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NBA

NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION

SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR)

FOR ACCREDITATION OF

UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES

(TIER-II)

First time Accreditation

NATONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION

4th Floor East Tower, NBCC Place


Bhisham Pitamah Marg, Pragati Vihar
New Delhi 110003
P: +91(11)24360620-22, 24360654
Fax: +91(11)24360682
(June, 2015)
Contents
Sl.No Title Page No.
Part A
1. Institutional Information
2. Departmental Information
3. Programme Specific Information

Part B
1. Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives
2. Programme Outcomes
3. Programme Curriculum
4. Students Performance
5. Faculty Information and Contributions
6. Faculties and Technical Support
7. Continuous Improvement
Institute level criteria
8 First year Academics
9. Students support systems
10 Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources
Part Declaration by the Institution
C
APPENDIX - A
Part A : Institutional Information

I. Institutional Information

1. Name and address of the institution:

ACS College of Engineering


207, Kambipura, Mysore Road
Bangalore-560074
Karnataka, India

2. Name and Address of the Affiliating University:

Visvesvaraya Technological University


Jnana Sangama
Belagavi 590108
Karnataka, India

3. Year of establishment of the Institution:

2009-10

4. Type of Institution:

Institute of national Importance

University

Deemed university

Affiliated

Autonomous

Any other (Please specific)

Note:

1. In case of Autonomous and Deemed University, mention the year of grant of status by the authority.

2. In case of university Constituent Institution please indicate the academic autonomy status of the
Institution as defined in 12th Plan guidelines if UGC. Institute should apply for Tier 1 only when fully
academically autonomous.

5. Ownership Status:

Central Government

State Government

Government Aided

Self financing
Trust

Society

Section 25 Company

Any Other (Please specify)

6. Other Academic Institutions of the Trust/Society/Company etc., if any:

Year of
Programs of
Name of the Institution(s) Establish Location
Study
ment

MBBS, MD,
RajaRajeswari Medical College & Hospital 2004-05 Bangalore
MS
RajaRajeswari Dental College & Hospital 1991-92 BDS, MDS Bangalore
BE, M.Tech.,
RajaRajeswari College of Engineering 2006-07 Bangalore
Ph.D
GNM, BSC,
RajaRajeswari College & School of Nursing 2004-05 PCBSC, Bangalore
MSC

7. Details of all the programs being offered by the institution under consideration:

Increase
S. Year of Year of AICTE Accreditation
Program Name Intake in intake
No. Start increase Approval Status*
if any
1. B.E- Computer
Science & 2009-10 60 No No
Engineering
Applying for
2. B.E-Civil 2009-10 60 No No F.No.06/06/KT the first time
Engineering
K/
B.E-Electronics
ENGG/2008/00
3. & 2009-10 60 No No 3 dt.22/06/2009
Communication
Engineering
4. B.E-Mechanical 2009-10 60 No No
Engineering

5. B.E-Aeronautical 2010-11 60 No No F.No.South-


Engineering West Region/1-
328729
6. B.E-Bio-Medical 2010-11 60 No No /2010/EOA
Engineering
dt.23/08/2010
F.No.South-
B.E-Electrical & West Region/1-
7. Electronic 2011-12 60 No No 402580963
Engineering /2011/EOA
dt.01/09/2011
M.Tech/PG Courses
M.Tech Product
1. 2013-14 F.No.South-
Design & 18 No No
West Region/
Manufacturing
1-1359990619
M.Tech /2013/EOA
2. Structural 2013-14 18 No No dt.19/03/2013
Engineering
M.Tech
3. Software 2014-15 18 No No F.No.South-
Engineering West Region/
M.Tech Digital 1-2017625631
Electronics & /2014/EOA
4. 2014-15 18 No No
Communication dt.04/06/2014
Engineering

8. Programs to be considered for Accreditation vide this application

S.
Program Name
No.
1. B.E- Computer Science & Engineering
2. B.E- Civil Engineering
3. B.E- Electronics & Communication Engineering
4. B.E- Mechanical Engineering

9. Total number of employees:

A. Regular* Employees (Faculty and Staff):

CAY CAYm1 CAYm2


Items
Min Max Min Max Min Max
M 69 65 52
Faculty in Engineering
F 33 37 28

Faculty in Maths, Science & M 9 9 13


Humanities F 8 8 9
M 40 40 24
Non-Teaching Staff
F 13 13 16

B. Contractual Staff Employees (Faculty and Staff): (Not covered in Table A):

CAY CAYM1 CAYM2


Items
Min Max Min Max Min Max
M
Faculty in Engineering
F
M
Faculty in Maths, Science &
Humanities F Not
Applicable
M
Non-Teaching Staff
F

10. Total number of Engineering Students:

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2

Total No. of Boys 211 170 178

Total No. of Girls 87 110 87

Total No. of Students 298 280 265


(Instruction: The data may be categorized in tabular form separately for undergraduate,
postgraduate engineering, other program, if applicable)

Note:

In case the institution is running programs other than engineering programs, a separate table
giving similar details is to be included.

11. Vision of the Institution:

Engineering the future of the nation by transforming the students to be technically skilled managers,
innovative leaders and environmentally receptive citizens.
12. Mission of the Institution:
1. To implement holistic approach in curriculum and pedagogy through Industry Integrated
Interactions to meet the needs of Global Engineering Environment.

2. To develop students with knowledge, attitude and skill of employability, entrepreneurship (Be
Job creators than job seekers), research potential and professionally ethical citizens.

13. Contact Information of the Head of the Institution and NBA coordinator, if designated:

Name: Dr. M.S Murali

Designation: Principal

Mobile No: +91-9900028024

Email Id: principal@acsce.edu.in

NBA coordinator, if designated:

Name: Dr. R. Siva Subramaniyam

Designation: Associate Professor

Mobile No: +91-9945535836

Email Id: rssbaby@gmail.com

I.2. Name, designation, telephone number, and e-mail address of the contact person for the
NBA:

Dr. M.S Murali


Principal
Tel: 080-28437955/56 Mobile: +91-9900028024
Fax No. : 080-28437989
E-mail: principal@acsce.edu.in
Website: www.acsce.edu.in

I.3. History of the College / Institution (including dates of introduction and no. of seats of
Various programmes of study along with NBA accreditation, if any), in tabular form:

Not Applicable
1.3.1 Historical background

With a view to make available enormous opportunities for the in higher and technical
education, Honorable Shri A. C.Shanmugum, a Social Reformer in true sense, vowed to establish an
ambitious project of an Engineering College at this interior, but a well connected place ACS College of
Engineering (ACSCE), ACS College of Engineering, an institution and academic excellence, has been
established in the year 2009 sponsored by Moogambigai Charitable and Educational Trust Bangalore
with a cherished desire to serve the cause of humanity through the education. The institute is affiliated
to Visvesvaraya Technological University, Belagavi. The college offers technical education in the
range of engineering disciplines including new age ones such as like B.E- Aeronautical Engineering,
B.E - Bio-Medical Engineering and so on.

The details of the programmes offered by the institute are depicted in Table below.

1.3.2. Location

Bangalore known as a green city is a centrally located and well connected to all the parts of the
country by air, rail and road. It is a capital city of Karnataka State. It is a fast growing Metropolis and
is the third fast growing city.

ACSCE is located in Bangalore, the silicon valley of India. Many colleges are situated in the heart
of Indias Garden City or the Silicon Valley of India-Bangalore (1257N, 7738E, 920m altitude),
which ranks amongst the most dynamic, progressive and fascinating of Indian cities.
The college is located at a beautiful lush green landscape, free from polluted environment and
excellent atmosphere and ambience ideally suited for growth of the sound, soul & mind.

It is on the Bangalore Mysore Highway 15Km from the Bangalore City Railway Station and
Central Bus Stand and 2Km from Kengeri Railway Station and 36Km from International Airport.

1.3.3. Regular Academic Programmes:

Academic Programmes
The Institution offers 7 Under Graduate Programs viz. B.E. in Aero, Bio-Medical, Civil,
Computer Science, Electronics & Communication, Electrical & Electronics and Mechanical
Engineering.
The Institution also offers four Post Graduate full time programs (2 years duration) viz. M.Tech-
Structural Engineering, M.Tech-Product Designing and Manufacturing Engineering, M.Tech-Software
Engineering and M.Tech-Digital Electronics and Communication Systems.

The Institution also offered Doctoral Research Ph.D (full/part time) program in all Engineering
Departments viz., Aero, Bio-Medical, Civil, Computer Science, Electronics & Communication,
Electrical & Electronics, Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics.
Sl.No. Program Name Year Intake Capacity
Under Graduate Program : B.E.

01. Computer Science Engineering 2009-10 60


02. Civil Engineering 2009-10 60
03. Electronics And Communication Engineering 2009-10 60
04. Mechanical Engineering 2009-10 60
05. Aeronautical Engineering 2010-11 60
06. Bio-Medical Engineering 2010-11 60
07. Electrical And Electronics Engineering 2012-13 60
TOTAL 420
Post Graduate & Research Programs : M.Tech.
01. Structural Engineering 2013-14 18
02. Product Design And Manufacturing 2013-14 18
03. Software Engineering 2014-15 18
04. Digital Electronics And Communication System 2014-15 18
TOTAL 72
Research Centers (R&D)
01. Department of Mechanical Engineering 2014-15 -
02. Department of Physics 2014-15 -
03. Department of Computer Science 2014-15 -
04. Department of Civil Engineering - -
05. Department of Electronics And Communication - -
Engineering
06. Department of Aeronautical Engineering - -
07. Department of Bio-Medical Engineering - -
08. Department of Electrical And Electronics - -
Engineering
09. Department of Mathematics - -
10. Department of Chemistry - -

1.3.4 Accreditation Status:

AICTE Notification for all Existing UG and Program vide letter No. F.No. South-West/1-
2812219163/2016/EOA dated 05-Apr-2016

AICTE First Notification vide letter No. F.No. 06/KTK/ENGG/2008/003 dated 23.06.2009

Campus

Satellite View of ACSCE campus


ACSCE campus spread over an area of 10.00 acres on Bangalore-Mysore Road. It presents a
panorama of harmony in architecture and natural beauty. The campus has been organized in three
functional sectors;

Hostels for Students, Health Centre, Sports Complex


Academic Buildings, Administrative Building and Library
Residential Sector for Family & Staff

The academic buildings are located fairly in close proximate, to the hostels and the staff quarters. The
campus has a full-fledged computerized branch of Kotak Mahindra bank with ATM facility, Post
office, Axis bank ATM as well as courier services and other needs of students, residents and office are
nearby.

The Institute has its own fully fledged Health Center with a full time residential medical Officer. The
specialized medical services of a Psychological Counselor, Dietician, physiotherapist, Pathology lab,
Yoga Centre and also medical consultants in Ayurveda and Homeopathy are available. Patients
suffering from serious illness/enquiring intensive care are referred to the Govt. Medical College and
Hospital and other Health Care Centers duly approved under the CGHS. A full time dedicated
Ambulance service is available at the dispensary.

Spacious and multicuisine canteen is located close to the instruction zone and hostels. Two more
cafeterias exist on the campus. The Institute has a well-equipped Gymkhana apart from various
playgrounds for Tennis, Badminton, Volley Ball, Foot Ball, Hockey and Cricket. NCC unit is also
located on campus. They are very well used by students and campus residents of quarters.
PART B

Criteria 1 to Criteria 10

Electronics and Communication Engineering


Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives
60
CRITERION 1 Processes

1. Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives (60)


1.1 State the Vision and Mission of the Department and Institute (5)

Vision of the Institute

Engineering the future of the nation by transforming the students to be technically skilled managers,
innovative leaders and environmentally receptive citizens.

Mission of the Institute

1. To implement holistic approach in curriculum and pedagogy through Industry Integrated


Interactions to meet the needs of Global Engineering Environment.

2. To develop students with knowledge, attitude and skill of employability, entrepreneurship (Be
Job creators than job seekers), research potential and professionally ethical citizens.

Department Vision

Impart quality education to create world class technocrats and entrepreneurs with new ideas and
innovations to meet industry expectations through advanced research.

Department Mission

M1: To Develop and deliver Quality academic programmes in Emerging and innovative field
of Engineering to empower the students to meet Industry Standards.
M2: To build student community with high ethical standards to undertake R&D in thrust areas
of national and international needs.
M3: To create Centre of Excellence by establishing the incubation centres to meet global
research challenges.

1.2 State the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) (5)

PEO I: To develop the ability among students to understand the concept of core electronics
subjects that will facilitate understanding of new technology.
PEO II: To embed a strong foundation in the engineering fundamentals to solve, analyze and
design real time engineering products.

PEO III: To give exposures to emerging edge technologies, adequate training and
opportunities to work as team on multidisciplinary projects with effective communication skills
and leadership qualities.

1.3 Indicate where the Vision, Mission and PEOs are published and disseminated among Stake
Holders (10)

Internal Stake Holders

1. Management - Moogambigai Charitable and Educational Trust (R)


2. Governing Council Members
3. Faculty members
4. Non-Teaching Staff
5. Students

External Stake Holders


1. Parents
2. Employers
3. Industry
4. Alumni

The Vision and Mission Statements are published

Particulars Internal Stake Holders External Stake Holders


Departmental Newsletter
College Website (www.acsce.edu.in)
Department website
College Brochure
Progress Report

The Vision and Mission Statements are disseminated

Internal Stake External Stake


Particulars
Holders Holders
Faculty rooms
Class rooms
Departmental notice boards
Laboratories
Departmental
Seminar
corridorsHall
1.4. State the process for defining the Vision and Mission of the department, and PEOs of the
Program (25)

Considering the institutional Mission & Vision, the Vision and Mission Statements of the
department were defined by involving the stakeholders.

Following process were adopted in developing Departmental Mission and Vision statements:
SWOT analysis was conducted by considering internal stakeholders including management and
alumni.
A detailed survey on various college websites was done to excel our vision and mission.
All the informations were collected summarized, and the faculty listed the most critical areas
to be addressed by the Department by next five years based on our expertise and available
resources.
Armed with the information thus collected, the departmental faculty met number of times to
develop and cultivate a strong and meaningful vision and mission. The mission was also
finalized based on the following components.
Quality education, Professional career, higher education, Innovation and Creativity and
Lifelong learning.

Following process were adopted in developing the PEOs of the program

A series of discussions were conducted simultaneously among ECE faculty, alumni


representatives, Industry experts, Training experts and department Academic Advisory Board
members consecutively to finalize the PEOs for the academic year 2015-16.
INSTITUTE
VISION AND
MISSION

EMPLOYER

FACULTY
DEFINE
ALUMNI
DEPARTMENTAL
VISION
INDUSTRY
EXPERTS AND MISSION PARENTS
ASSESS VISION
AND MISSION

NO
SATISF
ACTOR
YES
Y

PUBLISH/DISPLAY
VISION AND
MISSION

Figure 1.4-1: Process for defining Vision and Mission of the Department
Vision and
Mission of
institution

Department
Vision and
Mission

Faculty Management Alumni Industry

Views

SWOT

PEOs

Figure 1.4-2: Process for Establishment of PEOs


1.5. Establish consistency of PEOs with Mission of the institute (15)

PEO
M1 M2 M3 Justification
Statements

(Mission 1) strongly support to achieve PEO1, as


objective is to develop the ability among students
and understand concepts of core graduate
electronics which can be accomplished, if graduates
are facilitates understanding of new technology.

(Mission 2) moderately support PEO1 to embed a


PEO1 H M L
strong foundation in Engineering to meet global
research challenges.

(Mission 3) slightly support in achieving PEO1 as


global concern. Overall, a department mission
reasonably supports PEO1.

Quality Academic programmes (Mission 1) highly


supports for overall development of graduates and
to strengthen their technical skills & interest.

With high ethical standards to undertake R&D


PEO2 H H M (Mission 2) strongly helps in fulfilling needs of
industries and society.

To meet global research challenges (Mission 3)


moderately supports in industrial growth. Overall, a
department mission highly supports PEO2.
Mission 1 and 2 moderately support to achieve
PEO3 with respect effective communication skill and
leadership qualities.
PEO3 M M H
Mission 3 highly support to achieve PEO3 for
establishing the incubation centers to meet global
research challenges.

H-High M-Medium L-Low


CRITERION 2 Program Curriculum and TeachingLearning 120
Processes

2. PROGRAM CURRICULUM AND TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESSES (120)

2.1. Program Curriculum (20)

2.1.1. State the process used to identify extent of compliance of the University curriculum
for attaining the Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes as mentioned in
Annexure I. Also mention the identified curricular gaps if any (10)

Feedback
From
From
Parents &
Internet Faculty
Feedback
Feedback Needs Identified Through from
from Gap Analysis Alumni &
Industry/ Students
Academia
Departmental Core
Committee for Approval

Institute/ University for


Approval

Program Content
Curriculum Beyond
Syllabus

Figure 2.1-1: Gap analysis


Electronics and Communication Engineering department curriculum is affiliated to Visvesvaraya
Technological University, Belagavi, Karnataka. The curriculum comprises of General, Basic
Sciences and Professional Subjects related to electronics. Subjects are mapped with twelve
Programme Outcomes and gaps are identified.
.
Following is the process used to identify extent of compliance of University curriculum for attaining
the POs and PSOs.
Identify Course Outcomes for each subject
Map each Course Outcome with POs and PSOs
Based on All CO-POs/PSOs mapping, Map subject with POs and PSOs
Categorize entire Curriculum into Core Courses, Science & Humanities, Programming,
Inter Disciplinary, Projects / Lab Practices
Map each category with POs and PSOs

Program Curriculum Number


Grouping based on of POs
Course Component subjects

Professional Core PO1, PO2, PO3, PO4, PO5, PO6, PO8, PO11,
39
Subjects PO12
Science & Humanities 8 PO1, PO2, PO7
Programming 6 PO2, PO3, PO4, PO5, PO12
Interdisciplinary 17 PO1, PO2, PO3, PO5, ,PO12
Project, Seminar & Lab
16 PO2, PO3, PO7, PO9, PO10, PO11, PO12
Practices

2.1.2. State the delivery details of the content beyond the syllabus for the attainment of POs
and PSOs (10)

Course Delivery Methods used in our department:


Lectures
Tutorials
Presentation (Still and Video)
Experimental Laboratory Work
Group tasks (Projects)
Hand-outs
Black-board

Attainment of
Course Delivery Justification
POs
Faculty of the ECE Department Effectively teach
students about a concerned subject.
Faculty convey significant information, history,
Lecturing 1,2,3,4,8
background, theories, analogies and equations to
make the concepts clear.
Faculty relate engineering practice to the real world
Faculty help the slow learners by solving more
number of similar problems.
Hand outs will be given to the students.
Tutorials University question paper will be solved.
1,2,9,10
Regular assignments will be given.
Solutions to the assignment will be provided for the
students.
Presentations are given to illustrate ideas and
concepts.
Presentations give information with data relating to
Presentations
(Still and 4,5,6,10 an issue.
Video) Videos effectively communicate the working of
actual engineering solutions-long learning in the
appropriate societal context.
Laboratory work demonstrates how theory can be
verified by experiments through interpretation of
Experimental and results.
2,3,5,9,10
laboratory work
Experiments are normally done in groups thereby
encouraging students to do team work.
Here the concepts of engineering that the student has
Group tasks understood in the course is showcased.
4,7,9,10
(Projects)
This helps to do work in groups effectively.

Gives a quick insight to the course.

Hand-outs 1,2 It helps the slow learners to face the exams with
confidence

CAY (2015-16)

SL. Resource Person Relevance To


Gap Identified Action Taken Date
No With Designation POs
Technical Talk on
1 Embedded
Applications of Embedded 5th Sept 2015 Mr.Loganathan 1,2,3,4,5,12
Systems
Systems
Power Industrial Visit to Central
2 Electronics Power Research Institute, 15th Oct 2015 - 3,5,8,12
Applications Bengaluru

Guest Lecture on Dr Gopalakrishna


3 Antennas, Radar 16th Oct 2015 Nair, 1,2,3,4,5,12
Synthetic Aperture Radar
Rector RRGI
Rajeev
Student
Ramachandra
Interaction, Symposium 1,2,4,5,6,9,10,
4 29th Oct 2015 Chief Technology
Recent CLONEOLECTRIC 11,12
Officer, Mistral
Technologies.
Solutions

Guest Lecture on Logical Mr. Premananda B


5 VLSI Concepts 24th Feb 2016 1,2,3,4,5,12
Efforts in VLSI S, RVCE

Mr. Prathik Pai,


Arduino Workshop on Open 3rd& 4th CEO LogicHive 1,2,3,4,5,6,9,
6
Programming Hardware Prototyping March 2016 Solutions private 10,11,12
limited

Workshop On
Contextual Learning
Applications Of Signal And System, Mr. Sanjeev
23rd& 24th 1,2,3,4,5,6,9,
7 of Matlab and its Control System And Kubakaddi, ITIE
March 2016 10,11,12
Toolboxes Digital Signal Academy
Processing Using
Matlab

Industrial Visit to
Applications of
Doordarshan Kendra 30th March
8 Communication - 1,3,5,6,12
(DD Chandana), 2016
& Broadcasting
Bengaluru

2nd National Mr. Nandhi


Conference On Signal st
21 & 22 nd Dharma Kishore,
Advanced 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9
9 Processing, Computing Senior Manager
Research Topics April 2016 ,10,11,12
Networks And Power (R&D), Samsung
Engineering Electronics
CAYm1 (2014-15)

Gap Resource Person Relevance


SL.No. Action Taken Date
Identified With Designation To POs
Advanced Mr. Raghu T C
Processor, Workshop on Arm 07th August Embience 1,2,3,4,5,6,
1
Embedded Processor 2014 Technologies, 9,10,11,12
systems Bangalore
Satellite
Communicati Industrial Visit to Indian 11th
2 on, Space Research September - 1,3,5,6,12
Communicati Organization, Bengaluru 2014
on Systems

Opportunities 19th Sangamesh


Gugwad, 2,3,5,10,11,
3 in the IT Big Data and Hadoop September
Team Lead, 12
Sector 2014
British Telecom
Soft Skills 2 day FDP on Leadership, 28th & 29th
Interpersonal skills, Align Mr. Shivakumar
4 Training 9,10
to win, High-impact January 2015 and Team
Program
presentation skills
Mr. G Pradeep,
Advanced rd
Seminar On Intel Galilio- 23 March Technical Engineer,
5 Processors, 2,3,5,6,7,12
features & Applications 2015 Intel FICE,
Controllers
Bangalore

Workshop On Make
Applications 27th March Mr Parthiban, EPR
6 Objects, Gadgets And 2,3,5,6,7,12
of Electronics 2015 Labs
Robots

National Conference Dr. L M


Advanced On Signal Processing, Satyamurthy
31st March 1,2,3,4,5,6,
7 Research Computing & 2015 Academic Senate 8,9,10,11,12
Topics Networks Member, Senior
SPCN-15 Executive of ISRO
12th
Current Texas Instruments Edgate
8 September 2,3,5,6,7,12
Technologies ALSK Pro Workshop Technologies
2015
CAYm2 (2013-14)

Resource Person Relevance


SL.No. Gap Identified Action Taken Date To
With Designation
POs
Industrial Visit to
Industry Institute
1 Technilab Instruments, 2nd May 2014 - 1,3,5,6,12
Interaction
Bangalore

Placement Kunigal
Invited Talk on Career 17th August
2 Opportunities in Ramaswamy, 5,10,12
Guidance 2013
Industry Vocational Trainer
Ravikumar
th
Microwave Guest Lecture on 6 September Technilab
3 1,2,3,4,5,12
Communication Microwave Circuits 2013 Instruments,
Bengaluru

2.2. Teaching-Learning Processes (100)

2.2.1. Describe Processes followed to improve quality of Teaching &Learning (25)

Department calendar of events is prepared well in advance before the commencement of the
semester based on college calendar of events. It consists of the activities planned for the
semester which includes internal test dates, display of internal marks ,conduction of events like
organizing guest lectures, conferences etc.
Subject allotment is done well in advance for the staff to prepare lesson plans, course plan, soft
and hard copies of the lecture notes.
As per the university guidelines 10-12 experiments are to be conducted. One or two
experiments are conducted beyond the specified list for relevant courses. Laboratory manual
explaining the details of the experiment, designing issues are available with the course teacher
and are given to students at the commencement of the semester.
The faculty of department adopts various innovative Teaching & Learning methodologies to
create the best learning environment for student.
These methodologies include traditional black board teaching, presentations, video lecturing,
collaborative learning methods are used where every concept is explained with real world
illustrations, design and problematic aspects are conveyed by a short cut method.
The faculty are now oriented towards Outcome based Education (OBE) and are actively
utilizing the OBE to cater the learning needs of students by innovative way.
Lecture Session duration 60 minutes. Laboratory duration is 3 hrs.
Assignments are given to students for their better performance.
Invited talks and seminars on the current trends are done regularly from the industry persons.
Tutorial/Remedial classes are conducted for the slow learners based on their performance in
external exams and after the first internals.
Motivating and guiding students for higher studies and university ranks.
Technical quiz is conducted for the students.
All the faculties are requested to maintain Attendance registers, course files, Work dairies.
Industrial visits are conducted at least once a year to reduce the gap between industry and
institute.
Workshops are organized to help the students to understand concepts beyond curriculum.
One-one discussion, interaction between Professors and students has increased confidence
levels of the students.
Identification of bright and weak students. Motivate the weak students to attend tutorials and
help them solve more problems. Encourage the bright students to attend more workshops and
technical talks.

o To meet the current requirements of the industry, the syllabus was formulated with the
following POs.
To identify, formulate and to solve complex Engineering problems.
To use the skills, techniques and modern engineering tools and software necessary for
engineering course.
Students gain knowledge by conducting workshops, industry visits, guest lectures and
discussions with technical professionals.
For engineering students, Project Work allows them to gain in depth knowledge as they carry
out literature survey of the concepts, and hands on experience of the tools and hardware.
Through the experiences of independent research, students are better prepared in the areas of
critical thinking and learning. This encourages the students to pursue graduate studies and
research work.
2.2.1.1 Cooperative learning

Sl. No. COURSE ASSOCIATED LAB


SEM I
1 Engineering Chemistry Chemistry lab
2 Computer Concept of C Programming Computer Programming lab
SEM II
3 Engineering Physics Physics lab
4 Computer aided Engineering drawing CAD lab
SEM III
5 Analog Electronics Analog Electronics Lab
6 Digital Electronics Digital Electronics Lab
SEM IV
7 Microcontrollers Microcontrollers lab
8 Fundamentals of HDL HDL lab
SEM V
9 Digital Signal Processing Digital Signal Processing lab
10 Analog Communication & Linear Analog Communication &
Integrated Circuits LIC lab
SEM VI
11 Microprocessor Microprocessor lab
12 Digital Communication, Microwave and Advanced Communication
Radar, Antennas and Wave Propagation, lab
Optical Communication.
SEM VII
13 VLSI design VLSI Lab
14 Power Electronics Power Electronics lab
SEM VIII
15 Project Work Hands on experience for the
basic & advanced concepts
of Electronics &
Communication.
2.2.1.2. Impact analysis

The following are the positive outcomes observed after adopting the above mentioned innovative
TLP
Improved attendance of students for every class.
Active participation of students in OBE (Outcome Based Education) activities.
New view points and new project ideas are derived in class.
Better bonding between students and faculty.
Appreciation from the parents.

2.2.1.3. Initiatives and implementation details of improving Quality of Laboratory Experiments


Faculty members of respective specialization form a group with a team leader to discuss the
preparation of manual, Material requirements, conduction of experiments and cycle of
experiments before commencement of semester.
The Electronics and Communication Laboratories are conducted in session of 3 hours, in each
session the faculty explains the circuits/logic and design/ algorithm of the experiment.
The students will write the complete experiment concerned in the observation book, and then
rig up / code/debug/execute the program on the system and interpret the results.
The executed program with output, related theory and Algorithm or flowchart is documented in
the record book by the students later which will be evaluated.
In each subject many students are made to work on number of additional programs for the
better understanding of the subject.
Viva questions will be prepared in advance for all the experiment.
The college organize inter collegiate contests, Symposiums, to encourage students to
demonstrate their programming skills
The Laboratories are evaluated by the faculties for 25 marks based on their performance during
the semester, attendance, internal test and record submission.
2.2.1.4. Impact analysis
Very good results in laboratory examination. .
Improvement in analytical abilities of students thus improves the placement.
The stimulating environment made students to learn other programming languages apart from
curriculum.
2.2.1.5. Initiatives and implementation details of Encouraging Bright Students
The ACS College of Engineering always had the culture of encouraging bright students by
providing them necessary guidance and moral support.
Class Toppers will be provided by certificate and cash prize.
The bright students are identified based on their overall performance and their orientation
towards Academics.
Encouraged to attend conferences, workshops and publish papers.
Encouraged to take up innovative projects and apply for funding.
Encouraged to participate in various competitions.
The bright students having high academic track records are encouraged by faculties to achieve
university ranks, also encouraged to take up competitive examinations like GATE, GRE etc.,
The bright students having orientation to research are encouraged by faculties to publish their
work in National & International conferences& Journals.

Co-curricular activities
Paper Presentation

NATIONAL

Sl.
Participants Paper Title Presented At Date
No
Amarashree P Security Enhancement
NCPCCI- 15 24th 25th
1 AshikaV, Parimala of ATM System RVCE, Bangalore April 2015
N & Vinutha K V Through Human Body
Density Based Traffic
Chandrashekar B SPCN 2015 31st Mar
2 Control Using I R ACSCE,Bengaluru
R, Kantharaju A G 2015
Sensor
Wireless Serial Data
Synchronization
Mynavathi H S
Methodology for
Dravya B C SPCN 2015 31st Mar
3 secured Money ACSCE, Bengaluru
Nayana K & 2015
Transaction using Multi
Shifali K R
account Embedded
ATM Card
Gayathri B Implementation of
SPCN 2015 31st Mar
4 Tejaswini N D & Heart Rate Monitoring ACSCE,Bengaluru 2015
Dr Mathivanan System
National conference on
Sunil Kumar K V Design and Simulation Advanced communication,
15th May
5 Deepika J of Wide Band Stop VLSI design and Signal
Processing, KSSEM, 2014
Mohan Prasad P Microstrip Filter
Bangalore
National conference on
Mohan Prasad P* Advanced communication,
Microwave Stepped 15th May
6 Sunil Kumar K V VLSI design and Signal
Impedance LPF* Processing, KSSEM, 2014
Deepika J
Bangalore

INTERNATIONAL
Design and
Deepika J Development of 7th IETE Conference on RF 8th to 10th
1 Mohan Prasad P Parallel Coupled & Wireless, May 2014
Sunil Kumar K V Microstrip Bandpass HKBKCE,Bangalore
Filter
Sunil Kumar K V Design and Simulation 7th IETE Conference on RF 8th to 10th
2 Deepika J of Wideband Bandstop & Wireless, May 2014
Mohan Prasad P Microstrip Filter HKBKCE,Bangalore

* Awarded Best Paper.

Extra-curricular activities
Gagan N H, secured second place in Clay Modeling at VTU Inter-Collegiate fest at Belgaum,
2015.
Participation in Volley ball tournament organized by VTU at ACS college of Engineering.
Runners-Up in Inter Collegiate Zonal Cricket tournament held at SJBIT Bangalore, 2015

2.2.1.7. Initiatives and implementation details of Assisting Weak Students


The department has a well-defined process of monitoring, guiding and assisting slow learners
(weak students).
Care is taken by the faculties in monitoring the performance of slow learners, the students
deviations from studies is observed by the respective section coordinators and corrective
measures are suggested.
The faculties also go a step ahead and have periodic interaction with the parents about the
performance of slow learners.
A blended motivation and responsibility from both parents and faculty will create a positive
mindset and will help to overcome the inabilities and hurdles faced by the slow learners.
Every parent is informed about the IA marks and the attendance by a system.
Additional coaching is given to slow learners through Remedial classes, simplified exam
oriented coaching and materials are provided to them.
A special counseling and tutorial classes are conducted by the faculty for those students who
have failed in any subject. 2.2.1.8. Impact analysis
The observable impact of assisting weak students is reduced number of identifiable weak
students.
Improved results and less number of failures in each subjects.

2.2.2. Quality of internal semester Question papers, Assignments and Evaluation (20)

2.2.2.1. Initiatives and Implementation details for improving the quality of Internal
Semester Question papers (Internal Assessment Test)
The department conducts three internal assessment tests at 6th, 12th and 14th week respectively.
Each test covers one third of the syllabus.
The tests are conducted for a maximum of 25 marks. (No minimum marks criteria from the
university).
The duration of the test is one hour and question paper are set to make the student to learn time
management.
I. Question Papers:
For each subjects, question bank is prepared.
While setting the question paper all previous university exam papers are taken into
consideration.
According to level of toughness the questions are prepared (viz., analyzing the problems,
implementation of modern tools, formulating the problems etc), which is termed as Blooms
Taxonomy.
The questions will be of three categories:
o One third of the questions is straight and can be answered by all students.
o One third of the questions need analysis and use of content covered as per syllabus.
o Remaining one third of the questions is not straight. Certain amount of thinking,
analysis and mathematical knowledge are required to resolve.
II. Assignments:
Assignment issue and submission dates are announced by the respective faculty members.
Assignment questions are prepared using Blooms Taxonomy process.
Surprise tests, quizzes, video links are provided.
In order to bridge the gap in curriculum, bright students are given some assignment beyond
syllabus.
III. Evaluation:

The faculties after every internal assessment test they explain the solution of the questions in
the class which will enable them to perform well in the final examination.
For any genuine reasons, if a student was unable to perform well in the given three internal
assessment tests, improvement test is given to him/her.
The average of the marks obtained from any best two test is chosen for the award of internal
assessment marks.
If a candidate remains absent for all the tests conducted, the Internal assessment marks are
marked as Absent in the result.
Assignments are used as a tool for practice and evaluation is based purely on Internal
Assessment Test.

2.2.2.2. Impact analysis


Very good results in Internal and External examination.
Improvement in overall performance of students thus improves the placement and higher
studies.
The stimulating environment made students to plan their study plan for better performance.

2.2.2.3. Initiatives and implementation details of improving Quality of Laboratory Experiments


(Assignments)
The college organize/encourages inter collegiate contests to encourage students to demonstrate
their programming skills, circuit debugging skills.
The Electronics & Communication Engineering Laboratories are conducted in session of 3
hours, in each session the faculty explains the logic/circuit and (or) algorithm/design of the
program/circuit to be experimented.
The students will write the complete circuit/program in the observation book, and then rig up
the circuit and output is obtained and analyse the results.
For software and simulation labs the executed program with output, related theory and
Algorithm or flowchart is documented in the record book by the students later.
In each subject many students are made to work on number of additional programs for the
better understanding of the subject.
Quizzes/Viva questions are conducted at the ending of laboratory sessions to improve the
programming skills of the students.
The Laboratories are evaluated by the faculties for 25 marks based on their performance during
the semester, attendance, internal test and record submission.

2.2.2.4. Impact analysis


Very good results in laboratory examinationon.
Improvement in analytical abilities of students thus improves the placement.
The stimulating environment made students to learn other programming languages apart from
curriculum.

2.2.3. Quality of student projects (25)

2.2.3.1. Initiatives
The students projects are selected in line with department mission, vision and Program
outcomes.
Students are provided with brief idea of various fields for selecting the project ideas.
The list of previous year projects is displayed at notice board which ensures no repetition of
project work and also encourages students to enhance the previous works.
The faculties encourage the students to carry out in house projects and support will be provided
with all necessary software and hardware.
The faculties encourage students to participate in project exhibitions. The project exhibition is
aimed to provide common platform to exhibit their innovations and their work towards
excellence in latest technology.
The faculties encourage students to publish their project work in reputed journals/conferences.
The faculties encourage students to avail the external funding schemes for their project work.
(like KSCST, VTU project funding scheme)
Evaluation scheme for Projects.

Phase 1
Sl.No. Performance Indicator
1 Literature Survey/Phase 1 report
2 Presentation
3 Questions and Answer

Phase 2
Sl.No. Performance Indicator
1 Methodology Phase 2 report
2 Presentation
3 Questions and Answer
Phase 3
Sl.No. Performance Indicator
1 Final report
2 Demo with presentation
3 Questions and Answer

A committee consisting of Head of the Department, Professors and Project Coordinator are
responsible to identify the merits and hence decide the best project for the respective years.

Best Project Evaluation scheme


Sl.No. Performance Indicator Marks
1 Innovativeness & creativity of the project (10)
2 Review of literature& related studies about the project (10)
3 Implementation Strategies (10)
4 Question and Answer (10)
Best Projects (2015-2016)
SL. Projects
Title of the project Students Project Guide
NO Conducted At
1 Design of Low Power Rakshitha.T.M,
High Speed Carry Select Monica Ganga.T.G, Mr. Vijay
In House
Adder using Brent kung Tejeswini.S Mahantesh
Adder. Sandhya.M.C
2 Solar Based Precision Gowtham.A,
In House
Agriculture. Akil kumar B.S, Dr. M. Mathivanan
Ambrish.V

Best Projects (2014-2015)


SL. Projects
Title of the project Students Project Guide
NO Conducted At
Bharath N
Karthik P B
1 Smart System Tracer In House Rahul Rai
Rakesh G
Sachin J Y
Mohammed Irshad
Mind Controlled Wheel Chethan Nayak
2 Jaginder Bharath In House Bharathi Gururaj
Chair Vamshi
Narasinh Kulkarni

Best Projects (2013-2014)


SL. Projects
Title of the project Students Project Guide
NO Conducted At

Design & Development Deepika J


DRDO, A M Prasanna
1 of Microwave Filters for
Active Array Phased Mohan Prasad Bengaluru Kumar
Radar
Sunil Kumar K V
Pradeep L
Low Cost Tousif Sagheer
Implementation of Khan
2 In House Ramesha M
RHEX- A Robot for all Muniraju J
Terrain application.
Janardhana J L
Best Projects (2012-2013)
SL. Projects
Title of the project Students Project Guide
NO Conducted At
Usha N BEL,
1 Microwave Synthesizer Kavitha R J
Denita Supriya Bangalore
Nishant Raj K L
Border Security using
2 Kiran V In House Vanishree Moji
Porch light
Muniraju S Y

Our students have done their final year projects at industries in Bangalore and have obtained
practical exposure.

Projects Carried Out Outside the College

Academic Year 2015-2016

PROJECT NAME OF WORK


SL.No NAMES
TITLE GUIDE CARRIED OUT
Speed control of
BLDC Motor
1 Jaisimha G .V. Mr.Rahul Rai ISRO, Bengaluru
using Matlab/
Simulink
Ankit Kumar
Singh
Prof. A.M.
Vigilant Sheetal Hiremath
2 Prasanna ISRO, Bengaluru
Referring system
Kusumitha M C. Kumar

Dharani Sriraj

Academic Year 2014-2015


All projects are carried out in house.

Academic Year 2013-2014

WORK
NAME OF
SL.No PROJECT TITLE NAMES CARRIED
GUIDE
OUT
1 RTU & Micro Scada Bindiya K Mrs. Kavitha R J ABB
Bindu R
Mamatha Bai
Design & fabrication of Anusha R
test facility to test auto
Sarayu Gajendra
2 synchronizer for Mr. Suresh BHEL
generator and grid Manjula K
synchronization
Deepika J
Design and development
Mohan Prasad Mr. A M
3 of microwave filters for DRDO
Prasanna Kumar
active phased array Sunil Kumar K V
Shilpa Shree
Digitized fuel probe
4 testing in helicopters Shruthi G Mr. Pallavi V J HAL
using Microcontroller Sindhu Gowda

Academic Year 2012-2013

WORK
PROJECT NAME OF
SL.No NAMES CARRIED
TITLE GUIDE
OUT
Design and Harshitha R
development of
Kirana Upadhya
1 microwave filters BHEL
for active phased Prasad Ravi Bhatt Pallavi V J
array
Vinutha K
Microwave Denita Supriya
2 Kavitha R J BEL
Synthesizer Usha N

2.2.3.1.1. Implementation
A project coordinator is appointed by the Head of the department who is responsible for
planning, scheduling and execution of all the activities related to the student project work.

Timeline Task Particulars


SEMESTER SEVEN
Students are invited to prepare their batch and
Call for project get it registered with the project coordinator of
12th week the department.
batch
The student submitting project titles are pre-
evaluated by a team of experts.
14th week Synopsis The submitted project titles are reviewed by a
Submission committee consisting of Project coordinator,
Head of the department and experts.
SEMESTER EIGHT
Guide will be allotted based on areas of
1st week Guide allotment
interest.
Students are instructed to submit requirement
th
4 week First Review specification and give a PowerPoint
presentation for the project. (Evaluation phase
I by a team of faculty)
Students are instructed to submit Design
8th week Second Review document of the project and give a PowerPoint
presentation for the project. (Evaluation phase
II by a team of faculty)
Students are instructed to submit complete
Final project report with university compliance and
12th week
Demonstration give a PowerPoint presentation for the project.
(Evaluation phase III by a team of faculty)
Project internal The marks for the project work is announced
14th week marks and processed according to the university
announcement regulations.

2.2.3.1.2. Impact analysis


New innovative ideas from students form the basis of some projects.
Skills or abilities of students improved.
Knowledge on various aspects of project management were developed.
Confidence level of the students was boosted.
Improved teamwork spirit.
Implementation and deployment of the project for social benefits.
Document preparation and presentation.
Opportunities to showcase their project work in project exhibition.

2.2.4. Initiatives related to industry interaction (15)

2.2.4.1. Initiatives for industry interaction


To strengthen interaction with industries and to keep our students updated with the latest
trends in Electronics & Communication Engineering, the Department has entered into an
agreement with the following companies.
SL.No. Name of the Organization
1 Logic Hive Solutions, Mysore
2 ITIE Knowledge Solutions, Bengaluru
3 Rennova Solutions, Bengaluru

2.2.4.2. Implementation
Sl.
Event Name of the Organization Date/ Period Status
No
2 Day workshop on 3rd& 4th
LogicHive Solutions Private
1 Open Hardware Completed
limited, Mysuru March 2016
Prototyping
2 Day workshop On
Contextual Learning
Of Signal And System, 23rd& 24th
ITIE Knowledge Solutions,
2 Control System And Completed
Bengaluru March 2016
Digital Signal
Processing Using
Matlab

Students of the 2016 final year batch participated in the workshop conducted by LogicHive
Solutions gained from this partnership and went on to implement their project titled Solar
Based Precision Agriculture with technical assistance provided by LogicHive.
Another set of students of the same batch worked on their project Face Recognition Based
Attendance Monitoring with Wireless Embedded Server System with help provided by
Rennova Solutions, Bengaluru.

2.2.4.3. Impact Analysis

The effectiveness of this practice can be gauged by the great response of the participants of the
workshops.
Students picked up what they learnt at the workshops to implement their own mini project and
also final year projects.
Students gained from this exposure to incorporate an entrepreneurial spirit and project based
thinking.
2.2.5. Initiatives related to industry internship/summer training (15)
Industrial Visits:
The faculties of the department constantly try to interact with industries like ISRO, BEL,
BHEL, CPRI etc. for industrial visit.

Sl. No. Name of the Organization Date of Visit

1 30th March
Doordarshan Kendra, Bengaluru
2016
2 Central Power Research Institute 15th Sept 2015
Indian Space Research Organization, Satellite
3 11th Sept 2014
Center, Bengaluru
4 Technilab Instruments, Bengaluru 2nd May 2014

Internships:

The students are encouraged to take up internship programs during their semester break.
Faculty members give their guidelines, suggestions and scope and contact details of an
internship. They also help the students by interacting with the industrial experts, provide the
students recommendation letters and other necessary supports. The alumni coordinator
constantly interacts with alumni those who are working in the industries and request them to
provide necessary guidelines and supports for their juniors internship.

NAME OF CERTIFICATION
SL.
THE /TRAINING ORGANIZATION DURATION DATE
NO
STUDENT DETAILS
Hindustan Aeronautics
11/07/16
Limited, Aircraft Research
1 Prema J In-Plant Training 25 Days To
& Design Centre (ARDC),
06/08/16
Bengaluru
Hindustan Aeronautics
11/07/16
Limited, Aircraft Research
2 Ramya B In-Plant Training 25 Days To
& Design Centre (ARDC),
06/08/16
Bengaluru
Hindustan Aeronautics
11/07/16
Chandrashekar Limited, Aircraft Research
3 In-Plant Training 25 Days To
BR & Design Centre (ARDC),
06/08/16
Bengaluru
Hindustan Aeronautics
11/07/16
Limited, Aircraft Research
4 Rashmi B In-Plant Training 25 Days To
& Design Centre (ARDC),
06/08/16
Bengaluru
01/07/16
Sindhu C
5 Industrial Training HAL - Helicopter Division 31 Days To
Bharadwaj
31/07/16
18/01/16
Niranjan R Vocational Training Bharat Sanchar Nigam
6 10 Days To
Kumar Level B Limited, DTTC, Bengaluru
28/01/16
04/01/16
Brisa Technologies Pvt.
7 Lakshmi S Internship 25 Days To
Ltd, Bengaluru
28/01/16
Internship on
Simulation and 06/01/16
Research Center IMART,
8 Nandhini R analysis of Spectrum 20 Days To
DRDO, Hyderabad
Generation using 25/01/16
MATLAB
Internship on
Simulation and 06/01/16
G Manisha Research Center IMART,
9 analysis of Spectrum 20 Days To
Reddy DRDO, Hyderabad
Generation using 25/01/16
MATLAB
Optical Fiber
05/01/15
Sindhu C Communication & Regional Telecom Training
10 6 Days To
Bharadwaj Networking and IP Center, BSNL, Mysore
10/01/15
Security
Test & Evaluation of 01/07/15
LEOS, ISRO, Peenya,
11 G V Jaisimha USB based MIL-STD- 31 Days To
Bengaluru
1553B Simulator 31/07/15
07/07/14
Regional Training Center,
12 Lalitha R Internship on Telecom 5 Days To
BSNL, Chennai
11/07/14
From
September
Bharat Sanchar Nigam
13 Priyanka G BSNL-AICTE EETP 18 Weeks 2013 to
Limited, DTTC, Bengaluru
January
2014
From
September
Bharat Sanchar Nigam
14 Dhanush AG BSNL-AICTE EETP 18 Weeks 2013 to
Limited, DTTC, Bengaluru
January
2014
From
September
Parveen Bharat Sanchar Nigam
15 BSNL-AICTE EETP 18 Weeks 2013 to
Begum Limited, DTTC, Bengaluru
January
2014
CRITERION 3 COURSE OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM 120
OUTCOMES

3. COURSE OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM OUTCOMES (120)

3.1. Establish the correlation between the courses and the Program Outcomes (POs) and
Program Specific Outcomes (PSOs) (20)
(Program Outcomes as mentioned in Annexure I and Program Specific Outcomes as defined by
the Program)

Program Outcomes:

1. Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science,


engineering fundamentals, and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex
engineering problems.
2. Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyze
complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles
of mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.
3. Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems
and design system components or processes that meet the specified needs with
appropriate consideration for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal,
and environmental considerations.
4. Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and
research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and
synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.
5. Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and
modern engineering and IT tools including prediction and modeling to complex engineering
activities with an understanding of the limitations.
6. The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to
assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities
relevant to the professional engineering practice.
7. Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering
solutions in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of,
and need for sustainable development.
8. Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and
norms of the engineering practice.
9. Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or
leader in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.
10. Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the
engineering community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and
write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and
receive clear instructions.
11. Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
the engineering and management principles and apply these to ones own work, as a
member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.
12. Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to
engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological
change.

PSO-Program Specific Objectives

1. An ability to understand the concepts of basic Electronics & Communication Engineering


and to apply them to various areas like Signal processing, VLSI, Embedded systems,
Communication Systems, Digital & Analog Devices, etc.

2. An ability to solve complex Electronics and Communication Engineering problems, using


latest hardware and software tools, along with analytical skills to arrive cost effective and
appropriate solutions.

3. Wisdom of social and environmental awareness along with ethical responsibility to have a
successful career and to sustain passion and zeal for real-world applications using optimal
resources as an Entrepreneur.

3.1.1.Course Outcomes (COs) (SAR should include course outcomes of one course from each
semester of study, however, should be prepared for all courses and made available as
evidence, if asked) (05)

Course Name: C105 (Basic electronics -14ELN15) Year of Study: 2014 15

C105.1 Appreciate the significance of electronics in different applications.


Understand the applications of diode in rectifiers filter circuits and wave
C105.2
shaping. Understand the working of transistors.

C105.3 Apply the concept of diode in rectifiers, filters circuits.

Design simple circuits like amplifiers (inverting and non-inverting),


C105.4
comparators, adders, integrator and differentiator using OPAMPS.
Compile the different building blocks in digital electronics using logic gates
C105.5
and implement simple logic function using basic universal gates.
Understand the functioning of a communication system, and different
C105.6
modulation technologies.

C105.7 Understand the basic principles of different types of Transducers.


Course Name: C204 (Network Analysis-10ES34) Year of Study: 201516

Students will be able to construct a circuit to suit the need. & able to apply
C204.1
the nodal and mesh methods of circuit analysis.
Able to learn conversion of complex circuit into simpler circuit using

C204.2 theorems Thevinins, Norton, Superposition, Maximum power transfer,


reciprocity, Millmans.
Able to apply linearity and superposition concepts to analyze RL, RC, and
RLC circuits in time and frequency domains such that resonance concept.
C204.3
Able to understand the concept of Laplace transforms apply for the circuit
and understand initial and final condition apply to the circuit

C204.4 Able to understand Z, Y, T, h parameter to define the weight of the circuit.

Course Name: C213 (CONTROL SYSTEMS -10ES43) Year of Study: 2014-15

Understand control systems in brief- its types, classifications. Identify its


C213.1 basic elements & write the performance equations (Mathematical
Modeling).
Determine the transfer function of given system or equivalent system based
C213.2
on various methods.
Determine the steady state and transient response characteristics of different
C213.3
order systems for standard test signals and find the relative stability.
Define frequency domain specifications, correlate between time domain &
C213.4 frequency domain. Draw the frequency response in graph using different
methods to analyze stability.

Course Name: C304 (Microwaves and Radar -10EC54) Year of Study: 201516

Apply the knowledge of transmission lines micro-waves and microstrip


C304.1
lines to solve simple engineering problems.

C304.2 Ability to apply the working of microwave passive and active devices.

C304.3 Ability to analyze microwave passive devices using S-parameters.

C304.4 Ability to analyze the design parameters of microstrip lines.

C304.5 Analyze MTI and pulse Doppler radars.


Course Name: C316 (SATELLITE COMMUNICATION-10EC662) Year of Study: 2014 15

Define laws of planetary motion, terminologies used, and gain knowledge


with respect to various frequencies, services, and current applications of
C316.1
different organizations.

Solve basic problems, design link by understanding and analyzing different


losses to be considered and prepare budget for the same. Analyse the
C316.2
different access methods used for various applications.

Explain the space segment and earth segment in detail.


C316.3

Name the majority of applications along with their working principle,


C316.4 advantages, disadvantages etc.

Course Name: C402 (Optical Fiber Communication-10EC72) Year of Study: 2015 16

Able to understand the basic operating principles of physics, optical fiber,


C402.1
and its types, transmission characteristics of optical fibers.
Able to learn the optical source and detectors, optical receiver fiber
C402.2
couplers and connectors.
Able to understand the concept of analog and digital link, WDM concept
C402.3
and components
Able to learn optical network SONET/SDH, WDM, high speed optical
C402.4
network Such as GPON, FTTX, and High speed optical links.

Course Name: C408 (WIRELESS COMMUNICATION-10EC81) Year of Study: 2014 15

C412.1 Distinguish the major cellular communication standards (1G/2G/3G).


Characterize the tradeoff among frequency reuse, signal to interference
C412.2
ratio, capacity and spectral efficiency.
Able to understand the characteristics of different multiple access
C412.3
methods.
Able to understand the wireless communication systems and standards
C412.4
GSM, IS-95.

Table 3.1-1 Course outcomes

3.1.2 CO-PO matrices of courses selected in 3.1.1 (six matrices to be mentioned; one per
semester from 3rd to 8th semester) (05).
Course Name: C105 (Basic electronics-14ELN15) Year of Study: 2014 15

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
3 - - - - - - - - - - -
C115.1
2 3 2 - - - - - - - - 1
C115.2
1 3 - - - - - - - - - 1
C115.3
1 2 3 - - - - - - - - -
C115.4
3 1 2 - - - - - - - - 1
C115.5
1 2 3 - - - - - - - - -
C105.6
3 - - - - - - - - - - -
C105.7

Course Name: C204 (Network Analysis 10ES34) Year of Study: 2014-15

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
C204.1 3 2 1 2 1 - - - - - - -

C204.2 2 2 1 2 3 - - - - - - -

C204.3 2 2 1 1 3 - - - - - - -

C204.4 2 3 1 2 2 - - - - - - -

Course Name: C213 (CONTROL SYSTEMS 10ES43) Year of Study: 2015 16

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
C213.1 3 3 - - - 1 - - - 1 - -

C213.2 1 1 1 3 2 - 1 - 2 - 1 1

C213.3 1 1 2 1 3 - - 1 - - - 1

C213.4 1 1 2 1 3 - - - 1 - - 1

Course Name: C306 (Microwaves and Radar 10EC54) Year of Study: 2015 16

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
2 3 3 2 2 - - - - - - 1
C304.1
1 2 3 3 - - - - - - - 1
C304.2
1 3 3 - 2 - - - - - - 1
C304.3
1 2 3 3 2 - - - - - 1 1
C304.4
1 2 2 2 - - 2 - 1 - 1 2
C304.5

Course Name: C310 (SATELLITE COMMUNICATION 10EC662) Year of Study: 2015 16

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
3 3 1 1 2 1 - - 1 1 - -
C316.1
1 2 3 3 1 1 - - - 1 - 1
C316.2
1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1
C316.3
1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1
C316.4

Course Name: C401 (Optical Fiber Communication 10EC72) Year of Study: 2015 16

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
2 2 2 2 - - - - - - - -
C402.1
3 2 3 2 - - - - - - - -
C402.2
3 2 3 2 - - - - - - - -
C402.3
2 1 2 3 3 2 - - - - - -
C402.4

Course Name: C408 (WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (10EC81) Year of Study: 2014-15

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 P10 P11 P12
- 3 3 2 2 - - - - - - -
C411.1
- 2 3 3 - - - - - - -
C411.2
- 3 3 2 - - - - - - -
C411.3
- 3 3 2 - - - - - - -
C411.4
Table 3.1-2 Co Po Matrices

3.1.2 CO-PSO matrices of courses selected in 3.1.1 (six matrices to be mentioned; one per
semester from 3rd to 8th semester) (05)
Course Name: C105 (Basic Electronics -14ELN15) Year of Study: 2014 15

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 1 -
C105.1
3 3 -
C105.2
3 2 -
C105.3
2 3 -
C105.4
3 2 -
C105.5
2 1 1
C105.6
2 1 1
C105.7

Course Name: C204 (Network Analysis-10ES34) Year of Study: 2015 16

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3
C204.1 2 -
3 2 -
C204.2
3 2 -
C204.3
3 3 -
C204.4

Course Name: C213 (Control Systems -10EC43) Year of Study: 2015 16

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 3 -
C213.1
2 3
C213.2 -
2 3 -
C213.3
C213.4 2 3 -

Course Name: C304 (Microwave & Radar -10EC54) Year of Study: 2014 15

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 3
C304.1 -
2 3 -
C304.2
2 3 -
C304.3
2 3 -
C304.4
2 3 -
C304.5

Course Name: C316 (Satellite Communication -10EC662) Year of Study: 2015 16

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 1 -
C316.1
3 2 -
C316.2
3 2 -
C316.3
3 3 -
C316.4

Course Name: C402 (Optical Fiber Communication-10EC72) Year of Study: 2014 15

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


2 3 2
C402.1
3 3 2
C402.2
2 3 -
C402.3
3 3 1
C402.4

Course Name: C411 (Wireless Communication-10EC81) Year of Study: 2015 16

PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


3 3 -
C411.1
3 2 -
C411.2
3 2 -
C411.3
2 3 -
C411.4
Table 3.1-3 Co-PSO Matrices
3.1.3.Program level Course-PO matrix of all courses INCLUDING first year courses (10)

PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO1 PO1 PO1


Course
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
1st SEM
14ELN15 2 2.25 2.5 1

3rd SEM
3 3 3 1 2 1 1.25 1 1.75 1 1 1.25
10ES33

10ES34 2.25 2.25 1 1.75 2.25

10IT35 2.67 2 1.67 1 2 3

10ES36 1 2.67 3 2.67 2 1.4 1

4th SEM

10ES42 3 3 1.66 1.66 2.66 3 2 2 2 3 3

10ES43 1.50 1.50 1.67 1.67 2.67 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 1.00 1.00 1.00

10EC44 2.25 2.25 2.25 1.75 2

2 2.2 3 2.4 2.2 1 1.5 1.8 1 2 1.25


10EC45

10EC46 1.4 1.2 2.4 1.2 1 1 1 1.8 1

5th SEM

10AL51 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1

2.25 2.25 2.25 2 2


10EC52

10EC53 2 2.25 2.25 - 2.5 1

10EC54 1.2 2.4 2.8 2.5 2 2 1 1 1.2

10EC55 2.67 3 2.67 2 1

2 2.2 2.8 2.6 2.2 1 1 1.8 1 1.8 1


10EC56
6th SEM

1.333
10EC61 1.5 2.25 2 2 1.25 1 1 1 1 1 1
3

10EC62 2 3 3 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
10EC63 2.2 2 2 1 1

10EC65 1.66 2.5 2 2.5 2

10EC662 1.50 2.25 2.00 2.00 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.33 1.00 1.00 1.00

7th SEM

10EC71 1.5 2.25 3 2.25 1.75 1.75 1.25 1 1 1 1 1

10EC72 2.5 1.75 2.5 2.25 3 2

2.5 1.75 2.5 2.25 3 2


10EC73

10EC74 2 2.25 2.25 2.5 1 1.5 1

10EC751 2.25 2.5 2.5 2.5 2

3.00 3.00 1.67 1.67 3.00 2.00 1.00


10EC763
8th SEM

10EC81 2 3 2 1.5 1

10EC82 2 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.33 2

2.5 2.5 2.25 2.25 2


10EC832

10EC843 3 3 1.67 1.67 3 2 1

2.05 2.31 2.31 1.80 1.99 1.01 0.68 0.5 0.97 0.71 0.77 1.12
Average

Table 3.1-4 Program level Course-PO matrix


PROGRAM LEVEL COURSE - PO MATRIX

Program level Course-PSO matrix of all courses INCLUDING first year courses (10)

Course PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


1st SEM
14ELN15 3 1 2
3rd SEM
10ES33 3 3 -
10ES34 2 1 1
10IT35 2 3 1
10ES36 3 3 -
4th SEM
10ES42 3 2 -
10ES43 3 2 -
10EC44 3 3 -
10EC45 2 3 -
10EC46 3 3 -
5th SEM
10AL51 - - 3
10EC52 3 3 -
10EC53 3 3 -
10EC54 3 3 1
10EC55 3 3 -
10EC56 2 3 -
6th SEM
10EC61 2 3 -
10EC62 3 2 -
10EC63 3 3 2
10EC64 3 2 -
10EC65 2 3 1
10EC662 3 3 1
10EC665 3 3 1
7thSEM
10EC71 2 3 1
10EC72 3 2 -
10EC73 3 3 -
10EC74 3 2 3
10EC751 3 2 1
10EC763 3 2 -
8th SEM
10EC81 2 2 1
10EC82 3 2 -
10EC832 2 3 2
10EC843 3 2 -
Average 2.5 2.136 1.35

Table 3.1-4 Program Level Co with PSO matrices


3.2.Attainment of Course Outcomes (50)

3.2.1. Describe the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the eva1uation of
Course Outcome is based (10)

In the Outcome Based Education (OBE), assessment is done through one or more than one
processes, carried out by the institution, that identify, collect, and prepare data to evaluate the
achievement of course outcomes (COs).
CO Assessment Processes

Assessment tools are categorized into two methods to assess the course outcomes as:
Direct methods and indirect methods.

o y the students knowledge and skills from their performance in the


continuous internal assessment tests, semester examinations, seminars, and class room and
laboratory assignments etc. These methods provide a sampling of what students know and/or
can do and provide strong evidence of student learning.

o
learning. They assess opinions or thoughts about the graduates knowledge or skills and their
valued by different stakeholders.

Direct assessment Methods


Sl.no Direct Assessment Method Description

1. Internal Assessment Test The Internal Assessment marks in a theory paper shall be based
on three tests generally conducted at the end of 4, 8 and 12
weeks of each semester. An improvement test may be
conducted for the desirous students before the end of the
semester to give an opportunity to such students to improve
their Internal Assessment Marks. It is a metric to continuously
assess the attainment of course outcomes w.r.t course
objectives. Average of the better marks obtained from any two
tests shall be the Internal Assessment Marks for the relevant
subject.
2. Lab Assignments Lab Assignment can be one of the measuring criteria to mainly
assess students practical knowledge with their designing
capabilities. In case of Practical, the IA marks shall be based on
the laboratory records and one practical test.

3. Theory Semester Semester examination (theory or practical) are the metric to


assess whether all the course outcomes are attained or not
Examination
framed by the course owner. Semester Examination is more
4. Practical Semester focused on attainment of course outcomes and uses a
descriptive exam.
Examination
5. Seminar The IA marks in the case of projects and seminars in the final
year shall be based on the evaluation at the end of 8th semester
6. Project by a committee consisting of the Head of the concerned
Department and two senior faculty members of the Department,
one of whom shall be the project / seminar guide.
7. Project Work Viva-voce Viva-voce examination of project work shall be conducted
batch-wise.

Table 3.1-5 Assessment tool

Indirect assessment Methods


Sl no Indirect Assessment Method Method Description

1. ALUMNI:SURVEY Collect variety of information about program


Satisfaction and college from the Alumni
QUESTIONNAIRE
students.
2. EXIT FEEDBACK: SURVEY Collect variety of information about program
QUESTIONNAIRE Satisfaction and college from the final year
students.
3. PARENT:SURVEY Collect variety of information about program
satisfaction and college from parents.
QUESTIONNAIRE
4. EMPLOYERS FEEDBACK Collect variety of information about the
graduates skills, capabilities and opportunities.
FORM
5. STUDENT FEEDBACK Collect variety of information about outcome
based education in teaching and learning process.
(ABOUT OBE)
6. FEEDBACK FORM ON Collect variety of information about facilities
FACILITIES from the students.

Table 3.1-5 Indirect method

3.2.2 Record the attainment of Course Outcomes of all courses with respect to set attainment
levels (40)
Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Basic Electronics

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


14ELN1 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessme
5 PO P PO P P P P PO P P P P TO
nt
Method 1 O 3 O O O O 8 O O O O TA
2 4 5 6 7 9 10 1 1 L
1 2 CO
(%)
Final 62
Exam % 77%
- - - - - - - - - - -
C115.1 Internal 90
Assessme
%
nt
- - - - - - - - - - -
Final 62 62 62
Exam % % % 75.5
- - - - - - - - -
C115.2
Internal 89 89 89 %
Assessme
% % %
nt
- - - - - - - - -
Final 62 62
Exam % % 64.5
- - - - - - - - - -
C115.3 Internal 67 67 %
Assessme
% %
nt
- - - - - - - - - -
Final 62 62 62
Exam % % % 74.5
- - - - - - - - -
C115.4 Internal 87 87 87 %
Assessme
% % %
nt
- - - - - - - - -
Final 62 62 62
Exam % % % 70.5
- - - - - - - - -
C115.5
Internal 79 79 79 %
% % % - - - - - - - - -
Assessme
nt
Final 62 62 62
Exam % % % 82%
- - - - - - - - -
C115.6
Internal 82 82 82
Assessme % % %
nt
- - - - - - - -
Final 76.5
Exam %
C115.7 Internal 91 91 91 62
Assessme % % %
%
nt
- - - - -

Fig 3.3: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 14ELN15


Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Network Analysis

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10ES34 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
t PO1 P PO P PO P P PO P P P P TOT
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O 8 O O1 O O AL
6 7 9 0 1 1 CO
1 2 (%)
Final Exam 69% 69 69 69 58%
% % % - - - - - - - -
C204.1 Internal 47% 47 47 47
Assessmen % % %
t
- - - - - - - -
Final Exam 69% 69 69 69 65%
% % % - - - - - - - -
C204.2 Internal 61% 61 61 61
Assessmen % % %
t
- - - - - - - -
Final Exam 69% 69 69 69 76.5
% % % - - - - - - - -
%
Internal 84% 84 84 84
C204.3
Assessmen % % %
t
- - - - - - - -
Final Exam 69% 69 69 69 73.5
% % % - - - - - - - -
%
Internal 78% 78 78 78
C204.4
Assessmen % % %
t
- - - - - - - -
Fig 3.4: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 10ES34

Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Control systems

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10ES43 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
t PO1 P PO P PO P P PO P P P P TOT
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O 8 O O1 O O AL
6 7 9 0 1 1 CO
1 2 (%)
Final Exam 77% 77 7 77 84%
% 7 %
- - - % - - - - -
C213.1
Internal 91% 91 9 91
Assessmen
% 1 %
t
- - - % - - - - -

C213.2 Final Exam 77% 77 77 77 - - 7 - 7 - 7 7 61.5


% % % 7 7 7 7 %
% % % %
Internal 46% 46 46 46 4 4 4 4
Assessmen
% % % 6 6 6 6
t
- - % - % - % %
Final Exam 77% 77 77 77 77 77 7 74.5
% % % % % 7 %
- - - - - %
C213.3
Internal 72% 72 72 72 72 72 7
Assessmen
% % % % % 2
t
- - - - - %
Final Exam 77% 77 77 77 77 7 7 76%
% % % % 7 7
- - % - - %
C213.4
Internal 75% 75 75 75 75 7 7
Assessmen
% % % % 5 5
t
- - % - - %

Fig 3.5: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 10ES43


Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Microwave & Radar

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10EC5 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
4 PO1 P PO P PO P P PO P P P P TOT
t
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O 8 O O1 O O AL
6 7 9 0 1 1 CO
1 2 (%)
Final Exam 78% 78 78 78 78 7 76.5
% % % % 8 %
- - - - - - %
C304.1
Internal 75% 75 75 75 75 7
Assessmen
% % % % 5
t
- - - - - - %
Final Exam 78% 78 78 78 78 7 84.5
% % % % 8 %
- - - - - - %
C304.2
Internal 91% 91 91 91 9
Assessmen
% % % 1
t
- - - - - - %
Final Exam 78% 78 78 7 84.5
% % 8 %
- - - - - - - - %
C304.3
Internal 91% 91 91 91 9
Assessmen
% % % 1
t
- - - - - %
Final Exam 78% 78 78 78 78 7 7 89%
% % % % 8 8
- - - - - % %

C304.4 Internal 100 10 100 10 100 1 1


Assessmen
% 0% % 0% % 0 0
t
0 0
- - - - - % %
Final Exam 78% 78 78 78 7 7 7 7 70.5
% % % 8 8 8 8 %
- % - % - % %
C304.5
Internal 63% 63 63 63 6 6 6 6
Assessmen
% % % 3 3 3 3
t
- % - % - % %

Fig 3.6: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 10EC54

Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Satellite Communication

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10EC6 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
62 PO1 P PO P PO P P PO P P P P TOT
t
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O 8 O O1 O O AL
6 7 9 0 1 1 CO
1 2 (%)
Final Exam 65% 65 65 65 65 6 6 65
% % % % 5 5 % 75.5
C316.1
% - - % - %
Internal 86% 86 86 86 86 8 - - 8 86 -
Assessmen % % % % 6 6 %
t % %
Final Exam 65% 65 65 65 65 6 65 6
% % % % 5 % 5 75%
% - - - - %
C316.2
Internal 85% 85 85 85 85 8 85 8
Assessmen
% % % % 5 % 5
t
% - - - - %
Final Exam 65% 65 65 65 65 6 6 65 6 65 6
% % % % 5 5 % 5 % 5
% % % - % 74%
C316.3
Internal 83% 83 83 83 83 8 8 83 8 83 8
Assessmen
% % % % 3 3 % 3 % 3
t
% % % - %
Final Exam 65% 65 65 65 65 6 6 65 6 65 6 6
% % % % 5 5 % 5 % 5 5 74.5
% % % % % %
C316.4
Internal 84% 84 84 84 84 8 8 84 8 84 8 8
Assessmen
% % % % 4 4 % 4 % 4 4
t
% % % % %

Fig 3.7: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject : 10EC662


Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Optical Fiber Communication

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10EC7 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
2 PO1 P PO P PO P P PO P P P P TOT
t
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O 8 O O1 O O AL
6 7 9 0 1 1 CO
1 2 (%)
Final Exam 81% 81 81 81 85%
% % % - - - - - - - -
C402.1
Internal 89% 89 89 89
Assessmen
% % %
t - - - - - - - -
Final Exam 81% 81 81 81 89%
% % % - - - - - - - -
C402.2
Internal 97% 97 97 97
Assessmen
% % %
t - - - - - - - -
Final Exam 81% 81 81 81 90.5
% % % - - - - - - - - %
C402.3 Internal 100 10 100 10
Assessmen
% 0% % 0%
t - - - - - - - -
Final Exam 81% 81 81 81 81 87.5
% % % % - - - - - - - %
C402.4 Internal 94% 94 94 94 94
Assessmen % % % %
t
- - - - - - -
Fig 3.8: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 10EC72

Course Outcome and Program Outcome Attainment for Wireless Communication

COURSE OUTCOME AND PROGRAM OUTCOME


10EC8 Direct ATTAINMENT
Assessmen
1 PO1 P PO P PO P P P P PO P PO12 TOT
t
Method O2 3 O4 5 O O O O 10 O AL
6 7 8 9 1 CO
1 (%)
Final Exam - 74 74 74 74 74% 69.55
% % % % - - - - - -
C411.1
Internal - 65 65 65 65 65%
Assessmen % % % %
t - - - - - -
Final Exam - 74 74 74 74% 84%
% % % - - - - - -
C411.2
Internal - 94 94 94 94%
Assessmen % % %
t - - - - - -

C411.3 Final Exam - 74 74 74 74% 76.5


- - - - - -
% % % %

Internal - 79 79 79 79%
Assessmen % % %
t - - - - - -
Final Exam - - 74 74 74 74% 85%
% % % - - - - - -
C411.4 Internal - - 96 96 96 96%
Assessmen % % %
t - - - - - -

Fig 3.9: Attainment of Course Outcome of subject: 10EC81

3.3 Attainment of Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes

3.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for measuring the attainment of each PO and
PSO (10)

PO Assessment Tools
Assessment tools are categorized into direct and indirect methods to assess the program
Specific outcomes, program outcomes and course outcomes.

continuous assessment tests, endsemester examinations, presentations, and classroom


assignments etc. these methods provide a sampling of what students know and/or can do and
provide strong evidence of student learning.
Indirect methods such as surveys and interviews ask the stakeholders to reflect on students
learning. They assess opinions or thoughts about the graduates knowledge or skills and their
valued by different stakeholders.

Use of Rubrics for Evaluation and Assessment of Pos

The Course/ Program outcomes are difficult to measure such as assessing critical thinking,
creativity, analytical skills, and problem solving etc. Hence the department has adopted
Criterion Referenced Rubrics to assess the POs and COs wherever appropriate. The Rubric
criteria are either developed by department faculty or sometimes even with consultation with
students and distributed before an assignment, project or test.

Rubrics are used for both formative and summative assessment of students. Same rubric is used
for assessing an outcome so that the faculty is able to assess student progress and maintain the
record of the same for each student.

The rubrics are shared with students before being evaluated so that they are aware of the
performance criteria and their weight age.

3.3.2. Provide results of evaluation of each PO & PSO (40)

The expected level of attainment for each of the Program Outcomes;

The program outcomes are assessed with the help of course outcomes of the relevant Courses
through direct and indirect methods.
Direct Assessment Method:

Direct measures are provided through direct examinations or observations of student knowledge or
skills against measureable course outcomes. The knowledge and skills described by the course
outcomes are mapped to specific problems on internal exams/home assignment/group task. Throughout
the semester the faculty records the performance of each student on each course outcome. At the end of
the semester students receive grades from external exams.
Indirect Assessment Method:

Indirect assessment strategies are implemented by embedding them in the course end survey, Graduate
survey and Alumni Survey. Finally, program outcomes are assessed with above mentioned data and
Program Assessment Committee concludes the Po attainment level.
The evaluation POs is carried out with respect to student performance and surveys in both the terms of
direct and indirect assessment methods.

Direct method of assessment is based on assessment of PO on the achievements in the


contributing courses for that particular PO.
Indirect method of assessment is based on course exit survey, program exit survey, alumni
survey, placement survey, feedback on facilities by students, parents survey and rubrics
developed for project and seminar.
The evaluation PSOs is carried out with respect to student performance and surveys in both the
terms of direct and indirect assessment methods for the contributing courses mapped to the
PSO.

Program Outcome Assessment Tool

Program Outcome 1:
Utilize the basic knowledge in mathematics, science and engineering in the field of Engineering.

Subjects PO1 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 1.34
10ES33 2.76
10ES34 0.77
10IT35 1.86
10ES36 0.64 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 1.27 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 1.16 the
10EC44 0.92 Semester
10EC45 0.69
10EC46 0.75
10AL51 0.61
10EC52 1.64
10EC53 1.22
10EC54 0.94
10EC55 0
Course Exit
10EC56 1.72
Survey
10EC61 1.19 Survey End of
10EC62 1.37 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 1.02 Survey
10EC65 0.83
10EC662 1.04 Alumni Survey
10EC71 1.07
10EC72 2.09
10EC73 1.86
10EC74 1.473
10EC751 1.43
10EC763 2.25
10EC81
10EC82 1.9
10EC832 1.73
10EC843 2.39
Average 1.3324

Program Outcome 2:
Design system components that meet the requirement of public safety and offer solutions to the
societal and environmental concerns.

Subjects PO2 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 1.45
10ES33 2.76
10ES34 0.34
10IT35 1.42
10ES36 1.73 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.79 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 1.16 the
10EC44 0.92 Semester
10EC45 0.78
10EC46 0.64
10AL51 1.22
10EC52 1.66
10EC53 1.38
10EC54 1.9
10EC55 2.171
Course Exit
10EC56 1.95
Survey
10EC61 1.79 Survey End of
10EC62 2.06 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0.8 Survey
10EC65 1.28483
10EC662 1.56 Alumni Survey
10EC71 1.3
10EC72 1.46
10EC73 1.30243
10EC74 1.6595
10EC751 1.56
10EC763 2.25
10EC81 1.992
10EC82 2.85
10EC832 1.56
10EC843 2.39
Average 1.55507
Program Outcome 3:
Identify, formulate and solve complex problems to achieve demonstrated conclusions using
mathematical principles and engineering sciences.

Subjects PO3 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 1.33
10ES33 2.76
10ES34 0.59
10IT35 1.16048
10ES36 1.9662 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.7 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 1.26 the
10EC44 0.88 Semester
10EC45 1.04
10EC46 1.29
10AL51 1.2546
10EC52 1.66
10EC53 1.41
10EC54 2.226
Course Exit
10EC55 2.4495
Survey
10EC56 2.42
10EC61 1.61 Program Exit Survey End of
10EC62 2.06 Survey Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0.8
10EC65 1.04128 Alumni Survey
10EC662 1.38
10EC71 1.93
10EC72 2.09
10EC73 1.86632
10EC74 1.657
10EC751 1.6
10EC763 1.29
10EC81 2.277
10EC82 2.85
10EC832 1.56
10EC843 1.33
Average 1.60446
Program Outcome 4:

Apply research based knowledge to design and conduct experiments, analyze, synthesize and
interpret the data pertaining to Engineering problems and arrive at valid conclusions.

Subjects PO4 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 0.92
10ES34 0.78
10IT35 0.7012
10ES36 1.7429 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.69 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 1.22 the
10EC44 0.7 Semester
10EC45 0.78
10EC46 0.64
10AL51 0
10EC52 1.47
10EC53 0
10EC54 1.9845
Course Exit
10EC55 2.165
Survey
10EC56 2.18
10EC61 1.61 Program Exit Survey End of
10EC62 0.69 Survey Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0.18
10EC65 1.3416 Alumni Survey
10EC662 1.38
10EC71 1.29
10EC72 1.88
10EC73 1.687
10EC74
10EC751 1.56
10EC763 1.28
10EC81 2.045
10EC82 1.9
10EC832 1.38
10EC843 1.61
Average 1.23473

Program Outcome 5:

Construct, choose and apply the techniques, resources and modern engineering tools required
for Engineering applications.

Subjects PO5 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 1.84
10ES34 0
10IT35 1.3368
10ES36 1.3184 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 1.11 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 2 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.69
10EC46 0.33
10AL51 1.2244
10EC52 0
10EC53 1.53
10EC54 1.6027
10EC55 1.66
Course Exit
10EC56 1.76
Survey
10EC61 0.99 Survey End of
10EC62 1.37 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0 Survey
10EC65 1.0715
10EC662 0.86 Alumni Survey
10EC71 1.07
10EC72 0.62
10EC73 0.5768
10EC74 1.8435
10EC751 0
10EC763 2.32
10EC81 1.504
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 2.56
Average 1.10821

Program Outcome 6:

Apply the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety and cultural issues and endure
the consequent responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice

Subjects PO6 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 0.92
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0.90672 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.79 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.8 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.08
10EC46 0.54
10AL51 1.2546
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 0
10EC55 Course Exit
10EC56 0 Survey
10EC61 0.8
10EC62 1.37 Program Exit Survey End of
10EC63 0 Survey Report 20 the Year
10EC65 0
Alumni Survey
10EC662 0.69
10EC71 1.28
10EC72 0.41
10EC73 0.38455
10EC74 0.732
10EC751 0
10EC763 0
10EC81
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 0
Average 0.45799

Program Outcome 7: Environment and sustainability:


Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions in societal and
environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and need for sustainable
development.

Subjects PO7 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 1.23
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.71 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.17
10EC46 0.54
10AL51 1.2546
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 1.5
10EC55
10EC56 0 Course Exit
10EC61 0.8 Survey
10EC62 0.69 Survey End of
10EC63 0 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC65 0 Survey
10EC662 0.69
10EC71 0.85 Alumni Survey
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74
10EC751 0
10EC763 0
10EC81
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 0
Average 0.36095

Program Outcome 8: Ethics:


Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of
the engineering practice.

Subjects PO8 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 0.92
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.85 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.76 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0
10EC46 0
10AL51 0.6122
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 0
10EC55
Course Exit
10EC56 0
Survey
10EC61 0.8
Survey End of
10EC62 0.69
10EC63 0 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC65 0 Survey
10EC662 0.69
10EC71 0.64 Alumni Survey
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74
10EC751 0
10EC763 0
10EC81
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 0
Average 0.26585

Program Outcome 9: Individual and team work:


Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse teams, and in
multidisciplinary settings.

PO9 Method Of Source Target For When


Subjects Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 1.84
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.85 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 1.1 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.61
10EC46 0
10AL51 1.21493
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 0.75
10EC55
Course Exit
10EC56 1.52
Survey
10EC61 1.06
Survey End of
10EC62 0.69 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0 Survey
10EC65 0
10EC662 0.92 Alumni Survey
10EC71 0.64
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74
10EC751 0
10EC763 1.54
10EC81
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 1.69
Average 0.59134

Program Outcome 10: Communication:


Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering
community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective
reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear
instructions.

Subjects PO10 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 0.92
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 0.85 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.8 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.08
10EC46 0.97
10AL51 1.2149
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 0
Course Exit
10EC55
Survey
10EC56 0.22
10EC61 0.8 Program Exit Survey End of
10EC62 0.69 Survey Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0
10EC65 0 Alumni Survey
10EC662 0.69
10EC71 0.63
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74 1.106
10EC751 0
10EC763 0
10EC81
10EC82 0.95
10EC832 0
10EC843 0
Average 0.36744

Program Outcome 11: Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the engineering and management principles and apply these to ones
own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary
environments.

Subjects PO11 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0
10ES33 0.92
10ES34 0
10IT35 0
10ES36 0 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 1.27 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.71 the
10EC44 Semester
10EC45 0.69
10EC46 0
10AL51 1.2149
10EC52 0
10EC53 0
10EC54 0.787
10EC55
Course Exit
10EC56 1.54
Survey
10EC61 0.81
Survey End of
10EC62 0.68 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0 Survey
10EC65 0
10EC662 0.69 Alumni Survey
10EC71 0.63
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74 0
10EC751 0
10EC763 0
10EC81
10EC82 1.42
10EC832 0
10EC843 0
Average 0.437

Program Outcome 12: Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation
and ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of
technological change.

Subjects PO12 Method Of Source Target For When


Assessment For Data Performance Data Is
Collection Collected
14ELN15 0.65
10ES33 1.22
10ES34 0
10IT35 2.16
10ES36 0.65 Internal/Extern Evaluation
10ES42 1.27 al Evaluation Data 80 End of
10ES43 0.75 the
10EC44 0.81 Semester
10EC45 0.35
10EC46 0.54
10AL51 0.62
10EC52 1.47
10EC53 0.61
10EC54 0.94
10EC55 0.82
Course Exit
10EC56 0.88
Survey
10EC61 0.81 Survey End of
10EC62 0.69 Program Exit Report 20 the Year
10EC63 0 Survey
10EC65 0
10EC662 0.69 Alumni Survey
10EC71 0.64
10EC72 0
10EC73 0
10EC74 0.73
10EC751 1.26
10EC763 0.77
10EC81 0.76
10EC82 1.9
10EC832 0
10EC843 0.85
Average 0.74

3.3 Attainment of Program Outcomes


PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO1 PO1
Course PO12
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
1st SEM
14ELN
15 1.34 1.45 1.33 0.65
3rd SEM
10ES33 2.76 2.76 2.76 0.92 1.84 0.92 1.23 0.92 1.84 0.92 0.92 1.22
10ES34 0.77 0.34 0.59 0.78
2.1652
10IT35
1.86 1.42 1.16 0.70 1.33 2
10ES36 0.64 1.73 1.96 1.74 1.31 0.90 0.6554
4th SEM
1.27 0.79 0.70 0.69 1.11 0.79
10ES42 0.85 0.85 0.85 1.27 1.27
10ES43 1.16 1.16 1.26 1.22 2.00 0.80 0.71 0.76 1.10 0.80 0.71 0.75
10EC44 0.92 0.92 0.88 0.70 0.81
10EC45 0.69 0.78 1.04 0.78 0.69 0.08 0.17 0.00 0.61 0.08 0.69 0.35
10EC46 0.75 0.64 1.29 0.64 0.33 0.54 0.54 0.97 0.54
5th SEM
10AL51 0.61 1.22 1.25 1.22 1.25 1.25 0.61 1.21 1.21 1.21 0.62
10EC52 1.64 1.66 1.66 1.47 1.47
10EC53 1.22 1.38 1.41 1.53 0.61
1.9
10EC54
0.94 2.22 1.98 1.60 1.5 0.75 0.78 0.942
2.17 2.449 2.16
10EC55
1 5 5 1.66 0.82
10EC56 1.72 1.95 2.42 2.18 1.76 1.52 0.22 1.54 0.88
6th SEM
10EC61 1.19 1.79 1.61 1.61 0.99 0.80 0.80 0.80 1.06 0.80 0.81 0.81
1.37 0.69 1.37 1.37 0.68 0.69
10EC62 2.06 2.06 0.69 0.69 0.69 0.69
10EC63 1.02 0.80 0.80 0.18
10EC65 0.83 1.28 1.04 1.34 1.07
10EC66
1.04 1.56 1.38 1.38 0.86 0.69 0.69 0.69 0.92 0.69 0.69 0.69
2
7th SEM
1.07 1.30 1.93 1.29 1.07 1.28 0.85 0.64 0.64 0.63 0.63 0.64
10EC71
10EC72 2.09 1.46 2.09 1.88 0.62 0.41
1.86 1.30 1.86 1.68 0.57 0.38
10EC73
10EC74 1.47 1.65 1.65 1.84 0.73 1.10 0.73
10EC75
1 1.43 1.56 1.60 1.56 1.26
10EC76
2.25 2.25 1.29 1.28 2.32 1.54 0.77
3
8th SEM
10EC81 1.99 2.27 2.04 1.50 0.76
1.90 2.85 2.85 1.90 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 0.95 1.42 1.90
10EC82
10EC83 1.73 1.56 1.56 1.38
2
10EC84
2.39 2.39 1.33 1.61 2.56 1.69 0.85
3
Averag 1.33 1.55 1.60 1.23 1.11 0.45 0.36 0.26 0.59 0.36 0.43 0.7449
e

PROGRAM LEVEL COURSE PO MATRIX

Attainment of Program Specific Outcomes

Course PSO1 PSO2 PSO3


14ELN15 3 2 1
10ES33 1 2 1
10ES34 0 2 1

10IT35 0 1
10ES36 1 1
10ES42 2 3 1

10ES43 2 2
10EC44 3 2
10EC45 3 1
10EC46 3 3 1
10AL51 3 3 1
10EC52 3 1 1
10EC53 1 3
10EC54 3 2 1
10EC55 3 3 1
10EC56 1 1 1
10EC61 1 2 1
10EC62 2 1 1
10EC63 2 1
10EC65 1 2
10EC662 2 1
10EC71 1 0
2 2
10EC72
10EC73 3 1
10EC74 2 1
10EC751 1 2
10EC763 1 3 1

10EC81
1 3 1
10EC82 2 1

10EC832 1 2

10EC843 1 3 1
1.77 1.83 1.0
Average
Program Level Specific Outcome Matrix
CRITERION 4 Students Performance 150

4. STUDENTS PERFORMANCE (150)


Item CAYm
(Information to be provided cumulatively CAY CAYm CAYm CAYm CAYm CAYm
1
for all the shifts with explicit headings, 2015- 2 3 4 5 6
16 2014-
wherever applicable) 2013-142012-132011-12 2010-112009-10
15
Sanctioned intake of the program (N) 60 60 60 60 60 60 60
Total number of students admitted in first
year minus number of students migrated to
other programs / institutions plus no. of 47 35 42 27 19 47 29
students migrated to this program
(N1)
In
Number of students admitted in 2nd year in the
progres 03 13 01 14 10 26
same batch via lateral entry (N2)
s
Separate division students , if applicable (N3) NA
Total number of students admitted in the
Program 47 38 55 28 33 57 55

(N1+N2+N3)

Number of students who have successfully


graduated without backlogs in any semester
N1+N2+N3 / year of study (Without Backlog means no
Year of Entry (As defined above) compartment or failures in any semester /
year of study)

I Year II Year III Year IV Year


47 (47+0 ) Results
CAY (2015-2016)
tentative awaited
Results
CAYm1 (2014-2015) 38 (35+3) 12
awaited
CAYm2 (2013-2014) 55 (42+13) 19 7+0 7+0
CAYm3 (LYG) (2012-
28 (27+1) 14 7+0 6+0 6+0
2013)
CAYm4 (LYGm1) (2011-
33 (19+14) 12 10+1 6+1 6+1
2012)
CAYm5 (LYGm2) (2010-
57 (47+10) 16 5+0 5+0 5+0
2011)
CAYm6 (LYGm3) (2009-
55 (29+26) 18 3+3 2+0 2+0
2010)
N1+N2+N3 Number of students who have successfully
Year of Entry (As defined graduated
above) I Year II Year III Year IV Year
47 (47+0 ) Results
CAY (2015-2016)
tentative awaited
Results
CAYm1 (2014-2015) 38 (35+3) 25
awaited
CAYm2 (2013-2014) 55 (42+13) 39 33+0 24+2
CAYm3 (LYG) (2012-
28 (27+1) 25 20+0 19+0 18
2013)
CAYm4 (LYGm1) (2011-
33 (19+14) 14 12+3 9+1 11+1
2012)
CAYm5 (LYGm2) (2010-
57 (47+10) 24 10+0 25+2 32+4
2011)
CAYm6 (LYGm3) (2009-
55 (29+26) 18 5+1 12+5 21+9
2010)

4.1 Enrolment Ratio (20)

Enrolment Ratio = N1/N


Enrolment ratio = Percentag
Year N1 N Marks
N1/N e
2015-2016 47 60 0.7833 78.33 16
2014-2015 35 60 0.5833 58.33 0
2013-2014 42 60 0.70 70 16
Average 0.6889 68.89 14

4.2. Success Rate in the stipulated period of the program (40)

4.2.1. Success rate without backlogs in any semester/year of study (25)

Success rate without backlogs in any year of study = 25 Average SI = 4.285


LYG LYGm1 LYGm1
Item
(CAYm3) (CAYm4) (CAYm5)
Number of students admitted in the 2015-2016 2014-2015 2013-2014
corresponding First Year + admitted in
28 33 57
2nd year via lateral entry and separate
division, if applicable
Number of students who have graduated
6 7 5
without backlogs in the stipulated period
Success Index (SI) 0.2143 0.2121 0.0877
Average SI 0.5141/3 = 0.1714

4.2.2. Success rate in stipulated period (15)

Success rate=15Average SI = 8.1885


LYG LYGm1 LYGm1 LYGm3
Item (CAYm3) (CAYm4) (CAYm5) (CAYm6)
2015-2016 2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013
Number of students admitted in the
corresponding First Year + admitted in 2nd year
28 33 57 55
via lateral entry and separate division, if
applicable
Number of students who have graduated in the
Stipulated period 18 12 36 30

Success Index (SI) 0.6429 0.3636 0.6316 0.5455

Average Success Index 2.1836 / 4 = 0.5459


Note: If 100% students clear without any backlog, then also total marks scored will be 40 as
both 4.2.1 & 4.2.2 will be applicable simultaneously.

4.3. Academic Performance in Third Year (15)

Academic Performance=1.5* Average API (Academic Performance Index) = 5.0565


rd
API= ((Mean of 3 Year Grade Point Average of all successful Students on a 10 point
scale)

CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3


Academic Performance
2015-2016 2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013
Mean of CGPA or Mean Percentage of all
62.55 4.19 2.4 63.3
successful students (X)
Total no. of successful students
28 12 10 27
(Y)
Total no. of students appeared in the
37 23 37 46
examination (Z)
API = X * (Y/Z) AP1=4.734 AP2=3.349 AP3=1.686 AP4=3.715

Average API = (AP1+AP2+AP3+AP4) / 4 3.371

4.4. Academic Performance in Second Year (15)

Academic Performance Level=1.5*Average API (Academic Performance Index) = 3.161


Successful students are those who are permitted to proceed to the Third year.
CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3
Academic Performance
2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013
Mean of CGPA or Mean Percentage of all successful
69.04 64.55 63.02
students (X)
Total no. of successful students (Y) 9 10 15

Total no. of students appeared in the examination (Z) 54 27 34

API = X * (Y/Z) AP1 = 1.151 AP2 = 2.391 AP3 = 2.78

Average API = (AP1+AP2+AP3) / 3 2.1073

4.5. Placement, Higher Studies and Entrepreneurship (40)

Assessment Points = 40 average of three years of ((x + y + z) / N) = 40 x 0.327=13.08

CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3


Item
2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013
Total No. of Final Year Students 36 44 31
(N)
No. of students placed in companies or
Government Sector 8 15 6
(x)
No. of students admitted to higher studies with
valid qualifying scores (GATE or Equivalent 1 6 1
State or National Level Tests, GRE, GMAT, etc.)
(y)
No. of students turned entrepreneur in engineering
/ technology 1 0 0
(z)
x+y+z = 10 21 7
Placement Index : (x + y + z) / N P1= 0.2778 P2= 0.4772 P3= 0.2258
Average Placement = (P1 + P2 + P3) / 3 0.327

4.6. Professional Activities (20)


4.6.1. Professional societies/ chapters and organizing engineering events (5)

Year Professional Society /


Chapter
2012-13 ISTE
2013-14 ISTE
2014-15 ISTE, IETE

Guest lecture on Logical Efforts in VLSI by Mr. Premananda B S, Assistant Professor,


RVCE, is conducted on 24-02-2016 under IETE professional society.
4.6.2. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc. (5)

Newsletter published annually and circulated among faculty and students. It is also
posted on the college website.

The Editorial Board Includes:

1) Chief Editors: Prof. A M Prasanna Kumar, HOD, ECE Dept.,


Dr. A Muruganandham, Professor, ECE Dept.

2) Editors: Dr. Mathivanan M, Associate Professor, ECE Dept.,


Mr. Vijay Mahantesh, Assistant Professor, ECE Dept.

4.6.3 Participation in inter-institute events by students of the program of study(10)

SPORTS
2014-2015
SL. NAME OF THE TOURNAME ORGANISED
YEAR RESULT
NO. STUDENT NT COLLEGE
1 Akshay M R Cricket 2014 SJBIT, Bengaluru WINNER
2 Ankit Kumar Singh Football 2014 DBIT, Bengaluru RUNNER
3 Tejaswini N D Football 2014 AIFF, Assam RUNNER
4 Tejaswini N D Football 2014 KSFA, Mysore RUNNER
5 Tejaswini N D Throwball 2015 RRCE, Bengaluru RUNNER
6 Tejaswini N D Athletics 2015 VTU, Belagavi RUNNER
7 Rakesh Gowda S N Basketball 2015 SJBIT, Bengaluru RUNNER
8 Akshay M R Cricket 2015 AMIES, RUNNER
Bengaluru
9 Akshay M R Cricket 2015 DBIT, Bengaluru RUNNER

2015-2016

SL. NAME OF THE ORGANISED


TOURNAMENT YEAR RESULT
NO STUDENT COLLEGE
1 Yashaswini Throwball 8,9 Oct 2015 KSIT, Bengaluru Runners
2 Ankit Kumar Basketball 2015 SJBIT, Bengaluru Runners
3 Singh N D
Tejaswini Throwball 8,9 Oct 2015 KSIT, Bengaluru Runners
4 Tejaswini N D Basketball 2015-16 RRGI, Bengaluru 2nd Place
5 Akshay M R Mini Cricket 23 & 24 Apr, 1st Prize
SJBIT, Bengaluru
2016
6 Akshay M R Guly Cricket Apr 29 & 30- DBIT, Bengaluru 1st Prize
2016
7 Akshay M R Mini Cricket 23 & 24 Apr, SJBIT, Bengaluru 1st Prize
2016

STUDENTS PAPER PRESENTATION

NATIONAL

Sl.
Participants Paper Title Presented At Date
No
Amarashree P Security Enhancement
NCPCCI- 15 24th 25th
1 AshikaV, Parimala of ATM System
RVCE, Bangalore April 2015
N & Vinutha K V Through Human Body
Density Based Traffic
Chandrashekar B SPCN 2015 31st Mar
2 Control Using I R
R, Kantharaju A G ACSCE,Bengaluru 2015
Sensor
Wireless Serial Data
Synchronization
Mynavathi H S
Methodology for
Dravya B C SPCN 2015 31st Mar
3 secured Money
Nayana K & ACSCE, Bengaluru 2015
Transaction using Multi
Shifali K R
account Embedded
ATM Card
Gayathri B Implementation of
SPCN 2015 31st Mar
4 Tejaswini N D & Heart Rate Monitoring
ACSCE,Bengaluru 2015
Dr Mathivanan System
National conference on
Advanced
Sunil Kumar K V Design and Simulation
communication, VLSI 15th May
5 Deepika J of Wide Band Stop
design and Signal 2014
Mohan Prasad P Microstrip Filter
Processing, KSSEM,
Bangalore
National conference on
Advanced
Mohan Prasad P*
Microwave Stepped communication, VLSI 15th May
6 Sunil Kumar K V
Impedance LPF* design and Signal 2014
Deepika J
Processing, KSSEM,
Bangalore

INTERNATIONAL

Design and
Deepika J Development of 7th IETE Conference 8th to 10th
1 Mohan Prasad P Parallel Coupled on RF & Wireless, May 2014
Sunil Kumar K V Microstrip Bandpass HKBKCE,Bangalore
Filter
Sunil Kumar K V Design and Simulation 7th IETE Conference
2 8th to 10th
Deepika J of Wideband Bandstop on RF & Wireless,
Mohan Prasad P Microstrip Filter HKBKCE,Bangalore May 2014

*Awarded Best Paper at National conference on advanced communication, VLSI design and
Signal Processing, KSSEM, Bangalore

STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN PROJECT EXHIBITIONS

Name of the
Sl. No Project Title Presented At Date
Students
National Students Project
Gowtham A Solar Based Exhibition-2016 at Alpha
14th May
1 Ambrish V & Automated Precision College of Engg, Bangalore
2016
Akhil Kumar B S Agriculture in association with AICTE,
New Delhi

STUDENT PROJECTS SPONSORSHIP BY EXTERNAL AGENCIES

Name of the Name of the


Sl. No Project Title Year
Students Sponsor/Sectors
Rakesh G,
Smart system tracker with real time
1 Sachin, Bharath 2015 KSCST
compression that supports SOC
& Karthik

Co- curricular Activities


2013-2014

Name of the
Sl. Name of the
Events Date Program & Awards
No Students
Organizer
Employability From the date BSNL
BSNL,DTTC,
Dhanush A G Enhancement Training 23-09-2013 Silver
Bangalore
1 Programme for 18 weeks Certified
Employability From the date BSNL
BSNL,DTTC,
Priyanka G Enhancement Training 23-09-2013 Silver
Bangalore
2 Programme for 18 weeks Certified
Employability From the date BSNL
BSNL,DTTC,
ParveenBegum Enhancement Training 23-09-2013 Silver
Bangalore
3 Programme for 18 weeks Certified
Internship on telecom
Lalitha R 7th July 2014 RRTC, Chennai Certified
2014
4
2014-2015
Name of the
Sl. Name of the
Events Date Program & Awards
No Students
Organizer
28 Mar -1 Apr
1 Rakesh Gowda VTU Utsav VTU, Belagavi
2015 Certified
28 Mar -1 Apr
2 Rakshitha T M VTU Utsav VTU, Belagavi Certified
2015
3 Vinutha K V Gate Exam 2015 2015 GATE Qualified
28 Mar -1 Apr
4 Lakshmi S VTU Utsav VTU, Belagavi Certified
2015
28 Mar -1 Apr
5 Aishwarya R V VTU Utsav VTU, Belagavi Certified
2015
28 Mar -1 Apr
6 Rashmi K S VTU Utsav VTU, Belagavi Certified
2015
Personal Effectiveness
7 Niranjan R kumar 19th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
8 Niranjan R kumar Quiz 19th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore 1st Prize
Personal Effectiveness
9 Anil kuar S 19th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
10 Aishwarya R V Quiz 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Chandrashekar B Personal Effectiveness
11 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
R program
Personal Effectiveness
12 Aishwarya R V 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
Personal Effectiveness
13 Ramya B 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
Personal Effectiveness
14 Rashmi B 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
15 Akshay M R Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
16 Akshay M R 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
17 Darshan Gowda L Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
18 Jayasimha G V 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
19 Jayasimha G V Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
20 Lalitha R 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
21 Lalitha R Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
22 Lakshmi S 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
23 Lakshmi S Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
24 Pooja N S 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
25 Pooja N S Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
26 Yashaswini A CSIA, Bangalore
program 19th Mar 2015 Certified
27 Meghana T Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Personal Effectiveness
28 Meghana T 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
Personal Effectiveness
29 Sandhya M C 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
Sandhya M c Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
30
Personal Effectiveness
31 Rashitha T M 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
program
32 Rashitha T M Quiz 17th Mar 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Sindhu C
33 One day workshop 7th Mar 2015 ISM Certified
Bharadwaj
Sindhu C
34 Quiz 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Runner
Bharadwaj
Sindhu C Personal Effectiveness
35 27th Feb 2015 CSIA, Bangalore Certified
Bharadwaj Program
1st Jul 2015 to
36 Jaisimha Project work ISRO, Bangalore Certified
31st Jul 2015
Sindhu C Training in advanced 5th to 10th Jan
37 RTC, Mysore Certified
Bharadwaj telecom tech. 2016

2015-2016

Name of the
Sl. Name of the
Events Date Program & Awards
No Students
Organizer
VTU Youth Fest- Second
1 Gagan N H Clay Modeling 2015
2015, Belagavi Prize
Jaisimha and CLONEOLECTRIC, First
2. Circuit Debugging 29.10.2015
Sandhya ACSCE Prize
CLONEOLECTRIC , First
Nagashree G Logo Designing 29.10.2015
3. ACSCE Prize
1 day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
4 Rakesh Gowda App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
6th Jan-
Industry Training and Research center
5 Manisha Reddy 25th Jan Certified
Internship IMARAT, Hyderabad
2016
1 day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
6 Rakshitha T M App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
1 day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
7 Sandhya M C App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
From the
date
Niranjan R Vocational Training BSNL,DTTC, BSNL
9 18-01-2016
Kumar Programme Bangalore Certified
to 29-01-
2016
10 Lakshmi S Internship 4 Jan -28 BRISA Tech Pvt Ltd, Certified
Jan 2016 Bengaluru
Karthik Kumar Sphere Drone 15 & 16 Oct
11 Aerotrix, ACSCE Certified
TR Workshop 2015
One day workshop on
22 Sept
Jaisimha G V App Design VTURC, Bengaluru Certified
12 2015
Prototyping
One day workshop on VTURC,
Darshan Gowda 22 Sept
13 App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
L 2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
One day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
14 Lakshmi S App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
one day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
15 Lalitha R App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
One day workshop on VTURC,
22 Sept
16 Pooja N S App Design Nagarabhavi, Certified
2015
Prototyping Bengaluru
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
17 Aishwarya R V Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
18 Shreyas K M Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
19 Raymya B Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
20 Anam Fatima Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
21 Bindiya K Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
22 Anil kuamar S Technical quiz Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
23 Jaisimha G V Circuit debugging 1st prize
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
24 Lalitha R Technical quiz Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
25 Lakshmi S Circuit debugging Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
26 Lakshmi S Technical quiz Certified
2015 ACSCE
Chandrashekar 29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
27 Paper presentation Certified
BR 2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
28 Yashaswini S Technical quiz Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
29 Sandhya M c Circuit debugging Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
30 Sandhya M c Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
31 Rakshitha T M Paper presentation Certified
2015 ACSCE
29th Oct CLONEOLECTRIC,
32 Jaisimha Circuit debugging Certified
2015 ACSCE
19th Mar
33 Kruthika S Model exhibition ACSCE, Bangalore Certified
2016
19th Mar
34 Lisha S Model exhibition ACSCE, Bangalore Certified
2016
1st Jul
Sindhu C
35 Industrial training to31st Jul HAL, Bangalore Certified
Bharadwaj
2016
6th Jan to
G Manisha Industrial training cum RCI DRDO,
36 25th Jan Certified
Reddy Internship Hyderabad
2016
6th Jan to
Industrial training cum RCI DRDO,
37 Nandini R 25th Jan Certified
Internship Hyderabad
2016
CRITERION 5 FACULTY INFORMATION AND 200
CONTRIBUTIONS

5. FACULTY INFORMATION AND CONTRIBUTIONS (200)

Distribution of
Faculty

the

Consultancy and Product


Research
Qualification Teaching Load Academic Research
(%)

Joining

Ph.D. during the

Paper
Faculty Receiving
Year of Graduation
UG

(Funded Research)
Assessment Years
the

Degree (starting

SL.

Ph.D. Guidance

Specialization
NO

Development
from highest

Publications
P

Designation

In program
Name of

Sponsored
University

institution
of
G

Research
Program
Member

1st Year
degree)

Other
Date
Dr.H.B. MYSO 16/01 27/07/20 10
1 Ph.D. P 0 0 0 NIL 1 NIL NIL NIL Electronics
Bhuvaneswari RE /2006 16 0
Dr.C. Keshava 10
2 Ph.D. 2011 P 3/8/2016 0 0 0 NIL 7 NIL NIL NIL Electronics
Murthy MGR 0
Appli Image
3 Dr.A. Murugandham Ph.D. ANNA 2013 P 20/08/14 100 0 0 0 YES 6 9 NA
ed Processing
A M Prasanna GULBA 10 Power
4 M.E 1993 P 3/8.2009 0 0 0 NIL NA 4 NA NA
Kumar RGA 0 Electronics
AS 10 Speech
5 Dr. M. Mathivanan Ph.D. ANNA 2014 18/07/15 0 0 0 YES 6 10 NA NA
P 0 Processing
TECHN
O
GLOBA
Electrical
L AS 10
6 Dr.N. Saravanan Ph.D. 2014 1/8/2016 0 0 0 YES 0 NIL NIL NIL &
SOLUT P 0
Electronics
IONS
SHILL
ONG
M.Tech AS
7 R J Kavitha VTU 2008 1/8/2011 33 67 0 0 NA NA 2 NA NA VLSI & ES
. P
M.Tech
8 Vanishree Moji VTU 2009 AP 1/8/2012 0 67 0 33 NA NA NIL NA NA DECS
.
MAHE
10 VLSI
9 Vijay Mahantesh M.S. MANIP 2005 AP 1/8/2011 0 0 0 NA NA NIL NA NA
0 -CAD
AL
M.Tech 30/7/201
10 Bharathi Gururaj VTU 2008 AP 0 67 0 33 NA NA 1 NA NA DCE
. 2
M.Tech 24/7/201 10
11 Rahul Rai VTU 2008 AP 0 0 0 NA NA NIL NA NA DCE
. 4 0
M.Tech
12 Ramesha M. VTU 2009 AP 1/8/2013 0 67 0 33 NA NA 9 NA NA DEC
.
M.Tech
13 Nagesh. H. B VTU 2013 AP 1/8/2013 33 67 0 0 NA NA 2 NA NA VLSI
.

M.Tech 25/7/201 10
14 Vijayakumar H.R. SSU 2011 AP 0 0 0 3 DE
. 4 0 NA NA NA NA

M.Tech 10
15 Suresh VTU 2010 AP 1/8/2012 0 0 0 NA NA NIL NA NA DECS
. 0
M.Tech 5/12/201 10 VLSI
16 T Yamini Gayathri VIT 2012 AP 0 0 0 NA NA NIL NA NA
. 4 0 DESIGN

5.1. Student-Faculty Ratio (SFR) (20)

S: F ratio=N/F; N=No. of students = 3x where x is (approved intake + 20% lateral entry


Intake + separate division, if any)

F= No. of faculty= (a+b c) for every assessment year

a: Total number of full-time regular Faculty serving fully to 2nd,3rd and 4thyear of the this
program
b: Total number of full-time equivalent regular Faculty (considering fractional load)
serving this program from other

Program(s)

c: Total number of fulltime equivalent regular Faculty (considering fractional load) of


this program serving other program(s)

Regular Faculty means:

Fulltime on roll with prescribed pay scale. An employee on contract for a period of not
less than two years and drawing consolidated salary not less than applicable gross salary
shall only be counted as a regular employee.

Prescribed pay scales means pay scales notified by the AICTE/ Central Government
and implementation as prescribed by the State Government. In case State Government
prescribes lesser consolidated salary for a particular cadre then same will be considered as
reference while counting faculty as a regular faculty.

Year x N F SFR=N/F
CAY [2015- 72 216 12 18
2016]
CAYm1[2014- 72 216 12 18
2015]
CAYm2[2013- 72 216 12 18
2014
Average SFR for three assessment years 18
Marks to be given proportionally from a maximum of 20 to a minimum of 10 for average SFR
between15:1to20:1, and zero for average SFR higher than20:1.

5.2. Faculty Cadre Proportion (25)

The reference Faculty cadre proportion is 1(F1):2(F2):6(F3)

F1: Number of Professors required=1/9xNumber of Faculty required to comply with15:1


Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per 5.1

F2: Number of Associate Professors required=2/9xNumberofFacultyrequiredtocomplywith


15:1Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per 5.1

F3: Number of Assistant Professors required=6/9xNumberofFacultyrequiredtocomplywith


15:1Student-Faculty ratio based on no. of students (N) as per5.1

Professors Associate Professors Assistant Professors


Year
Required Available Required Available Required Available
(F1) (AF1) (F2) (AF2) (F3) (AF3)
CAY
1 1 3 3 8 8
[2015-2016]
CAY
[2014-2015] 1 1 3 1 8 10
CAYm1
1 2 3 2 8 8
[2013-2014]
Average
RF1=1 AF1=1.33 RF2=3 AF2=2 RF3=8 AF3=8.66
Numbers

Cadre Ratio Marks = AF1 + AF2 x 0.6 + AF3 x 0.4x x12.5 = 27.03
RF1 RF2 RF
Case1:AF1/RF1=1; AF2/RF2=1; AF3/RF3=1; Cadre proportion marks=(1+0.6+0.4)x12.5 = 25

Case2:AF1/RF1=1; AF2/RF2=3/2; AF3/RF3=8/9; Cadre proportion marks=


(1+0.9+0.3) x 12.5=limited to 25

Case3:AF1/RF1=0; AF2/RF2=1/2; AF3/RF3=11/9; Cadre proportion


marks=(0+0.3+0.49)
x12.5=9.87

5.3. Faculty Qualification (25)

FQ=2.5x [(10X+6Y)/F)] where x is no. of regular faculty with Ph.D. is no. of


Regular faculty with M. Tech., F is no. of regular faculty required to comply 1:15
Faculty
Student ratio (no. of faculty and no. of students required are to be calculated as per 5.1)

Year X Y F FQ=2.5x[(10X+6Y)/F)]

CAY
05 11 15 19.33
[2016-2017]
CAYm1
02 15 15 18.33
[2015-2016]
CAYm2
[2014-2015] 00 13 15 13

CAYm3
[2013-2014] 01 12 15 13.66

Average Assessment 16.08

Page 96 of 189
5.4. Faculty Retention (25)

No. of regular faculty members in

CAY [2015-2016] = 17
CAYm1 [2014-2015] = 13
CAYm2 [2013-2014] = 13
Item Marks(Allotted) Marks(Obtained)
>=90 % of required retained during the
period of assessment keeping 2012-13 25
as base year
>=75% of required retained during the
period of assessment keeping 2012-13 20
as base year
>=60% of required retained during the 20
period of assessment keeping 2012-13 15
as base year
>=50% of required retained during the
period of assessment keeping 2012-13 10
as base year
<50 % of required retained during the
period of assessment keeping 2012-13 0
as base year

5.5. Innovations by the Faculty in Teaching and Learning (20)

Following are the innovative tools used by the Faculty in Teaching and Learning Process:
I. Multimedia Learning Process:
The faculties are using multimedia elements LCD projectors in the Class room. It will
help the faculties to represent the content in a more meaningful way using different media
elements.

Page 97 of 189
Various multimedia tools used are:
Tools Methods Metaphor
Power Point Presentation Easy to prepare and it can
by referring E-learning be prepared with many of Slide based
the popular multimedia
videos techniques.
Easy to prepare and with
word documents if u have
Book based
Acrobat Reader 5 with
Adobe Acrobat Reader many popular multimedia
elements like graphs sound
and charts
Smart Class Room Teaching through Smart boards Interactive based
Demonstration Videos and Easy to prepare and download Web Based
Lectures learning

Appropriate Methods to improve Teaching and Learning Process with relevance


Curriculum

Resource Person
Sl.No. Workshops
Topics Date With designation
/Technical Talk

Communication Technical Talk 16th Oct 2015 Dr. Gopala Krishna


1 Nair, Rector RRGI
Systems
Image Processing Hands on lab 21st Sept 2015 Smt. Vanishree Moji
2
Asst. Prof. ACSCE
st rd
Digital Electronics Hands on lab 1 and 3 Sept Mr. Suresh
3 2015 Asst. Prof. ACSCE
Mr. Premananda, Asst.
Prof.
4 VLSI Design Technical Talk 27th May 2016
RV College of
Engineering
Contextual Learning of Mr. Sanjeev Kubakaddi,
23rd and 24th
5 Signals and Systems, Workshop ITIE Solutions,
May 2016
Control Systems Bangalore
Open Hardware
3rd and 4th March Mr. Pratik, Logic Hive
6 Prototyping of Arduino Workshop
2016 Solutions, Mysore
Board

Page 98 of 189
5.6. Faculty as participants in Faculty development/ training activities /STTPs (15)

A Faculty scores maximum five points for participation

Participationin2to5daysFacultydevelopmentprogram: 3 Points

Participation > 5daysFacultydevelopmentprogram: 5 Points

Max. 5 per Faculty


Name of the Faculty CAY CAYm1[2014- CAYm2[2013-
[2015-2016] 2015] 2014]
Dr. H.B. Bhuvaneswari - - 3
Dr. C. Keshava Murthy - - 5
Dr.A. Muruganandham 5 5 5
Mr. Prasanna Kumar A.M. 5 5 5
Dr. M. Mathivanan 5 - -
Dr. N. Saravanan - - 5
Mrs. Kavitha R.J. 5 5 -
Mr. Vijay Mahantesh 3 5 -
Mrs. Vanishree Moji 3 5 -
Mrs. Bharathi Gururaj 3 5 -
Mr. Ramesh M. 5 3 3
Mr. Nagesh H.B. 5 3 -
Mr. Rahul Ravindra Rai - 3 -
Mr. Suresh - 3 -
Mr. Vijaya Kumar H.R. 5 5 3
Mrs. Yamini Gayathri 5 3 -
Total 42 50 29
RF=Number of Faculty required to
17 13 13
comply with 15:1 student faculty ratio
Assessment = 3x(sum/0.5RF) 14.82 23.07 13.384
Average assessment over three years
17.09
(Marks limited to 15)

5.7. Research and Development (30)

5.7.1. Academic Research (10)


Academic research includes research paper publications, Ph.D. guidance, and
faculty receiving Ph.D. during the assessment period.
Number of quality publications refereed/SCI Journals, citations, Books/Book
Chapters etc. (6)
Ph.D. guided/Ph.D. awarded during the assessment period while working in the

Page 99 of 189
Institute (4).

All relevant details shall be mentioned.

Ph.D. Guidance

University
Name of Topic of the
Research Guide & Year of Status
the Scholar Research
Registration
Dr.H.B. K. Ram Patch Antenna 2014 Course work
Bhuvaneswari Kumar Completed
Medical Jain Perusing literature
Jayashree J. survey and course
Electronics University
work is completed
Image Jain Perusing literature
Revanna
survey and course
C.R. Processing University
Dr.C. Keshava work is completed
Murthy Subhagya Embedded Jain Perusing literature
survey and course
D.S. Systems University
work is completed
Image
Mahesh VTU course work is
A.A. Steganography completed
AISECT
Wireless
University
Veeresh Sensor course work is
Bhopal,
Patil Networks completed
Govt. of M.
P.
AISECT
Wireless University
Sangappa course work is
Sensor Bhopal,
S.B. completed
Networks Govt. of M.
P.
Dr.A. Bio-Medical Registered and
VTU
Muruganandham Girish H.R. Image appearing for
2015
Processing Coursework
Krishna Image
VTU
Murthy. K. Processing
2016
T Registration is in
Image process
VTU
H. N. Processing and
Veena 2016
ANN

R. Karthike Medical Image VTU


yan Processing 2016

Page 100 of 189


Vijay Image
Mahantesh Steganography
Registered under
Vijay Image VTU in 2015.
Kumar H.R. Processing Appearing for
Coursework
Dr. M. Vanishree Video
Mathivanan Moji Compression VTU
Rahul R. Speech Registration is
Rai compression under Process
Wireless
Panchakshri
networks
Vamsha Speech Coding
Deepa

Faculty Pursuing Ph.D.

Number of
quality
publications
in
Date of refereed /S
Faculty Research
University Guide registratio CI
name Topic
n Journals,
citations,
Books/
Book
Chapters
Image
Processing
Bharathi Dr. G
& VTU 7/11/2012 01
Gururaj Sadashivappa
Communicat
ion
Signal Dr. T
Ramesha M. GITAM 12/04/2013 03
Processing Venkataramana

R. J Kavitha Antennas VTU Dr. Arvind H.S. 03/03/2015 Nil

Image
Vijay Dr. M
steganograph VTU Jan 2016 Nil
Mahantesh Mathivanan
y
Vijaya Kumar Image Dr. M
VTU Jan 2016 Nil
H. R. Processing Mathivanan

Page 101 of 189


List of Publications

International
Name of the / National
Name of the Year of
S.No Guide Title/Topic Journal with
Journal Publication
Impact
FACTOR
Dr.H.B. Design and
ISSN 0973-
Bhuvaneswari performance analysis International
1 4562,
of a low-Power first IJAER (Scopus
Vol.10,
order sigma delta Index)
No.92,2015
modulator
Design and
Implementation of Australian International
ISSN 1991-
Fuzzy Logic based Journal of Basic Impact
1 8178 JAN
Intelligent Adaptive and Applied Factor: 0.658
2014.
Speed Control for DC Sciences(AJBAS)
Motor
(E-
A Novel Model ISSN 1817-
Journal of
Reference Intelligent 3195 / ISSN
Theoretical and International
Adaptive Control 1992-8645).
2 Applied (Scopus
Using Neural Network 10 April
Information Index)
and Fuzzy Logic 2014 - Vol.
Technology
Controller 62. No. 1
2014
Dr.A. Volume 1,
Controller Design and
Muruganandh Issue 2,
Implementation of EC
3 am IJAICT International June 2014
Based Cryptosystem
05 (06)
On FPGA
2014
(E-
International
Design and ISSN 2278-
Journal of
Implementation of 0181) Volu
4 Engineering International
Stream Cipher Key me. 3, Issue.
Research and
Exchange in FPGA 05, May
Technology
2014
Design Optimization
and its Validation Proceedings of
5 International 2015
using Wind Tunnel and ICAME
Numerical Simulation
DTCWT and IFS Asian journal of
International 2016
6 based fractal image information
Accepted
compression technology
A.M. Performance Analysis Proceedings of International
1 2013
Prasanna of DOA Estimation International Springer

Page 102 of 189


Kumar Algorithms for Mobile Conference On
Applications VLSI
Communication,
Advanced
Devices, Signals
& Systems and
Networking
Lecture Notes in
Electrical
Engineering 258.
AICTE
International Seminar
Sponsored 19th,20th, &
On Electric Vehicle
International 21st
2 (Ev) / Hybrid Electric International
Seminar February
Vehicle(Hev)
At RRCE 2014
Technology
Bangalore
Two Days
Study of Design & National
Development of 8-Bit Conference On
Fast Multiplier for Advanced August 23
3 National
Low Power Communication & 24,2012
Applications Trends Act12,
Held at RRCE,
Bangalore

Dynamically Miticating
Flooding Overhead and
1 Automatic Repairing Asian Journal of International
Volume 04,
for Mobile Ad Hoc Applied Sciences Issue 04
Networks

An Innovative Design International International


2016
2 Approach to Control Journal on Impact factor
Vol- 7,
over Ad Hoc Networks Circuits and : 0.93
Issue-6,
Dr. M. Systems
Mathivanan
Analysis of Noise Australian
International 2013
Characteristics in Journal of Basic
(Scopus vol 7,
3 VMR-WB Speech and Applied Index) Impact Issue 2,
Using Sub Band Filters Sciences Factor: 0.329. pp. 79-88,

International 2013
Multi Channel Voice International
Review on vol-8, No-7,
Active Detection (Scopus
4 Computers and pp. 1680-
Using Instance Filed Index) Impact
Software 1687.
Auto-Interrelation Factor: 0.486

Page 103 of 189


Function.

Image coding,
Bharathi Packetization and 2015, Vol.
1 Gururaj IJARSE International
Channel 4, Issue 1
coding
Analysis of polyphase 2014,
1 filtering & FFT in IJECT International Vol. 5, Issue
FBMC transceiver 3.
Ramesh. M Design and
2016,
Implementation of
Volume 11
2 fully pipelined 64- IJAER International
ISSN 0973-
point FFT Processor in
4562
a FPGA

5.7.2. Sponsored Research (5)

Funded research: Applied

Dr.A. Muruganandham

S.No Title of the Project Funding Agency Year

1 Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems, VGST July 2016


Transportation and Industrial Applications

2 An Experimental Investigation on Embedded Based Department of May 2016


Compound Parabolic Concentrator Hybrid Solar science and
Thermoelectric Generator technology

3 System- on- Chip (SOC) Design- Embedded AND Technologies July 2016
System Design Challenges

Page 104 of 189


5.7.3. Development activities (10)

Provide details:

5.7.3.1. Product Development: One


5.7.3.2. Research laboratories:

ECE Research Center has been approved for the year-2016-2017


Awaiting the letter form VTU.

5.7.3.3. Instructional materials: Laboratory Manuals, Data Sheets, Power


Point Presentation, handouts, Subject notes

5.7.3.4. Working models/charts/monograms etc.

Charts displayed in all Laboratories.


The department has many models created by students and has been
displayed in research Laboratory. This prototype models helps the students
to understand the working of basics and recent technologies in a better
manner. Also, this can be used for better teaching and learning process
5.7.4. Consultancy (from Industry) (5)

The department has MoUs with various Companies.

5.8. Faculty Performance Appraisal and Development System (FPADS) (30)

Faculty members of Higher Educational Institutions today have toper form a variety of
tasks pertaining to diverse roles. In addition to instruction, Faculty members need to
innovate and conduct research for their self-renewal, keep abreast with changes in
technology, and develop expertise for effective implementation of curricula. They are
also expected to provide services to the industry and community for understanding and
contributing to the solution of real life problems in industry. Another role relates to the
shouldering of administrative responsibilities and co- operation with other Faculty,
Heads of Departments and the Head of Institute. An effective performance appraisal
system for Faculty is vital for optimizing the contribution of individual Faculty to

Page 105 of 189


institutional performance.
The assessment is based on:

A well-defined system for faculty appraisal for all the assessment years (10)

Its implementation and effectiveness (20)

Faculty Performance Appraisal letter is collected from each faculty in which they need to
show their innovations and research for their self-renewal to cope up with changes in
technology and develop expertise for effective implementation of curricula. The format of
Faculty Performance Appraisal letter is provided in annexure.
Key points for faculty appraisal are:

1. Professional Society Membership


2. Professional Society Chapter (Student Branch) and the activities
3. Result Analysis and Actions on that to improve higher grades.
4. Remedial Coaching
5. Q papers of other Universities and Q bank generation
6. Books with the latest Editions, well known publishers an internationally valid authors
to be followed
7. Workshops to be organized
8. Professional Networking
9. Experiment list to be revised and to be prepared and circulated in group to avoid
duplication
10. Additional Content to be covered other than regular curriculum
11. Research work and activities and projects/consultancy to be carried out
12. Open House to be kept for the students to shown internal evaluation
13. Other initiatives for department. College and Campus
14. Industry Interactions and Visits
15. Placements related efforts
16. Improvements in T-L Process and Pedagogical Innovations
17. More publications
18. Exposure on Magazines, Journals, Articles to be increased

Page 106 of 189


5.9. Visiting/Adjunct/Emeritus Faculties. (10)

Adjunct faculty also includes Industry experts. Provide details of participation and
contributions in teaching and learning and/or research by visiting /adjunct/ Emeritus faculty
etc. for all the assessment years:
Provision of in visiting/having visiting/adjunct/emeritus faculty (1)

Minimum 50 hours per year interaction with adjunct faculty from industry/retired professors
etc.(Minimum 50 hours interaction in a year will result in 3 marks for that year; 3marks x
3Years = 9 marks)

Two Visiting Faculties from industry.

Sl.No. Name of Faculty Qualification Company Name

Executive committee
Mr. Kalyan B. member ,IAOE
1 M.S.
Ram
Electrono Solutions
Ms. Preethi Pvt.Ltd.
2 M.Tech.
Birader

Page 107 of 189


CRITERION 6 Facilities and Technical Support 80

6. FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT (80)

6.1. Adequate and well equipped Laboratories and Technical Manpower (30)

Sr. No. Technical Manpower support


No. Name of the of Name of the Important Weekly
Laboratory stu equipment utilizati
de on Name of the Designati Qualifica
nts status technical on tion
per staff
1. 3rd semester set Dual channel cathode ray
up oscilloscope Mr.
Analog 20
(Bat Function Generator 9hrs Govindaraju Tutor
Electronics lab Dual Power Supply N B.E
ch
size) Decade resistance,
15ESL37 Capacitance
Inductance boxes
Continuity Tester
Voltmeter
(0-200V),(0-20V)&(0-
2V),Ammeter (0 -2 mA),(0-
20mA), (0-200mA).

2. 3rd Semester 20 Digital Trainer Kit


Digital IC Tester 9hrs Mr. Raji.G Instructor Diploma
Digital Linear IC Tester
Electronics Lab

15ESL37
3. 4th Semester 20 AT89C51 Microcontroller 9hrs Mr. Dattatraya Foreman B.E
kit, L Naik
Microcontroller MSP 430 kit.
15ESL38
lab Stepper motor, DC Motor,
Matrix key board, LCD,
10ESL47 LED Display.
10KVA UPS
D-Link 24 port 10/100
switches, 4 unit rack, D-Link
Category 6 Cable Box.
ACER PC system
Page 108 of 189
4. 4th semester 20 Universal Multi-Vendor 9hrs Mr. Dayanand Asst. I.T.I
Development Kit Instructor
HDL lab Xilinx FPGA Kits -400K
Gate Density
10ECL48 ACER PC system
10KVA UPS, D-Link 24 port
10/100 switches, 4 unit rack,
D-Link Category 6
Cable Box.
5. 5th semester 20 ACER PCs 9hrs Mr. Dattatraya Foreman B.E
DSP Starter Kits TMS-320 L Naik
DSP Lab C6713 Development Board
with 512K Flash and 8MB
10ECL57 SDRAM and Softwares
with power supply
10KVA UPS
D-Link 24 port 10/100
switches, 4 unit Rack, D-
Link Category 6 Cable Box.

6. 5th semester 20 Good Will Instek GOS-630 9hrs Mr. Kiran S Instructor Diploma
FC,30 MHz 2 channel
AC + LIC Lab colour LCD Display Digital
Storage Oscilloscope
10ECL58 3 MHz function Generator
with Voltage Display
2 Channel 180W,DC Power
Supply
Arbitrary Function
Generator
DSO 70 MHz Tektronix

Page 109 of 189


7. 6th Semester 20 Digital Storage 9hrs Mr. Kiran S Instructor Diploma
Oscilloscope.
Advanced Microwave Test bench
communication frequency 8.22 to 12.4
Lab GHz.
Microstrip Antenna Trainer
10ECL67 Kit.
X band Microstrip
Components.
Microwave Signal Source
frequency 4.00 to 6.00
GHz.
PCM Generation &
Detection Using CODEC
Chip Kit,
ASK, FSK, PSK, DPSK,
QPSK, TDM Modulation
& Demodulation Kits,
Fiber optics trainer kit.
8. 6Th semester 20 ACER
OpticalPC System
power meter. 9hrs Mr. Dattatraya Foreman B.E
PC
TDM MODULES. I/O
Add on 48 Lines L Naik
Microprocessor Card Model: ESA ECI
Lab DIOT.
Microprinter , 24 Col Dot
10ECL68 Matrix Printer Model: ESA,
P 24P,
4*4 Matrix Hex Key pad
Interface.
4-Digital, 7 Segment LED
Display Interface
Logic Controller Interface
Stepper Motor Interface with
Stepper Motor & Power
Adapter.
10KVA UPS
D-Link 24 port 10/100
switches, 4 unit Rack, D-
9. 7th semester 20 Link Category
Licensed 20126 Cable Box.
Virtuoso 9hrs Mr. Dattatraya Foreman B.E
Version CADENCE Tools L Naik
VLSI Lab for 25 Users.
ACER PC System.
10ECL77

Page 110 of 189


10. 7th semester 20 SCR & TRIAC trainer kit 9hrs chanchalakshi Instructor Diploma
MOSFET & IGBT trainer
Power electronics kit.
Lab Controlled HWR & FWR
using R and RC triggering
10ECL78 circuit.
SCR Triggering using UJT
relaxation oscillator Kit
Forced commutation study
Unit.
UJT triggering for half wave
and full wave rectifier using
Digital firing circuit
AC Voltage controller using
Triac and Diac combination
kit.
Single phase fully controlled
converter with R and RL
Load Power unit
Single Phase Converter
firing Unit.
Single Phase Converter
firing Unit using
Microcontroller.
Single phase isolation
transformer with tapping.
R and L load Voltage
controlled (impulse
commutated chopper) both
constant and variable
frequency.
Speed control of DC motor
Power supply Unit.
Speed Control Unit for
0.5HP/220V DC shunt
motor using single Phase.
Speed control unit for
0.5HP/220V DC shunt
motor using MOSFET
Chopper with built in power
supply and meters.
Rheostate.
Series and Parallel Inverter
Kit
DC power Supply,
MOSFET/IGBT based,
regulated power supply unit Page 111 of 189
PSPICE software student
version
6.2. Additional facilities created for improving the quality of learning experience in Laboratories
(25)

Sr. Reason(s) for Relevance


Facility Details Utilizatio Areas in which to
No. Name creating facility n students are
expected to have POs/PSOs
enhanced
learning
1. Smart Fully equipped In Smart classes, we use all Per Subjects
Class Semester (communicati
Room shared Smart interactive modules like videos/ PO5
on,
Class room with presentations and these visually 10hrs
microwave,
LCD projector attractive methods of teaching Real time
and software's becomes appealing to students application
oriented
with the seating who are already struggling with
subjects)
capacity of 60. the traditional method of teaching which have
Comfortable in a classroom. design,
simulation and
desks, chairs In fact, smart classes are almost
fabrication can
and teaching like watching videos as be easily
aids. Glass sometimes, animated visuals are analyzed and
visualized
board, Fan, used to teach a point. This kind of
2. Seminar Fully To present technical talk/ Per To bridge
Tube light, visual is both eye-catching and Semester the band
Hall equipped shared project seminars/ research 12 hrs gap between PO5
chalk board young students can easily relate
seminar hall with papers/ workshops/ industry
academic
with them.
Computer, interaction presentation. and industry
Projector, 100 Overall development of curriculum.
To upgrade
Student Desk, students like cultural, sports
students to
White Board, Air activities etc,. industry
conditioner, Fan, standard.
Cushion chair, Cultural and
sports
Microphone, activities.
Speaker, LED
lights, Podium.

Page 112 of 189


2.
Lab Manuals are To create an awareness about Througho Design of PO1
ut the Electronic
3. Manuals provided for the experiment and to educate semester
circuit and
along with Analog the need of conducting the
testing.
instruction Electronics, same.
classes Digital Students can understand Better usage
of software
For all the Electronics, concept of the experiment tools.
labs HDL, better.
Microcontroller, To document the same using
Microprocessor, the relevant data.
AC +LIC,
Advanced
communication,
E Journals, IEEE,
Power Springer, For research/ Througho Engineering
ut the and PO2
4. E- books Elsevier Science
Electronics and project/internship activities. semester Technology
facility VLSI labs. To know about recent trends /Medical.
in science and technology. Automotive,
Update the subject Solar, Metro
Electronics/A
knowledge using various
griculture
books and journals. Engineering.
English The English To increase communication Per Better
semester Communicati PO10
5. learning faculty is skill among students. 20 hrs on and
language deputed to
understanding
class teach Basic English
English for the language
first year
students to
make them to
understand
.regular
engineering
concepts
clearly.
Page 113 of 189
Departmen Having To meet the needs of students Througho Student
5. tal Library collection of Text To provide reference facilities ut the learning PO1
Books, CDs, semester process
To refer advanced information
Reference, Books
and Project / for seminar, laboratory projects
seminar report.
Research Mini and Real time application Througho Prototype
6 and Major project ut the models are
Developm models- guided To create innovative ideas semester developed, PO1 to
PO12
ent lab and by our faculty Automotive
Project lab members in To build the creative skills electronics
various fields of Home
engineering. Motivates student to come up automation
Open with projects/products.
Safety
source electronics
softwares like models are
Lab View, P developed
spice, Keil micro Publishing
vision, Xilinx Quality
9.1i, Micro Technical
wind. papers.
7 Videos Displayed in Understanding the Video Per Better PO 5
From the Lab. oriented Teaching and learning. semester Understandi
NPTEL, 15 hrs ng the
Classle, subject.
VTU In depth
Edusat knowledge
beyond Lab.

6.3. Laboratories: Maintenance and overall ambiance (10)


Maintenance:
1. Dos and Donts and Safety measures rules are displayed in each laboratory.
2. Well Technical Staff are available for maintenance of Electronic equipments and software.

3. Department having four 10 KVA UPS, 240 VDC along with Batteries is used in case of
power failure in the PC system Labs.
4. Servicing of each laboratory is doing frequently.
5. Calibration of the each laboratory is done frequently.

Page 114 of 189


6. Department having internet of 100 Mbps and Wi-Fi of 35 Mbps is maintained for students
and Faculty usage.
7. All necessary PC system regular software like Microsoft office, browser, lab software;
antivirus software etc, is installed and maintained.

Ambiance:
1. Department has Full furnished State of Art laboratories with well equipped equipments which

shall cater to all UG and PG courses as per curriculum requirements.

2. Conditions of chairs/benches are in good condition. Chair with desk are provided for

individual students in Labs.

3. Department has experienced faculty to educate them in all the fields of engineering.

4. All the labs are conducted and evaluated every week. .

5. Labs are equipped with sufficient hardware and licensed software to run program specific

curriculum and off program curriculum.

6. Laboratory manual are distributed to students.

7. Sufficient number of windows is available for ventilation and natural light and every lab has

one exit.

8. Lighting system is very effective, along with the natural light in every corner of the rooms.

9. Cup-boards are available in each lab for students to place their belongings.

10. Each Lab is equipped with white/black board, computer, Internet, and such other amenities.

11. Research laboratory/dept library is available 24X7 for all faculties and students to carry

research work and projects.

12. Exclusively, a project lab has been provided for the students to carry out their mini and major

project work.

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6.4. Project laboratory (5)

Sr. Name of the Facilities Utilization


No.
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
1. Matlab licensed version software members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
and DSP kits in DSP lab 25 user and research activities.
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
VLSI - Cadence licensed software members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
2.
in VLSI Lab 25 user
and research activities
Keil micro vision 3 free version UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
software tool and Microcontroller members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
3. and research activities
8051, MSP 430 kit in
Microcontroller Lab

Antenna and microwave UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty


4. components in communication members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
system Lab and research activities
Xilinx free version software for UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
5. designing and verifying codes of members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
digital logic. and research activities
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
P-Spice free version software for members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
6.
implementation of power circuits.
and research activities
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
7. Lab view free Version software members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
and research activities
Project seminar hall which includes UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
8. projector, PC system, software, members utilize for their mini projects, projects,
audio systems. and research activities presentation.
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
9. R & D Lab members utilize the R & D Lab for their projects
and research activities
UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
10. Project Lab members utilize the R & D Lab for their mini
projects, projects, and research activities

Page 116 of 189


UG/PG students, Research Scholars and Faculty
Internet of 100Mbps and Wi-Fi of members utilize the internet and Wi-Fi facility for
11.
35Mbps their Project and research activities,

10KVA UPS 240 VDC along with Used in case of Power failure in all PC System
12. power failure
batteries

6.5. Safety measures in laboratories (10)


The following safety measures are used in all the labs:

Specific Safety Rules like Dos and Donts are displayed and instructed for all students.
First aid box and fire extinguishers are kept in each laboratory.
Students are supposed to wear Lab Apron.
Well trained technical supporting staff monitor the labs at all times.
Damaged equipments are identified and serviced at the earliest.
Periodical calibration of the lab equipments are regularly done
A clean and organized laboratories are maintained
The use of cell phones is prohibited.
Appropriate storage areas are available.
Fully and rightly loaded PC Systems with needed software are readily available for students
usage.

Page 117 of 189


CRITERION 7
Continuous Improvement 50

7. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (50)

7.1. Actions taken based on the results of evaluation of each of the POs & PSOs (20)

POs & PSOs Attainment Levels and Actions for improvement CAY (2015-16)

TARGET ATAINMENT
POs OBSERVATIONS
LEVEL LEVEL

PO1: Engineering knowledge: To Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science,


engineering fundamentals, and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex
engineering problems.

PO1 Electronics and communication


engineering curriculum requires the strong
foundation of theoretical and practical
2.05 1.33 knowledge of science and mathematics,
which the students study in their first year,
but students lags in correlating the
theoretical concepts with applications.

ACTION1: Tutorials based on real application inclusion of simulation software in teaching


learning process.
ACTION2: We inspire students to participate in technical events, other events where their
basic knowledge should convert to application matching with defined level of their
standards.

PO2: Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, review research literature, and analyze
complex Engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles
of mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.

PO2 The problem solving and analyzing skills


2.31 1.55 gained through first and second year
courses helps the students to apply in real
time application.
ACTION 1: Students are encouraged to observe, their homes and surroundings to gain
insight into real life engineering problems and think of possible approaches/solutions to
these problems.

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ACTION 2: Gained knowledge on complex engineering problems and solution on visiting
industries.

PO3: Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering


problems and design system components or processes that meet the specified needs with
appropriate considerations for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal,
and environmental considerations.

PO3 Some of the projects developed by the


2.31 1.6 student as hobby projects/major projects
(final year) are not fully considering the
social and environmental issues.
ACTION1: Students are motivated to include all standard parameters and constraints
according to National and International safety norms and to address environmental
concerns.

PO4: Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge


and research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of
data, and synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.

It is observed that most of the project


PO4 1.80 1.23 abstract and literature survey are addressing
the research based approach but does not
end with valid conclusions.
ACTION1: Academic workshops are coming into picture to apply more knowledge in
terms of conduction of experiments and analysis of results at required level.

PO5: Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources,
and modern engineering and IT tools including prediction and modeling to complex
engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.

PO5 It is observed that Up-gradations of tools


1.99 1.1 and resources are necessary to meet the
industry standards and research.

ACTION1: Modern labs are developed to demonstrate the use of Modern tools like
MATLAB, Arduino, LabView, Cadence etc. to specify fulfillment of requirement in
engineering applications in new industrial era.

PO6: The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual
knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent
responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice.

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The courses of Electronics and
communication Engineering are addressing
PO6 1.01 0.46 the needs of, health, safety and social
concerns regarding engineering practices in
real life.
ACTION1: To understand the safety concerns and social aspects, students visited industry
to expand their practical knowledge with the effect of improved practices in engineering.

PO7: Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional


engineering solutions in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the
knowledge of, and need for sustainable development.

The issues of global and environmental


PO7 0.68 0.36 awareness among the student should be
improved.

ACTION1: Students are encouraged to indulge in projects, in which global and


environmental issues are improved, with respect to consumption of energy and utilization of
renewable energy resources.

PO8: Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and
responsibilities and norms of the engineering practice.

The students are doing better in improving


the overall expertise in field of engineering
PO8 0.5 0.27 but due to lack of communications and other
ethical moral knowledge, some are lagging
in real life situations.
ACTION1: Career readiness program, corporate lectures and motivational talks are
arranged to overcome the above observations.

PO9: Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a


member or leader in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.

The students are not able to work as


PO9 0.97 0.6 individual as well as in team.

ACTION1: Institute has initiated Program which provides a platform to work in individual
as well as a group in the fields of Engineering helps the students to groom the skills like
leadership, effective team member.

PO10: Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities

Page 120 of 189


with the engineering community and with society at large, such as, being able to
comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective
presentations, and give and receive clear instructions.

The communication, presentation and report


PO10 0.71 0.37 writing skills are to be further improved
among the students.
ACTION1: Soft skills training is imparted to students to enhance various aspects of
communication/technical talks by group discussions, presentations and new learning
outcomes.

PO11: Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding


of the engineering and management principles and apply these to ones own work, as a
member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.

Few courses of curriculum give knowledge


of Management principle and applying
PO11 0.77 0.44 managerial principles to his/her work
including financial implications and to
manage the project in multidisciplinary
environments.

ACTION1: The awareness created among the student regarding the management principles
and managing projects.

PO12: Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability
to engage in independent and life- long learning in the broadest context of technological
change.

PO12 The pre final year and final year courses of


the program are demonstrating the resource
1.12 0.74 for contemporary issues and lifelong
learning.

ACTION1: Using ICT facilities, such as PPTs, live demonstration of topic imparted using
video lecture.
ACTION2: Lecture content includes new technological developmental tools and knowledge
of new Products.

PsO1: Professional Skills: An ability to understand the basic concepts in electronics and
communication engineering and to apply them to various areas like electronics,
communication, signal processing, VLSI, embedded systems etc., in the design and
implementation of complex systems.

Page 121 of 189


The courses of the program are
demonstrating the resource fullness for
PSO1 2.5 1.77 contemporary issues.
The project titles of the final year and pre-
final year students are addressing the real
life problems.

ACTION1: Students are motivated to take up the real life problems during their project
work so that they can design, analyze and find solution which gives exposure to latest
technologies.

PsO2: Problem-solving skills: An ability to solve complex electronics and communication


engineering problems, using latest hardware and software tools along with analytical skills
to arrive cost effective and appropriate solutions.

PSO2 Usage of different tools and designs are used


to , develop/ implement, test, manufacture
2.136 1.83 and maintain the electronics systems for
consumer electronics/telecommunication/
optical communication/ automobile/
Industrial Equipment /Machinery control,
articulate/ publish/ exhibit/ innovations/
conference, journals etc.

ACTION1: Academic workshops and conferences are coming into picture to apply more
knowledge in terms of conduction of experiments and analysis the as required level.

PsO3: Successful Career and Entrepreneurship: An understanding of social-awareness


& environmental-wisdom along with ethical responsibility to have a successful career and to
sustain passion and zeal for real-world applications using optimal resources as an
entrepreneur.

PSO3 To inculcate ethics, good interpersonal


1.35 relationships, ability to communicate,
1.0 leadership and project management.

ACTION1: Career readiness program and corporate lectures are arranged to meet required
expertise in field of engineering.

Page 122 of 189


7.2 Academic Audit and actions taken thereof during the period of Assessment (10)

Academic audit and actions taken are carried out with the help of different components:

Feedback from students

Academic Lecture / Lab evaluation


committee
Observation
Feedback

Faculty FDP Review


Feedback

Course file
Academic
evaluation
committee -- Audit

Preparation of
course files during
semester start

1. Course file evaluation

Course files are prepared by faculty members before the semester starts. Course file
contents are as per recommendations mentioned in below table. The academic committee
consisting of HOD, course coordinator and few of departmental senior faculty members
performs audit of course files i.e. verify the contents of the course file, lesson plan,
assignments, extra material lecture notes, etc. The comments of the committee are given
as feedback to the faculty member to include the recommended material. This audit
ensures the quality deliverables to the students.

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Sl. Contents of Course File
No.
1. Plan of course delivery
2. Question papers
3. Answer scripts
4. Assignments and Reports of
Assignments
5. Project Reports
6. Report of Design Projects
7. List of Laboratory Experiments
8. Reports of Laboratory
Experiments
9. Include any other relevant
information

2. Lectures/ Lab evaluation

The academic committee during their random observation of the lectures/lab check delivery
of course material as per the lesson plan, teaching aids used, communication skill and
classroom management etc. parameters to ensure the teaching methods of benchmarked
standards are being used throughout the institute. Feedback is communicated to the faculty
member. The academic committee for observation consists of HOD, and few senior faculty
members.

3. Faculty development program (FDP)

A faculty member has to undergo faculty development program. The FDP to improve the
communication skills and to improve the methods of teaching-learning are carried out at the
institute level itself by the learning and development team. The technical component in the
teaching are improvised with the help of faculty members attending workshops, expert
lectures etc. either organized at our institute or at other institute.

4. Review

Review of the faculty member is taken at the end of the semester again to compare the levels
what was at the beginning and after the various feedbacks and training received.

Action taken by the faculty members:

Faculty members incorporate changes suggested by the academic committee, if any gaps
are found, to ensure quality deliverables.
Faculty members have to match the pace of their deliverables as per the students
requirements as well as they have to schedule the lecture plans in such a way that the

Page 124 of 189


syllabus is completed on time. To achieve this they can arrange extra lectures and cope-up
the syllabus.
Regular analysis of the results of internal assessment examination of all subjects is done
and concerned faculties are guided to take necessary actions. Remedial classes are
scheduled in reference to academic progress of the student.
Faculty members attend FDP as required for the overall development of teaching skills in
terms of communication, methods and technical.
The academic audit is carried out at the beginning of the semester as soon as the faculty
members are ready with their course files.
The academic observation is carried out considering two criteria feedback from students
(requested to the authorities) and randomized observation.
FDP for communication skill development and improving methods of teaching-learning
are being carried out regularly by the learning and development department.
Technical FDP, expert lectures, seminars etc. are being arranged by the individual
departments at least once in a semester.

7.3. Improvement in Placement, Higher Studies and Entrepreneurship (10)

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2


(2015) (2014) (2013)
Total No. of Final Year Students(N) 36 44 31
No. of Students Placed in Companies or
08 15 06
Government Sector (X)
No. of Students admitted to higher studies with
valid qualifying scores (GATE or Equivalent
State or National Level Tests, GRE, GMAT, 01 06 01
etc.)(Y)
No. of students turned entrepreneur in
01 00 00
engineering / technology(Z)

Placement Index: (X+Y+Z)/N 0.28 0.48 0.22

Page 125 of 189


7.4. Improvement in the quality of students admitted to the program (10)

Item CAY CAYm1 CAYm2

No. of Students 0 0 0
National Level Entrance admitted
Examination(Name of the Opening Score/Rank - - -
Entrance Examination)
Closing Score/Rank - - -

State/University/Level No. of Students 47 35 42


Entrance admitted
Examination/Others Opening Score/Rank 22,006 22,266 23,163
(Name of the Entrance
Closing Score/Rank 1,24,087 1,14,646 1,14,646
Examination)

Name of the Entrance No. of Students 3 13 01


admitted
Examination for Lateral Entry
or Opening Score/Rank 12,786 8,192 -
Lateral entry details
Closing Score/Rank 14,698 21,561 -

Average CBSE/Any other Board Result of admitted


62.19 66.64 57.33
students(Physics, Chemistry & Mathematics)

Page 126 of 189


CRITERION 8 FIRST YEAR ACADEMICS 50

8.1 First year student-Faculty Ratio (FYSFR) (5)

Assessment = (5 x 15)/average FYSFR (Limited to Max. 5)

Number of Branches Approved for Academic Year 203-14 = 7.

1. Aeronautical Engineering (60)


2. Biomedical Engineering (60)
3. Civil Engineering (60)
4. Computer science Engineering (60)
5. Electronics and Communication Engineering (60)
6. Electrical Engineering (60)
7. Mechanical Engineering (60)

Total intake 7 x 60 = 420.

Year Number of Students Number of Faculty FYSFR


( Approved Intake Members
Strength) (Considering fractional
load)
2015-16 420 26 1:15
2014-15 420 22 1:15
2013-14 420 22 1:15
Average 420 23.33 1:15
Assessment= (5 x 3.2
15)/Average FYSFR
(Limited to Max. 5)

8.2 Qualification of Faculty teaching first year common courses (5)

Year X y(No. of Regular RF ( Number Assessment of


(No. of Regular Faculty with faculty Faculty
Faculty with P.G members as per qualification
Ph.D) Qualification) SFR of 15:1) (5X + 3Y)/RF

2015-16 6 20 26 3.46
2014-15 6 16 22 3.54
2013-14 4 18 22 3.36
Average Assessment 3.45

Page 127 of 189


8.3. First year Academic Performance (10)

Academic Year Branch Appeared for No. Successful Academic


Examination Students Performance
AE
BME
2015-16 CSE
Results yet to be announced. Once it is declared
Civil
academic performance will be calculated.
ECE
EEE
Mech
AE 49 39 4.19
BME 37 29 3.99
2014-15 CSE 39 21 2.79
Civil 48 27 2.65
ECE 35 26 3.96
EEE 14 6 2.09
Mech 52 36 3.22
AE 52 52 5.71
BME 24 24 5.43
2013-14 CSE 41 41 5.45
Civil 49 45 4.86
ECE 40 40 5.66
EEE 11 10 5.02
Mech 45 45 5.34
Academic Performance: (Mean of the percentage of marks in first year of all successful
students/10) * number of successful students/ number of students appeared for Examination)

2014-15
60

50

40

30

20

10

0
AE BME CSE Civil ECE EEE Mech

No. students appeared Successful students Academic Performance

Page 128 of 189


60
2013-14
50

40
Appeared
30 successful students
Academic Performance
20

10

0
AE BME CSE Civil ECE EEE Mech

8.4. Attainment of course outcomes of first year courses (10)

8.4.1. Describe the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of
course outcomes of first year is done. (5)

2015-16 Three Internal tests for a maximum mark of 20 are conducted and
best of two internals is considered. The average of it is considered
for final internal assessment mark.
The performance of a student in internal assessment with respect
to the COs is recorded.
End semester University exam performance of students for the
maximum mark of 80 is considered for external exam
performance.
The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for a prescribed course out come.
For laboratory assessment, the performance of a student in
conduction of each experiment (10 marks), final lab internal test
(10 marks) and external lab exam(80 marks) is considered.
2014-15 Three Internal tests for a maximum mark of 25 are conducted and
best of two internals is considered. The average of it is considered
for final internal assessment mark.
The performance of a student in internal assessment with respect
to the COs is recorded.
End semester University exam performance of students for the
maximum mark of 100 is considered for external exam
performance.
The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for a prescribed course out come.

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For laboratory assessment, the performance of a student in
conduction of each experiment(10 marks), final lab internal
test(15 marks) and external lab exam(50 marks) is considered.
2013-14 Three Internal tests for a maximum mark of 25 are conducted and
best of two internals is considered. The average of it is considered
for final internal assessment mark.
The performance of a student in internal assessment with respect
to the COs is recorded.
End semester University exam performance of students for the
maximum mark of 100 is considered for external exam
performance.
The summation of these two performances is considered as
cumulative assessment for a prescribed course out come.
For laboratory assessment, the performance of a student in
conduction of each experiment(10 marks), final lab internal
test(15 marks) and external lab exam(50 marks) is considered.

8.4.2. Record the attainment of course outcomes of all first year courses (5)

Academic year 2014-15

AE Engineering Physics

0.86 0.85
0.84
0.82
0.80 0.78 0.78
0.78 0.76 0.76 0.76
0.76
0.74
0.72
0.70
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

Page 130 of 189


BME Engineering Physics

1.20
0.98
1.00
0.85
0.80
0.60 0.58 0.59
0.60
0.40 0.35
0.20
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

CSE Engineering Physics

0.90 0.79
0.80 0.68
0.70 0.62
0.60 0.55
0.48
0.50 0.41
0.40
0.30
0.20
0.10
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

Page 131 of 189


Civil Engineering Physics

0.80
0.66 0.74 0.66
0.70 0.62 0.62
0.60
0.50 0.44
0.40
0.30
0.20
0.10
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

ECE Engineering Physics

1.00 0.93 0.91


0.90 0.86
0.80 0.72 0.68
0.70
0.60
0.50
0.40
0.30 0.23
0.20
0.10
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

Page 132 of 189


EEE Engineering Physics

1.20
1.00
1.00 0.89
0.80
0.64 0.59
0.60 0.46
0.40 0.27
0.20
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

Mech Engineering Physics

1.00 0.87
0.79
0.80 0.69
0.59 0.55
0.60 0.50
0.40
0.20
0.00
CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4 CO-5 Average
Attainment

CO-1 CO-2 CO-3 CO-4

Page 133 of 189


8.5 Attainment of Programme outcomes from first year courses(20)

2014-15 (Engineering Physics)

1. Aeronautical Engineering

9
8
7
6
5
4 Series1
3
2
1
0

2. Biomedical Engineering

9
8
7
6
5
4 Series1
3
2
1
0

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3. Computer Science & Engineering

3 Series1

4. Civil Engineering

3 Series1

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5. Electronics and Communication Engineering

10
9
8
7
6
5
Series1
4
3
2
1
0

6. Electrical and Electronics Engineering

Attainment
9
8
7
6
5
4 Attainment
3
2
1
0

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7. Mechanical Engineering

Attainment
7
6
5
4
3 Attainment
2
1
0

Page 137 of 189


8.5.1. Indicate result of evaluation of each relevant PO and/or PSO, if applicable(15)

Academic Year 2014-15

Aeronautical Engineering
Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086 7.086
C102 Engg Maths2 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08 7.08
C103 Engg. Physics 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14
C104 Engg. Chemistry 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18 4.18
C105 Basic Electricals 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36 5.36
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14 7.14
Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066 5.066
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86 2.86
Direct
Attainment 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739 5.739

Biomedical Engineering
Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 7.086 6.292 6.292 0 7.022 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.91
C102 Engg Maths2 8.41 0 6.34 0 7.12 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.65
C103 Engg. Physics 7.69 3.14 7.1 1.48 4.12 8.56 4.45 0 0 0 0 3.73
C104 Engg. Chemistry 4.58 5.88 7.33 0 0 6.59 5.74 0 0 0 0 4.91
C105 Basic Electricals 3.538 2.662 2.548 1.162 0 3.464 1.242 0 0 0 0.888 1.878
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47
Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 4.528 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.1 2.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12

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Direct Attainment 5.796 3.882 5.216 0.330 2.913 2.327 1.429 0.041 0.000 0.041 0.111 3.055

Computer Science Engineering

Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
6.29
C101 Engg. Maths1 7.086 6.292 2 0 7.022 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.91
C102 Engg Maths2 5.15 5.88 3.82 0 4.21 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.79
C103 Engg. Physics 6.152 2.522 5.65 1.148 3.244 6.916 3.546 0 0 0 0 2.972
C104 Engg. Chemistry 2.63 3.34 4.32 0 0 3.91 3.43 0 0 0 0 2.89
2.81
C105 Basic Electricals 3.812 2.904 6 1.244 0 3.828 1.296 0 0 0 1.04 2.036
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47
Elements of Mechanical 4.52
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 8 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.12.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12
4.37
Direct Attainment 4.987 4.252 7 0.299 2.4398 1.83175 1.034 0.041 0 0.0413 0.13 2.4948

Civil Engineering

Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 7.086 6.292 6.292 0 7.022 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.91
C102 Engg Maths2 4.918 4.42 4.42 0 4.982 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.67
C103 Engg. Physics 5.54 2.56 4.892 0.912 2.776 6.656 3.12 0 0 0 0 2.972
C104 Engg. Chemistry 3.35 4.32 5.32 0 0 4.75 4.16 0 0 0 0 3.53
C105 Basic Electricals 3.25 2.55 2.22 1.13 0 3 1 0 0 0 0.77 1.8
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47
Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 4.528 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77

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Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.1 2.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12
Direct Attainment 4.901 4.153 4.4078 0.2553 2.4778 1.80075 1.035 0.041 0 0.0413 0.0963 2.5303

Electronics and communication


Engineering

Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 4.918 4.42 4.42 0 4.982 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.67
C102 Engg Maths2 6.17 7 4.53 0 4.94 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.3
C103 Engg. Physics 8.388 3.174 7.89 1.484 4.4 9.3 5.018 0 0 0 0 3.896
C104 Engg. Chemistry 3.06 3.96 4.92 0 0 4.29 3.76 0 0 0 0 3.28
C105 Basic Electricals 5.2 3.92 3.6 1.77 0 4.88 1.75 0 0 0 1.19 2.79
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47
Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 4.528 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.1 2.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12
Direct Attainment 5.35 4.444 4.6848 0.4068 2.4205 2.30875 1.316 0.041 0 0.0413 0.1488 2.662

Electrical and Electronics


Engineering

Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 4.918 4.42 4.42 0 4.982 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.67
C102 Engg Maths2 4.59 4.116 4.116 0 4.634 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.49
C103 Engg. Physics 8.12 3.248 7.412 1.48 4.472 8.888 4.724 0 0 0 0 3.816
C104 Engg. Chemistry 4.19 1.38 2.24 1.2 0 2.3 2.3 0 0 0 0 2.3
C105 Basic Electricals 4.325 4.985 3.255 0 3.54 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.39
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47

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Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 4.528 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.1 2.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12
Direct Attainment 5.151 3.903 4.1951 0.335 2.8338 1.3985 0.878 0.041 0 0.0413 0 2.3783

Mechanical Engineering

Courses Subject PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
C101 Engg. Maths1 4.918 4.42 4.42 0 4.982 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.67
C102 Engg Maths2 6.81 7.7 4.98 0 5.44 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.61
C103 Engg. Physics 6.228 2.396 5.668 0.92 3.264 6.988 3.716 0 0 0 0 2.872
C104 Engg. Chemistry 3.95 5.07 6.39 0 0 5.66 4.95 0 0 0 0 4.26
C105 Basic Electricals 3.396 2.6 2.576 1.168 0 3.548 1.315 0 0 0 0.98 2.25
C106 Basic Electronics 7.14 5.45 5.07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.47
Elements of Mechanical
C107 Engg 5.066 4.528 4.528 0 5.042 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
Computer Concepts and
C108 Programming 2.86 3.1 2.52 0 0 0 0 0.33 0 0.33 0 1.12
Direct Attainment 5.046 4.408 4.519 0.261 2.341 2.0245 1.2476 0.041 0 0.0413 0.1225 2.6278

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CRITERION 9 STUDENT SUPPORT 50
SYSTEMS

9. STUDENT SUPPORT SYSTEM

9.1 Mentoring System to help at individual level (5)

An effective Student mentoring system (SMS) has already been implemented in


our college.
All the students of the college are coming under this system from the date of
joining the college.
A complete track of the student activities like Academic, Curricular, Co curricular
Extra Curricular achievements, Social activities and the details of Parent Meetings
are registered in the system.
A Mentoring Register has been distributed to all the staffs of the college .Each
staff is allocated with 10- 15 students under the mentoring system.
Faculties will have a meeting with the students periodically and their Academic
progress and all his activities are discussed and noted in the register
Any discrepancies in the student behavior like Attendance , etc will be questioned
and will be counseled with care
Staff will be submitting the register to the high level Mentoring /Counseling
committee with members like Head of the institution ,HOD
The committees will scrutinize case by case and suggest corrective measures
If necessary the committee will have discussions with the Parents and Medical
Counselor

9.2. Feedback analysis and Rewards and Corrective Measures taken, if any (10)

Three types of Feedback system is followed

1. Direct Feedback from the Students


Every department have constituted Class Committees for Each semester with Staffs and
student Members .Student members are invited to express their view on Subjects on the
Academic Environment of the department and the feedback is collected by the chairman
of the Committee and submitted to the HOD for further actions.
2. Interactive Feedback
Principal will be conducting interactive meeting only with the section of students regarding
the Academic activities and collect the feedback from the students directly.
3. Consolidate Feedback
Feedback forms are circulated and collected from all students of the class collected Various
awards for the students based on the performance of the awards

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Rewards

College Toppers based on the academic performance


Best outgoing Student award
Department Toppers
Certificate to Students having 100% Attendance
Certificate to students securing topper in each subject

9.3. FEEDBACK ON FACULTIES (10)

9.3.1 Introduction

Staff appraisal report consists of the appraisal PERCENTAGE for the different entities of the
College like Student, Staff and Vice Principals and the following feedback has been carried out

1) Student on Staffs
2) Staffs self appraisal (Department wise )
3) Staffs on HOD (Department wise )
4) Staffs on VPs Department wise on VP ADMIN VP ACADEMIC
5) HOD on staffs (Department wise )
6) HOD on VPs (Department wise )
7) VPs on HOD ( VP ADMIN,VPACADAMIC)

9.3.2.0 Methodology of Appraisal

Based on the feedback forms carried out following methodology is adapted

Table-WEIGHTAGE MATRIX
CATAGE SUB STUDENT HOD CO- EXTRA TOT
ORY PASS FEEDBAC CURRICUL CURRICU AL
% K AR LAR
ACTIVITIE ACTIVITI
S ES
STAFF 35 30 15 10 10 100
CATAGE SUB STUDENT STAFF VP FEED CO- EXTRA
ORY PASS FEEDBAC FEEDB BACK CURRICU CURRICU
% K ACK LAR LAR
ACTIVITIE ACTIVITI
S ES
HOD 30 20 20 10 10 10 100
CATAGE SUB MANAGE STAFF HOD COLLEGE GROUP
ORY PASS MENT
% FEEDBAC
K

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VP 30 25 25 10 10 100

Page 144 of 189


9.4. Self Learning

Wi-Fi enabled campus


Internet access to all the computers for the benefit of students.
Edusat Program from the university.
Projects, Internship Modeling Webinar, Video conferring Edusat, NPTEL materials
Accession of Journals
Newspaper of major languages
Open Book Test
e-notes for all subjects of all Department
Digital Library

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9.5 Carrier Guidance, training and Placement

Branch
/Institution Company
Date Sl. no Activity Remarks
Name
The seminar was very
informative to the students, as the
Seminar 1st year students had access to get in
4/9/2015 1 Purvankara Sherphify
students touch with the top employers and
various study materials about the
employable skills.
The seminar was very
informative to the students, as we
Communicati Seminar 2nd
10/9/2015 2 MGIRD have explained the importance of
on Skills year students
Communication skills in the
industries.
The seminar was very
informative to the students, as the
NASSCOM- Seminar 3rd & students had access to get in
11/9/2015 3 Sherphify
iPrimed 4th year students touch with the top employers and
various study materials about the
employable skills.
Seminar on
Industries
12/9/2015 4 MGIRD NIIT
prerequisite Good and students were eager to
skills take up the aptitude test.
Introduction on
Prototyping and
Apple Students were happy and wanted
Larsen IOS Creative application to take up further test on
15/09/2015 5
&Toubro Infotech development Prototyping as its a basic
programme requirements demanded the
affiliated with companies to build/work on a
VTU. project.

16/092015 6 KPTCL - Soft Skills Bhagya:-Deployed soft skills


program on Importance of
Communication skills
Certificate
program
IOS Finishing conducted by
22/09/2015 7 KPTCL
School IOS Finishing This certification program was
School/VTU on informative also; added more
Prototyping value to the profile.

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Seminar on
ICFAI Industries The seminar was very
29/09/2015 8 KPTCL Business prerequisite informative to the students, as the
School skills & students were able to get an idea
Aptitude test of the industries requirements.
Conducted 2
hours seminar
on Soft skills
Importance of
23/09/2015 Soft Skills
Larsen & Communication
to 9 Training
Toubro skills/ Time
3/10/2015 Program
Management/Cri
tical thinking/ The students were very happy
Creativity/ and wanted more classes on soft
Documentation. skills regularly.
Importance of
Soft Skills Time
Larsen &
12/10/2015 10 Training Management for
Toubro
Program 1st year and 2nd
year students
Critical
Soft Skills
Thinking for
13/10/2015 11 KPTCL Training
final year
Program
students
Toonmedia-
Free-
Soft Skills Creativity for
Japanese
15/10/2015 12 Training 2nd year
Language
Program students
training
program
Group Discussin
Soft Skills
on Current
16/10/2015 13 Reddonatura Training
Affairs for final
Program
year students
Points to be
IBS(ICFAI Soft Skills discussed during
20/10/2015 14 Business Training the HR rounds
School) Program for Final Year
students

Yellamma Met Mr. Ramesh Rao, requested


Aseuro Dassapa Campus for an invite our students for
6/11/2015 15 campus drive, said that the next
Technologies Institution of Recruitment
Technology drive will happen only in the
month of Jan 2016, he'll keep us
posted on the same.

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Conducted 1
hour seminar on
importance of
16 Seven Sense knowing the
bridge between Students were happy and wanted
Aseuro the institutions to take up more sessions on this
7/11/2015 Technologies and industries aptitude test etc.
Rajeev from
Seven Sense:
Conducted 1
Seven Sense hour Aptitude
17
Aptitude Test test at CS lab
with 40 students Students were happy and wanted
Larsen & were present for to take up more of aptitude test
7/11/2015 Toubro the test etc.
Soft Skills
Training
Program on
18 T&P Initiative
Communication Students were happy and wanted
skills for 1st to take up more of aptitude test
9/11/2015 KPTCL Year students etc.
Ind Expo
(Karnataka
CNC Tech
Off Campus
19 Pvt Ltd- T&P Initiative
Recruitment
Rajajinagar-
Bangalore-
13/11/2015 10) SJBIT
Soft Skills
Training
Program on
13/11/2015 20 ATS ELGI T&P Initiative Effective
Industrial communication Students were happy and wanted
Sales skills for 3rd to take up more of sessions based
Corporation Year students on the market rquirements.
Informed that
they will inform
ARK about the
Industries number of
Ashwini(HR
14/11/2015 21 Singasandra candidates list in
& marketing)
Village, another 15days
Begur Hobli, for their new
Bangalore project starting Students required from CV, ECE
South up shortly. & EEE

Page 148 of 189


Informed that
they will inform
about the
number of
Comtron candidates list in
14/11/2015 22 Sunil
Electric(India 4days for the
) internships and
Jayanthi MoU's will be
Nagar post, signed
Bangalore-43 accordingly. Students required from CV.
Sri
Vigneshwara
Enterprises Was OK with
23 Rajajinagar Dr.Shobha the MoU draft
Industrial Anand Reddy/ and agreed to
town, Senior sign the MoU on
30/11/2015 Bangalore-44 Faculty 4th Dec 2015
Mr. Mukund
Jhunjhunwala,
Business Requested to run
Head, the Aricent
Operations, Employability
iPRIMED program at ACS
Educations College of
Solutions,/ Engineering
24 Prithvi Mr. Santosh from Feb 2016
Chemical Abraham, till Mar 2016
Manufacturin Associate VP, followed with
g Co. Pvt Ltd NASSCOM On Campus
KSSIDC Foundation, Drive in the
Industrial Bangalore, month of April
Area, NAVIN 2016 for ECE,
Tumkur Dist- KUMAR- BME and CSE In collaboration with NASSCOM
1/12/2015 572168 CEO iprimed departments. and NSDC and NO's
KASSIA
Magadi
Chord Road,
Vijayanagar,
25
Bangalore-40 Executive
Small scale Director-
industries Dr.Shobha Signed MoU for
4/12/2015 association Anand Reddy 1 year
QUALIDEL Redirected to
S Head office
26
Andhrahalli GE. Vasanth Kumarakrupa
8/12/2015 Main Road, Kumar Road Bangalore

Page 149 of 189


Near Peenya for further
2nd stage, Approval.
Bangalore-91

SECO Recommended
Smart to meet AE
Technologies maintenance
Authorised Rajajinagar
27 Distributers
for SECO
Make Cutting Mr. Girish
Tools & Rajarajeshwar
10/12/2015 Accessories i Nagar
JAYALAKS Recommended
HMI POLY to meet the chief
PACKS PVT Engineer at
LTD Anand Rao
Manufacturer Circle
28 s of Plastic
Speciality
Poly films &
Allied Mr. Girish
Packaging Rajarajeshwar
14/12/2015 Products i Nagar
Submitted the
written
application at
the dispatch and
29 TIDE gave the
Technology acknowledgeme
Informatics nt and asked to
Design Mr. revisit after
15/12/2015 Endeavour Raghupathi. 4days.
KSIC Requested to
A meet the HR
30 Government head directly at
of India Kumara krupa
17/12/2015 Enterprise Sujitha Road
Accepted the
letter and
informed to
follow-up on
31
Friday, since the
HR head
Shiva Kumar- Mr.Vikasranjan
18/12/2015 MSME Asst HR is on vacation.

Page 150 of 189


Advised to
Informed the
number of
students
attending the
industrial tour
32 along with the
specified date,
CE- also; asked to
transmission contact the
Zone/ Mrs. HRD-Training
Mythili at Hoody for
18/12/2015 EE guest lecture.
Proposed for
Japan Desk,
need to speak to
33 the management
about the same
Mr.B.G.Sreed to take further
19/12/2015 hara decision.
Interested in
EEE branch
students, and
34
would let us
know in the near
28/12/2015 Aayush Gupta future.
Requested to
deploy industry
specific training
35
program, would
Lima be scheduled
30/12/2015 Sadhukhan shortly.
Requested to
organize a
36 campus drive at
ACS College of
8/1/2016 Sandeep.C Engineering
Conducted
Campus drive a
ACS College of
Engineering.
37 3students got
selected for final
round of
Sandeep.C interview and 1
13/01/2016 and team got selected for

Page 151 of 189


the HR round,
which is shortly
to be scheduled
at the clients
site.
Informed that
they have listed
college on
which they
choose to permit
for project
38
works as well as
campus drives
and will get
back if our
college is been
14/01/2016 Sujisha (HR) shortlisted.
Submitted the
Xerox of the
written
application and
requested to do
the needful at
the earliest.
39 permitted to
visit the station
on 10th Feb
2016, got the
confirmation
letter to visit the
Mr.Balachand Somanahalli
18/01/2016 ra PS industry visit.

40
Venkatesh R Invited for
20/01/2016 Campus drive
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering
(Company is
41
interested to hire
ME &
Automobile
20/01/2016 Umesh B A students)

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Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering
42 (Company is
interested to hire
Shashikiran ME students in
20/01/2016 KR future)
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering and
43
requested to
Suhail come for
20/01/2016 Ahmed.S campus drive.
J.S Babu
SS Introduced the
Fabrication, ACS College of
Boilers, Tig Engineering
44
Welding, (Company is
Railings, SS interested to hire
& Aluminium CVE students in
21/01/2016 3D Letters future)
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering
(Company is
interested to hire
45
All the
branches)Dropp
ed and email
Ashwin requesting for a
21/01/2016 D.Acharya campus drive
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering
(Company is
interested to hire
46
All the
branches)Dropp
ed and email
Praveen.B requesting for a
21/01/2016 Chair man campus drive
Introduced the
ACS College of
47 Ravikiran Engineering
Kulkarni (Company is
21/01/2016 CEO interested to hire

Page 153 of 189


ME students)

Introduced the
ACS College of
48 Engineering
(Company is
interested to hire
21/01/2016 Suresh.S AE students)
Introduced the
ACS College of
Vinod Kumar Engineering
49
S.B (Company is
Marketing interested to hire
25/01/2016 Head ME students)
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering and
50
requested to
Malleswaram come for
25/01/2016 Bangalore-03 campus drive.
Introduced the
ACS College of
Engineering and
51
requested to
Ravi Oran come for
28/01/2016 Asst.Manager campus drive.
Devaraj.K
MSME Introduced the
Development ACS College of
Institute Engineering and
Ministry of requested to
52 Micro, provide the data
Small& of the SME,
Medium need to visit to
Enterprises. collect the data
Rajajinagar- in 2nd week of
28/01/2016 bangalore-10 Feb 2016.
Purushotham. Introduced and
BV requested to
53 Fully Loaded started the
Training training since
1/2/2016 Faculty 2nd Feb 2016.

Page 154 of 189


Deployed soft
skills programs
Lokesh.S based on
Soft Skill Industry specific
3/2/2016 54 trainer knowledge.

9.6 Entrepreneurship Cell (5)

Entrepreneurship cell is established at ACS College of Mechanical Engineering and various


events was organized to know the importance of being an entrepreneur and ways to get financial
assistance to become an entrepreneur and at present Entrepreneurship Awareness programme
is going to be organized between 18-20th February 2016 to create awareness to the faculty and
students,

9.7. Co-Curricular and Extra-Curricular Activities

1. Extra-Curriculum Activities

Sl.No Events
1. Rangoli
2. Poetry Writing
3. Sudoku
4. Mehendi
5. Essay Writing
(English/Kannada)
6. Debate
(English/Kannada)
7. Quiz
8. Pick N Speak
(English/Kannada)
9. Pot Painting
10. Sketching
11. Cooking
without fire

12. Painting
13. Dumb Charades

14. Anthakshari
15. Collage

Page 155 of 189


Sports Facilities:

Sports Club
International Cricket Ground
Gymnasium
Foot Ball Ground
Basket Ball Ground
Volley Ball Court
Recreation Room:
1).Chess 2). Carrom 3). Table Tennis 4). Swimming Pool

Page 156 of 189


CRITERION GOVERANCE, 120
10 INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT
& FINANCIAL RESOURCES

10. GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES


10.1.2 GOVERNING BODY
10.1.2.1 List of Governing Council Members for the year 2013-2014

Sl.N
Name Qualification Designation
o
Sri. A. C. Shanumugam Chairman & Managing
B. A.,
1 Trustee
Founder, MCET, Former MLA & MP L L.B.,
Sri. A.C.S Arun Kumar B.Tech (Hons) Vice Chairman &
2
President, Dr. M.G.R University MBA Member
Dr. P.T. Manoharan
3 Vice-Chancellor, University of Madras, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Chennai
Prof. Venkatachalappa .M
4 Former Prof & Head, Dept of Maths, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Central College, Bangalore
Dr. K. Ramachandra
5 Ph. D Advisor & Member
Former Director, GTRE, Bangalore
Dr. H.B Paniraj,
6 Principal, Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Ph. D VTU Nominated Member
Technology, Bangalore
Prof. A.M Prasanna Kumar
7 ME Member
Prof & HOD of ECE, ACSCE, Bangalore
Sri. Ramesh. C
8 Assoc Prof, Dept of Mech Engg, ACSCE, ME Member
Bangalore
Dr. Krishna Kumar
9 Regional Officer, AICTE, South West Region, Ph. D Member
Bangalore
Prof. H.U. Talwar
10 ME Member
DTE, Govt. of Karnataka, Bangalore
Dr. M.R. Shivakumar Ex-Officio Member
11 Ph. D
Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore Secretary & Principal

Page 157 of 189


10.2.1.2List of Governing Council Members List of Governing Council Members for
the year 2014-2015

Sl.No Name Qualification Designation


Sri. A. C. Shanumugam B. A.,
1 Chairman
Founder, MCET L L.B.,
Dr. P.T. Manoharan
2 Former Vice-Chancellor, University of Ph. D Advisor & Member
Madras,Chennai
Sri A.C.S ArunKumar,
B.Tech(Honors)
3 Vice chairman, Member
MBA
Rajarajeswari Group of Institutions
Prof. Venkatachalappa .M
4 Former Prof & Head, Dept of Maths, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Central College, Bangalore
Prof R.M Vasagam
5 Former Vice Chancellor, Anna University, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Chennai
VTU Nominated
6 V.T.U Nominee Ph. D
Member
Dr.Ravi Kumar B N
7 Prof & HOD of Civil Engg, ACSCE, Ph.D Member
Bangalore
Prof R.Elangovan
8 Prof & HOD of Aeronautical Engg, ACSCE, ME Member
Bangalore, Bangalore
Dr M.Sunderasan
9 Regional Officer& Director, AICTE, South Ph. D Member
West Region, Bangalore
Prof. H.U. Talwar
10 ME Member
DTE, Govt. of Karnataka, Bangalore
Dr. H.B Phani Raju Ex-Officio Member
11 Ph. D
Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore Secretary & Principal

10.2.1.3List of Governing Council Members List of Governing Council Members for the
year 2015-2016
Sl.No Name Qualification Designation
Sri. A. C. Shanumugam B. A.,
1 Chairman
Founder, MCET L L.B.,
2 Dr. P.T. Manoharan Ph. D Advisor & Member

Page 158 of 189


Former Vice-Chancellor, University of
Madras,Chennai
Sri A.C.S ArunKumar,
B.Tech(Honors)
3 Vice chairman, Member
MBA
Rajarajeswari Group of Institutions
Prof. Venkatachalappa .M
4 Former Prof & Head, Dept of Maths, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Central College, Bangalore
Prof R.M Vasagam
5 Former Vice Chancellor, AnnaUniversity, Ph. D Advisor & Member
Chennai
VTU Nominated
6 V.T.U Nominee Ph. D
Member
Mr. Sundramoorthy
7 Former Scientist ISRO & Mission Director Member
Indian Commn. Satellite System, Bangalore
Prof R.Elangovan
8 Prof & HOD of Aeronautical Engg, ACSCE, ME Member
Bangalore, Bangalore
Dr Ramesh Unni Krishnan
AICTE Nominee &
9 Director cum Regional Officer,AICTE, South Ph. D
Member
Western Region, Bangalore
Prof. H.U. Talwar
10 ME Member
DTE, Govt. of Karnataka, Bangalore
Dr. Dr. Punal M Arabi
Professor & Head, Dept. of Bio-Medical
Engg., ACS College of Engineering, Ex-Officio Member
11 Ph. D
Bangalore. Secretary & Principal

M.S.Murali Faculty Nominee &


12 Ph. D
Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore Member

Page 159 of 189


10.1.2 Administrative Set-up:
We at ACSCE believe in FAMILY KIND of work culture. Basically it aims at love and
affection to each and every stake-holder of the institute. In particular, the concept of process
owners, which facilitates a perfect decentralization of activities and delegation of authorities,
has proven itself to be a key concept in the success achieved by the institute on different
counts. The working methodology basically a student centric, which is the dearest and highly
responsible element of the system.

Involvement of each and everyone in the decision-making at their respective levels is ensured
through decentralization and delegation of powers. Hence there are various institutional
committees consisting of faculty and staff members. Transparency associated therein also
forms an important feature of the work culture. This is done through an institutional rule
book and code of conduct document which is easily accessible by any one as the copies are
available in the library, with the HODs and the Principal.

The institute functions with perfect decentralized administration as depicted in Figure 1 that
has complete transparency in the decision making process.

Functions of Key Administrative Positions:


The functions of various key positions are depicted in Table below.
Position Functions
Frame directive principles and policies
Governing
Amend and approve policies from time to time
Council
Approve budgets
Chairman/Chairman To look after the overall development of the institute
Rep i.e., Executive Mobilize external resources to strengthen the institute
Director Plan & provide for necessary facilities / equipments for development
Instill confidence and devotion in every member of the institute
Design & define organization structure
Define & delegate responsibilities of various positions in the
Principal
organization
Ensure periodic monitoring & evaluation, of various processes &
sub- processes

Page 160 of 189


Ensure effective purchase procedure
Define quality policy and objectives
Prepare annual budget
Conduct periodic meeting of various bodies such as Governing
Council, LMC, Standing Committee and Grievances Redressal
Committee etc
Manage accounts and finance
Employee recruitment process
Office Administration
Compliance with AICTE, DTE & University
Admission
Resource Generation
Internal and External examinations
Library Up gradation
To discharge routine duty of Principal during absence of Principal
Annual Magazine
Resource Provision
Transport
Alumni interaction
Housekeeping including hostels
Prepare and execute academic calendar
Oversee the teaching-learning process
Vice- Principal
Carry out result analysis and submit corrective measures to Principal
Initiate supplementary teaching measures
Co-curricular activities
Formation of student council
Cultural activities
Sports activities
Student discipline
Student health care

Page 161 of 189


Student orientation

QMS coordination as MR
Establish, implement and maintain quality management system
Arranging internal audits and MRM
I/C Quality
Maintain up-to-date master documents with history of revision.
Management System
Oversee Employee Attendance System & Maintain the monthly
and Estate
attendance report
Maintaining updated building plans
Overall building maintenance
Propose admission policy
Arrange campaign
Execute the admission process
Public Relations
Design and print admission brochure
Officer
Maintain and update college website
Maintain softcopy of photographs
Publicity of events
Formation of student council (SC)
Arrange periodic meetings of SC
I/C Alumni Ensure alumni registration
Association Prepare alumni news letter
Arrange Runanubandha meet
Proposing annual budget
Smooth running of college workshop
Preparing Material Requirement
I/C Workshop Oversee the routine work
Oversee the college bus service
Oversee the generator facility
I/C Employee Identifying training needs of employees
Development Cell,

Page 162 of 189


Training Officer Notify the employees about various Employee Development
programmes
Arrange Employee Development Programmes
Maintain training records
Liasoning with AICTE, DTE and University
College roster
Service Books
Faculty personal files
Recruitment process
Administrative
Maintain minutes of meeting (all)
Officer
New proposals
Co ordinate day to day activities of office
Purchase process
AICTE, DTE, SU committee preparation
Annual College budget
Shikshan Shulka Samiti requirements
Liaison with industry
Student Training and Placement
Placement Officer Identify and provide for training needs of students
Arrange campus interviews
Proposing annual T & P budget
Plan and execute modus operandi of routine activity of the library
Plan and propose expansion / development
I/C Library
Maintain library discipline and culture
Prepare annual budget for library
Facilitate career guidance to students
Assist students suffering from psychological disorders
I/C Counseling Cell
Arrange for professional counselors
Maintain record of counseling activities

Page 163 of 189


Student academic counseling
Provide slow-pace programme for weaker students
Arrange remedial classes for weaker students
Central time table
Monitoring of lectures and practical
Conduction of internal examinations
I/C Monitoring Cell Students feedback
Collective attendance of students
Co-ordinate the activities of class teachers
Submission of term work and POE mark lists
Organize events through students professional societies / chapters
Organize paper and design contests
I/C Student Encourage student participation
Professional Publication of technical magazine and news letters
Activities Record of student participation and achievements in Co-curricular
and extra curricular activities
Maintain record of such events
Ensure smooth conduct of sports
Ensure proper use of gym
I/C Gymnasium/ Purchasing of sport items
Sports Encourage students to participate in zonal tournaments
Creation and upkeep of sports facilities
Proposing annual budget
Plan and execute academic activities of the department
Maintain discipline and culture in the department
Maintain the department neat and clean
Head of Departments
Pick and promote strengths of students / faculty / staff
Monitor academic activities of the department
Propose Department Budget

Page 164 of 189


Adhere to QMS Procedures
Maintain records of departmental activities and achievements

10.1.2.3 Define Rules, Procedures, Recruitment and Promotional Policies, etc..,


The rules and policies regarding recruitment and promotion are as per AICTE
and Moogambigai Charitable and Education Trust (MCET).
The AICTE pay scales are implemented periodically.
Additional increments are given to staff members who excel in academics and
research.
Recruitment Procedure:
Advertisement: In leading News Papers requesting the eligible candidates as per AICTE
norms to apply within a given time to the Principal.
Applications: The applications along with the Resume and supporting documents will be
collected at the office of HR, RRGI, Bangalore.
Listing: After the applications are received, a list will be prepared highlighting the eligibility,
Qualification and experience.
Merit List: Will be prepared as per the requirements of the individual department.
Expert Body: An expert panel consisting of Special officer, Principal, HOD, subject expert
and a University nominee will be formed.
Call Letters: Eligible Candidates will be called for interview.
Interview: Discussions with the candidates to know their potentials, strengths, teaching skills
etc., will be conducted.
Selection: Based on the performance and requirement, selection list in the order of merit will
be prepared.
Orders: Appointment orders are issued to selected candidates.
Duty report: Selected Candidates should report to the duty on or before the given time.

10.1.3 GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL MECHANISM(10)


Grievance Redressal Cell headed by Dr. M.S. Murali shall meet within a week from the date
of receipt of any petition/complaint from anybody and take necessary action as deem fit and
initiate necessary action for solving problem.

Page 165 of 189


Grievance Redressal Committee for the academic year 2013-14 & 2014-2015 at ACSCE is
reconstituted as under consequent on relocation of some of the faculty members.

GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL COMMITTEE FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-16


Sl No Name Designation

1. Dr. M.S. Murali Chairman

2. Prof. R.R. Elangovan Convener

3. Mrs. Vanishree Moji Representative of Faculty

4. Mr. Siddesha. H.S Student Welfare Officer

5. Respective Head of Departments Representative of Faculty

6. Mrs. Usha. M Representative of Staff

7. Ms. Dhanya G Student Representative

8. Mr. Riyaz Ali Durani Student representative

GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL COMMITTEE FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-15

Sl. No. Name Designation


Prof R. Elangovan Chairman
1.
Vice-Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore-74
Dr. H. B. Phani Raju, Convener
2.
Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore-74
Mrs. Vanishree Moji Representative of Faculty
3.
Asst. Professor, Dept. of ECE, ACSCE,Bangalore-74
Mr. Siddesha. H.S Student Welfare Officer
4.
Dept of Mechanical, ACSCE,Bangalore-74
5. Respective Head of Departments Representative of Faculty

Page 166 of 189


ACSCE,Bangalore-74
Mrs. Usha. M Representative of Staff
6.
Instructor Dept of CSE, ACSCE,Bangalore-74
Mr. Tabrez Nadvi A Student Representative
7. Dept of AE,8th Sem BE, Department of AE
ACSCE, Bangalore-74
Ms. Gayathri A.V Student representative
8.
8th Sem BE, Dept of CSE, Bangalore

GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL COMMITTEE FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2013-14

Sl. No. Name Designation


Prof. Dr. M. Murugesh Mudaliar Chairman
1.
Rector-RRGI, Bangalore
Prof. Dr. M.R. Shivakumar Convener
2.
Principal, ACSCE, Bangalore
Mrs. Vanishree Moji Representative of Faculty
3.
Dept of ECE, ACSCE, Bangalore
Mr. Siddesha. H.S Student Welfare Officer
4.
Dept of MECH, ACSCE, Bangalore
Respective Head of Departments Representative of Faculty
5.
ACSCE, Bangalore
Mrs. Usha. M Representative of Staff
6.
Asst Prof Dept of CSE, ACSCE, Bangalore
Mr. Pradeep M.S 6th Sem BE, Dept of MECH, Student Representative
7.
ACSCE, Bangalore
Ms. Deepika J 6nd Sem BE, Dept of ECE, ACSCE, Student representative
8.
Bangalore

Page 167 of 189


Anti-Ragging Committees for the academic year 2013-14:

1. The following team members are informed to act members of Anti- ragging
group from 1.8.2013
2. Group members are informed to make surprise visits as per the schedule given
below and one of the team members are requested to write a brief report after
Inspection in the register. These groups are formed to prevent and to curb the menace
of Ragging.

ANTI RAGGING COMMITTEE: (To Monitor in both in Morning & Evening)


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Prof. A.M Prasanna Kumar Vice Principal 8867590052
2. Mr. Siva subramaniyam. R Asso Prof 9945535836
3. Prof. Ramesh C Asso. Prof 9035366043

ANTI RAGGING SQUADS (Lunch Break) Canteen, Campus, Classrooms, Library


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. DR. Selvarani Professor & HOD 9964144757
2. Dr. RaviKumar B.N Asst.Prof
8861331671
3. Mr. Vijay Mahantesh Asst.Prof 9845011148

Page 168 of 189


3. DEDICATED CADRE OF WARDEN: Visit to Canteen, Campus, Classrooms,
Hostel

Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No

1. Mr. Madesha J Hostel Warden 9945898247

2. Mrs. Chitrakala Hostel Warden 9900026015

4. PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR: (Evening around 3 Pm) Visit to Canteen ,


Cam[pus, Classrooms
Sl. No. Name of the Member Designation Contact No
1. Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Professor 8867590052
2. Dr. Ravikumar B N Professor 8861331671

3. Dr. Raju B.R Professor 8884451258

4. Mrs. Selvarani Professor 09887150218

In addition to the committees or bodies presented above, the college has the following
Non-statutory committee

Sl. No Committee Headed By


1 Academic Dr. M.R Shivakumar
2 Sports Prof. Ramesh C
3 Cultural Mrs. Deepa
4 Placement Mr. Nabi
5 Library Dr. Selva Rani
6 Hostel and canteen Dr. C.S. Pillai
7 Transport Mr. M.S Shivakumar
8 College Day Mr. R Sivasubramanian
9 Student Welfare Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
10 Magazine All Department Heads

Page 169 of 189


11 Drug Abuse Dr. Ravikumar B N
12 Co-operative Mr. Sanjeev kumar
13 Seminar Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar

14 Workshop Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar

15 Conference Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar

16 Promotion of Brand image Dr. C.S. Pillai


17 Parent/Relation All Department Heads
18 Disciplinary All Department Heads
19 ISTE Dr. Suresh R
20 EDUSAT Programme Prof. A. M. Prasanna Kumar
21 Alumni Association Mr. Ramesh C
22 Media Co-ordinator Dr. Suresh R
23 NSS Co-ordinator Mr. M.S. Shivakumar
24 Mentoring of Student Welfare Respective Mentors
25 Counselling Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
26 Research Development Dr. Selvarani
27 Project Exhibition Dr. Raju. B R
28 Estate Officer Mr. Athipathiraj
29 NBA NIL
30 ISO Mr. R Sivasubramanian
31 Purchase Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
32 Journal Mr. Ravikumar .N
Chairmans Vision
Incubation Centre
Vice Principal
33 Software Development
( Academic,Admin)
Cell
Energy Park
34 LIC/AICTE Coordinators Mr. Lokanadham M
35 Industry Institution Interaction Mr. Yogi Adarsh

Page 170 of 189


Cell
36 Red Cross Mr. Ramesh C
37 GD Cell Dr. C.S. Pillai
Attendance/ Class Teaching of Individual Faculties
38 Every Class/ Student Progress
Communication
a) Cultural Club Mrs. Deepa
b) Heritage Club Mr. M S Shivakumar
c) Sports Club Mr. R. Siva subramanian
d) Green Club Mr. Laxmi G Gandagi
39
e) Creative Club Mrs. Jyothi Metan
f) Innovation Club Mr. Mahantesh Matapath
g) Yoga Club Dr. C.S. Pillai
h) Cricket Club Mr. Ramesh C

10.1.4 Delegation of financial power (10)


S.NO DESGNATION LIMIT TO SANCTION
1 PRINCIPAL 1,00,000
2 HODS 25,000

Sl. Name Position


No.
1 Mr. S Vijay Anand Executive Director
2 Dr. M. R. Shivakumar Principal
3 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Vice Principal( Administration)
4 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Head of Department Electronics & Communication
5 Dr. Selvarani Head of Department Computer Science & Engineering
6 M.R. Shivakumar Head of Department Electrical Engineering
7 Dr. Neerajarani Head of Department Basic Sciences

Page 171 of 189


8 Mr. Ramesh C In-Charge, Alumni Association
9 Mr. Ramesh C In-Charge, Workshop
In-Charge, Counseling Cell
10
Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar In-Charge, Student Professional Activities Cell
11 Mr. Venkata swamy Administrative Officer
12 Dr. Neerajarani Chairman, Central Library

13 Anti-Ragging Dr. M. R. Shivakumar

List of faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various assigned jobs:
Anti-Ragging Committees for the academic year 2014-15:
1. The following team members are informed to act members of Anti- ragging group from
1.8.2014
2. Group members are informed to make surprise visits as per the schedule given below and
one of the team members are requested to write a brief report after Inspection in the
register. These groups are formed to prevent and to curb the menace of Ragging.
ANTI RAGGING COMMITTEE: (To Monitor in both in Morning & Evening)

Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Prof. R. R. Elangovan Vice Principal 9176602009
2. Mr. Sivasubramaniyam. R Asso Prof 9945535836
3. Dr.Senthil Kumaran.T Asso. Prof 8884000900
4 Mrs. Vanishree Moji Asst. Prof 9900155265

ANTI RAGGING SQUADS (Lunch Break) Canteen, Campus, Classrooms, Library


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Dr. Pillai. C.S Professor & HOD 9964144757
2. Mr. Shashikiran C.R Asst. Prof 9663856954
3. Mr. Vijay Mahantesh Asst. Prof 9845011148

Page 172 of 189


5. DEDICATED CADRE OF WARDEN: Visit to Canteen, Campus, Classrooms, Hostel

Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Mr. S.B. Verma Hostel Warden 9900030927
2. Mrs. Chitrakala Hostel Warden 9900026015

6. PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR: (Evening around 3 Pm) Visit to Canteen , Campus,


Classrooms
Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Professor 8867590052
2. Prof. R.R. Elangovan Professor 9176602009

3. Dr. Selvanandham. S Professor 8884451258

4. Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy Professor 09887150218

In addition to the committees or bodies presented above, the college has the following
Non-statutory committee
Sl. No Committee Headed By
1 Academic Dr. H.B. Phaniraju
2 Sports Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy
3 Cultural Mrs. Deepa
4 Placement Mr. Shivakumar
5 Library Dr. Selvanandham. S

Page 173 of 189


6 Hostel and canteen Dr. C.S. Pillai
7 Transport Mr. M.S Shivakumar
8 College Day Mr. R Sivasubramanian
9 Student Welfare Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
10 Magazine All Department Heads
11 Drug Abuse Dr. B.N Ravikumar
12 Co-operative Mr. Sanjeev kumar
13 Seminar Prof. R.R. Elangovan
14 Workshop Prof. R.R. Elangovan
15 Conference Prof. R.R. Elangovan
16 Promotion of Brand image Dr. C.S. Pillai
17 Parent/Relation All Department Heads
18 Disciplinary All Department Heads
19 ISTE Dr. Mukesh
20 EDUSAT Programme Prof. A. M. Prasanna Kumar
21 Alumni Association Mr. Dhanya Prakash R Babu
22 Media Co-ordinator Dr. T. Senthil Kumaran
23 NSS Co-ordinator Mr. M.S. Shivakumar
24 Mentoring of Student Welfare Respective Mentors
25 Counselling Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
26 Research Development Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy
27 Project Exhibition Prof. R. Elangovan
28 Estate Officer Mr. Athipathiraj
29 NBA Mr. R. Siva subramanian
30 ISO DR. Muruganandham
31 Purchase Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
32 Journal Mr. Ravikumar .N
Chairmans Vision
Vice Principal
33 Incubation Centre
( Academic,Admin)
Software Development

Page 174 of 189


Cell
Energy Park
34 LIC/AICTE Coordinators Mr. Krishnakumar. A
Industry Institution Interaction Mr. Yogi Adarsh
35
Cell
36 Red Cross Mr. Chandrashekhar B
37 GD Cell Dr. C.S. Pillai
Attendance/ Class Teaching of Individual Faculties
38 Every Class/ Student Progress
Communication
i) Cultural Club Mrs. Deepa
j) Heritage Club Ms. Prathibha
k) Sports Club Mr. R. Siva subramanian
l) Green Club Mrs. Gayathri Joshi
39
m) Creative Club Mr. Munikrishna D
n) Innovation Club Mrs. Surekha Nigudgi
o) Yoga Club Dr. C.S. Pillai
p) Cricket Club Mr. Manjunath Prasad

10.1.4 Delegation of financial power

S.NO DESGNATION LIMIT TO SANCTION


1 PRINCIPAL 2,00,000
2 HODS 5,000

Page 175 of 189


List of faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various assigned jobs

Name Position
Sl.
No.
1 Mr. S Vijay Anand Executive Director
2 Dr. H.B. Phaniraju Principal
3 Prof. R.R. Elangovan Vice Principal( Administration)
4 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Vice-Principal
5 Dr. A. Muruganandham Head of Department Electronics & Communication
6 Dr. C.S. Pillai Head of Department Computer Science & Engineering
7 Mr. Dinakar Head of Department Electrical Engineering
8 Dr. Selvanandham Head of Department Basic Sciences
9 Mr. Dhanya Prakash. R. Babu In-Charge, Alumni Association
In-Charge, Workshop
10 Prof. R.R. Elangovan
In-Charge, Counseling Cell
11 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar In-Charge, Student Professional Activities Cell

12 Mr. C.S. Rajagopalan Administrative Officer

13 Dr. Selvanandham. S Chairman, Central Library

14 Anti-Ragging DR. H.B. Phaniraju

Page 176 of 189


Anti-Ragging Committees for the academic year 2015-16:

The following team members are informed to act members of Anti- ragging group from
1.8.2015.Group members are informed to make surprise visits as per the schedule given below
and one of the team members are requested to write a brief report after Inspection in the register.
These groups are formed to prevent and to curb the menace of Ragging.

ANTI RAGGING COMMITTEE: (To Monitor in both in Morning & Evening)


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Prof. R. R. Elangovan Vice Principal 9176602009
2. Mr. Siva subramaniyam. R Asso Prof 9945535836
3. Dr.Senthil Kumaran.T Asso. Prof 8884000900

ANTI RAGGING SQUADS (Lunch Break) Canteen, Campus, Classrooms, Library


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Dr. Pillai. C.S Professor & HOD 9964144757
2. Mr. Shashikiran C.R Asst.Prof 9663856954
3. Mr. Vijay Mahantesh Asst.Prof 9845011148

DEDICATED CADRE OF WARDEN: Visit to Canteen, Campus, Classrooms, Hostel


Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Mr. S.B. Verma Hostel Warden 9900030927
2. Mrs. Chitrakala Hostel Warden 9900026015

Page 177 of 189


PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR: (Evening around 3Pm) Visit to Canteen , Cam[pus,
Classrooms
Sl.
Name of the Member Designation Contact No
No.
1. Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Professor 8867590052
2. Prof. R.R. Elangovan Professor 9176602009

3. Dr. Selvanandham. S Professor 8884451258

4. Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy Professor 09887150218

In addition to the committees or bodies presented above, the college has the following
Non-statutory committee
Sl. No Committee Headed By
1 Academic Dr. M.S. Murali
2 Sports Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy
3 Cultural Mrs. Deepa
4 Placement Mrs. Bhagyalakshmi .L
5 Library Dr. Selvanandham. S
6 Hostel and canteen Dr. C.S. Pillai
7 Transport Mr. M.S Shivakumar
8 College Day Mr. R Sivasubramanian
9 Student Welfare Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
10 Magazine All Department Heads
11 Drug Abuse Dr. W. Prema Kumar
12 Co-operative Mr. Sanjeev kumar
13 Seminar Prof. R.R. Elangovan
14 Workshop Prof. R.R. Elangovan
15 Conference Prof. R.R. Elangovan
16 Promotion of Brand image Dr. C.S. Pillai
17 Parent/Relation All Department Heads

Page 178 of 189


18 Disciplinary All Department Heads
19 ISTE Dr. Mukesh
20 EDUSAT Programme Prof. A. M. Prasanna Kumar
21 Alumni Association Mr. Dhanya Prakash
22 Media Co-ordinator Dr. T. Senthil Kumaran
23 NSS Co-ordinator Mr. M.S. Shivakumar
24 Mentoring of Student Welfare Respective Mentors
25 Counselling Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
26 Research Development Dr. M. Eshwaramoorthy
27 Project Exhibition Prof. R. Elangovan
28 Estate Officer Mr. Athipathiraj
29 NBA Mr. R. Siva subramanian
30 ISO DR. Muruganandham
31 Purchase Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar
32 Journal Mr. Ravikumar .N
Chairmans Vision
Incubation Centre
Vice Principal
33 Software Development
( Academic,Admin)
Cell
Energy Park
34 LIC/AICTE Coordinators Mr. Krishnakumar. A
Industry Institution Interaction Mr. Yogi Adarsh
35
Cell
36 Red Cross Mr. Chandrashekhar B
37 GD Cell Dr. C.S. Pillai
Attendance/ Class Teaching of Individual Faculties
38 Every Class/ Student Progress
Communication
q) Cultural Club Mrs. Deepa
39
r) Heritage Club Ms. Prathibha

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s) Sports Club Mr. R. Siva subramanian
t) Green Club Ms. Vamsha Deepa N
u) Creative Club Dr. M. Punal Arabi
v) Innovation Club Mrs. Surekha Nigudgi
w) Yoga Club Dr. C.S. Pillai
x) Cricket Club Mr. Manjunath Prasad

10.1.4 Delegation of financial power


S.NO DESGNATION LIMIT TO SANCTION
1 PRINCIPAL 2,00,000
2 HODS 5,000

List of faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various assigned jobs:

Sl. Name Position


No.
1 Mr. S Vijay Anand Executive Director
2 Dr. M.S. Murali Principal
3 Prof. R.R. Elangovan Vice Principal( Administration)
4 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar Vice-Principal
5 Dr. A. Muruganandham Head of Department Electronics & Communication
Head of Department Computer Science &
6 Dr. C.S. Pillai
Engineering
7 Dr. S.S. Patil Head of Department Electrical Engineering
8 Dr. Selvanandham Head of Department Basic Sciences
9 Mr. Dhanya Prakash. R. Babu In-Charge, Alumni Association
In-Charge, Workshop
10 Prof. R.R. Elangovan
In-Charge, Counseling Cell
11 Mr. A.M. Prasanna Kumar In-Charge, Student Professional Activities Cell
12 Mr. C.S. Rajagopalan Administrative Officer

13 Dr. Selvanandham. S Chairman, Central Library

14 Anti-Ragging Dr. M.S. Murali

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10.2. Budget Allocation, Utilization, & Public Accounting at Institute Level (30)

For CFY
Total No.
Actual expenditure (till
Total Income of
31/10/2015)
students:
Fee Govt. Grant( Other Recurri Non- Special Expendit
s) Source ng recurri projects/A ure per
s includin ng ny other, student
(specif g specify (Oct -15)
y) Salaries
710 NIL NIL 533.33 - 0.48

Actual
Actual
expens Actual Actual
Budget Budget expens
Budget es in expense expenses Budgeted
ed in ed in es in
Items ed in CFY s in in in
CFYm CFYm CFYm
CFY (till CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3
1 2 3 (12-
Oct - (14-15) (13-14)
13)
15)
Infrastructu
re Built-up 160.00 75.27 110.00 104.41 110.00 111.61 200.00 143.66
Library 10.00 5.33 25.00 22.16 5.00 2.99 25.00 21.88
Laboratory
equipment 25.00 13.59 70.00 67.75 40.00 39.90 80.00 70.50
Laboratory
consumable
s 5.00 1.13 50.00 46.08 5.00 2.71 4.00 1.16
Teaching
and non-
teaching
staff salary 500.00 257.75 400.00 422.56 350.00 303.54 300.00 253.65
Maintenanc
e and spares 25.00 11.36 30.00 26.54 30.00 27.49 30.00 25.95
R&D 45.00 19.39 5.00 3.43 3.00 1.00 5.00 3.99
Training
and Travel 15.00 1.86 10.00 7.72 10.00 7.08 4.00 2.67

Miscellaneo
us
expenses* 2.00 0.6 2.00 1.15 2.00 0.42 2.00 0.60

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Others,
specify 400.00 147.05 400.00 320.42 400.00 343.51 400.00 312.94
1187.0 1102.0
Total
0 533.33 0 1022.22 955.00 840.25 1050.00 837.00

For CFY
Total No.
Total Income Actual expenditure (till 31/10/2015)
of students:
Non-recurring (For whole year) Recurring (For Non-recurring Recurring Expenditure
whole year) per student

- 710 533.33 0.48

Actual Actual Actual


Actual
expenses Budgeted expenses expenses
Budgeted in Budgeted expenses Budgeted in
Items in CFY in in in
CFY in CFYm2 in CFYm2 CFYm3
(till Oct- CFYm1 CFYm1 CFYm3
(13-14)
15) (14-15) (12-13)
Laboratory
equipment 25.00 12.42 75.00 66.07 40.00 36.48 50.00 47.48
Software
5.00 1.17 4.00 1.68 5.00 3.42 25.00 23.02

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Laboratory
consumables 3.00 1.13 75.00 46.08 4.00 2.71 2.00 1.16
Maintenance
and spares
25.00 11.36 60.00 26.54 30.00 27.49 25.00 25.95

R&D
25.00 19.39 8.00 3.43 2.00 1.00 5.00 3.99
Training and
Travel
5.00 1.86 8.00 7.72 8.00 7.08 3.00 2.67
Miscellaneous
expenses*
2.00 0.6 2.00 1.15 2.00 0.42 2.00 0.60
Total
90.00 47.93 232.00 152.67 91.00 78.60 112.00 104.87

For CFY
Total No.
Total Income (14-15) Actual expenditure (14-15) of
students:
Fee Govt. Grant(s Other Recurrin Non- Special Expenditur
) Sources g recurrin projects/An e per
(specify includin g y other, student
) g specify
Salaries
802.59 NIL NIL 1.06 827.18 - 0.81

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For CFY

Total No.
Total Income (13-14) Actual expenditure (13-14) of
students:
Fee Govt. Grant(s Other Recurrin Non- Special Expenditur
) Sources g recurrin projects/An e per
(specify includin g y other, student
) g specify
Salaries
651.65 NIL NIL 2.02 492.65 - 0.47

For CFY

Total No.
Total Income (12-13) Actual expenditure (12-13) of
students:
Fee Govt. Grant(s Other Recurrin Non- Special Expenditur
) Sources g recurrin projects/An e per
(specify includin g y other, student
) g specify
Salaries
460.65 NIL NIL 4.72 388.20 - 0.57

10.4 Library and Internet (20)

Carpet area of library (in m2) 600 sq ft


Reading space (in m2) 600 sq ft
Number of seats in reading space 148
Number of users (issue book) per day 40
Number of users (reading space) per day 50

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Timings: During working day, weekend, and
8:30am to 8:00 pm
Vacation

Number of library staff 03


Number of library staff with a degree in
01
Library
Library Management 01

Computerization for search, indexing Yes

Issue/return records bar coding used Yes


Library services on Internet/Intranet INDEST or other
Yes
similar membership archives

10.5.2 Titles and volumes per title (4)


Number of titles: 6144
Number of volumes: 27984
Number of new Number of new Number of new
titles added editions added volumes added
2011-2012 498 94 14699
2012-2013 351 87 17553
2013-2014 161 38 18699
2014-15 314 104 2303

Scholarly journal (3)


Details 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11
Engg. and As soft copy 7 - - - -
Tech. As hard copy 109 101 101 101 101

Digital Library (3)


Availability of digital library content:

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If available, mention number of courses, number of e-books, etc. : 09
Availability of an exclusive server : Yes
Availability over Intranet/Internet : Yes
Availability of exclusive space/room : Yes
Number of users per day : 15

Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous content (5)

Expenditure
Magazines/journals Magazines/journals Comments
Year Misc.
Books ( for hard copy ( for soft copy if any
content
subscription) subscription )
2010-2011 232635 47013 323510 - -
2011-2012 692317 258201 386750 - -
2012-2013 504130 269670 1579032 - -
2013-2014 130693 261181 1579032
2014-2015 66575 273655 1308022

INTERNET (5)
Name of the Internet provider city online and BSNL
Available bandwidth 60Mbps
Access speed 100Mbps
Availability of Internet in an exclusive lab Yes
Availability in most computing lab Yes
Availability in Departments and other units Yes
Availability in Faculty rooms Yes
Institute own e-mail facility to faculty/students Yes
Security/privacy of e-mail/internet users Yes

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