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EBC Connecticut Program

:

Update on Programs & Priorities of U.S.
EPA and the Connecticut Department of
Energy & Environmental Protection
Welcome

Daniel Moon
Executive Director
Environmental Business Council

Environmental Business Council of New England
Energy Environment Economy
Welcome

Joseph Luchini
Vice President, Electric System Operations
Eversource Energy

Environmental Business Council of New England
Energy Environment Economy
Update from the DEEP Deputy
Commissioner for Air, Waste & Water

Robert Kaliszewski
Deputy Commissioner, Environmental Quality
Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
State of Connecticut

Environmental Business Council of New England
Energy Environment Economy
Connecticut Department of
Energy and Environmental Protection
CT DEEP - EQ Branch:
Addressing Our State’s Climate
and Environmental Challenges

Robert Kaliszewski, Deputy Commissioner
Environmental Business Council
March 29, 2017

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
What We Do
Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Current State Budget Proposal

GENERAL FUNDS TRANSPORT FEDERAL
GENERAL FUNDS ATION
TRANSPORTATION FUND FUNDSFUNDS
FEDERAL
FUND
FISCAL
FISCAL % OF
YEAR
YEAR FUNDING
FUNDING %%OF
OF TOTAL
TOTAL FUNDING
FUNDING %
% OF
OF TOTAL
TOTAL FUNDING% OF
FUNDING TOTAL
TOTAL
06-07
06-07 36,391,410
36,391,410 26.54%
26.54% 28,037,584
28,037,584 20.45%
20.45%
07-08
07-08 39,802,773
39,802,773 26.47%
26.47% 30,388,173
30,388,173 20.21%
20.21%
08-09
08-09 38,887,492
38,887,492 23.43%
23.43% 32,119,953
32,119,953 19.35%
19.35%
09-10 **
09-10 69,021,669
69,021,669 48.13%
48.13% 39,315,942
39,315,942 27.41%
27.41%
10-11
10-11 71,200,039
71,200,039 46.96%
46.96% 39,342,053
39,342,053 25.95%
25.95%
11-12 **
11-12 ** 71,436,728
71,436,728 34.74%
34.74% 68,116,199
68,116,199 33.13%
33.13%
12-13
12-13 66,301,663
66,301,663 34.56%
34.56% 48,720,226
48,720,226 25.40%
25.40%
13-14
13-14 71,199,186
71,199,186 39.85%
39.85% 44,249,666
44,249,666 24.77%
24.77%
14-15
14-15 74,337,592
74,337,592 40.06%
40.06% 40,213,607
40,213,607 21.67%
21.67%
15-16 ***
15-16 *** 70,843,793
70,843,793 37.18%
37.18% 2,743,313
2,743,313 1.44%
1.44% 37,868,443
37,868,443 19.88%
19.88%
16-17 (Budget)
16-17 (Budget) 63,869,057
63,869,057 36.16%
36.16% 2,799,408
2,799,408 1.59%
1.59% 45,000,000
45,000,000 25.48%
25.48%
17-18 (GovRec)
17-18 (Gov Rec) 60,968,446
60,968,446 35.33%
35.33% 2,799,408
2,799,408 1.62%
1.62% 45,000,000
45,000,000 26.08%
26.08%
18-19 (Gov
18-19 (GovRec)
Rec) 60,968,446
60,968,446 35.33%
35.33% 2,799,408
2,799,408 1.62%
1.62% 45,000,000
45,000,000 26.08%
26.08%

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Potential Federal Budget Cuts

• The President’s budget proposes an overall
31% cut to EPA
• Grants to states may be cut as much as 40%
• Some programs are eliminated or drastically
reduced
• Potentially eliminating funding for dozens of
DEEP staff

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Potential Federal Budget Cuts (cont.)

• Other Federal agency cuts may severely
impact CT
– NOAA funding to CT reduced by more than $2m
– DOE cuts > $2.5m in community weatherization
and energy programs

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Water Protection and Land Reuse

• Reorganization
– Land & Water Resources
– Water Planning & Management
– Remediation
• State Water Plan – multi-agency effort
– http://www.ct.gov/water/site/default.asp?

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Water Planning Council

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Benefits of Wave 1 Amendments

Verifications per year

Post-2013 (Wave 1)
114 118
104 Verifications per year
97
87
Pre-2013 75 77 75
54 Verifications per year 59
49 49 53
40 41
28

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
RSRs Wave 2 Underway

Transformation is Progressing
Transformation Process is Evolving...
COMPLETE UPCOMING

RSR Wave 1 Release
Amendments Reporting
Regulations
ONGOING Soil
EUR Wave 1 SEHN Wave 2 FUTURE
Reuse
Amendments Amendments Guidance
Regulations
Municipal RSR Wave 2 Data/Web
Wave 3
Relief Amendments Information
Amendments
Management
GW Science
Transformation ECO
Reclass Advisory
Work Groups Guidance
Statute to Evaluation Panel
Unified
Expand EUR Wave 2
Program
Institutional Amendments
Elements
Controls GW
Risk Historical
Classification
Evaluation Releases
Improvements

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Water Protection and Land Reuse

• Blue Plan – a guide for future uses of offshore
LIS
– Public Act 15-66
– Compile inventory of LIS natural resources and
human uses
– Guide existing programs not create new ones

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Materials Management & Compliance Assurance

• CMMS
– Reuse/recycle/divert 60% by 2024
– Save $25m in next decade on disposal
– New infrastructure & new technology
– RecycleCT Foundation – public education
– SMART/PAYT
– EPR

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
CT Solid Waste Management

3.6 Million Tons of Waste Per Year
9%

30%

4%

57%

Disposed Out of State Disposed at CT RRF
Disposed at CT Landfills Diverted from Disposal

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Anaerobic Digestion

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
MMCA “New Rules”

• “Wipes” rule – fast tracked adoption of EPA
regulations that exclude solvent contaminated
wipes from certain HW requirements.
• Release Reporting Requirements – better
define types of spills that must be reported

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Stormwater - MS4 Assistance

• Online webinars, mapping tools and permit assistance
• MS4 Circuit Rider – Municipal Stormwater Educator

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Bureau of Air Management
• Continued emphasis on reducing mobile source and diesel
emissions
– VW settlement money to offset NOx emissions and continue to invest
in EV infrastructure see www.ct.gov/deep/vw

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Reducing Range Anxiety

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Ozone Transport
CAA Section 176A
Petitioned States

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Statewide Ozone Exceedance
Meteorological Regime

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Coastal-only Exceedance
Meteorological Regime

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
RICE Rule Compliance Assistance

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Connecticut climate action GSC Adaptation Subcommittee issues
Impacts of Climate Change on Connecticut
Agriculture, Infrastructure, Natural
Resources and Public Health
CT signs NEG/ECP 2001 GSC finalizes CT Climate Change
Climate Change Action Action Plan
Plan NESCAUM publishes CT Greenhouse
Creation of Governor's Gas Emissions: Mitigation Options
Steering Committee (GSC) Overview and Reduction Estimates
on Climate Change

2001 2004 2005 2008 2010 2013
9-month stakeholder dialogue CT Global Warming Solutions Act
process develops 2004 Connecticut (Public Act 08-98) reaffirms
Stakeholder Recommendations commitment to GHG targets for
2020 and 2050
2013 Comprehensive
Energy Strategy

CT and other northeastern states
An Act Concerning Climate Change participate in first auction of Regional
(Public Act 04-252) sets GHG goals Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the
that align with NEG/ECP regional nation’s first carbon cap-and-trade
goals program.
Review timeline details
CT Response to Climate Challenges

Mitigation
• Reduce burning of fossil fuels
– RGGI
– Energy Efficiency
– Renewables
– Transportation Alternatives

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Sources of GHGs and NOx in CT
Mobile Sources (on-road and non-road) account for 75%
of NOx emissions and 41% of GHG emissions in CT.

Mobile
Other Fuels

NOx Industrial
Waste Disp.
GHGs
EGUs

“Other Fuels” is the combination of
residential and commercial fuel use.

NOx Data: 2011 NEI Tier 1 Summary GHG Data: EPA-SIT, Summary originally prepared for NEG-ECP 2014

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Governor’s Council on Climate Change (GC3)
Executive Order 46 (April 22, 2015)

The Council Charge:
• Examine the efficacy of existing policies and regulations designed to
reduce greenhouse gas emissions and identify new strategies to meet
reduction targets
• Monitor greenhouse gas emission level in CT annually
• Recommend interim statewide greenhouse gas reduction targets to
ensure meeting the 2050 target
• Recommend policies, regulations, or legislative actions to achieve
targets
• Report findings to the Governor and the Office of Policy and
Management
CT Response to Climate Challenge

Mitigation
• Goal: Reduce carbon emissions from 2001
levels 80% by 2050.
Adaptation
• Strategies to protect people and communities
from impacts we are seeing

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
CT Response to Climate Challenges

Adaptation
• CT Institute for Resilience and Climate
Adaptation (CIRCA)
– Applied research to support homeowners,
businesses, municipalities and institutions

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Sea level rise in Long Island Sound

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
DEEP: Diverse Responsibilities

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
Connecticut Department of
Energy and Environmental Protection
Update from U.S. EPA Region 1
Deputy Regional Administrator

Deb Szaro
Acting Regional Administrator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Region One

Environmental Business Council of New England
Energy Environment Economy
Environmental Business Council, CT
March 29, 2017

Deb Szaro
Acting Regional Administrator
US EPA Region 1
Presentation Overview

I. Introduction
II. Connecticut Community Revitalization
I. Raymark Superfund Site
II. Brownfields Redevelopment
III. Diesel Emissions Improvements

III. Public Health: Drinking Water and Infrastructure
IV.Long Island Sound Updates
V. Ozone in Connecticut

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Revitalizing Communities:
Raymark Superfund Site

• Cleanup Progress:

• September Cleanup Decision
Made
• Cooperative Agreement with CT
DEEP on Vapor Mitigation
Systems
• Summer Sampling Work
Planned
Former Raysbestos Facility
• Major excavation currently
planned to begin in 2018
Revitalizing Communities:
Brownfields in Connecticut

$77.7M Statewide in Brownfields Funding Since
1994

476 Properties Assessed

29 EPA-Funded Cleanups Completed

4,455 Jobs Leveraged ($17.4k per)

$654M Leveraged (over 8:1 ratio)
Waterbury ~ PAL Park ~ Before
Waterbury ~ PAL Park ~ After
Waterbury ~ South End Greenhouses ~ Before
Waterbury ~ South End Greenhouses ~ After
Shelton ~ Farmers Market ~ Before
Shelton ~ Farmers Market ~ After
Meriden ~ HUB Site ~ Before Remediation
Meriden ~ HUB Site (“Meriden Green”) ~ After
Revitalizing Communities:
Diesel Emissions

• Diesel Emissions Reduction Act
(DERA)
• $800,000: New London Ferry
Tier 3 engine upgrade
• $800,000: repowering Ferry

• DERA School Bus Rebate Program
has provided $7.7 million to
upgrade school bus fleets across
the country
• 2015-2016: four CT school
districts received funds for
new school buses
Public Health and Drinking Water

2016: EPA & CT DPH partnered to oversee and ensure…

• 98% of the CT population (almost 2.7 million people) served by
community systems received drinking water that met all health-based
standards

• 83% reduction in lead levels across New England, enhancing public
health protection for more than 4.5 million people

• Mitigation of the unregulated contaminant – chlorate

• Hospitals & Water Suppliers partnering for emergency response

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Aged Water Infrastructure

• EPA Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund: $556 million towards
water infrastructure improvements in CT including Combined
Sewer Overflow Problems

• Hartford MDC Tunnel is Under Construction

• The tunnel will be a wastewater storage tunnel that will eliminate
106 million gallons of CSO discharges for a typical year of rain
events.

• It will eliminate CSO discharges into Wethersfield Cove and
greatly reduce or eliminate sewage backups into basements and
businesses.
Long Island Sound
Nitrogen Reduction Strategy

• On Sept 28, 2016 EPA awarded
the Nitrogen Strategy contract to
Tetra Tech
• To assist EPA in establishing
nitrogen loading thresholds and
allowable loads for western LIS
point source discharges, large
riverine systems and select
coastal embayments.
• More information, public
outreach efforts and deliverables
can be found at:
www.longislandsoundstudy.net

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Air Quality and Ozone

• Implementation of 2008 Ozone NAAQS (75 ppb)
• Ozone Trends
• Attainment Planning
• Actions to Address Ozone Transport

• 2015 Ozone NAAQS (70 ppb)
• Implementation
• Designations
• Interstate Transport for 2015 NAAQS

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Ozone Trends in Connecticut
Map of CT Areas for 2008 NAAQS

Two Nonattainment Areas:

- Greater CT

- New York City Area
Attainment Planning: 2008 Ozone Standard

• Connecticut has two ozone nonattainment areas that
together cover the entire state
• CT portion of New York City Area – includes Fairfield, New Haven,
and Middlesex counties in CT, as well as portions of New York and
northern New Jersey
• Greater CT Area – includes the remainder of the state

• These areas were originally marginal nonattainment areas,
but were bumped up to moderate after failing to meet
standard by July 20, 2015 attainment deadline
• Required to submit to attainment plans to EPA for 2008
NAAQS by Jan 1, 2017
• Greater CT Area – submitted plan on Jan 17, 2017; currently under
review by EPA
• CT portion of New York City Area – not yet submitted
Continuing Actions to Help Meet 2008 Ozone
Standards

• Tier 3 Vehicle Emissions and Fuels Standards – Started in 2017
• Tailpipe standards for light-duty vehicles represent approx. an 80% reduction in
NMOG+NOX (non-methane organic gases and nitrogen oxides) from today’s fleet
average and a 70% reduction in per-vehicle particulate matter (PM) standards.
• Lowers the sulfur content of gasoline to a maximum of 10 ppm beginning in
2017.
• The program is projected to cost less than a penny per gallon of gasoline, and
about $72 per vehicle.

• Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) Update
• In Sept. 2016, EPA finalized an update to CSAPR ozone season program to assist
states in meeting the 2008 Ozone NAAQS.
• EPA estimates that this rule and other changes already underway in the power
sector will cut ozone season NOX emissions from power plants in the eastern
United States by 20 percent – a reduction of 80,000 tons in 2017 compared to
2015 levels.
• These NOx emissions reductions result in benefits worth millions per year,
including, over $800 million from the prevention of harmful and costly health
effects.
• The benefits of the final rule outweigh the estimated costs of $68 million per
year.
Cross State Air Pollution Rule Update Addresses States
Significantly Contributing to CT for 75 ppb Ozone Standard

Map from letter from CT Governor dated Oct 1, 2016
Clean Air Act §126 Petitions for Ozone

• Six §126 petitions from CT, DE (4), and MD ask EPA to address the
impact of upwind state Electric Generating Units on downwind
attainment and maintenance of the 2008 and 2015 ozone NAAQS.
• Section 126 of the gives a state the authority to ask EPA to set emissions limits
for specific sources of air pollution in other states that significantly contribute to
the petitioning state’s air quality problems.

• Petitioners request EPA make a finding for 41 units at 21 facilities
located in in the states of Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and
West Virginia

• EPA currently reviewing the petitions.
2015 Ozone Standards Implementation

• 2015 8-hour ozone NAAQS promulgated October 1,
2015: 70 ppb
• Proposed implementation rule published Nov 17,
2016 (81 FR 81276). EPA currently addressing
comments before finalization.
• Proposed rule follows approach similar to previous SIP
8-hr Ozone Design Values (ppb) Proposed Attainment Date (years after
Requirements
Classification
Ruleforfor70 ppbthe
NAAQS 2008 ozone NAAQS.
designation)
Marginal 71-80 3

• Proposed
Moderate Nonattainment 81-92 area classification 6 thresholds -
Same percent-above-standard
Serious
approach as previously implemented – See
93-104 9
table below for first three
classification levels

63
Preliminary 2014-2016 Ozone Design Values*

Map from ME DEP

*2016 Data is preliminary and subject to change
Anticipated Timeline for 2015 Ozone NAAQS
Designations

Milestone Date

EPA promulgates 2015 Ozone NAAQS rule October 1, 2015
States and Tribes submit recommendations for ozone No later than October 1, 2016
designations to EPA
The EPA notifies states and tribes concerning any No later than June 2, 2017 (120
intended modifications to their recommendations (120- days prior to final ozone areas
day letters) designations)
End of 30-day public comment period On or about July 10, 2017
States and tribes submit additional information, if any, to No later than August 7, 2017
respond to the EPA’s modification of a recommendation
designation.
The EPA promulgates final ozone area designations No later than October 1, 2017
CT’s Preferred Option for Boundaries of New
York City Area

Expansion of
area into PA, The Greater
MD and Connecticut Area as a
Delaware separate
nonattainment area

The rest of New
England meets the
2015 Ozone
Standard

Map from letter from CT Governor dated Oct 1, 2016
NJ’s Preferred Options for Boundaries for New
York City Area

Eastern
Pennsylvania

All of Connecticut to
Washington D.C

Map from letter from NJ DEP Commissioner dated Sept 29, 2016
Notice of Data Availability (NODA) - Preliminary Interstate
Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2015 Ozone NAAQS

• Preliminary Interstate Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2015 Ozone
NAAQS was published in the Federal Register on Jan 6, 2017
• Intended to help states as they develop Good Neighbor SIPs to address the cross-
state transport under the 2015 ozone NAAQS. SIPs due Oct 26, 2018.
• The information available includes:
• (1) Emission inventories for 2011 and 2023
• (2) air quality modeling results for 2011 and 2023
• (3) projected 2023 ozone contributions from state-specific anthropogenic emissions
to ozone concentrations at individual ozone monitoring sites
• The NYC nonattainment area is still expected to exceed the 2015 Ozone
NAAQS in 2023 with currently project controls
• The public comment period ends April 6, 2017
Environmental Business Council, CT

Thank You…

Deb Szaro
Acting Regional Administrator, EPA
Region 1

69
Panel Discussion

Moderator: Daniel Moon, EBCNE

Panelists:
• Robert Kaliszewski, CT DEEP
• Deb Szaro, U.S. EPA

Environmental Business Council of New England
Energy Environment Economy
EBC Connecticut Program:

Update on Programs & Priorities of U.S.
EPA and the Connecticut Department of
Energy & Environmental Protection