 2001 Page : 1 of 1 . MODIFICATION REQUEST FORM INTRODUCTION._Vergunst@Heineken.nl Issue : 02 HMESC : 03. who will forward it to the secretary of the relevant Steering Committee . room 4. This form is a means of communication to indicate your suggestions for improvement of Corporate PP&C Engineering Policy Instructions & Procedures.: W. SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT Document type : HMESC Code : Issue date : Chapter : Page : Suggestion(s) : Please return this form to the Document Manager (Wim Vergunst – HTS).P.10.11.159 Phone: (+31)715456186 Fax: (+31)715457888 email: W. “BDM Manuals”.