GGSIP UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING

KASHMERE GATE, NEW DELHI

Thesis Topic

CRICKET HALL OF FAME

Thesis Guide

Prof. Rupinder Singh

Name of the Student

Pallavi Rikh (005/USAP/2005)

R i k h | ii GGSIP UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
KASHMERE GATE, NEW DELHI

Thesis Topic

CRICKET HALL OF FAME

Approval Certificate
The following study is hereby approved as a creditable work on the approved subject, carried out and presented in a manner sufficiently satisfactory to warrant its acceptance. It is to be understood that by this approval the undersigned does not necessarily endorse or approve any statement made, opinion expressed or conclusions drawn therein, but approve the study only for the purpose for which it is submitted and satisfies himself as to the requirements laid down by the thesis committee.

Name of the student

Name of the Guide

Pallavi Rikh
(005/USAP/2005)

(Prof. Rupinder Singh)

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to express my sincerest thanks and gratitude to my guide Prof. Rupinder Singh for his guidance, support and wealth of information which he shared with me and also helped me understand the intricacies of the topic without which I would not have succeeded in writing this paper. I would also like to thank our thesis coordinator Prof. Ashok Lal for his consistent guidance and update of the study, and for his immense support and guidance. Also to the staff of SPA library and my College who helped in arranging for the required data when it was needed the most. I would also like to thank my Classmates and Juniors for providing me with relevant information. And most of all, I would like to thank my parents for their moral support and understanding.

Pallavi Rikh (005/USAP/2005)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pg.No APPROVAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENT INTRODUCTION ISSUES AIM METHODOLOGY SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS

ii
iii 1-4 5

6
6 6

CHAPTER 1
THE SITE

7-11

CHAPTER 2
CASE STUDY

12-24

CHAPTER 3
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 25-26

CHAPTER 4
CONCEPT 27

CHAPTER 5
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 28-33

CHAPTER 6 FINAL DRAWINGS 34-46

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INTRODUCTION

It’s true that cricket was not originated in India but has the largest and the craziest fan following than anywhere else in the world. Although the national game of India is Hockey and the country has been a strong power in the game at world level for a long period, still over the period of time Hockey took the back seat and Cricket came to the forefront as far as popularity among the masses is concerned. Though people in Indian sub-continent follow variety of different religions and Hinduism is regarded as the leading religion in this region. But today, India has a religion not heard, but followed by most Indians. Cricket is the biggest religion in India. This religion is quite phenomenal and has several gods who keep changing every few years or even months. India considered as a poor country but still cricket, the rich man’s game, is the most popular. Indians easily get emotional when it comes to cricket. Each game is watched with great intensity. When a match is won, the whole nation rejoices and when they lose, people just burst out with anger. Whether it is a six year old or a twenty year old, the game is played with enthusiasm and great intensity. Even a person who does not know to hold a bat, enjoys watching the game and rejoices when sees his country win. A spectator and a player both equally enjoy the game and both undergo the same emotions at every ball. So, by keeping this in mind and with my analysis the major part of population is cricket fan. This craze will not fade as the cricket board keep introducing new ideas such as Indian Premiere League and T20 cricket that keeps a hold on its viewers.

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WHY CRICKET HALL OF FAME????? BEGINNING: The word 'cricket' may have its origin in the word 'cric'. Crics were wooden staves carried by shepherds. The game developed in the grasslands of Kent and Sussex in England, where it was a kid sport and not seriously taken up by the adults. The first written record of the game can be traced to 1598, when a mention of the game 'crekett' or 'crickett' was found. Slowly, it became popular among the adults, only to be suppressed by the clergy. In 1611, two men were prosecuted for playing cricket instead of going to the church. But, the growing popularity meant more and more arrests. The new puritan government of England clamped down on the spread of cricket. It had become a major pastime in the 1600s among the labor class and peasants. The 1680s saw the end of the puritan regime and Monarchy was in power again. The new rulers were themselves fond of the game and hence it gained in popularity and respectability. Inspite of betting and petty violence associated with cricket's early following, the London magistrate viewed the game as 'respectable'. In the year 1788, the 'Laws of Cricket' were laid down by the Marylebone Cricket Club, England which are still adhered to, except for a few revisions and modifications. Till today, it is the only game in the world that has 'laws' instead of rules, heralding the beginning of the modern version of the game in the 1700s. The game was played in the eastern United States along with England, in accordance with the new laws of the game.

IN INDIA: Cricket was brought to India by the British. In the beginning the game was played amongst the British nationals. Later it struck deep roots in the Indian soil as a result of the patronage extended to it by the ruling class and the princely households. By the beginning of the 19th century, cricket became popular in the cities of Bombay, Calcutta and Madras. An England team toured India in 1902-03. An All-India team went on a tour of England in 1911 under Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala. The Indian cricket control board came into being

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towards the end of 1928. With the efforts of several Indian princes, H.E. Grant Goven and A.S.De Mellow, the national championship for the Ranji Trophy began in 1935. India entered the international arena and played its first official Test against England in 1932.

Meanwhile Prince Ranjit Singhji of Nawanagar who had gone to England for further study, made a remarkable name for himself in the game of cricket. He is generally acknowledged as the Father of Indian Cricket although he played only in England. He will always be remembered through the National Cricket Championship - Ranji Trophy, named after him.

In the context of today, it can be said that Cricket has become synonymous with the identity of being an Indian sports enthusiast. Such is the charisma of the game in the nation and so badly are the people influenced with the aura of Cricket-stars that their glory and fan following can easily put some Bollywood stars to shame.

SITE SELECTION: Firoz Shah Kotla to most people gives an image of extremely popular cricket stadium of the city. The stadium overlooks a 4th century citadel. To its north, is the imperial city of Shahjahanabad with Delhi gate, marks the entrance into Daryaganj (mart by the river). The other important feature is the Netaji Subhash Marg and Sunday book bazaar. To south, is Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg, busy street touches the heart of Delhi’s commerce. On this road are institutes, media offices and major government offices too. Other attraction is the Doll Museum for the children. All functions as institutions, museum, commercial and offices at one place provide a strong context to this site. The area has people from all age groups together which undoubtedly have craze for cricket and would love to have a place like this around them. It is a place of congestions and traffic jams, the project should be near to traffic junctions where

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people can easily access it. For the project to gain popularity this site is the best because of the neighbouring buildings around it and most importantly the popularity base that is provided to the site is by the Firoz shah Kotla Cricket stadium.

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THESIS ISSUES: Delhi being the capital is the gateway to the nation so it’s important to keep the peoples interest intact. In terms of entertainment, the first and the foremost thing that people enjoy is cricket. Cricket has become a type of religion which majority of people follow. Even a non-religious person follows cricket. So whenever, there is a match people find a good spot to relax and watch, along with their friends. Therefore places like Cafe Coffee Day, Barista, shops etc are crowded more with cricket lovers than regular customers during matches. ARCHITECTURAL ISSUE: An attempt is made to build a place where cricket fans can watch matches with a drink and enjoy. Create a museum or a hall of fame like in Wisconsin, Louisiana etc for cricket fans with souvenir shops. Overall, to create an ambience suited for cricket lovers. The building needs to become a symbol of “Indian Cricket” at one level. The other most important aspect is the nature of the exhibit and need for large column free space for sports bar and museum. FUTURE RELEVANCE: The first time a boy learns to play a sport is Cricket. And with time develops a craze for the sport. Earlier there were only One day and test cricket but seeing the fan following of the sport the cricket committee introduced new leagues such as Indian Premiere League and T20, more and more matches are played. The other reason for the sport to gain importance is from the private sector. With boost in the private sector, more and more brands are coming up. And the best way to promote their brand is through cricket. Hence, these brands sponsor different teams whether it is at district level or international level. Therefore the love for the sport will never fade.

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AIM: This project will not only provide entertainment to people will also give opportunities to people interact with others during matches. And in coming days this idea if combined with public space may became good hangout space for people. Firoz shah Kotla will no longer be known only for the stadium but also for the cricket hall of fame. METHODOLOGY: started by understanding the evolution of cricket and the importance of cricket. Analyse the influence of cricket on the social and economic factors of society. Pick out one important aspect of cricket and develop a form. Create an experiential place for the users. To make a place that takes the user to a whole new experience as watching cricket takes a viewer to a new level of excitement and taking tension out. SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS: the scope of hall of fame is limited to only cricket. Attempt is made to evolve a unique form and idea for the building. Propose a structural system for the building. And create spaces that are new and experiential.

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CHAPTER 1 THE SITE chosen is near Firoz Shah Kotla Cricket stadium at intersection of Jawaharlal Nehru Marg and Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg. The site is near to the commercial and institutional hub like Darya Ganj, Chandni chowk, Maulana Azad Medical College, IP University and most

importantly I.T.O(Income Tax Office). Not too far from the site is I.S.B.T, Kashmere Gate metro station and

Pragati Maidan metro station. Besides this, next to the site is the 14th century monument Kotla Firoz Shah.
ACCESS TO SITE:

The site has access from South Delhi via Bahadur Shah Road or Ring Road. Asaf Ali Road and Bahadurshah Zafar Road can be used to access from Central Delhi and West Delhi. Ring Road and ITO Flyover can be used to access from North Delhi and East Delhi.
PRESENT LAND USE:

Adjacent to site is rest house, hospital, institutions, Indraprastha offices and further deep are shops and residences. Across the road are shops and some of the old Delhi residences. A few shacks and unauthorized shops have come up. Gandhi memorial museum

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and historical structure from the 14th century is around the site and a large open space further down towards South of the site. Hence, mixed land use concept is seen around the site.
NATURAL FEATURES:

Delhi is located at latitude 28’53’ and longitude 77’2’E, and is north of the Tropic of Cancer, and has fairly hot summer and a cold winter. These are interspersed by spell of rain thus making the climate of Delhi composite. In summer, shadow patterns on the ground dictate outdoor activity. The winter sun, on the contrary, is a welcome element and sunny area in winter is actively used for outdoor activity. During most of the year, the wind blows from the north-west direction and during the rainy seasons the wind blows from the east.
PRESENT CONDITIONS: Narrow roads cause traffic congestion during peak hours and also sue to the Delhi’s busy market Chandni Chowk and Darya Ganj across the site. Lack of parking facilities. People coming by vehicles to stadium or parks have to use public transportation or park their vehicles near Doll museum. They can also use Kotla Firozshah parking. Exept for bus stand no other public transport stand. Pedestrian path almost around 3 meters. No proper maintenance of parks.

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ISTORY OF KOTLA FIROZ SHAH: Feroz Shah Kotla was the erstwhile citadel of Ferozabad, the Fifth city of Delhi. It is situated off the Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg of Delhi, near the Feroz Shah Kotla Cricket Stadium. Emperor Firoz Shah Tughlaq, the nephew of Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq and successor of Muhammad Tughlaq, got the citadel of Ferozshah Kotla built in the year 1354. Along with the citadel, he also laid the foundation of the city of Ferozabad. The 13 meter high sandstone obelisk with Ashoka’s edict stands a testimony to the history of this old city in ruins which has seen Hindu and Muslim rulers over years. The ruins of Ferozabad, the 5th city of Delhi, built by Feroz Shah Tughlaq in 1354 can be found at Feroz Shah Kotla, just off Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg between the Old and New Delhi. The remains of a mosque and a well can also be seen, but most of the ruins were used for the construction of later cities. Feroz Shah was a great builder and so, this fifth city of Delhi was full of splendid palaces, mosques and gardens. The Tughlaqabad area was woefully short of water and this made the Tomars move westward to Mehrauli. Firoz Shah, Muhammad Tughlaq’s successor solved this problem by building his new city on the banks of Yamuna. Kotla was the inner citadel of Firozabad, built like Windsor, with great palaces and a magnificent mosque inspiring Timur’s envy. Designed by Malik Ghazi and Abdul Hakk, Feroz Shah Kotla was then popularly known as Kushk-I-Feroz, which meant Feroz's palace. Consisting of three rubble-built walled rectangular enclosures, it forms an irregular polygonal plan with its eastern wall in one alignment. The eastern wall of the citadel was built on a bank of the River Yamuna and it is said that Feroz Shah erected this citadel here in spite of having three palaces in Delhi because

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of the shortage of water in those areas. Destroyed by the Mughals, Kotla palaces were reduced to mere ruins, exposing to view the subterranean passages and covered cloisters. One can still see the pyramidal structure topped by the Ashokan Pillar brought from Topra, and a three tiered baoli. Timur’s invasion of Delhi reduced the city to a city of ruins as he took away with him elephants loaded with treasures and costly building material, artists, masons and skilled workmen as prisoners. The Saiyyads and Lodis used Kotla as their citadel.

At Present, We can still see the ruins of the palaces, pillared halls, a mosque, a pigeon-tower and a baoli in the citadel. Mostly in ruin, all that’s now visible is traces of plaster clinging to rubble masonary. With time the area popularised by the Firoz shah Kotla cricket stadium. This provided a good opportunity for the traders to sell their goods, which later developed as the famous wholesale market area Darya Ganj and Chandni Chowk. Many Institutes and Head Offices opened in time such as School of Architecture and Planning, Maulana Azad Medical College, Commissioner of Police Headquarters, DDA Head Office, Doll Museum etc. With such important and busy areas it lacks the basic infrastructure as no proper roads, poor parking facility and footpaths taken over by hawkers or book stalls.

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HISTORY OF FIROZ SHAH KOTLA STADIUM: Deriving its name from the Emperor of Delhi - Feroz Shah Tughlaq, who ruled from 1351 to 1388, Feroz Shah Kotla stadium was initially a fortress, built by the by the Emperor to house his version of Delhi city - Ferozabad. It was established in the year 1883 and is situated in a prime location of India's capital, Delhi. One of the oldest cricket stadiums in India, the stadium hosted the first ever test match in Independent India. Held between India and West Indies, the match was the first ever tour of West Indies to India, under the captainship of John Goddard in 1948-49. Ever since the first match played, Feroz Shah Kotla stadium has witnessed some notable performances over the years. Currently, the stadium is being managed and maintained by the Delhi District Cricket Association (DDCA) and has two ends namely TATA end and ITC end. Feroz Shah Kotla stadium underwent renovation and revamping in the later stages. The stadium was outfitted with latest amenities for successfully organizing an international cricket matches. Floodlights were even installed in the stadium, thereby making it one of the choicest venues for day-night matches as well. In the present times, Kotla stadium boasts of a seating capacity of over 40, 000 people. With the initiation of Indian premier League (IPL) since 2008, the stadium has been the home venue of the Delhi Daredevils, a franchise of IPL.

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CHAPTER 2 CASE STUDY

Case Study I:
SPORTS HALL OF FAME AND REGIONAL HISTORY MUSEUM by Trahan Architects

Natchitoches, Louisiana Project size: 28,000 sqft

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Trey Trahan, FAIA, describes the project as “an incredible opportunity to create a place that will celebrate the deep history of North Louisiana, as well as the indelible influence sports have had on our state’s culture.” The museum unites these two programs - formerly housed in trophy cases lining a coliseum concourse at North-western State University and on the ground floor of the Natchitoches Parish Courthouse, respectively - in a stunning 28,000-square-foot contemporary venue that highlights the collections' important cultural assets and recognizes each segment as part of the greater cultural history of the state of Louisiana. The building will also serve as a progressive space for community gatherings and events.

In turn, the site of the new museum, on the border of the city's commercial district and overlooking the lake, has inspired Trahan Architects to embrace this profound history and this historic landscape in its design. The architects have used sinker cypress planks for cladding the exterior as a reference to region’s rich timber legacy. They embrace the historic architecture and materials of the region.

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The museum's exterior is clad in sinker cypress planks - (sinker cypress comes from cypress logs that have been buried for years in the soft muddy bottoms of rivers, lakes, swamps, and bayous) - a reference to the region's rich timber legacy. The spacing and manipulation of the boards control light, views and ventilation and create a sense of porosity, articulation, and texture that will animate the façade and mediate the building's scale; these louvers are also a reference to the cladding at nearby Oakland Plantation, where wood planks were used for the purpose of mitigating the climate.

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In addition, on the interior, the firm derived the building's geometry from the area's distinctive geomorphology and aspects of the river's hydromorphology. The design concept was guided by the fluid shapes of the braided corridors of river channels separated by interstitial masses of land - this idea becomes the organizing principle for visitor circulation and gallery arrangement.

The focus of the interior is the atrium, which will serve as a place for special events, gatherings and general spatial orientation. Clad in light-colored cast-stone panels, the space will be washed with natural light from all sides and will present an atmosphere of calm and reflection

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Case Study II:
WISCONSIN SPORTS HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM by Star Services, Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Project size: 81,000 sqft

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A new 50,000 sf museum, 15,000 sf restaurant, and 15,000 sf Retail

View of the Atrium

Gallery view of the museum

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Conference/Media Room

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Case Study III:
SPORTS MUSEUM OF AMERICA

New York, United States Project size: 65,000 sqft

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ZAMET SPORTS CENTRE Project Size: 16830 sqm

Sports hall with max 2380 seats, local community offices, library, 13 retail and service spaces and a garage with 250 parking spaces. The goal and a perpetual guideline for the project were the evaluation and a minimum distortion of the existing urban environment. One third of the sports hall volume is cut in the ground, and the rest of the Centre is fully fitted into the surrounding landscape.

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The public space on the roof is not only a feature of the building in the business part of the centre, but the roof of the hall is also used as a kind of an extension of the park situated to the north of the hall. The hall has been designed for major international sports competitions, in compliance with state-of-the-art world sports standards. The design of the hall has been conceived as a very flexible space.

The auditorium has been designed as a system with telescopic stands, which open and adapt to the kind of competition and the number of spectators; at major competitions 2100 spectators have seating places by opening all the stands. The architecture of public facilities, the shopping centre, the library and the local authority stands out in the topography of the

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terrain, connecting the square in front of the hall and in front of the school and tries to integrate into the overall existing context of western Zamet.

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CHAPTER 3 DESIGN REQUIREMENT Lobby Reception Ticket Counter Waiting Area Toilets Shops/Souvenir Media Room Cyber Zone FOODCOURT Stall Kitchen Seating Toilet SPORTS BAR MUSEUM Storage Exhibition Area
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200sqm 30sqm 20sqm 50sqm 30sqm 50sqm 250-300sqm 300sqm 400sqm

500sqm

300sqm 600sqm
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BCCI OFFICE Administrator+Toilet+PA Accounts Officer Curator+Toilet+PA Stores Staff Room Guard Room Pantry SERVICES AHU Generator LT/HT Panel Electrical Room Water Tank TOTAL 3500sqm 30sqm 40sqm 30sqm 30sqm 50sqm 20sqm 20sqm 500sqm

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CHAPTER 4 CONCEPT

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CHAPTER 5 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT FIRST LEVEL FROM SCRATCH

Trying to find spaces that reveal themselves to the user

SECOND LEVEL Since cricket is a western sport and is a religion in India. So the next step, try to merge the idea of western church with Indian temples. In churches there is a god in the front and followers behind. Whereas, in Indian temples he Gods are in centre and followers circling them.

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THIRD LEVEL Used ramps as processions. Since a cricket field is 22 yard so a standard length of ramps is taken as 22 yard and the functions are arranged around it.

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FOURTH LEVEL Random forms

FIFTH LEVEL After all the above step. We came down to the idea of using cricketers as god or stars and since gods/stars are in the sky. So lifted the building above the ground.

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FINAL STEP Taking batting strokes of a batsman as a base and tracing them to get an organised yet a unique form.

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The final chosen organization. Next step was to play with the voids. THE IDEA

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CHAPTER 6 FINAL DRAWINGS

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EXPLODED VIEW

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SECTION

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FINAL VIEWS

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PLAY OF LIGHTS

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MODEL PICTURES

Building with respect to context in Firoz Shah Kotla.

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