You are on page 1of 4

Huck Finn­Moral Dilemma

Author: Kristiana Lee
Date created: 12/08/2014 6:40 PM PST ; Date modified: 12/08/2014 9:48 PM PST

Use APA Style Format For In­Text Citations And Full References (Publications, Web Resources, Lessons Plans
Etc.) And Include Full Reference Page At The End Of The Lesson Plan.

VITAL INFORMATION
Subject(s) Language Arts (English)

Topic or Unit of Study The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Grade/Level Grade 11

Objective By the end of this lesson, student should demonstrate understanding of one of the major ideas/themes of The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain­­the struggle between good and evil in the human consciousness. In
addition, students will effectively participate in a an academic, written discussion about a moral dilemma via an online
discussion thread.

Summary During this lesson, students will first participate in a cause and effect activity surrounding a hypothetical situation.
Students will be presented with a statement and identify the potential causes and effects of that statement and create
generalizations about the situation as a whole. 

Next, students will participate in a discussion surrounding Chapter 31 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn­­a pivotal
moment in Huck's moral development. The discussion will be in the format of a Numbered Heads Together SDAIE
strategy.

For homework, students will return to the moral dilemma presented towards the beginning of class and will participate in
an online, written discussion about that dilemma. Students will need to 1) post, 2) reply in agreement to someone else's
post, and 3) reply respectfully in disagreement to someone else's post.

IMPLEMENTATION
W (Where, Why & What) Where:

By the end of this lesson, students will be able synthesize answers to the following essential questions:

What makes moral dilemmas so complex?
How can internal dilemmas contradict our notions of morality?
How does Huck's moral dilemma help develop the novel as one large satirical piece?

Why:

Mark Twain's Huck Funn is considered a large satirical work designed to criticize racism and prejudicial
thinking. By reading and understanding Huck's moral dilemma in Chapter 31, students can analyze how Twain's
development of Huck's inner struggle with whether or not to turn in Jim contributes to the overall meaning of the
novel (CA Common Core State 11th Grade Standard for Reading 2).

What:

Students will apply their thinking by participating in an online discussion about another moral dilemma and a response to
chapter 31.

H (Hooked & Hold) The teacher will begin by presenting a statement on the projector screen:

"Brendan was in third grade when he was caught cheating on his math quiz."

The teacher will ask students to think of some possible causes for Brendan to cheat on his Math test. Some responses
could include: he felt pressured to succeed, he felt stupid compared with his peers, his parents offered a reward for a
positive grade, he thought it'd be okay, etc.

As the students offer causes, the teacher will write those causes on the board under a column labeled, "Causes."

The teacher will then ask students to think of some possible effects of Brendan cheating on his Math test. Some
responses could include: he got in trouble with his parents, he got called to the principal's office, he got a zero on the
test, etc.

As the students offer effects, the teacher will write those effects on the board under a column labeled, "Effects."

Next the teacher will ask students to consider the prior causes of the event. What really drove Brendan to cheat? Some
responses could include: he is driven by his parents' approval, he's driven by his peers' approval, he fears failure, etc.

As the students offer prior causes, the teacher will write those prior causes on the board under a column labeled, "Prior
Causes."

Then the teacher will ask students to consider the subsequent effets of the event. What was the effects of the effects?
Some responses could include: he lost his teacher's trust, he lost his parents' trust, he felt embarrassed and/or stupid,
he had to transfer schools, his overall grade suffered.

As the students offer subsequent effects, the teacher will write those subsequent events on the board under a column
labeled, "Subsequent Effects."

The teacher will then ask students to consider what's on the board and come up with a conclusion. A possible conclusion

Page 1 of 4
for this statement is that Brendan had many good reasons to cheat, but the effects weren't very good. The teacher will
write what the class comes up with on the board and label it, "Conclusion."

Finally, the teacher will ask the students to make a generalization about cheating. One generalization students might
make is that there are many reasons that drive one to cheat, but the consequences are not worth the risk.

The teacher transition to the rest of the lesson by posing the first question for discussion: How can there be good
reasons to do something bad? Is that contradictory?

E (Explore & Experience) Input:

The teacher will begin by reading the most important passage in Chapter 31 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (the
passage right after Huck finds out that the King and the Duke have sold Jim back into slavery). The passage (about 3
pages long) details Huck's moral struggle between doing what society tells him is right­­turning Jim in and returning him
to his owner, Miss Watson­­and doing what his heart is telling him­­that Jim is his friend and equal so he should protect
and hide him from slavery and help him gain his freedom.

Modeling:

As the teacher reads, she should stop periodically to comment on and/or question parts of Huck's train of thought that
are significant.

Check for Understanding:

The teacher will ask students to get out a sheet of paper and quickly list:

1.  To whom does Huck consider sending a letter to? What would the letter say?
2.  Name one reason why Huck thinks that helping Jim is a sin.
3.  Does Huck actually send the letter? Why?
4.  What does Huck think about that leads him to say, "I'll go to Hell."

The teacher will collect the paper at the end of the period.

Guided Practice:

The teacher will direct students into their "Numbered Heads Together" groups. Students should be in groups of four and
each member of the group will have a number between 1­4.

The teacher will display a series of discussion questions, one at a time. The questions are as follows:

1.  Why might people have thought it would have been bad to help Jim escape?
2.  Huck remembers all the good times he had with Jim before deciding not to send the letter. What do those
memories reveal about Huck and Jim's relationship?
3.  Why does Huck think he'll go to Hell for not turning Jim in?
4.  What do you think about the fact that this is a dilemma for Huck? Are you surprised he has to think so hard about
it?

The teacher will only dispay one question at a time, and instruct students to discuss answers to the proposed question,
knowing that any member of their group may be called upon to discuss aloud with the class.

After a sufficient amount of time, the teacher will draw the students back together and call on a number betwen 1­4. For
the first question, lets assume that that number is 2. Then, all number 2's will be expected to speak as a representative
for their group's ideas.

The process will repeat multiple time until all questions are proposed and all students have spoken.

Model:

For the first question, the teacher will provide a sample answer. For "Why might people have thought it would have been
bad to help Jim escape?", the teacher will remind them of the Webquest they completed surrounding the Fugitive Slave
Act.

Check for Understanding:

As students discuss, the teacher will roam the room, listening to conversations and providing support when needed. At
this time, the teacher will have an informal opportunity to monitor students' progress.

R (Rethink, Revise & Refine) Closure:

The teacher will wrap up the lesson by posing one final discussion question:

What is this novel satirizing and how does Huck's dilemma contribute to the satirical effect of the novel?

This question will be open to all students and may require the teacher's guidance towards appropriate thought. The
teacher might remind students that satire is criticism aimed at changing public opinion or action. The teacher may have to
pose additional prompts, such as: What thought sounds stupid in Huck's dilemma? Since that's what sounds stupid, can
we assume that that's what's being criticized? If that's what's being criticized, what do you think Twain's intended
change is?

Independent Practice:

Finally, the teacher will direct students to the online discussion thread that they will need to participate in overnight.
Students will read a 1­page article on Brendan's full story (from the Hook), and respond to 3 questions regarding his
dilemma. After posting their own responses, students will be expected to respond positively to at least one other
person's post and response negatively (but respectfully) to another person's post. As with any other assignment,
students will need to agree/disagree with something specific in the post and explain why.

The prompts for the discussion are as follows:

1.  Do you think Brendan should try to talk to his dad again about his lying at the movies?
2.  Why might Brendan have hurt by cheating on his quiz?
3.  Brendan's dad said it was okay to be dishonest as long as no one was hurt. Who do you think might have been hurt by his lying at the

Page 2 of 4
movie ticket office?
 

Attachments:

1.  Moral Dilemma.docxBrendan's Moral Dilemma

E (Evaluate) There will be two formative assessments collected from this lesson: the quick response after reading the passage and
the discussion posts and responses online.

The quick response after reading the passage has students simply answer a series of text explicit questions. Part of
what I'm looking for is whether or not students were following along while the teacher was reading and whether or not
they can identify main ideas in a passage with difficult language (Southern dialect). This assessment would not be
graded.

The discussion post assesses students' understanding of the paradoxical nature of moral dilemmas. This assignment
would be graded on the quality and clarity of the post itself, and the depth of responses to others.

T (Tailored) ELs:

The activity, "Numbered Heads Together" is a SDAIE strategy designed to engage and include all students in
participation. It's a discussion based activity, so ELs would be forced to practice academic language/academic discussion.
The nice thing about this strategy of grouping and discussion is that all students have the opportunity to think and
collaborate before being called on so all students can feel confident when asked to answer. This will lower the affective
stress level of the students and it will give the ELs a chance to learn and practice the vocabulary needed for each
response before actually being asked to produce.

SPED:

The check for understanding after reading the passage is designed to scaffold the ideas for both students with learning
disabilities and/or memory struggles and ELs. By asking basic, text explicit questions prior to asking evaluative
questions, the teacher is giving students a base knowledge that they can use later. When thinking critically and
analytically, students can refer back to what they already know from the text itself. Leveled questioning is generally
helpful for all students but it's particularly benefitial for the SPED and EL populations.

GATE:

In discussion, I will offer 1 point extra credit for answers/comments that "wow" me. In order to get that 1 point of extra
credit on their participation grade, students will have to express a comment that has significant depth of thought. Making
this extra credit available with encourage advanced students to stay engaged in the conversation. In addition, I might
designate my more advanced students as the group leader when I set up the Numbered Heads Together group. The
group leader would be responsible for keeping the group on task and directing discussion. Giving an advanced student
responsibility can also increase motivation.

O (Organized) This lesson would take place right after reading the 31st chapter of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and after
completing a WebQuest about racism, moral dilemmas, and the Fugitive Slave Act and how those themes and motif
relate to the novel. Students will be getting close to finishing the novel, so students would be taking an objective,
summative Test on the novel sometime in the following two weeks. In addition, students will be asked to write a
summative, in­class essay about the presence of contradictions and paradoxes in the novel and how those
contradictions contribute to the confusion in morality in Huck's consciousness.

MATERIALS AND RESOURCES
Instructional Materials Attachments:
(handouts, etc.)
1.  Moral Dilemma.docx

Resources
Materials and resources:
Laptop
Projector
Projector Screen
Canvas (LMS)­for discussion thread
iPads­for students to complete the discussion thread

STANDARDS & ASSESSMENT
Standards CA­ California Common Core State Standards (2012)
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
Grade: Grades 11–12 students:
Content Area: English Language Arts
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature
Domain: Key Ideas and Details
Standard:
2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of
the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an
objective summary of the text.

Assessment/Rubrics

Page 3 of 4
Page 4 of 4