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E N G I N E E R I N G M A N UA L

Waukesha Cherry-Burrell
R OTA RY P O S I T I V E D I S P L AC E M E N T P U M P S

FOR M NO.: M M 604 DAT E : 0 2 / 2 0 1 5

FPO
SPX FLOW, Inc.
611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: (800) 252-5200 or (262) 728-1900
Fax: (800) 252-5012 or (262) 728-4904
E-mail: wcb@spxflow.com
Web site: www.spxflow.com

Information contained in this manual is subject to change Copyright 2005, 2015 SPX FLOW, Inc.
without notice and does not represent a commitment on the All Rights Reserved.
part of SPX FLOW, Inc. No part of this manual may be
reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, Issued Date: 11/2002
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and
Revision Date: 02/2015
recording, for any purpose, without the express written
permission of SPX FLOW, Inc. Publication: MM 604
Table of Contents
Considerations for Optimum Pump Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pumping System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Fluid Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pump and Drive Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Fluid Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Density, or Specific Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Specific Gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Vapor Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Viscosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Viscous Fluid Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Type: Constant Viscosity at All Shear Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Newtonian Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Type: Decreasing Viscosity at Increasing Shear Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Plastic Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Pseudo-Plastic Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Thixotropic Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Type: Increasing Viscosity at Increasing Shear Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Dilatent Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Flow Rate vs Shear Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Viscosity Profile Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Frictional Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Basic Definitions and Hydraulic Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Atmospheric Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Gauge Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Absolute Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Vacuum or Suction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Outlet Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Inlet Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Differential Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Relation of Pressure to Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Net Positive Suction Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Fluid Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Potential Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Pressure Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Kinetic Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Mechanical Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Frictional Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Energy Types and Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Energy Levels in a Pumping System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Open Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Closed Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
The Inlet Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Rotary Pump Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Slip and Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
1. Low NIPA Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2. Vacuum Vessels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3. Priming Ability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4. Metering Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Power Requirements in a Pumping System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Determining Pump Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

02/2015 MM 604
Table of Contents
Checking the Inlet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Calculating Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Selecting the Pump Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
1. Constant Speed Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
2. V-Belt Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3. Variable Speed Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Selecting the Pump Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Sanitary Pump Features and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
1. Seal Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
2. Port Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
3. Relief Valve Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4. Jacketed Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5. ECP Rotor Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Industrial Pump Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
1. Relief Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
2. Seal Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Rotor Clearance Options Sanitary and Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Special Purpose Pump Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
RF Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Aseptic Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Pump Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
1. Installing the Pump and Drive Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
2. Good Piping Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
3. Alignment of Pump to Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Start-Up Check List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Troubleshooting a Pumping System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Engineering Data Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Waukesha PD Pump Sanitary/Industrial Model Cross Reference . . . . 90
Pump Curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Curve Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Universal I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Universal II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Universal Lobe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
420/520 UHC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
5000 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Absolute Pressure Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Fluid Viscosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Viscosity Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Temperature Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Friction Loss in Valves and Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Piping Fitting Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Pipe Frictional Loss Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Miscellaneous Engineering Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Metric Prefixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Viscosity Conversion (approximate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Chemical Compatibility of Pump Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Pump Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

MM 604 02/2015
Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Considerations for Optimum Pump Application

Considerations for Optimum Pump Application


Pumping System Requirements Pump and Drive Characteristics
Flow requirements Flow capacity range of pump
Type and location of equipment in the piping Efficiency and slip
system
Speed range of pump
Line sizes and lengths
Net inlet pressure required
Pump inlet system conditions Pressure capability
Pump outlet pressure requirements
Operating temperature
Type of service Self priming ability
Service life requirements, duty cycle
Maximum service factors of pump
Accuracy of flow control required
Materials and type of construction
Mounting of pump and piping
Power required and type of drive

Fluid Characteristics
Type of liquid to be pumped
Effective viscosity of the liquid under
pumping conditions
Specific gravity of the liquid
Pumping temperature
Vapor pressure
Chemical characteristics
Abrasive properties of the fluid
Shear or product breakage sensitivity

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Fluid Fundamentals Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Fluid Fundamentals
Fluids include liquids, gases, and mixtures of liquids, solids, and gases. For the purposes of this manual, the
terms fluid and liquid are used interchangeably to mean pure liquids, or liquids mixed with gases or solids
which act essentially as a liquid in a pumping application.

DENSITY, OR SPECIFIC WEIGHT of a fluid is its


weight per unit volume, often expressed in units of
pounds per cubic foot, or grams per cubic centimeter.
EXAMPLE: If weight is 80#; density is 80#/cu. ft.

The density of a fluid changes with temperature.

SPECIFIC GRAVITY of a fluid is the ratio of its density


to the density of water. As a ratio, it has no units
associated with it.
80#
EXAMPLE: Specific gravity is ---------------
62.4#
or S.G. = 1.282

TEMPERATURE is a measure of the internal energy


level in a fluid. It is usually measured in units of
degrees fahrenheit (F) or degrees centigrade (C).
The temperature of a fluid at the pump inlet is usually
of greatest concern.
See F C conversion chart on page 130.

VAPOR PRESSURE of a liquid is the absolute


pressure (at a given temperature) at which a liquid will
change to a vapor. Vapor pressure is best expressed
in units of PSI absolute (psia). Each liquid has its own
vapor pressure-temperature relationship.

For example: If 100 water is


exposed to this reduced
absolute pressure of 0.95
psia, it will boil at 100F.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Fluid Fundamentals

VISCOSITY The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of


its tendency to resist a shearing force. High viscosity
fluids require a greater force to shear at a given rate
than low viscosity fluids.
Shear Stress
Viscosity = ----------------------------------
Shear Rate
When
Force
Shear Stress = ---------------
Area

Velocity
Shear Rate = ----------------------------------------
Film Thickness

The CENTIPOISE (CPS) is the most convenient unit


of viscosity measurement. This measurement of
absolute viscosity units (CPS) can be obtained from a
type of instrument as shown. This type of instrument
measures the force needed to rotate the spindle in the
fluid (shear stress) at a known shear rate.

Other units of viscosity measurement such as the


centistoke (cks) or Saybolt Second Universal (SSU)
are measures of Kinematic viscosity where the
specific gravity of the fluid influences the viscosity
measured. Kinematic viscometers usually use the
force of gravity to cause the fluid to flow down a
calibrated tube, while timing its flow.

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Fluid Fundamentals Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

The absolute viscosity, measured in units of cenitpoise


(1/100 of a poise) is used throughout this manual as it is a
convenient and consistent unit for calculation. Other units
of viscosity can easily be converted to centipoise.
Kinematic Viscosity x Specific Gravity = Absolute Viscosity
Centistokes x S.G. = Centipoise
SSU x 0.2158 x S.G. = Centipoise
A conversion chart for viscosity is on 128
Viscosity unfortunately is not a constant, fixed property of
a fluid, but is a property which varies with the conditions of
the fluid and the system.

In a pumping system, an important factor is the normal


decrease in viscosity with temperature increase. Another
extremely important factor is viscous fluid behavior,
discussed in the following section.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Viscous Fluid Behavior

Viscous Fluid Behavior


Effective Viscosity is a term describing the real effect of the viscosity of the actual fluid, at the shear rates
which exist in the pump and pumping system at the design conditions.

Type: Constant Viscosity at All Shear Rates

NEWTONIAN FLUIDS Viscosity is constant with


change in shear rate or agitation.
Newtonian
Forces to cause motion increase proportionately as
speed increases.
Fluids showing Newtonian behavior include water,
mineral oils, syrups, hydrocarbons, resins.

Type: Decreasing Viscosity at Increasing Shear Rates

PLASTIC FLUIDS This type of fluid always requires


an initial force or stress, which is called the Yield
Point, before flow will start. With a Yield Point too high,
flow may not start in a normal inlet system to the
pump.
PSEUDO-PLASTIC FLUIDS Viscosity decreases as
shear rate increases. At any constant flow rate or
shear rate, viscosity stays constant and is
independent of time.

THIXOTROPIC FLUIDS Along with the characteristic


of the viscosity decreasing over a finite time as the
shear rate is constant, Thixotropic flow is also Thixotropic
characterized by: having a Yield Point; plastic or
pseudoplastic behavior; a tendency to rebuild
viscosity or Yield Point on standing.
Typical fluids with the above characteristics are paints,
inks, caulking compounds, gels, slurry mixes, lotions,
shampoo.

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Viscous Fluid Behavior Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Type: Increasing Viscosity at Increasing Shear Rates


DILATENT FLUIDS Viscosity increases as shear rate
increases. This fluid type needs to be pumped at very
conservative pump speeds since rotary pumps have
areas of high shear which may cause the product to
reach a sufficient viscosity to stall the drive or in extreme
cases mechanically damage the pump.
Some fluids showing dilatent behavior are high solids Dilatent
concentrations of clays, oxides and granular or
crystalline materials.

Waukesha Cherry-Burrell has the instrumentation and trained technicians to determine the product
characteristics necessary to economically size a pump and assist in determining optimum line sizing
for a pumping system.

For a Newtonian fluid, the shear rate varies linerally from a maximum at the tube wall to zero at the center. In
practice, a very high percentage of fluids pumped are non-Newtonian.
Plastic and pseudo-plastic types which include Thixotropic fluids have higher shear rates near the tube wall.
Dilatent types have lower shear rates near tube wall.

Velocity Profile

Shear Rate Profile

Establishing an exact shear rate on these non-Newtonian fluids is very complex and requires very specialized
equipment.
The most accurate method of determining pressure drop in a pipe system and pump performance is to run the
product in a pilot circuit of existing operating system, recording pressure drop through a linear length of line, pipe
I.D., and flow rate. From this data, the viscosity can be determined by using the graph on 133.
When an operational test is not practical, a viscosity/shear rate relationship can be established using a
properly designed viscosity instrument.
If we assume a shear rate as though it were a Newtonian fluid and use this shear rate to determine an effective
viscosity, the resulting pressure drop determined in a piping system and pump power requirements will be
adequate.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Viscous Fluid Behavior

Flow Rate vs Shear Rate

1 From a known flow rate


2 At a selected line size
3 Will establish a shear rate
4 The effective Viscosity 4 is found using this Shear Rate 3 on the Viscosity Profile Curve obtained from a
viscometer (see example on page 8).

NOTE: Schedule 40 pipe will change shear rate considerably.

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Viscous Fluid Behavior Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Viscosity Profile Curve

Typical Effective Viscosity vs Shear Rate Curve


Non-Newtonian

Calculating shear rate in a non-Newtonian fluid moving in a tube is complex. For a Newtonian fluid, the shear
rate varies linearly from a maximum at the tube wall to zero at the center. In practice a very high percentage of
fluids pumped are non-Newtonian. Plastic and pseudo-plastic types including Thixotropic fluids have higher
shear rates near the wall and dilatent types have lower shear rates near the wall.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Frictional Losses

Frictional Losses
The nature of frictional losses in a pumping system can be very complex. Losses in the pump itself are
determined by actual test, and are allowed for in the manufacturers curves and data. Similarly, manufacturers
of processing equipment, heat exchangers, static mixers etc. usually have data available for friction losses.
Frictional losses due to flow in pipes are commonly considered to occur in two principle modes:
losses under laminar flow and losses under turbulent flow.

In laminar flow, sometimes called viscous flow, the


fluid moves through the pipe in concentric layers with
maximum velocity in the center of the pipe, decreasing
toward the walls where the fluid particle is essentially
standing still. A cross section of velocity would appear
as shown at right. There is very little mixing of fluid
across the pipe cross section. Friction loss is directly
proportional to:
the length of the pipe
the flow rate
1/d4 (d is pipe diameter)
viscosity (centipoise)

In turbulent flow, considerable mixing takes place


across the pipe cross section and the velocity is nearly
the same across the section, as shown at right.
Turbulent flow is more likely to occur in thin liquids,
and is often characterized by higher friction losses
than would be expected. Friction loss is directly
proportional to:
the length of the pipe
the flow rate squared (Q2)
1/d5 (d is pipe diameter)
viscosity (to 1/4 to 1/10 power)

There is a range between laminar and turbulent flow, sometimes called mixed flow, where conditions are
unpredictable and have a blend of each characteristic.

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Frictional Losses Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

A convenient number, called the Reynolds number, can be used for estimating the transition between
laminar and turbulent flow. The Reynolds number, a ratio of flow rate to viscosity, can be computed by the
relation:
Q x S.G.
R = 3, 160 x -----------------------
d
where:
R = Reynolds Number
Q = Flow rate in gallons per minute
d = Internal diameter of pipe in inches
= Absolute (dynamic) viscosity in centipoise
S.G. = Specific Gravity of liquid relative to water at
standard temperature (60F).

For engineering purposes flow is:


Laminar if R is less than 2,000
Turbulent if R is greater than 4,000
Mixed if R is between 2,000 and 4,000
In the mixed flow range, assuming turbulent flow for friction loss calculations gives a higher value which results
in a margin of safety.

Computation of friction loss is very difficult using these and other relationships. Pipe friction tables have been
established by the Hydraulic Institute and many other sources which can be used to compute the friction loss in
a system for given flow rates, viscosities and pipe sizes.
Tables of equivalent lengths for fittings and valves are also available.
See page 131 in this manual.
Dilatent and Thixotropic fluids can materially change friction loss calculations. The effective viscosity at
actual pumping rates must be determined for accurate calculations. Usually this can only be determined
by test. Pages 126 and 127 show effective viscosities for some fluids. Consult Waukesha Cherry-Burrell for
additional information or for determining the effective viscosity of your fluid.

Page 10 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Basic Definitions and Hydraulic Fundamentals

Basic Definitions and Hydraulic Fundamentals

PRESSURE The basic definition of pressure is force


per unit area. As commonly used in hydraulics and in
this manual, it is expressed in pounds per square inch
(PSI).
F
P = ----
A

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE is the force exerted on


a unit area by the weight of the atmosphere. At sea
level, the atmospheric standard pressure is 14.7
pounds per square inch.

GAUGE PRESSURE Using atmospheric pressure


as a zero reference, gauge pressure is a measure of
the force per unit area exerted by a fluid. Units are
psig.

ABSOLUTE PRESSURE is the total force per unit


area exerted by a fluid. It equals atmospheric pressure
plus gauge pressure. Units are expressed in psia.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 11


Basic Definitions and Hydraulic Fundamentals Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

VACUUM OR SUCTION are terms in common usage to indicate pressures in a pumping system below normal
atmospheric pressure, and are often measured as the difference between the measured pressure and
atmospheric pressure in units of inches of mercury vacuum, etc. It is more convenient to discuss these in
absolute terms; that is from a reference of absolute zero pressure, in units of psia.

Lbs/Sq In
Absolute
(psia)

ZERO GAUGE

ZERO ABSOLUTE

OUTLET PRESSURE or discharge pressure is the average pressure at the outlet of a pump during operation,
usually expressed as gauge pressure (psig).
INLET PRESSURE is the average pressure measured near the inlet port of a pump during operation. It is
expressed either in units of absolute pressure (psia) preferably, or gauge pressure (psig).
DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE is the total absolute pressure difference across the pump during operation.
Examples:

Page 12 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Relation of Pressure to Elevation

Relation of Pressure to Elevation


In a static liquid (a body of liquid at rest) the pressure This pressure difference is due to the weight of the
difference between any two points is in direct liquid and can be calculated by multiplying the
proportion only to the vertical distance between the vertical distance by the density (or vertical distance x
points. density of water x specific gravity of the fluid). In
commonly used units:

( 62.4 lbs. cu. ft. ) S.G.


P static (in PSI) = Z (in feet) ----------------------------------------------------------------
144 sq. in. sq. ft.

EXAMPLE: Calculate pressure difference between


two points vertical distance 18' specific gravity 1.23.
62.4
P = Z ----------- S.G.
144
P = 18 0.433 1.23

P = 9.59 PSI

To obtain pressure in elevation units the equation is


rearranged:

P static (PSI)
Z (feet) = ---------------------------------------------------------------- 144 sq. in. sq. ft.
( 62.4 lbs. cu. ft. ) S.G.

EXAMPLE: A pressure gauge reads 85 PSI. The fluid


has a specific gravity of 0.95. What is the height of the
equivalent column of fluid that would produce that same
pressure.
P
Z = ------------------------------ 144
62.4 S.G.

85 144 - = 206.5 ft.


Z = ----------------------------
62.4 0.95

02/2015 MM 604 Page 13


Relation of Pressure to Elevation Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

This relationship, the elevation equivalent of pressure, is commonly called HEAD and is still frequently used.
Although this manual uses pressure units, it may be helpful to explain certain terms in head units: that is,
pressure converted to the equivalent height of fluid that would produce that pressure.
Static Head The hydraulic pressure at a point in a fluid when the liquid is at rest.
Friction Head The loss in pressure or energy due to frictional losses in flow.
Velocity Head The energy in a fluid due to its velocity, expressed as a head unit.
Pressure Head A pressure measured in equivalent head units.
Discharge Head The outlet pressure of a pump in operation.
Total Head The total pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of a pump in operation.
Suction Head The inlet pressure of a pump when above atmospheric.
Suction Lift The inlet pressure of a pump when below atmospheric.
These terms are sometimes used to express different conditions in a pumping system, and can be given
dimensions of either pressure units (PSI) or head units (feet).
In rotary pump usage, and throughout this manual, pressure units, and the terms such as inlet
pressure and outlet pressure, will be used, as they represent a consistent, simple way of describing
pumping conditions.

Page 14 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Relation of Pressure to Elevation

Net Positive Suction Head


A common term used to describe pump inlet conditions is Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH). Although still
used in centrifugal pump terminology, two new terms are now used for rotary pump inlets.
Net Inlet Pressure Available (NIPA) is the average pressure (in psia) measured near the inlet port during
operation, minus the vapor pressure. It indicates the amount of useful pressure energy available to fill the
pump cavities.
Net Inlet Pressure Required (NIPR) is an individual pump characteristic, determined by test, of what pressure
energy (in psia) is needed to fill the pump inlet. It is a characteristic which varies primarily with the pump speed
and the viscosity of the fluid. For satisfactory operation under any set of conditions, the NIP Available must be
greater than the NIP Required.

The terms NIPR and NIPA have been accepted and used for many years. Most PD pump users are familiar
with these terms, and we will use them throughout this manual. However, it is worth noting that these terms
were originally defined in the standards of the Hydraulic Institute. The Hydraulic Institute issued a significant
revision to the standards in 1994. This new standard is also an ANSI standard, and is titled:
American National Standards for
Rotary Pumps
for Nomenclature, Definitions,
Application and Operation
The revised terms are as follows:
Net Positive Inlet Pressure Available (NPIPA). Net Positive Inlet Pressure Available is the algebraic sum of
the inlet pressure of the liquid at the inlet temperature:
NPIPA = ps + pb - pvb
Net Positive Inlet Pressure Required (NPIPR). Net Positive Inlet Pressure Required is the pressure required,
above liquid vapor pressure, to fill each pumping chamber or cavity while open to the inlet chamber. It is
expressed in PSI (kPa).
For purposes of this manual, the new and the old terms can be used interchangeably.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 15


Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System


Fluids at rest, or in motion, must conform to the principle of conservation of energy.
In the following:
W = Weight of fluid
V = Velocity
g = Acceleration of gravity
P = Pressure
w = Weight per unit volume
Z = Height

Fluid Energy
The types of fluid energy in a pumping system are:

POTENTIAL ENERGY Energy due to the elevation


of the fluid above some reference level.

PRESSURE ENERGY The internal energy of the


fluid which could do work.

KINETIC ENERGY Energy due to the motion of the


fluid.

Page 16 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System

MECHANICAL ENERGY Energy put into the fluid


by a pump, or taken out by a motor, or other device.

FRICTIONAL LOSSES Represents the energy loss


due to friction when a fluid flows through the parts of a
system.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 17


Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Energy Types and Losses


These forms of energy can be changed from one form to another within the system. For example:

The potential energy of fluid in an elevated tank is


changed to kinetic energy as it flows down through
piping system.

Mechanical energy, added by a pump can be


changed to potential energy by pumping fluid to a
higher elevation.

Potential, Pressure, Mechanical, or Kinetic energy can


be changed to heat energy through frictional losses.
This energy loss is often seen as a change in pressure
energy.

NOTE: The energy in a system is conserved, not created or destroyed but merely changed in form.

Page 18 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System

For part of a pumping system where energy is not added or removed, the total energy (E) is constant and
equal to:
2
WV - Kinetic WP
+ ---------
Pressure
+ WZ
----------- Potential
= E
2g Energy w Energy Energy

If the equation is divided by W (weight) and multiplied by w (weight per unit volume) it becomes:
2
wV Ew
----------- + P + wZ = -------- ( Constant )
2g W

in which each term represents energy per unit volume and each has the dimension of pressure.
In a rotary pump system, the kinetic energy of the fluid is usually small in relation to other forms and is often left
out.

It is then very handy to consider these energy levels in terms of PRESSURE, as most measurements can be
easily made with pressure gauges.
For the simple steady-state system, the energy relationship is:
P + wZ = Ew
--------
W

When we consider the frictional losses in flow from


one point to another, the relationship takes the form:
P1 + wZ1 = P2 + wZ2 + FL
Where FL is the pressure loss due to friction of the
fluid flowing from point 1 to point 2. This is the form
that pressure calculations will take in this manual.
As shown before, the units are made consistent by
using P in units of PSI, and by converting wZ to PSI
by:
62.4
Z (feet) ----------- S.G. or: Z 0.433 S.G.
144

02/2015 MM 604 Page 19


Flow of Fluid in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

EXAMPLE: What is the pipe friction loss or pressure


loss from 1 to 2?

Specific Gravity = 1.2


P1 = 60 psig
P2 = 52 psig
P1 + wZ1 = P2 + wZ2 + FL
60 + (0.433 x S.G.)(Z1) = 52 + (0.433 x S.G.)(Z2) + FL
60 + (0.433 x 1.2)(40') = 52 + (0.433 x 1.2)(30') + FL
60 + 20.78 = 52 + 15.59 + FL
FL = (60 + 20.78) - (52 + 15.59)
FL = 80.78 - 67.59
FL = 13.19 PSI

Page 20 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Energy Levels in a Pumping System

Energy Levels in a Pumping System


Using the fact that energy can change form in a system, we can look at several simple pumping systems, and
at a useful type of energy level graph. The energy level graph can be used to help understand system
calculations, and to help identify potential problems in a pumping system.

Open Systems
In the system below, points 1 through 6 in a system are identified. Below it the energy gradient line follows
the fluid flow through the system.

1-2 Potential energy (wZ1) changes to pressure energy; very small frictional loss because tank area is large.
2-3 Potential energy changing to pressure energy but with loss of pressure energy due to frictional losses (FL).
3-4 Internal pump frictional losses then rise in pressure energy as mechanical energy is added by pump.
4-5 Pressure energy changing to potential energy but with loss of pressure energy due to frictional losses (FL).
5-6 Pressure energy changing to potential energy (wZ2) very small frictional loss.
It should be noted here that the pump adds only enough energy to fulfill the system requirements; that is,
take the fluid at its inlet, increase its pressure sufficiently to raise it to the higher elevation and to overcome the
pipe friction losses.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 21


Energy Levels in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

In this last example, the system can be called an open system, where at one or more points the fluid is open
to atmospheric pressure.

It is usually easiest to use a free surface (the liquid


level exposed to the atmosphere) as a beginning point
in calculations, because the pressure there is known
and constant.

Page 22 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Energy Levels in a Pumping System

Closed Systems

In a closed system, a free surface can be used as a


reference, if the pressure is known.
The method of analyzing energy levels in a closed
system is similar.

In the following example we assume that tank A has a pressure on the free surface less than atmospheric, P1 =
10 psia, and the fluid in tank B has a free surface pressure of 50 psia. These are conditions that often can be
found in processing equipment.
The energy gradient principles are the same, as are calculations. The inlet portion of the system is analyzed
starting with the free surface pressure, the outlet portion calculated ending with the free surface pressure. The
pump input must provide the difference required from its inlet to its outlet.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 23


Energy Levels in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Below we show a pumping system with a low potential energy level (wZ1) at the inlet. With high frictional losses
to the pump inlet, the energy available to fill the pump may become critically low.

At point 1 or 2, the atmospheric pressure plus the potential energy due to elevation provide the only energy
available to get the fluid into the pump. If the friction loss is great in the inlet line, the pressure at the inlet (3)
may fall below the liquid vapor pressure. Reduced flow or no flow will occur as the liquid flashes into vapor.
The term flooded suction is sometimes used to describe the condition where a fluid level is above the pump
inlet.
The fluid level does not ensure flow into the pump; the energy available at the inlet port must be high enough
to overcome frictional losses and maintain a margin over the liquid vapor pressure.

Page 24 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell The Inlet Side

The Inlet Side


NOTE: The energy available to push a fluid into the pump inlet is usually very limited, often less than
the 14.7 psia atmospheric pressure on the free surface of the fluid. This fact makes the inlet side in a
pump installation the critical part of pump selection.

The energy required by a pump, called Net Inlet Pressure Required (NIPR), is characteristic of the pump,
and varies primarily with the pump speed and the fluid viscosity.

With a given fluid viscosity, the energy graph of a


pump would appear as shown, with the NIPR
increasing as flow increases.

In a typical pumping system, the graph for energy


available at the pump inlet would appear as shown.
As flow increases, the friction loss increases thus
reducing the energy available.

From the previous energy graph, the vapor pressure


of the fluid must be subtracted because the vapor
pressure represents the pressure energy needed to
keep the fluid as a fluid the energy level left is
NIPA. A graph of energy available to fill the pump at
any flow rate can be plotted as shown.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 25


The Inlet Side Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Combining the graph of NIPA and NIPR, we have the


result as shown.

NOTE: NIPA must be greater than NIPR to enable satisfactory operation.

The total graph of system energy and losses would


appear as shown, plotted against increasing flow.

If the NIPA is too low for a specific pumping condition,


as at Point X above, the pressure at a point in the
pump, or near its inlet, will become lower than the
vapor pressure of the fluid. The fluid will vaporize, or
change to a gas, which will fill the pump cavities
instead of fluid. This will reduce the pumping capacity
of the pump. The collapse of this vapor in the pump or
outlet line is called cavitation and is the cause of noisy,
inefficient operation, often resulting in pump damage.

Page 26 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell The Inlet Side

As fluid viscosity increases, the effect can be seen on


both NIPA and NIPR. Friction losses increase in direct
proportion to absolute viscosity, thus lowering NIPA.
The NIPR of the pump also increases, and they both
act to rapidly decrease the zone of satisfactory
operation. It is usually necessary to reduce pump
speeds to pump viscous liquids.

The system characteristics can be changed to assure operation in the satisfactory zone. With these
physical changes, the NIPA or NIPR lines can be shifted to expand the zone of operation to avoid cavitation
or pump starvation and assure that NIPA is greater than NIPR.

Slow Down the Speed of the Pump


(Decrease Flow).

Increase Inlet Line Size.

Shorten Inlet Line Length.


Minimize Direction and Size Changes.
Reduce Number of Fittings.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 27


The Inlet Side Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Increase Pump Size for Given Flow


(This Lowers NIPR).

Elevate Liquid Source OR


Lower Pump OR
Pressurize Source Tank.

Using any of these changes, or combinations of them, the system and pump characteristics can be selected
to allow operation at satisfactory flow rates and system conditions.
Rotary pumps, such as those made by Waukesha Cherry-Burrell, have better inlet characteristics (low NIPR)
than most other types of pumps, and are often selected for their ability to operate under low net available inlet
pressures, to self prime, to lift the liquid on the inlet side, or to pump fluids from vacuum equipment. They are
particularly suited for pumping viscous liquids and are often the only pumps which can be used in this service.

Page 28 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Rotary Pump Fundamentals

Rotary Pump Fundamentals


A rotary pump is a positive displacement pump which moves fluids by means of the motion of rotors, cams,
pistons, screws, vanes, or similar elements in a fixed casing, usually without the need of inlet or outlet valves.

The motion of the rotary parts causes specific volumes


to be created near the pump inlet, allowing
atmospheric or external pressures to force liquid into
the pump. Near the outlet these volumes are
collapsed or destroyed, forcing the liquid out of the
pump.

The Waukesha Cherry-Burrell rotary external


circumferential piston (ECP) pump, has arc shaped
pistons traveling in the annularly shaped cylinders
as shown.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 29


Rotary Pump Fundamentals Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Each rotor has two pistons; two rotors are used in the pump driven by external timing gears to rotate in
opposite directions.
The motion of the rotors creates an expanding cavity on the inlet side allowing fluid to flow into the pump
chamber. The rotors then carry the fluid around the cylinder to the outlet side, where it is forced out of the
pump as the cavity contracts.

The rotors turn at constant velocity, and the shape of the rotors and cavities allow the Waukesha Cherry-
Burrell ECP Pump to deliver a constant volume per unit of time for any rotor position.

This means a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump delivers a smooth, non-pulsating flow. Many other pump
types have a variation in flow per unit of time, resulting in pulsations.

Page 30 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Rotary Pump Fundamentals

Each rotor forms a long seal path:

Between its outer diameter and the housing:

Between its inner diameter and the Body Hub:

Or, between the outer diameter and the


scallop in the opposite Hub.

So, at any position in the rotation of the two rotors,


there is a long and continuous sealing path between
the inlet and outlet.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 31


Rotary Pump Fundamentals Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

These long sealing paths limit the backflow or slip from the high pressure pump outlet to the low pressure
inlet.
The clearance between rotating and stationary parts is even more important in limiting slip. Slip increases
rapidly with increasing clearances (proportional to clearance to the 3rd power C3).

Using alloy combinations that minimize galling, Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pumps can be machined to
very close clearances, making it a low slip pump.
The combination of the basic style, the materials of construction, and close clearances makes the Waukesha
Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump one of the most efficient rotary pumps available.

Page 32 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Slip and Efficiency

Slip and Efficiency


Pump performance in many cases is dependent on the slip (slip flow), which occurs in a pump.
Stated again, slip increases:

Directly with pressure.

Directly with clearance.

Inversely with viscosity.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 33


Slip and Efficiency Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

The major effect of slip on pump performance is the


loss in flow capacity.
Let us illustrate it this way.
The expanding cavity on the inlet side creates a low
pressure area that sucks fluid in to equlized the
pressure. This cavity can be filled with fluid from the
inlet line in normal performance.

However, if the slip is high, the cavity can be partly


filled with fluid flowing back through the pump from the
outlet side.

If this occurs, the pump loses the ability to deliver the volume of fluid it is theoretically capable of pumping.
This phenomena is sometimes defined by the term volumetric efficiency, or:
Actual Flow -
V.E. = -------------------------------------------
Theoretical Flow

Although often used by pump manufacturers, this term is less useful than really understanding slip.

Page 34 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Slip and Efficiency

For a given pump and fluid, the slip is proportional to


the pressure differential from outlet to inlet. If the
pump had no slip, the volume pumped would be
directly proportional to the speed or rpm.

When the slip flow is superimposed on this graph for a


given pressure differential, we can see the loss of flow
which is due to slip.

If the slip is high enough at a certain speed, no flow at


all can occur.

If a certain flow is needed at a given pressure, the


speed must be increased.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 35


Slip and Efficiency Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

If the pressure is increased, the slip will increase, and


therefore, the actual flow will decrease.
This type of chart is commonly used to show pump
performance. It should be remembered that this type
of chart shows the performance for only one fluid
viscosity.

If the viscosity increases, the slip will decrease (for a given pressure differential and pump).
So a series of charts would actually be needed to cover a full range of viscosities.

In a standard clearance Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump the slip is essentially zero when the viscosity is
above 200 to 300 centipoise.* Therefore, the pump will deliver its theoretical displacement at any pressure in
its working range.

The flow performance can then be shown as one line


for all viscosities above 200 to 300 CPS, and the
theoretical or zero pressure line can be used to find
flow and rpm.
Later we will develop a type of chart which can be
used for all viscosities, even between 1 and 200 -
300 CPS range.

*See individual pump curves for zero slip.

Page 36 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance

The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance


When the internal slip of a pump is low, as in the Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump, the pump can be used
effectively to:
1. Pump low viscosity fluid in low NIPA systems.
2. Pump from vacuum vessels.
3. Self prime. (And lift fluids from lower levels.)
4. Meter fluids.

1. LOW NIPA SYSTEMS When pumping low


viscosity fluids in low NIPA systems, the effect of slip
in reducing capacity, along with the energy
requirements in entry to the pump (NIPR) must be
considered. A careful balance must be made in
selecting pump size and speed.
At low pump speeds, the inlet losses are low, but if the
pressure differential across the pump causes
excessive slip, little or no flow may result.

At higher speeds, the inlet and internal pump losses


may be high enough to limit flow. At these higher
speeds a point of no return can be reached where
high velocities within the pump chamber create
localized low pressure zones. Vapor formation can
take place in these zones, and the vapor can fill the
pump cavities, destroying its ability to sustain uniform
flow of fluid.

The selection of pump size to get the required flow and acceptable speeds may also be cost dependent, with
smaller pumps generally less costly.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 37


The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

2. VACUUM VESSELS Pumping from vacuum


vessels is an extreme example of low NIPA operation
which is possible with a low slip pump. Typically the
vacuum chamber is used to evaporate fluids or to
process at low temperatures. This causes an
additional problem, in that operation is taking place at
the vapor pressure of the fluid. In these cases, the
maximum energy available to push fluid into the pump
is that of the liquid leg or elevation.
If this liquid leg is low, and NIPA is barely higher than
the NIPR, cavitation in the lines or pump can easily
occur. In the design of these systems, it is typical to
elevate the tanks, often to 30 feet or more, to obtain
the leg needed.

If the viscosity is low, the additional factor of slip flow


must be overcome. We have again the limits on speed
range where at low speeds the slip may be a high
percentage of theoretical flow, resulting in little net
flow, and at higher speeds, the flow can be limited by
cavitation or vaporization of fluid.

Pumping low viscosity fluids from a vacuum is nearly impossible with a high slip pump. The low slip Waukesha
Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump can do this job when the system and pump conditions are carefully selected.

In pumping viscous fluids from vacuum vessels, slip is


not a factor, and the NIPA and NIPR values determine
the operating range, with both subject to the increased
frictional losses due to higher viscosities.

Page 38 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance

Care in systems design must be taken, because


raising the liquid level to obtain more energy to fill the
pump also means that the inlet lines are longer and
the increased frictional losses may offset the higher
elevation. A typical solution to this problem is a large
diameter standpipe, (to reduce frictional loss) tapering
down to the pump port size just at the inlet, with a
minimum of elbows and fittings.

3. PRIMING ABILITY The Waukesha Cherry-


Burrell ECP Pump clearances are small enough, that
at higher speeds, the pump can even move air. What
this means is that the pump can be use to dry prime,
or actually evacuate the air in the inlet line, reducing
the pressure and allowing the liquid to move up in line,
fill the pump chamber and begin normal pumping.

This ability can be very important and useful, as the Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump is one of the few
pumps which can be used to empty barrels, tanks, and tank cars, etc. in this way, without priming with
liquid.
When pumping low viscosity fluids this dry priming action happens rapidly. Higher viscosity fluids move up
the inlet piping more slowly, but they will move and the priming will take place. The Waukesha Cherry-Burrell
ECP Pump can run dry without damage, long enough for these viscous fluids to reach the pump inlet.

Chart Shows the dry priming ability of different size Prime Characteristics Waukesha ECP Pumps
pumps at various speeds. The pressure differential P Pumping Air vs. Pump Speed
shown is expressed in psia, but can easily be
converted to vertical lifts. The second scale shows the
lift possible for water, assuming 14.7 psia atmospheric
pressure and negligible line losses.
See following examples on how to use charts.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 39


The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Determining Speed for Liquid Lift

Example 1:
Given a 130 size ECP pump handling water, what
minimum speed must the pump run to lift water (self
prime) from a tank with a liquid surface 8 feet below
the pump?
The chart on page 39 shows a lift requirement of 8 feet
for a liquid of S.G.= 1. The curve for the 130 size
pump indicates a minimum speed of 305 RPM.
3
62.4 lbs/ft
8 ft. ---------------------------- S.G. = PSI
2 2
144 in /ft

8 ft. 0.433 1 = 3.46 PSI

Example 2:
Effect of specific gravity on priming ability. For the
pump above, a 130 size, with a lift requirement of 8
feet, what speed must the pump run to lift
Trichloroethylene of S.G. = 1.47?
8 ft. x 0.433 x S.G. = PSI
8 ft. x 0.433 x 1.47 = 5.09 PSI
On chart for 5.09 PSI 130 size pump requires
minimum speed of 445 RPM.

When a pump must be selected for its priming ability, it


can be seen on the graph that a smaller pump,
running faster, often must be used to develop more
dry prime differential pressure.
Example 3:
For a 100 GPM flow rate, a 220 size ECP pump at
200 RPM could be used, or a smaller 130 size ECP
pump at 400 RPM. (See typical flow vs. RPM curves.)
For 100 GPM flow rate, on water (S.G. = 1):
220 size pump at 200 RPM can develop 4.2 PSI
differential or lift 9.7 feet.
130 size pump at 400 RPM can develop 4.5 PSI
differential or lift 10.4 feet.

Of course, if it is possible to have some fluid in the pump, priming will be improved even more. The film of
liquid in the clearances of the pump will close up those clearances, and allow a higher pressure differential to
be created, approaching the differential which could be developed if the pump were filled with fluid. Because it
will still be pumping air, it will not reach full pumping conditions until all the air is expelled and the lines and
pump cavities are filled with fluid.

Page 40 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance

4. METERING FLUIDS A low slip pump can be


used effectively to meter fluids. If the slip is low, a
pump will deliver nearly its theoretical displacement in
each revolution. By electrically counting and
controlling revolutions of the pump, or its revolutions
per minute, we can get a measure of the amount of
liquid displaced, or the rate (GPM) of flow.
Lets see how this can be done with a low slip pump.
We saw before that slip is proportional to pressure. In
a metering application, to reduce slip as much as
possible, the pressure differential should be kept low.
This can be aided with short, large diameter lines with
few fittings or bends. With this low pressure
differential, slip will be low and constant.

Looking then at a FLOW-RPM chart, we can see that at a low pump speed, the slip might be still a sizeable
percentage of theoretical flow (1). If the pump speed is increased, the slip becomes a small percentage of
theoretical flow (2), and by counting shaft revolutions only a small constant error exists, which can be
compensated for in several ways.
In any case, repeatability is usually obtained and is often what is really needed.

Then for metering low viscosity fluids, the pump size


should be selected so it will run at high speed, but
avoiding loss of flow due to cavitation.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 41


The Effect of Slip on Pump Performance Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

To obtain best metering performance when using a standard Waukesha Cherry-Burrell ECP Pump on low
viscosity fluids, the system should be designed to operate under a constant pressure differential if possible.
On the inlet side, changes in pressure due to liquid level changes in a supply tank can be minimized by using
a small balance tank with a level control.
In the outlet side, pressure can often be kept constant by discharging at the top of the delivery container.

Page 42 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Power Requirements in a Pumping System

Power Requirements in a Pumping System


All the system energy requirements, and the energy losses in the pump must be supplied by the pump drive in
the form of mechanical energy. The rate of energy input needed is defined as power, commonly dimensioned
as horsepower, where 1 HP = 33,000 ft-lbs/minute.
In a pump and system, we find it convenient to consider separately:
Power required due to external system conditions WHP sometimes called fluid horsepower,
hydraulic horsepower or water horsepower.
Power required due to internal conditions in the pump VHP which includes viscous power losses
and mechanical friction.
Therefore, total horsepower needed at the pump shaft:

QP
WHP is defined as ------------
1714
-

where: Q = GPM (for this calculation, slip is ignored so Q = displacement x RPM)


P = Pressure in PSI
1714 is a conversion constant
VHP, viscous horsepower, is the power loss due to viscous fluid friction in the pump. We have also included the
mechanical losses due to bearing, seal, and gear drag. VHP is determined by test of each pump.
Many manufacturers use the term efficiency defined as:
EFF = WHP
--------------
BHP
and often use it in a horsepower formula as follows:
QP
HP = -------------------------------
1714 EFF
which is equivalent to:
WHP
HP = --------------
EFF
Although a useful concept, it means that a vast number of efficiency values must be determined by test for
many combinations of flow, pressure and viscosity.
By identifying VHP and WHP separately, Waukesha Cherry-Burrell has developed a very simple and effective
form of horsepower chart for calculation of all conditions of viscosity, flow and pressure. This is discussed later
in the section entitled Calculating Power Requirements.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 43


Power Requirements in a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Torque
The power requirements for mechanical devices such
as pumps and pump drives are best expressed in
terms of Torque and Speed where:
Torque
is the moment of the forces required to cause
motion.
is usually expressed in units of in-lbs or ft-lbs.
can sometimes be identified as F x r.

In rotary motion, HP (the rate of doing work) can be expressed in terms of Torque and RPM
T (ft-lbs) N (rpm) T (in-lbs) N (rpm)
HP = ------------------------------------------------- or --------------------------------------------------
5250 63025
Since power requirements were calculated as HP = WHP + VHP, the horsepower will generally be known, and
it may be necessary to calculate torque. Rearranging the equation:
5250-
T(ft-lbs) = HP
---------------------------
N (rpm)
or

T(in-lbs) = HP 63025-
------------------------------
N (rpm)

Later, in selecting drives for pumps, it can be seen that not only must a drive have sufficient horsepower to
drive the pump, but in the useful range of the drive the torque must be adequate to drive the pump. In
addition, the drive components such as V-belts, couplings, and clutches must have enough torque capacity to
do the job.

Page 44 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump

How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump


Starting with these characteristics:

Viscosity (CPS) Flow Required (GPM) SIZE (Flow Capacity Range)

Review the individual pump curves to find the smallest model that can achieve the required flow rate.
See curves starting on page 91. Quick sizing selection can be determined from curve index on page 92.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 45


How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Special considerations that might modify preliminary choice.

Effective Viscosity
For Newtonian Fluids Use Size Selection Guide
For Non-Neutonian Fluids Utilizing effective viscosity, use Size Selection Guide.
See page 3, 4, 5, and 126, 127 or consult Waukesha Cherry-Burrells Application Engineering Department.

Unfavorable Inlet Conditions


Low NIPA (See page 37) Consider larger size pump to decrease NIPR.
Vacuum Services (See page 38)
(Size Selection Guide is based on 0 psig at inlet.)

High Vapor Pressure


(Often associated with high Consider larger size pump to decrease NIPR.
temperature.)

Abrasive Fluids Consider larger size pump to reduce speed and wear.

Shear Sensitive Fluids Consider larger size pump to minimize shear.

Expected combination of high pressure Consider larger size pump to reduce speed and increase load
and high viscosity. capacity.

Minimum damage wanted to


particulates Consider larger size pump for more gentle handling and the use of
single wing rotors.

Severe Duty Cycle


Frequent Start-Stop Consider larger size pump to increase service life.
Multi-Shift Operation
High Pressure Operation
High Horsepower Operation

Page 46 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump

EXAMPLE: Given these requirements:

Fluid
Viscosity 10 CPS
specific gravity 1.47
Vapor Pressure 1.6 psia at 80F
System
60 GPM required in system below.
Outlet line after heat exchanger must be 1-1/2 inch.
Pump
to be Industrial model (5000 Series).

Pump
Size, speed, horsepower to be determined.
Preliminary choice of a model 5050 size pump is made.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 47


How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

With the preliminary size just selected, and using these factors:

Using the system layout, determine line lengths and diameters of the discharge line.
When necessary to design a system, a suggested starting point is to use line sizes of the same size as the
pump port.

Sanitary Industrial
Pump Size Line Size Pump Size Line Size
6 1" or 1-1/2" 5040 1-1/2"
15 1-1/2" 5050 2"
18 1-1/2" or 2" 5060 3"
30 1-1/2" or 2" 5070 4"
45 2" 5080 6"
60 2-1/2"
130 3"
180 3"
210 4"
220 4"
320 6"
420 6"
520 8"

Page 48 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump

Determine friction loss in discharge piping.


From the system layout, determine the number and types of fittings and valves.

Tabulate these fittings as on the table below. If the piping system has more than one size of piping, group line
lengths and fittings of each together.

Pipe Diameter 2" 1-1/2"


Length 40 ft 100 ft
Elbows none 3
Valves 1 Gate 1 Gate
Other Fittings none none

Note: Use fully open gate valves and medium sweep elbows in this example.

Determine equivalent length of each fitting using page 131. Enter valves and add line lengths and equivalent
lengths together.
See equivalent length table on page 50.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 49


How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Resistance of Valves and Fittings to Flow of Fluids

In the above example, 1-1/2" standard pipe size and medium sweep elbow.

Discharge Piping

2" 1.5"

40 100

0 3 0 4 0 12
1 1 1.2 1 1.2 1

41.2 113

Page 50 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump

Using flow and line size, determine pressure drop in discharge piping due to friction loss using pipe frictional
loss graph below.
If two or more line sizes are used, find the pressure drop in each section separately, and add together.

EXAMPLE: At 60 GPM, and 10 CPS

2 in.* 1-1/2 in.**


2.9 PSI 13.6 PSI
F.L. = 2.9+13.6=16.5 PSI

*Equivalent Length of 41.2 ft


** Equivalent length of 113

NOTE: Full size graph available on page 133.

Determine static pressure requirements due to elevation change.

EXAMPLE:
62.4
P = 40 ft. ----------- S.G.
144

P = 40 ft. 0.433 1.47

P = 25.5 PSI

02/2015 MM 604 Page 51


How to Select a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Determine pressure requirements due to equipment in the system, such as filters, heat exchangers, relief
valves, orifices, nozzles, pressurized tanks.

EXAMPLE:

105 PSI

Add the pressure requirements due to friction loss and elevation changes. This pressure must be less than
the rated pressure of the pump.

Friction Losses
Pg. 50, 51

Static Pressure Requirement


Pg. 13, 14, 51

Equipment Pressure Drop

Total Discharge Pressure

This pressure can now be used for further calculations.


However, if the pressure is too high, consider one or more of these changes to reduce pressure to a
workable level.
Reduce flow
Larger diameter piping and fittings
Shorter length of piping and fewer fittings

Page 52 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Determining Pump Speed

Determining Pump Speed

A typical type of Flow-Speed Chart shown can be


used to determine pump speed and compensate for
slip.
EXAMPLE: Using 60 GPM and 147 PSI pressure, the
curve indicates a speed of 509 RPM.

EXAMPLE: However, this type of curve is valid only


for water, or fluid of the same viscosity. For fluids of
viscosity of over approximately 200 CPS, the zero
pressure line can be used on 5050. See individual
curves for zero slip viscosity starting on page 91.

To allow speed determination for any viscosity, Waukesha Cherry-Burrell has developed a nomen graph on
every curve.
Starting with the known viscosity, 10 CPS, on the viscosity scale, move down to the pressure previously
calculated, 147 PSI.
From that point, a line (3-3) drawn parallel to the chart lines, becomes the operating line for that viscosity and
pressure.
Using the desired flow, 60 GPM, move horizontally to the operating line, and then vertically down to the RPM
scale: Read 426 RPM.
Note that for all viscosities above approximately 200 CPS, the 0 PSI line is the operating line. In other words,
no slip occurs and no speed correction is needed, with standard clearance pumps.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 53


Checking the Inlet Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Checking the Inlet


Using these characteristics:

Determine static pressure available due to elevation.


See equation on page 13.
EXAMPLE:

Static Pressure Avail = P ATM + wz

P = 14.7 + -8 ----------- S.G.


62.4
144
P = 14.7 + ( -8 0.433 1.47 )

P = 14.7 5.1

P = 9.6 psia

NOTE: Atmospheric pressure is 14.7 PSIA at sea level, which we assumed in this example. Above sea level it
is very important to determine atmospheric pressure at the current elevation of the equipment.

Page 54 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Checking the Inlet

Using the system layout, determine line lengths and diameters of the inlet line.
When designing a new inlet system, a suggested starting point is to use line sizes of the same size as the
pump port.

Sanitary Industrial
Pump Size Line Size Pump Size Line Size
6 1" or 1-1/2" 5040 1-1/2"
15 1-1/2" 5050 2"
18 1-1/2" or 2" 5060 3"
30 1-1/2" or 2" 5070 4"
45 2" 5080 6"
60 2-1/2"
130 3"
180 3"
210 3"
220 4"
320 6"
420 6"
520 8"

Due to the normally limited pressure energy available on the inlet side, it is good practice to keep the inlet line
as short and straight as possible. It may be necessary to increase line size above those shown when:
Pumping high viscosity fluids
Lifting fluids from lower elevations
Pumping from vacuum vessels
See pages 21, 38 for more complete discussion of these conditions.

From the system layout determine the number and


types of fittings and valves and tabulate these fittings.
If the piping system has more than one size of piping,
group the line lengths and fittings of each together.

Pipe Diameter 2
Length 20 feet
Elbows One
Valves None
Other Fittings None

02/2015 MM 604 Page 55


Checking the Inlet Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

NOTE: Full size graphic available on page 131.

Determine equivalent length of each fitting using the above graph.


Enter the number valves, fittings, and add line lengths and equivalent lengths together.

Page 56 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Checking the Inlet

Using flow and line size, determine pressure drop in suction line due to friction loss using pipe frictional loss
graph below.
If two or more line sizes are used, find the pressure drop in each section separately, and add together.
EXAMPLE: F.L. = 1.8 PSI at 60 GPM, 10 CPS, 2 pipe and 25.4 ft total equivalent length.

NOTE: Full size graphic available on page 133.

Subtract the pressure drop due to friction loss from the


static pressure available.
EXAMPLE: Static Pressure FL = Inlet Pressure
9.6 1.8 = 7.8 psia

Based on example flow of 60 GPM, 2 pipe, 10 CPS


and 25.4 ft total equivalent length.
See page 54 for static pressure calculation.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 57


Checking the Inlet Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Determine the vapor pressure of the fluid at pumping


temperature. Refer to references for values for typical
fluids. Subtract this vapor pressure from the inlet
pressure in the system as calculated above. This
point is the Net Inlet Pressure Available (NIPA) for
these system and fluid conditions.
EXAMPLE: Given
Vapor Pressure = 1.6 psia at 80F
Inlet Press VP = NIPA
7.8 1.6 = 6.2

This NIPA must be greater than the Net Inlet Pressure


Required (NIPR) of the pump. Every pump has a set
of NIPR curves which are determined by speed and
fluid viscosity. These curves are shown starting on
page 93 for Waukesha Pumps.
See page 121 for the 5050 curve used in this
example.

Comparing NIPA with NIPR:


In this case the design is satisfactory as NIPA
(6.2 psia) is greater than NIPR (2.7 psia).
If NIPA is less than NIPR, changes in system
conditions are needed. Refer to page 25 for
suggestion of changes to permit satisfactory
operation.
NIPR based on 60 GPM at 426 RPM, in this example.

Page 58 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Checking the Inlet

EFFECTIVE VISCOSITY REQD PRELIMINARY PUMP SELECTION


REF: PG. 5 GPM PG. 47

PG. 47, 50 PG. 56

FRICTION LOSSES FRICTION LOSSES


PG. 51 PG. 57

STATIC PRESSURE REQMT. EQUIPMENT PRESSURE DROP


PG. 13, 54 (Z. x .433 x S.G.)

EQUIPMENT PRESSURE DROP STATIC PRESSURE REQMT.


PG. 52 PG. 13, 54 (Z. x .433 x S.G.)

TOTAL DISCHARGE PRESSURE TOTAL INLET PRESSURE DROP


PG. 52

PUMP SPEED
PG. 53, 93 420
DIFFERENTIAL PRESS
PG. 12, 60 STATIC PRESSURE
PG. 13, 54
HORSEPOWER
PG. 60, 93 to 124

TORQUE
PG. 62

426

02/2015 MM 604 Page 59


Calculating Power Requirements Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Calculating Power Requirements

Using:

Determine differential pressure developed by pump:


Using outlet pressure calculated
Add or subtract inlet pressure (see pg. 12)
Total = Differential pressure
Example shown is with inlet pressure below atmospheric pressure

Using the differential pressure, plus the viscosity, flow rate, and pump speed determined earlier, the required
HP can be easily found on the page 66. Starting at the pump speed, 420 RPM, follow vertical line down to the
pressure line 154 PSI. A horizontal line to the left will give you the value for WHP, 5.9.
Then continue down on the RPM line to the viscosity line for 10 CPS and draw a horizontal line to the VHP
scale, and read .7 HP.
Add WHP and VHP together for a required power of 6.6 HP. (See page 43 for discussion of HP, WHP and
VHP.)
NOTE: HP, flow, and pressure will vary with gear motor speed. Constant speed gear motor may not be
available for speed selected. Variable speed may be required. All values must be calculated at actual speed
pump will be run at.

Page 60 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Calculating Power Requirements

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 61


Calculating Power Requirements Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

NOTE: This type of pump performance curve is EXAMPLE:


used primarily to calculate required horsepower. If
it is necessary to calculate efficiency, use: EFF = ( output input ) 100

output flow Q in GPM


EFF = ------------- WHP + VHP 100
QP
differential pressure P in PSI as calculated 1714

total input horsepower from curve 60 154


EFF = ---------------------- ( 5.9 + .7 ) 100
(VHP + WHP) 1714
5.39
EFF = ----------- 100 = 81.7%
6.6

Torque Requirements With the horsepower and speed just determined, the torque needed can be
calculated. Using this relationship for HP:

T (ft.-lbs.) N (RPM)
HP = -------------------------------------------------------
5250
Rearranging, we get

HP 5250
T = ----------------------------
N
Torque is sometimes expressed in inch-lbs. or

12"
Torque (ft.-lbs.) -------- = T (inch-lbs.)
ft.

In our example

6.6 5250
Torque = ---------------------------- = 81.3 ft.-lbs,
426
or

81.3 976 = 1116 inch-lbs.

This torque should not exceed the torque limit of the pump shaft. Torque should be checked especially on
high viscosity, low speed applications. See next page for torque limits.

Page 62 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Calculating Power Requirements

The table below shows the torque limits of various Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pumps.

Sanitary Industrial
Torque Limit Torque Limit
Pump Size (FT.-LBS.) (INCH-LBS.) Pump Size (FT.-LBS.) (INCH-LBS.)
6-15-18 66.6 800 5040 100 1,200
30, 33 250 3,030 5050, 5060 190 2,300
45, 60, 130, 133 420 5,050 5070 790 9,500
180, 220, 223 790 9,500 5080 1,320 15,800
210, 320, 323 1,320 15,800
420, 423 2,190 26,250
520, 523 2,190 26,250

This completes the pump selection procedure for your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump. Following this is some
general information to help you select a pump drive. Because of the great variety of available drives, we
cannot include the detailed information which is found in drive manufacturers catalogs. However, Waukesha
Cherry-Burrell is happy to assist in drive selection, and does maintain a stock of suitable drives in commonly
used sizes.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 63


Selecting the Pump Drive Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Selecting the Pump Drive

Rotary pumps are slow to medium speed pumps, and generally require a speed reduction from normal motor
speeds of 1750, 1150 or 850 rpm. Using HP, speed, and torque required, a selection can be made from one of
the readily available types of drives discussed below.

1. CONSTANT SPEED DRIVES When exact flow is


not critical with changes in system and pump
conditions, a constant speed drive is a good choice.
Integral Gear Motor and Motor-Reducer Drives
These are rugged, self-contained drives generally
using a 1750 rpm, 3-phase induction motor and helical
gear reductions. Commercially available in a wide
range of HP and speeds.

With the calculated speed and horsepower required, a conservative approach is to select the next lower stock
speed, and a stock horsepower equal or above the requirement, using the manufacturers recommended
service class and ratings.
If a minimum flow must be maintained even with system changes and pump wear, the next higher speed may
be needed. In this case, the system should be recalculated, as the higher speed and resulting higher flow and
pressure drop will require higher horsepower. The drive selected must be able to supply this power.
The integral gear motor is generally more compact, lower in cost, and easier to install with only one coupling
and guard.
The motor and separate reducer is sometimes preferred for its flexibility, especially in changing standard
motors for maintenance.

Page 64 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Drive

2. V-BELT DRIVES V-belt Drives are usually the


lowest initial cost constant speed drive, and offer
some flexibility to change pump speed by a change in
sheave size. Using readily available standard motors
of 1750 and 1150 rpm, a range of medium pump
speeds are possible. Due to sheave size and space
limitations, the useful range of pump speeds is
generally 200 to 600 rpm. Table 1 shows some
practical combinations for use with Waukesha Cherry-
Burrell pumps.
Table 1
Practical
Motor Sheave Pump Sheave Center Approximate
Pump Speed Motor Speed V-Belt Section Diameter Diameter Distance HP/Belt
220 1160 A 3 15.6 18.8 1.23
260 1160 A 3 13.2 15.1 1.14
290 1160 A 3 12.0 11.0 1.12
330 1160 A 3 10.6 12.4 1.12
390 1160 A 3 9.0 11.9 1.13
440 1750 A 3 12.0 13.6 1.62
495 1750 A 3 10.6 12.4 1.52
580 1750 A 3 9.0 11.9 1.54
640 1750 A 3 8.2 12.6 1.62
210 1160 B 3.4 18.4 15.9 1.49
260 1160 B 3.4 15.4 14.8 1.47
290 1160 B 3.4 13.6 16.5 1.49
360 1160 B 3.4 11.0 16.5 1.51
440 1750 B 3.4 13.6 14.0 1.88
480 1750 B 3.4 12.4 15.2 1.93
540 1750 B 3.4 11.0 16.5 1.93
630 1750 B 3.4 9.4 17.9 1.97
690 1750 B 3.4 8.6 16.8 1.97
220 1160 3V 2.65 14 12.1 1.14
270 1750 3V 3 19 16.3 2.2
305 1750 3V 3.5 19 16 2.74
370 1750 3V 3 14 15.6 2.25
430 1750 3V 2.65 10.6 12.7 1.66
490 1750 3V 3 10.6 12.5 2.22
555 1750 3V 3.35 10.6 12.2 2.73
605 1750 3V 2.8 8 11.2 1.92
650 1750 3V 3 8 11.1 2.27
700 1750 3V 2.8 6.9 10.9 1.92
340 1160 C 7 24 23.6 7.56
400 1160 C 7 20 21.8 7.83
450 1160 C 7 18 21.6 7.73
505 1160 C 7 16 20.4 7.53
510 1750 C 7 24 23.6 9.57
610 1750 C 7 20 21.8 9.57
680 1750 C 7 18 21.6 9.69
290 1160 5V 7.1 28 29.6 11.48
380 1160 5V 7.1 21.2 21.6 10.83
430 1160 5V 8 21.2 21.0 13.1
510 1160 5V 7.1 16 21.4 11.2
545 1160 5V 7.1 15 19.8 10.9
580 1750 5V 7.1 21.2 21.6 14.9
620 1750 5V 7.5 21.2 21.4 16.3

02/2015 MM 604 Page 65


Selecting the Pump Drive Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

One disadvantage of a V-belt drive is the side load or overhung load it puts on both pump and motor shafts
and bearings, particularly at low speeds and higher horsepowers. Table 2 shows the calculation of overhung
loads and permissible load for various pumps.

Table 2
Calculation of Overhung Loads
The overhung load (OL) can be calculated using the
torque calculated previously.
Torque (inch-lbs.)
OL = K -----------------------------------------------
Pitch diameter
--------------------------------------
2
or

T
K -----------
D2

Where K = 1.0 for Chain Drives


1.25 for Timing Belt
1.5 for V-Belts
It can be seen that the overhung load can be kept to a
minimum by using the largest practical pulley size.
EXAMPLE: For 7.0 HP at 428 RPM, we previously
calculated a torque of 1032 in.-lbs. Assuming a driven
sheave of 18.4 in. P.D. for a V-belt drive:
T 1.5 1032
OL = K ----------- = ---------------------------- = 168 lbs.
D2 18.4 2

Permissible Overhung Loads for Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pumps


Based on location of sheave on pump shaft being as close to gear case as possible, and using a driven
sheave of practical size.

Sanitary Industrial

Pump Size O.H.L.-LBS. Pump Size O.H.L.-LBS.


6, 15, 18 140 5070 870
30 420 5080 1,370
45, 60, 130 670
180, 220 750
210, 320 1,370

Industrial
Pump Size O.H.L.-LBS.
5040 260
5050, 5060 300

Page 66 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Drive

Beyond these loads, a jack shaft arrangement, or an


outboard bearing arrangement can be used, or a
change made to a direct drive

Timing Belt Drives can be used successfully on


pumps. They have good high speed power capability,
and will not slip at lower speeds. Refer to
manufacturers catalogs for selection and application.

3. VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES Many excellent


types of packaged variable speed drives are available
which are well matched to pump requirements. They
offer the ability to adjust pump speed to control flow
and adjust for system conditions and eventual pump
wear.

a. Belt type variable speed drives are available in a


wide choice of horsepower and speed ranges.
Coupled directly to a pump, they provide a compact
drive at a reasonable cost.
In selecting a drive from a manufacturers catalog, the
torque capability must be checked for the range of
speeds needed, and compared to the pump torque
requirements. Waukesha Cherry-Burrell has
preselected certain models which have good torque
capabilities over a broad speed range.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 67


Selecting the Pump Drive Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

b. Traction type VS drives have been used


successfully on pump applications, and recent
developments in lubricants have greatly improved
capacity and life. Some drives are infinitely variable
from zero speed, and reversible.

c. Electronic Variable Speed Drives. Recently many


types of electronically controlled variable speed drives
have become available. Using DC and AC motors,
with variable voltage or frequency to vary speed, they
can be applied as adjustable speed pump drives.
Generally a speed reducer is needed to get the
required torque at the lower pump speeds; thus
permitting a smaller and more economical motor and
control.

d. Hydraulic Drives. Packaged or custom designed


hydraulic drives are extremely well suited for
Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump drives. They have
excellent high torque capabilities over a broad speed
range, with many available control options.

e. Air motors provide a good low cost drive with


adequate torque capabilities when suitable motors are
used. They have definite speed control limitations, but
are useful in special situations.

Waukesha Cherry-Burrell can provide assistance in selecting a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump and
associated drive to fit your application. The application data sheet in this manual illustrates the type of
information needed to aid in the selection.
It should be noted that many local, state, and federal codes govern the use of drives and controls, in addition
to other practical factors of selection. Some of these factors to consider are:
State and OSHA Safety Codes High Humidity Environment
Local, State and National Electrical Codes Wet Environment
Local, State and National Sanitary Standards Ambient Temperature Considerations
User, Industry and Manufacturers Standards Adequate Mechanical and/or Electrical
Hazardous Liquid Duty Overload Protection
Duty and Service Considerations
Explosion Hazards, Inflammable Vapors
Lubrication and Maintenance Requirements
Air Borne Dust, Lint Particles, etc.

Page 68 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Type

Selecting the Pump Type


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell builds pumps for two general areas of application: Sanitary service and general
Industrial application.
The Sanitary type features both COP (Clean Out of Place) and CIP (Clean In Place) designs. Rotors, body,
and all parts in contact with the fluid are designed and manufactured for acceptability by USDA and 3A sanitary
standards.
Available in 316 stainless steel with Waukesha 88 rotors. 316SS rotors are available as an option.
The Industrial type is built for general heavy duty service in a wide variety of industrial applications. Available
in three basic material choices:
316 stainless steel with Waukesha 88 rotors
optional 316SS rotors
ductile iron (ASTM #A-395)

Sanitary Pump Features and Options


The Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Sanitary style pump features simple take-apart or CIP construction. The cover,
body, rotors, and seal parts can be disassembled by removing the cover and rotor nuts. Reassembly alignment
is assured by precision locating dowels.
The Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Sanitary Pump is the standard of the food industry, and is used to pump nearly
every edible product. In addition, its features make it very suitable for pumping pharmaceuticals, dyes,
chemicals, latex and many other products. Its easy take-down, high efficiency, corrosion resistance, seal
choices, and its performance-to-cost ratio make it suitable for a number of medium duty industrial uses.

1. SEAL OPTIONS Seal construction for a Sanitary pump differs from Industrial seal design. For sanitary
service, seal parts are simple in shape and have no corners or crevices which would be hard to clean. The
seals are made to be removed and cleaned daily, often by personnel unskilled in seal care.

a. Universal I O-ring Seal: Stationary O-ring in body


groove. Rotating, replaceable shaft sleeve.
Easy to clean
Easy to assemble
Periodic seal replacement required
Best at moderate temperatures (to 180F)
Choice of sleeve and O-ring styles and
materials

02/2015 MM 604 Page 69


Selecting the Pump Type Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

b. Universal I Twin O-ring Seal: Two Stationary


O-rings with flushing space, rotating, replaceable shaft
sleeve.
Easy to clean and service
Liquid seal or barrier
Prevents air entry
Cools and extends life
Flushes away particle build-up
Choice of sleeve and O-ring styles and
materials

c. Universal I, Universal II, Universal Lobe


Sanitary Mechanical Seal: Single or double as
shown. Rotating seal seat. Floating, stationary seal
assembly. (Universal I shown)
Long life
Wide temperature range
High speed capability
High pressure performance
Choice of face and O-ring materials
Requires greater care in handling
Flushing arrangements available

2. PORT OPTIONS Bevel seat, IMDA thread.

Sanitary clamp type fittings (gasketed). Wide variety of


styles available.
S line (shown)
I line
Q line
DIN
SMS
RJT

NPT or flanged connections are not considered a sanitary connection. NPT connections are normally used
for industrial applications. Contact your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Representative for more information.

Page 70 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Type

3. RELIEF VALVE OPTIONS As a positive displacement pump can develop very high pressures, the piping
system and equipment may require protection from excessive pressure due to a restricted or closed discharge
line.
An external relief valve, or by-pass, can be used:

The Waukesha Vented Cover is a unique integral, compact, internal by-pass valve which can be used as a
pressure relief valve. It is bi-directional; that is, the pump flow or rotation can be in either direction. However,
the combinations of flow, pressure, and viscosity which may be encountered may exceed the by-pass
capability of the vented cover passages. Specific operating conditions should be furnished to Waukesha
Cherry- Burrell Application Engineering for recommendation.
Three types of Vented Covers are available:

a. Manual. By-pass pressure is adjusted by a


threaded adjusting screw which compresses a spring.
Several spring sizes are available, each with limited
operating range.

b. Pneumatic. By-pass pressure is adjusted by


regulated air or gas pressure, operating on the side of
a diaphragm opposite the pumped fluid. Most
sensitive control of the three types.

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Selecting the Pump Type Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

c. Piston. By-pass pressure is adjusted by regulated


air or gas pressure, operating on the side of a metal
piston, opposite the pumped fluid. Extended pressure
range possible.

On all three types of relief valve covers, the temperature and chemical resistance of the elastomer
diaphragms and O-rings determine the useful range.
Standard material Buna N
Optional material Silicone, Viton, EPDM

4. JACKETED COVERS A jacketed cover is


available for Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pumps. This
type of cover is used to transfer heat to the pumping
body prior to introducing the types of fluid that change
consistency (set-up) when coming into contact with
chilled or excessively warm surfaces. It is also
commonly used to maintain product temperature
within the pumping body during extended shut-down
periods.

5. ECP ROTOR TYPES


Single Wing Recommended for handling products
containing discrete particles that should see minimum Optional
damage or breakage such as large curd cottage Single Wing
cheese, chilli containing beans, fruit preservatives, pie
fillings, etc.

Twin Wing This type is standard and suitable for


most applications.
Standard
Twin Wing

U1 Rotors Shown

Page 72 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Type

Industrial Pump Features


For general pump applications, the Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Industrial series is most suitable. Its flow,
pressure and viscosity range, along with its close clearance construction, make it extremely versatile in a wide
variety of pumping applications.
The industrial pump is constructed to be easy to maintain, with pumping head disassembly especially
convenient. Commercially available mechanical seals or packing are available.

1. RELIEF VALVE A unique, compact pressure


relief valve that is completely integrated within the
pump cover features full flow characteristics to handle
any pressure within the pumps rating. By-pass
pressure is set by adjustable spring tension operating
on the end of a metal piston opposite the pumped fluid.
The pump cover is reversible for right or left hand flow
direction. O-ring seals are furnished in material
compatible with the product being pumped.

2. SEAL OPTIONS The gland area for the seal is


capable of using many arrangements of packing or
mechanical seals, chosen for the specific duty.
a. Packing. A simple, low cost, and easy-to-maintain
sealing arrangement. It is not sensitive to thermal
changes, and external adjustment to maintain sealing
is possible, until packing replacement can be
conveniently made.
A small amount of liquid leakage is normal for packing
lubrication.
To suit the required service, a variety of packing
materials and replaceable shaft sleeves are available.
Standard sleeves are 316 stainless or ceramic coated
stainless.

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Selecting the Pump Type Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

b. Mechanical Seals. There are many different


makes, types, materials and arrangements that can
be installed on a Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump.
Under suitable conditions, a mechanical seal
arrangement provides long life and leak-free sealing.
The following are the most commonly used
arrangements.
Single Inside Seal Most commonly used for
general conditions.
Seal is enclosed and protected
Simplest arrangement
All parts cooled and lubricated by pumped fluid
Natural circulation of fluid
Seal face in compression
Best when fluid conditions are nearly ideal

Single Outside Seal Used when minimum


exposure to the pumped liquid is wanted.
Seal elements not in liquid
Good for shear sensitive and high viscosity
fluids

Double (Inside-Outside) Seal Used with a


flushing liquid to:
Cool and lubricate the seal faces
Carry away leakage past the inner seal
Good for toxic and hazardous fluids, as well as
high vapor pressure fluids
Good for fluids which would set-up in contact
with air

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Selecting the Pump Type

Double Inside Seal A solution for difficult


applications. All the advantages of an Inside-
Outside seal plus minimum exposure to pumpage.
All seal elements in flushing fluid
Good lubrication and cooling
Maintain a flushing pressure higher than the
pump pressure, causing any leakage to be
into the pump chamber good for abrasive
liquids

Rotor Clearance Options Sanitary and Industrial


The standard clearance rotors for your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump are designed to operate with most
fluids at temperatures up to 200F. Expansion of the pump parts at higher temperatures requires additional
clearance. We offer the hot clearance rotor option for temperatures up to 300F.
If your application requires special clearance, or for temperatures above 300F, please consult Waukesha
Cherry-Burrell.
Some high viscosity or shear sensitive fluids (i.e., chocolate) may require extra clearance. We offer a complete
line of rotors with specialized clearances.
Standard Waukesha Cherry-Burrell rotors are made with Alloy 88 metal which gives optimum pumping
efficiency and wear characteristics for most fluids. We also offer optional rotors made of 316 stainless steel.
For applications that require the added chemical compatibility of this material, consult Waukesha
Cherry-Burrell.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 75


Selecting the Pump Type Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Special Purpose Pump Types

RF MODELS
The Rectangular Flange design is a large opening
pump designed for pumping highly viscous materials.
Generally used for food products.
Universal I Models: 014-U1, 024-U1, 034-U1,
064-U1, 134-U1, 224-U1, 324-U1.
Universal II Models: 014-U2, 034-U2, 064-U2,
134-U2, 224-U2.
Universal Lobe Models: 034-UL, 054-UL, 134-UL

ASEPTIC MODELS
This pump is designed for aseptic processing in the
canning, food, dairy and other industries. A special
live steam or sterile solution seal is maintained at
every possible opening into the pump.
Models 33U1, 133U1, 213U2, 233U1, 323U1,
423UHC, 523UHC

Page 76 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Installation

Pump Installation
The installation of your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell pump and its piping system should follow good
practice to give optimum performance.

1. Installing the Pump and Drive Unit


Pumps of this type and size are generally mounted on a common base plate with the drive.
The unit can be installed in the plant location in several ways:

a. Permanent installation on foundation with bolts and


grout.
Level unit before grouting.

b. Leveling and/or vibration isolation pads.


Many commercial types available.

c. Adjustable leg base, commonly used for sanitary


pumps. For washdown under base. Can be easily
moved or repositioned.

d. Portable bases for movement to different


locations.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 77


Pump Installation Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

2. Good Piping Practice


All piping to the pump should be supported independently, to minimize the forces exerted on the
pump. Such forces can cause misalignment of pump parts and lead to excessive wear of rotors,
bearings and shafts.

a. Piping support: Weight of piping and fluid


support piping independently with hangers or
pedestals. On rectangular inlet flange pumps,
hopper should also be supported independently.

b. Thermal expansion of piping can cause


tremendous forces. Use thermal expansion joints to
minimize forces on pump.
Flexible joints can also be used to limit the
transmission of mechanical vibration. Anchor free
ends of any flexible hose in system.

c. Piping Layout:
1. Inlet side slope piping up to inlet to avoid air
pocket.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Installation

2. Inlet Side use check valves to keep inlet line


full, particularly with low viscosity fluids, and in
start-stop operation.

3. Inlet Vacuum Service use check valve on


outlet side.
Prevents backflow (air or fluid)
Facilitates initial start-up (minimizes differential
pressure pump must supply to start flow)

4. Isolation Valves permit pump maintenance and


removal safely and without emptying entire
system.

5. Relief Valve To protect the pump and piping


system against excessive pressure, a relief valve
should be installed. An integral relief valve,
designed to bypass the fluid internally from the
pump outlet to the inlet, should not be used on
applications where the discharge must be closed
for more than a few minutes. Prolonged operation
of the pump with closed discharge will cause
heating of the fluid circulating through the relief
valve. When such operation is necessary, the relief
valve, whether integral, attachable, or line-
mounted, should discharge externally through
piping connected to the fluid source, or if that is not
practical, into the inlet piping near the source.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 79


Pump Installation Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

A particular relief valve design will have a


characteristic curve as shown. The cracking
pressure can usually be set by spring adjustment, or
by adjustable pneumatic pressure, etc. Flow will begin
to bypass when this cracking pressure is reached.
As flow increases through the bypass, the system
pressure will also increase.
The pressure increase for a given valve design
depends on the valve setting, the flow rate, and the
viscosity of the fluid being pumped. If the full-flow
bypass pressure exceeds the maximum allowable for
the particular pump and piping system, an oversize
attachable relief valve may sometimes be used to limit
the full-flow bypass pressure to an acceptable value.

6. Inlet Side: Strainers and Traps Inlet side


strainers and traps can be used to prevent pump
damage from foreign matter. Selection must be
carefully made as clogging can easily occur,
restricting the inlet, causing cavitation and flow
stoppage.

7. Pressure gauges Pressure and Vacuum


gauges provide the easiest way to tell you
something about the pump operation.
Normal or abnormal pressures
Overflow conditions
Indication of flow
Changes in pump condition
Changes in system conditions Wherever possible install gauges!!
Changes in fluid viscosity

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Installation

3. Alignment of Pump to Drive


Pumps and drives which are ordered from the factory and mounted on a common base plate are
accurately aligned before shipment. The alignment should be re-checked after the complete unit has
been installed and the piping completed. Periodic re-checking is advisable during the pump service
life.

In-line drives. For initial pump installation, and for re-


checking alignment, the following steps are advised.
A flexible coupling should be used to connect the drive
to the pump. Many different types are available,
including couplings with slip or overload provision.

A flexible coupling is used to compensate for end play


and small differences in alignment. The pump and Feeler or Taper Gauge
drive shaft should be aligned as closely as possible.
Check angular alignment using feeler or taper gauge.
Adjust to get equal dimension at all points at the
same time, set space between coupling halves to the
coupling manufacturers recommended distance.

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Pump Installation Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Check parallel misalignment using straight edges and


shims.

NOTE: After piping is complete, and drive and couplings are aligned, turn pump shaft manually to see
that it turns freely without binding.

Check rotation direction of drive to see that pump


will rotate in proper direction facing Liquid End of
pump.
Then connect coupling halves.

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Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Installation

Align belt and chain drives using straight-edges


and visual check.

After piping is complete and before belts are installed, turn pump shaft manually to see that it turns freely.
Check rotation direction of pump to see that pump will rotate in proper direction. Then install belts and
tension them correctly.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 83


Start-Up Check List Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Start-Up Check List


The Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump is a positive displacement pump and thus can develop very high
pressures. To protect lines, equipment and personnel, certain precautions must be taken.

1. Review Pump Installation, particularly Relief 6. Seals: Packing supply flushing fluid if needed.
Valves. Install relief valves if needed in system. Leave packing gland loose for normal weepage!
2. Check that piping and pump are clean and free of Make adjustments as initial conditions stabilize, to
foreign material, such as welding slag, gaskets, maintain normal weepage.
etc. Do not use pump to flush system.
Double O-ring or double mechanical seals
3. See that all piping connections are tight and leak Check that flush liquid is connected and turned
free. Where possible, check system with on.
non-hazardous fluid.
7. See that all valves are open on discharge system,
4. Check to see that pump and drive are lubricated. and free flow path is open to destination.
See pump lubrication section in Maintenance
Manual. Install breather plug. Check drive 8. See that all valves are open on inlet side, and that
lubrication instruction. fluid can reach pump.

5. Check that all guards are in place and secure. 9. Check direction of pump and drive rotation
(jogging is recommended).
10.Start pump drive. Where possible, start at slow
speed, or jog.

Check to see that liquid is reaching pump within several minutes. If pumping does not begin and
stabilize, check items under No Flow or Insufficient Flow in Pump Troubleshooting section.

Page 84 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Troubleshooting a Pumping System

Troubleshooting a Pumping System


Once a pump is properly selected and installed in a system, operation should be trouble free. However, in
existing systems, or as pump and system conditions change, problems may develop. Following are some
troubleshooting hints to help identify and solve problems.

Problem Possible Cause Solutions

No flow, pump not turning Drive Motor not running Check resets, fuses, circuit breakers

Keys sheared or missing Replace

Drive belts, power transmission Replace or adjust


components slipping or broken

Pump shaft, keys, or gears sheared Inspect; replace parts

No flow, pump turning Wrong direction of rotation Reverse

No flow, pump not priming Valve closed in inlet line Open valve

Inlet line clogged or restricted Clear line, clean filters, etc.

Air leaks due to bad seals or pipe Replace seals; check lines for
connections leakage (can be done by air
pressure, or by filling with liquid and
pressurizing with air)

Pump speed too slow Refer to Dry Prime chart, speed up


pump. Filling inlet lines with fluid may
allow initial start-up. Foot valve may
solve start-up problems permanently.

Liquid drains or siphons from system Use foot valve or check valves
during off periods

Air lock. Fluids which gas off or Manual or automatic air bleed from
vaporize, or allow gas to come out of pump or lines near pump
solution during off periods

Extra clearance rotors, worn pump Increase pump speed, use foot valve
to improve priming

Net inlet pressure available too low Check NIPA, NIPR, recalculate
system. Change inlet system as
needed.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 85


Troubleshooting a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Problem Possible Cause Solutions

No flow, pump not priming On Vacuum inlet system: on initial Install check valve in discharge line
(continued) start-up, atmospheric blow back
prevents pump from developing
enough differential pressure to start
flow.

No flow Relief valve not properly adjusted, or Adjust or clear valve


held off seat by foreign material (flow
is being recirculated to inlet)

Insufficient flow Speed too low to obtain desired flow Check flow-speed chart

Air leak due to bad seals or pipe Replace seals, check inlet fittings
connections

Fluid vaporization Strainers, foot valves, inlet fittings or Clear lines. If problem continues, inlet
(starved pump inlet) lines clogged system may require change

Inlet line size too small, inlet line Increase inlet line size. Reduce
length too long. Too many fittings or length, minimize direction and size
valves. Foot valves, strainers too changes, reduce number of fittings.
small. Refer to The Inlet Side section.

NIPA too low Raise liquid level in source tank

NIPA too low Increase by raising or pressurizing


source tank

NIPA too low Select larger pump size with smaller


NIPA < NIPR NIPR

Fluid viscosity greater than expected Reduce pump speed and accept
lower flow, or change system to
reduce line losses

Fluid temperature higher than Reduce temperature, reduce speed


expected (vapor pressure higher) and accept lower flow or change
system to increase NIPA

Insufficient flow, fluid being Relief valve not adjusted or jammed Adjust or clear
bypassed somewhere

Flow diverted in branch line, open Check system and controls


valve, etc.

Page 86 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Troubleshooting a Pumping System

Problem Possible Cause Solutions

Insufficient flow, high slip Hot (HC) or extra clearance rotors on Replace with standard clearance
cold fluid, and/or low viscosity fluid rotors

Worn pump Increase pump speed (within limits).


Replace rotors, recondition pump.

High pressure Reduce pressure by system changes

Noisy operation Cavitation

High fluid viscosity, Slow down pump, reduce


High vapor pressure fluids, temperature, change system
High temperature

NIPA < NIPR To increase NIPA or reduce NIPR,


see Manual Sections and Pump
Charts

Air or gas in fluid

Leaks in pump or piping Correct leaks

Dissolved gas or naturally aerated Minimize discharge pressure. Also


products see Cavitation above.

Mechanical noises
Rotor to body contact

Improper assembly Check clearance with shims

Rotor to body contact

Distortion of pump due to improper Reassemble pump or re-install piping


piping installation to assure free running

Pressure higher than rated Reduce pressure if possible

Worn bearing Rebuild with new bearings, lubricate


regularly

Worn gears Rebuild with new gears, lubricate


regularly

Rotor to rotor contact

Loose or mis-timed gears, twisted Rebuild with new parts


shaft, sheared keys, worn splines

02/2015 MM 604 Page 87


Troubleshooting a Pumping System Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Problem Possible Cause Solutions

Noisy operation (continued) Relief valve chattering Readjust, repair or replace

Drive component noise gear Repair or replace drive train


trains, chains, couplings,
bearings.

Pump requires excessive Higher Viscous losses than If within pump rating, increase drive
power (overheats, stalls, high expected size
current draw, breakers trip)

Higher pressure than expected Reduce pump speed, increase line


size

Fluid characteristics

Fluid colder than expected, Heat fluid, insulate or heat trace lines.
viscosity high Use pump with more running
clearances.

Fluid sets up in line and pump Insulate or heat trace line.


during shut down Install soft start drive.
Install recirculating bypass system.
Flush with other fluid.

Fluid builds up on pump surfaces Use pump with more running


(Example: latex, chocolate, clearance
fondants)

Short pump service life High corrosion rate Upgrade material of pump

Pumping abrasives Larger pumps at slower speeds can


help

Speeds and pressures higher than Reduce speeds and pressures by


rated changes in system

Worn bearings and gears due to lack Set up and follow regular lubrication
of lubrication schedule

Misalignment of drive and piping. Check alignment of piping. Check


Excessive overhung load or drive alignment and loads.
misaligned couplings.

Page 88 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Engineering Data Section

Engineering Data Section


The performance curves in this manual are based on actual test data under specific conditions, and are
considered representative. As variations in fluids, system conditions, and normal manufacture can occur,
performance of a specific pump may vary from these curves. Waukesha Cherry-Burrell should be consulted for
more precise information if needed, and for performance requirements outside of the ranges shown.

NOTE: Consult Waukesha Cherry-Burrells Application Engineering Department for sizing of CIPable
and Aseptic models.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 89


Universal Universal Universal Universal Universal
Displacement Universal Universal Universal Industrial Industrial 5000 5000

Page 90
DO 1 1 CDL Aseptic 2 Lobe High
Gallons / Rev 1 2 Lobe DI SS DI SS
RF CIP RF RF Capacity
0.0075 3
0.0082 006-U1 006-U2
0.0133 10
0.0142 015-U1 014-U1 12 015-U2 014-U2
0.029 16 018-U1 024-U1 22 018-U2
Engineering Data Section

0.033 018-UL
0.051 33
0.060 25 030-U1 034-U1 32 030-U2 034-U2 25DI 25I 5040DI 5040SS
0.071 4040 030-UL 034-UL
0.098 045-U2
0.123 050-UL 054-UL
0.142 4050
0.153 55 060-U1 064-U1 62 060-U2 064-U2 060-UL 55DI 55I 5050DI 5050SS
0.205 133
0.254 125 130-U1 134-U1 132 130-U2 134-U2 130-UL 134-UL 125DI 125I 5060DI 5060SS
0.373 4060

MM 604
0.380 180-U2
0.440 233 200DI 200I 5070DI 5070SS
0.502 213-U2 210-U2 220-UL
0.522 220-U1 224-U1 222 220-U2 224-U2
0.616 323
0.754 320-U1 324-U1 320-U2 300DI 300I 5080SS
0.878 320-UL
1.619 423-UHC 420-UHC
1.831
2.375 523-UHC 520-UHC
2.670
NOTES 1 2 3 6 4 5
Waukesha PD Pump Sanitary/Industrial Model Cross Reference

Shaded columns are obsolete model series. See notes 1 thru 5 for replacement model series.
1. DO models obsolete; replaced by Universal 1 Series. 4. Industrial DI models obsolete; replaced by 5000 DI Series.
2. Universal CIP models obsolete; replaced by Universal 2 Series. 5. Industrial I models obsolete; replaced by 5000 SS Series.
3. CDL models obsolete. 6. Aseptic models available in Universal, Universal 2, and UHC
Series.

02/2015
Waukesha Cherry-Burrell
Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Curves

Pump Curves

IMPORTANT
The pump curves provided in this document are for reference only and may
not be current. Contact your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell representative for a
copy of our most up-to-date PD Pump Curve booklet.
(Publication number 95-03062).

02/2015 MM 604 Page 91


Curve Index

Pump Displacement Nominal Pressure


Series Inlet and Curve Page
Per Capacity Range Up To**
Outlet Number Number
Size Revolution To * (See Note 1 below)
Universal 1
006 0.0082 Gal (0.031 Liter) 7 GPM (1.6 m3/hr) 1" or 1-1/2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07133 93
015 0.0142 Gal (0.054 Liter) 10 GPM (2.3 m3/hr) 1-1/2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07134 94
018 0.029 Gal (0.110 Liter) 17 GPM (3.9 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07135 95
030 0.060 Gal (0.227 Liter) 36 GPM (8.2 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07136 96
060 0.153 Gal (0.579 Liter) 90 GPM (20.4 m3/hr) 2-1/2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07137 97
130 0.254 Gal (0.961 Liter) 150 GPM (34.1 m3/hr) 3" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07138 98
220 0.522 Gal (1.976 Liter) 310 GPM (70.4 m3/hr) 4" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07139 99
320 0.754 Gal (2.854 Liter) 450 GPM (102 m3/hr) 6" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07140 100
Universal
II
006-U2 0.0082 Gal (0.031 Liter) 8 GPM (1.8 m3/hr) 1" or 1-1/2" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07075 101
015-U2 0.0142 Gal (0.054 Liter) 11 GPM (2.5 m3/hr) 1-1/2" 250 PSI (17.2 bar) 95-07076 102
018-U2 0.029 Gal (0.110 Liter) 20 GPM (4.5 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07077 103
030-U2 0.060 Gal (0.227 Liter) 36 GPM (8.2 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 250 PSI (17.2 bar) 95-07078 104
045-U2 0.098 Gal (0.371 Liter) 58 GPM (13.2 m3/hr) 2" 450 PSI (31.0 bar) 95-07106 105
060-U2 0.153 Gal (0.579 Liter) 90 GPM (20.4 m3/hr) 2-1/2" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07079 106
130-U2 0.253 Gal (0.958 Liter) 150 GPM (34.1 m3/hr) 3" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07080 107
180-U2 0.380 Gal (1.438 Liter) 230 GPM (52.2 m3/hr) 3" 450 PSI (31.0 bar) 95-07107 108
210-U2
0.502 Gal (1.900 Liter) 300 GPM (68.1 m3/hr) 4" 500 PSI (34.5 bar) 95-07156 109
213-U2
220-U2 0.521 Gal (1.972 Liter) 310 GPM (70.4 m3/hr) 4" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07081 110
320-U2 0.752 Gal (2.847 Liter) 450 GPM (102 m3/hr) 6" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07132 110
Universal
Lobe
018-UL 0.033 Gal (0.125 Liter) 33 GPM (7.5 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07089 112
030-UL 0.071 Gal (0.269 Liter) 71 GPM (16.1 m3/hr) 1-1/2" or 2" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07082 113
060-UL 0.153 Gal (0.579 Liter) 120 GPM (27.3 m3/hr) 2-1/2" 300 PSI (20.7 bar) 95-07083 114
130-UL 0.253 Gal (0.958 Liter) 170 GPM (38.6 m3/hr) 3" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07084 115
220-UL 0.502 Gal (1.900 Liter) 300 GPM (68.1 m3/hr) 4" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07085 116
320-UL 0.878 Gal (3.324 Liter) 520 GPM (118.1 m3/hr) 6" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07145 117
UHC
420-UHC
1.619 Gal (6.129 Liter) 640 GPM (145.4 m3/hr) 6" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07086 118
423-UHC
520-UHC
2.375 Gal (8.990 Liter) 830 GPM (188.5 m3/hr) 8" 150 PSI (10.3 bar) 95-07087 119
523-UHC
5000
5040 0.060 Gal (0.227 Liter) 36 GPM (8.2 m3/hr) 1-1/2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07092 120
5050 0.153 Gal (0.579 Liter) 90 GPM (20.4 m3/hr) 2" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07141 121
5060 0.254 Gal (0.961 Liter) 150 GPM (34.1 m3/hr) 3" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07142 122
5070 0.440 Gal (1.666 Liter) 260 GPM (59.1 m3/hr) 4" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07143 123
5080 0.754 Gal (2.854 Liter) 450 GPM (102 m3/hr) 6" 200 PSI (13.8 bar) 95-07144 124

* Note: Most applications are not suitable for continuous operation at maximum capacity shown.
** Note: Contact Application Engineering for higher pressure applications.

Page 92 MM 604 02/2015


Universal I
006

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 93


015

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 94 MM 604 02/2015


018

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 95


030

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 96 MM 604 02/2015


060

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 97


130

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 98 MM 604 02/2015


220

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 99


320

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 100 MM 604 02/2015


Universal II
006-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 101


015-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 102 MM 604 02/2015


018-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 103


030-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 104 MM 604 02/2015


045-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 105


060-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 106 MM 604 02/2015


130-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 107


180-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 108 MM 604 02/2015


210-U2/213-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 109


220-U2

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 110 MM 604 02/2015


SPX Flow Technology
611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 111


Universal Lobe
018-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 112 MM 604 02/2015


030-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 113


060-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 114 MM 604 02/2015


130-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 115


220-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 116 MM 604 02/2015


320-UL

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 117


420/520 UHC
420-uhc/423-uhc

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 118 MM 604 02/2015


520-uhc/523-uhc

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 119


5000 Series
5040

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 120 MM 604 02/2015


5050

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 121


5060

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 122 MM 604 02/2015


5070

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

02/2015 MM 604 Page 123


5080

SPX Flow Technology


611 Sugar Creek Road
Delavan, WI 53115 USA
Tel: 1-800-252-5200 or 262-728-1900
Fax: 1-800-252-5012 or 262-728-4904
wcb@spx.com
www.spx.com

Page 124 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Absolute Pressure Conversion

Absolute Pressure Conversion


The scales below show different ways of expressing pressures below atmospheric pressure (0 psig, 14.7 PSI).
The preferred scale is PSIA (lbs/in2 absolute) which is used throughout this manual. Other scales can be
converted to PSIA easily by use of this chart.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 125


Fluid Viscosity Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Fluid Viscosity
Typical fluid viscosities are listed below. Values for many common organic and inorganic fluids can be found in
other references. The values given for thixotropic fluids are effective viscosities at normal pumping shear rates.
Effective viscosity can vary greatly with changes in solids content, concentration, etc. Waukesha will test your
fluid if necessary to determine effective viscosity.
Viscous Behavior Type: N Newtonian T Thixotropic D Dilatent

Specific Viscosity Viscous Specific Viscosity Viscous


Fluid Gravity CPS Type Fluid Gravity CPS Type
Reference Water 1.0 1.0 N
DYES AND INKS
ADHESIVES Ink, Printers 1 to 1.38 10,000 T
Box Adhesives 1 3,000 T Dye 1.1 10 N
PVA 1.3 100 T Gum 5,000 T
Rubber & Solvents 1.0 15,000 N
FATS AND OILS
BAKERY Corn Oil 0.92 30 N
Batter 1. 2,200 T Lard 0.96 60 @ 100F N
Butter, Melted 0.98 18 @ 140F N Linseed Oil 0.93 30 @ 100F N
Egg, Whole 0.5 60 @ 50F N Peanut Oil 0.92 42 @ 100F N
Emulsifier 20 T Soybean Oil 0.95 36 @ 100F N
Frosting 1. 10,000 T Vegetable Oil 0.92 3 @ 300F N
Lecithin 3,250 @ 125F T
FOODS, MISC
77% Sweetened
1.3 Black Bean Paste 10,000 T
Condensed Milk 10,000 @ 77F N
Cream Style Corn 130 @ 190F T
Yeast Slurry 15% 1. 180 T
Catsup 1.11 560 @ 145F T
BEER, WINE Pablum 4,500 T
Beer 1.0 1.1 @ 40F N Pear Pulp 4,000 @ 160F T
Brewers Concentrated Potato Mashed 1.0 20,000 T
Yeast 80% Solids 16,000 @ 40F T Potato Skins & Caustic 20,000 @ 100F T
Wort Prune Juice 1.0 60 @ 120F T
Wine 1.0 Orange Juice Conc. 1.1 5,000 @ 38F T
Tapioca Pudding 0.7 1,000 @ 235F T
CONFECTIONERY Mayonnaise 1.0 5,000 @ 75F T
Caramel 1.2 400 @ 140F Tomato Paste 33% 1.14 7,000 T
Chocolate 1.1 17,000 120F T Honey 1.5 1,500 @ 100F
Fudge, Hot 1.1 36,000 T
Toffee 1.2 87,000 T MEAT PRODUCTS
Animal Fat, Melted 0.9 43 100F N
COSMETICS, SOAPS Ground Beef Fat 0.9 11,000 60F T
Face Cream 10,000 T Meat Emulsion 1.0 22,000 40F T
Gel, Hair 1.4 5,000 T Pet Food 1.0 11,000 40F T
Shampoo 5,000 T Pork Fat Slurry 1.0 650 40F T
Toothpaste 20,000 T
Hand Cleaner 2,000 T MISC CHEMICALS
Glycols 1.1 35 @ Range
DAIRY
Cottage Cheese 1.08 225 T PAINT
Cream 1.02 20 @ 40F N Auto Paint, Metallic 220 T
Milk 1.03 1.2 @ 60F N Solvents 0.80.9 0.5 to 10 N
Cheese, Process 30,000 @ 160F T Titanium Dioxide Slurry 10,000 T
Yogurt 1,100 T Varnish 1.06 140 @ 100F
Turpentine 0.86 2 @ 60F
DETERGENTS
Detergent Concentrate 10 N

Page 126 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Fluid Viscosity

Specific Viscosity Viscous


Viscous Behavior Type:
Fluid Gravity CPS Type N Newtonian
PAPER & TEXTILE T Thixotropic
Black Liquor Tar 2,000 @ 300F
Paper Coating 35% 400
D Dilatent
Sulfide 6% 1,600
Black Liquor 1.3 1,100 @ 122F
Black Liquor Soap 7,000 @ 122F

PETROLEUM AND
PETROLEUM
PRODUCTS
Asphalt Unblended 1.3 500 to 2,500
Gasoline 0.7 0.8 @ 60F N
Kerosene 0.8 3. @ 68F N
Fuel Oil #6 0.9 660 @ 122F N
Auto Lube Oil SAE 40 0.9 200 @ 100F N
Auto Trans Oil SAE 90 0.9 320 @ 100F N
Propane 0.46 0.2 @ 100F N
Tars 1.2 Wide Range

PHARMACEUTICALS
Castor Oil 0.96 350 N
Cough Syrup 1.0 190 N
Stomach Remedy
Slurries 1,500 T
Pill Pastes 5,000 T

PLASTICS, RESINS
Butadiene 0.94 0.17 @ 40F
Polyester Resin (Typ) 1.4 3,000 T
PVA Resin (Typ) 1.3 65,000
(Wide variety of plastics
can be pumped,
viscosity varies
greatly)

STARCHES, GUMS
Corn Starch Sol 22B 1.18 32 T
Corn Starch Sol 25B 1.21 300 T

SUGAR, SYRUPS,
MOLASSES
Corn Syrup 41 Be 1.39 15,000 @ 60F N
Corn Syrup 45 Be 1.45 12,000 @ 130F N
Glucose 1.42 10,000 @ 100F
Molasses A 280 to 5,000 @
1.42
100F
Molasses B 1.43 to 1,400 to 13,000
1.48 @ 100F
Molasses C 1.46 to 2,600 to 5,000
1.49 @ 100F
Sugar Syrups
60 Brix 1.29 75 @ 60F N
68 Brix 1.34 360 @ 60F N
76 Brix 1.39 4,000 @ 60F N

WATER & WASTE


TREATMENT
Clarified Sewage
1.1
Sludge 2,000 Range

02/2015 MM 604 Page 127


Viscosity Conversion Chart Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

When Specific When Specific Gravity


Gravity is 1 is Other than 1

Then Multiply

Then Multiply
Viscosity Conversion Chart

Stoke x S.G.
Find Stokes
CKS x S.G.
Find CKS

= Poise
Read

= CPS
Directly
Across

Saybolt
Seconds Degrees Dupont Dupont Dupont Dupont Krebs Mac- Pratt &
CPS Poise CKS STOKE Universal
Engler Engler Parlin #7 Parlin #10 Parlin #15 Parlin #20 Units Michael Lambert F
(SSU)
1 .01 1 .01 31 54 1.0 20 4.2
2 .02 2 .02 34 57 1.1 23 4.3
4 .04 4 .04 38 61 1.3 24 4.4
7 .07 7 .07 47 75 1.6 26 4.6
10 .10 10 .10 60 94 1.9 28 11 4.7
15 .15 15 .15 80 125 2.5 30 12 4.9
20 .20 20 .20 100 170 3.0 32 13 5.0 125
25 .24 25 .24 130 190 4.1 37 14 5.1 139
30 .30 30 .30 160 210 4.9 43 15 5.4 151
40 .40 40 .40 210 300 6.0 50 16 5.7 177
50 .50 50 .50 260 350 7.5 57 17 6.0 30 201
60 .60 60 .60 320 450 9.1 63 18 6.3 3.1 33 230
70 .70 70 .70 370 525 10.5 68 20 6.8 3.2 35 260
80 .80 80 .80 430 600 12.4 73 22 7.5 3.3 37 290 7.3
90 .90 90 .90 480 875 14.0 78 23 7.7 3.4 38 315 7.8
100 1.0 100 1.0 530 750 15.3 81 25 8.0 3.5 40 335 8.3
120 1.2 120 1.2 580 900 16.1 90 30 8.3 3.6 43 380 8.9
140 1.4 140 1.4 690 1,050 20.0 106 32 8.9 3.9 46 415 9.8
160 1.6 160 1.6 790 1,200 23.0 120 37 9.7 4.1 48 465 10.8
180 1.8 180 1.8 900 1,350 26.3 135 41 10.7 4.3 50 520 11.9
200 2.0 200 2.0 1,000 1,500 29.2 149 43 11.5 4.5 52 570 12.5
220 2.2 220 2.2 1,100 1,650 32.2 45 12.2 4.8 54 610 13.0
240 2.4 240 2.4 1,200 1,800 35.0 49 13.0 5.0 56 660 14.2
260 2.6 260 2.6 1,280 1,950 37.7 53 13.7 5.3 58 700 15.1
280 2.8 280 2.8 1,380 2,100 40.5 58 14.4 5.6 59 750 15.6
300 3.0 300 3.0 1,475 2,250 43.0 64 15.0 5.9 60 800 16.7
320 3.2 320 3.2 1,530 2,400 44.7 66 15.5 6.1 825 17.3
340 3.4 340 3.4 1,630 2,550 47.5 70 16.4 6.4 875 18.5
360 3.6 360 3.6 1,730 2,700 50.3 74 17.3 6.7 62 925 19.6
380 3.8 380 3.8 1,850 2,850 54.0 79 18.2 7.0 980 21.0
400 4.0 400 4.0 1,950 3,000 57.0 84 19.1 7.3 64 1,035 22.1
420 4.2 420 4.2 2,050 3,150 59.9 88 20.0 7.6 1,070 23.2
440 4.4 440 4.4 2,160 3,300 63.6 93 21.0 8.0 1,125 24.x
460 4.6 460 4.6 2,270 3,450 67.0 100 22.0 8.5 65 1,180 26.x
480 4.8 480 4.8 2,380 3,600 69.5 104 23.0 8.9 67 1,240 27.x
500 5.0 500 5.0 2,480 3,750 73.1 107 23.9 9.2 68 1,290 28.1
550 5.5 550 5.5 2,660 4,125 78.0 115 26.3 9.7 69 1,385 30.1
600 6.0 600 6.0 2,900 4,500 85.0 126 28.5 10.6 71 1,510 32.8
700 7.0 700 7.0 3,380 5,250 95.0 145 31.9 12.1 74 1,760 38.2
800 8.0 800 8.0 3,880 6,000 110 168 36.4 13.9 77 2,020 44.4
900 9.0 900 9.0 4,300 8,750 125 185 40.0 15.5 81 2,240 48.6
1,000 10.0 1,000 10.0 4,600 7,500 135 198 43.0 16.8 85 2,395 52.0
1,100 11 1,100 11 5,200 8,250 151 224 48.0 18.7 88 2,710 58.1
1,200 12 1,200 12 5,620 9,000 164 242 53.2 20.2 92 2,930 63.6
1,300 13 1,300 13 6,100 9,750 177 262 58.0 22.0 95 3,180 69.0
1,400 14 1,400 14 6,480 10,350 188 280 61.6 23.2 96 3,370 73.4
1,500 15 1,500 15 7,000 11,100 203 300 69.0 25.0 98 3,650 79.3
1,600 16 1,600 16 7,500 11,850 217 322 72.0 26.7 100 3,900 85.0
1,700 17 1,700 17 8,000 12,600 233 344 76.0 28.5 101 4,180 90.5
1,800 18 1,800 18 8,500 13,300 248 366 81.0 30.0 4,420 96.2
1,900 19 1,900 19 9,000 13,900 263 387 86.0 31.8 4,830 102.0
2,000 20 2,000 20 9,400 14,600 275 405 90.0 33.0 103 4,900 106.2
2,100 21 2,100 21 9,850 15,300 287 433 94.5 34.7 5,120 111.3
2,200 22 2,200 22 10,300 16,100 300 453 99.0 36.0 5,360 116.6
2,300 23 2,300 23 10,750 16,800 314 473 105.7 38.0 105 5,600 124
2,400 24 2,400 24 11,200 17,500 325 493 110.3 39.5 109 5,840 127
2,500 25 2,500 25 11,600 18,250 339 510 114 40.8 114 6,040 131
3,000 30 3,000 30 14,500 21,800 425 638 142 51.0 121 7,550 165
3,500 35 3,500 35 16,500 25,200 485 725 164 57.0 129 8,600 187
4,000 40 4,000 40 18,500 28,800 540 814 186 64.5 133 9,640 210
4,500 45 4,500 45 21,000 32,400 615 924 214 73.5 136 10,920 238
5,000 50 5,000 50 23,500 36,000 690 239 82.0 12,220 267
5,500 55 5,500 55 26,000 39,600 765 265 90.6 13,510 295
6,000 60 6,000 60 28,000 43,100 820 285 97.5 14,570 318
6,500 65 6,500 65 30,000 46,000 885 306 104 15,610 340
7,000 70 7,000 70 32,500 49,600 960 331 113 16,900 369
7,500 75 7,500 75 35,000 53,200 1,035 356 122 18,200 397
8,000 80 8,000 80 37,000 56,800 1,095 377 129 19,250 420
8,500 85 8,500 85 39,500 60,300 1,175 402 138 20,600 449
9,000 90 9,000 90 41,080 63,900 1,220 417 143 21,350 465
9,500 95 9,500 95 43,000 67,400 1,280 433 150 22,400 488
10,000 100 10,000 100 46,500 1,385 464 162 24,200 527
15,000 150 15,000 150 69,400 106,000 242
20,000 200 20,000 200 92,500 140,000 322
30,000 300 30,000 300 138,500 210,000 483
40,000 400 40,000 400 185,000 276,000 645
50,000 500 50,000 500 231,000 345,000 805
60,000 600 60,000 600 277,500 414,000 957
70,000 700 70,000 700 323,500 484,000 1,127
80,000 800 80,000 800 370,000 550,000 1,290
90,000 900 90,000 900 415,500 620,000 1,445
100,000 1,000 100,000 1,000 462,000 689,000 1,810
125,000 1,250 125,000 1,250 578,000 850,000 2,010
150,000 1,500 150,000 1,500 694,000 2,420
175,000 1,750 175,000 1,750 810,000 2,820
200,000 2,000 200,000 2,000 925,000 3,220

Page 128 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Viscosity Conversion Chart

When Specific When Specific Gravity


Gravity is 1 is Other than 1

Then Multiply

Then Multiply
Viscosity Conversion Chart

Stoke x S.G.
Find Stokes
CKS x S.G.
Find CKS

= Poise
Read

= CPS
Directly
Across

Redwood Redwood Stormer


Saybolt Ford Ford Zahn Zahn Zahn Zahn Zahn
CPS Poise CKS STOKE Standard Admiralty 100 KG
Furol #3 #4 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5
#1 #2 Load
1 .01 1 .01 29
2 .02 2 .02 32
4 .04 4 .04 36 4.9
7 .07 7 .07 44 5.9 2.5 8
10 .10 10 .10 52 6.8 3.6 9 5 30 16
15 .15 15 .15 63 8.4 13 5.8 10 8 34 17
20 .20 20 .20 86 10.1 15 7.3 12 10 37 18
25 .24 25 .24 112 12.5 17 9.6 15 12 41 19
30 .30 30 .30 138 14.8 19 11.9 19 14 44 20
40 .40 40 .40 181 19.5 24 15.6 25 18 52 22
50 .50 50 .50 225 24.2 29 19.5 29 22 60 24
60 .60 60 .60 270 28.8 34 24.0 33 25 68 27
70 .70 70 .70 314 33.3 39 28.1 36 28 72 30
80 .80 80 .80 364 38.0 42 32.5 41 31 81 34
90 .90 90 .90 405 42.5 49 36.5 45 32 88 37 10
100 1.0 100 1.0 445 47.0 54 40.7 50 34 41 12 10
120 1.2 120 1.2 492 56.0 59 44.5 58 41 49 14 11
140 1.4 140 1.4 585 65.1 70 53 66 45 58 16 13
160 1.6 160 1.6 670 74.0 79 61 72 50 66 18 14
180 1.8 180 1.8 762 83.0 91 70 81 54 74 20 16
200 2.0 200 2.0 817 91.5 100 77 90 58 82 23 17 10
220 2.2 220 2.2 933 99.5 110 85 98 62 88 25 18 11
240 2.4 240 2.4 1,020 108 120 92 106 65 27 20 12
260 2.6 260 2.6 1,085 115 128 98 115 68 30 21 13
280 2.8 280 2.8 1,170 124 138 106 122 70 32 22 14
300 3.0 300 3.0 1,250 133 148 114 130 74 34 24 15
320 3.2 320 3.2 1,295 141 153 118 136 89 36 25 16
340 3.4 340 3.4 1,380 150 163 125 142 95 39 26 17
360 3.6 360 3.6 1,465 159 173 133 150 100 41 27 18
380 3.8 380 3.8 1,570 170 185 143 160 106 43 29 19
400 4.0 400 4.0 1,650 179 195 150 170 112 46 30 20
420 4.2 420 4.2 1,740 188 205 158 180 118 48 32 21
440 4.4 440 4.4 1,830 199 216 166 188 124 50 33 22
460 4.6 460 4.6 1,925 209 227 175 200 130 52 34 23
480 4.8 480 4.8 2,020 219 238 183 210 137 54 36 24
500 5.0 500 5.0 2,100 228 248 191 218 143 58 38 25
550 5.5 550 5.5 2,255 245 266 204 230 153 64 40 27
600 6.0 600 6.0 2,460 267 290 221 250 170 68 45 30
700 7.0 700 7.0 2,860 311 338 260 295 194 76 51 35
800 8.0 800 8.0 3,290 357 388 298 340 223 57 40
900 9.0 900 9.0 3,640 396 430 331 365 247 63 45
1,000 10.0 1,000 10.0 3,900 424 460 354 390 264 69 49
1,100 11 1,100 11 4,410 479 520 400 445 299 77 55
1,200 12 1,200 12 4,680 509 562 433 480 323 59
1,300 13 1,300 13 5,160 560 610 470 520 350 64
1,400 14 1,400 14 5,490 596 648 498 550 372 70
1,500 15 1,500 15 5,940 645 700 539 595 400 75
1,600 16 1,600 16 6,350 690 750 577 635 430 80
1,700 17 1,700 17 6,780 735 800 615 680 460 85
1,800 18 1,800 18 7,200 780 850 654 720 490 91
1,900 19 1,900 19 7,620 829 900 695 760 520 96
2,000 20 2,000 20 7,950 865 940 723 800 540
2,100 21 2,100 21 8,350 906 985 757 835 565
2,200 22 2,200 22 8,730 950 1,030 793 875 592
2,300 23 2,300 23 9,110 1,075 827 910 617
2,400 24 2,400 24 9,500 1,120 861 950 645
2,500 25 2,500 25 9,830 1,160 893 985 676
3,000 30 3,000 30 12,300 1,450 1,115 1,230 833
3,500 35 3,500 35 14,000 1,650 1,223 1,400 950
4,000 40 4,000 40 15,650 1,850 1,420 1,570 1,060
4,500 45 4,500 45 17,800 2,100 1,610 1,175
5,000 50 5,000 50 19,900 2,350 1,810 1,350
5,500 55 5,500 55 2,600 2,000 1,495
6,000 60 6,000 60 2,800 2,150 1,605
6,500 65 6,500 65 3,000 2,310 1,720
7,000 70 7,000 70 3,250 2,500 1,870
7,500 75 7,500 75 3,500 2,690 2,010
8,000 80 8,000 80 3,700 2,850 2,120
8,500 85 8,500 85 3,950 3,040 2,270
9,000 90 9,000 90 4,100 3,150 2,350
9,500 95 9,500 95 4,350 3,310 2,470
10,000 100 10,000 100 4,650 3,580 2,670
15,000 150 15,000 150 6,940
20,000 200 20,000 200 9,250
30,000 300 30,000 300 13,860
40,000 400 40,000 400 18,500
50,000 500 50,000 500 23,100
60,000 600 60,000 600 27,750
70,000 700 70,000 700 32,350
80,000 800 80,000 800 37,000
90,000 900 90,000 900 41,550
100,000 1,000 100,000 1,000 46,200
125,000 1,250 125,000 1,250 57,800
150,000 1,500 150,000 1,500 69,400
175,000 1,750 175,000 1,750 81,000
200,000 2,000 200,000 2,000 92,500

02/2015 MM 604 Page 129


Temperature Conversion Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Temperature Conversion
0.555 (F - 32) = C (1.8 x C) + 32 = F

Page 130 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Friction Loss in Valves and Fittings

Friction Loss in Valves and Fittings


Find fitting reference point 1 line size point 2, read equivalent length at point 3. For high viscosity move straight
across from 3 and read point 4 in proper viscosity column.

02/2015 MM 604 Page 131


Piping Fitting Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Piping Fitting Dimensions


FLANGE THREADED FLANGED BEVEL SANITARY
SEAT CLAMP

Pipe 150# MSS Flange Fittings

Sanitary SCH. 40
Nom. Holes
Size I.D. O.D. I.D. O.D. O.D. T B.C. NoDia. A B C D E F G

1 .870 1.000 1.049 1.315 4-1/4 3/8 3-1/8 45/8 1-1/2 2 1-13/16 2-11/16 2 2-3/8

1-1/4 1.380 1.660 4-5/8 13/32 3-1/2 45/8 1-3/4

1-1/2 1.370 1.500 1.610 1.900 5 7/16 3-7/8 45/8 1-15/16 2-7/8 2-3/8 3-13/32 2-3/4 2-3/4

2 1.870 2.000 2.067 2.375 6 1/2 4-3/4 43/4 2-1/4 4-1/2 3-23/32 2-25/32 3-13/16 3-1/2 3-1/2

2-1/2 2.370 2.500 2.469 2.875 7 9/16 5-1/2 43/4 2-11/16 5 4-27/32 3-3/16 4-1/4 4-1/4 3-1/2

3 2.834 3.000 3.068 3.500 7-1/2 5/8 6 43/4 3-1/16 5-1/2 5-29/32 3-1/2 4-5/8 5 3-3/4

4 3.834 4.000 4.026 4.500 9 11/16 7-1/2 83/4 3-13/16 6-1/2 8-1/16 4-21/32 6-1/8 6-5/8 4-1/2

6 5.782 6.000 6.065 6.625 11 13/16 9-1/2 87/8 8 10-1/2 6-1/2

8 7.782 8.000 7.981 8.625 13-1/2 15/16 11-3/4 87/8 9 13-1/2 7-1/2

Page 132 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pipe Frictional Loss Graph

Pipe Frictional Loss Graph

02/2015 MM 604 Page 133


Miscellaneous Engineering Constants Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Miscellaneous Engineering Constants

Flow
Lbs of Water/Hr x 0.002@68F = Gal/Min Cu Meters/Hr x 4.4 = Gal/Min (US)
Gal/Min x 500 = Lbs of Water/Hr@68F Gal/Min x 0.227 = Cu Meters/Hr
(Lbs of Fluid/Hr S.G.) x 0.002 = Gal/Min Kg of Water/Min x 0.264@68F = Gal/Min (US)
Liters/Min x 0.264 = Gal/Min (US) Gal/Min x 3.8 = Kg of Water/Min@68F
GPM x 3.785 = Liters/Min

Pressure
Ft of Water x 0.433@68F = PSI Meters of Water x 1.42 = PSI
PSI x 2.31@68F = Ft of Water ATM x 760 = mm Hg
Inches Hg x 0.491 = PSI mm HG x 0.039 = Inches Hg
Inches Hg x 1.135@68F = Ft of Water Bar x 14.5 = PSI
ATM x 14.7 = PSI Newton/Meter2 x 1 = Pascal
ATM x 33.9 = Ft of Water@68F PSI x 6.9 = kPa (Kilopascal)
Kg/Sq cm x 14.22 = PSI kPa x 0.145 = PSI

Volume
Lbs Water x 0.119@68F = Gal Liter x 0.264 = Gal
Gal (Brit) x 1.2 = Gal (US) Cubic Meters x 264.2 = Gallons
Gal x 128 = Fluid Ounces Cubic Meter x 1000 = Liter
Cubic Ft x 7.48 = Gal Liters x 1000 = Cubic Centimeters
Cubic In. x 0.00433 = Gal Cubic Centimeters x 0.0338 = Fluid Ounces
Gal x 3.785 = Liters Fluid Ounces x 29.57 = Cubic Centimeters

Length
Mils x 0.001 = Inches Millimeters x .0394 = Inches
Meters x 3.281 = Feet Microns x .0000394 = Inches
Centimeters x 0.394 = Inches

Mass
Gal of Water x 8.336@68F = Lbs Kilograms x 2.2046 = Lbs
Cubic Ft of Water x 62.4@68F = Lbs Lbs x 0.4536 = Kilograms
Ounces x 0.0625 = Lbs Metric Ton x 2204.623 = Lbs

Temperature
(1.8 x C) + 32 =F
.555 (F - 32) =C
Degrees Kelvin - 273.2 =Degrees Centigrade

Page 134 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Miscellaneous Engineering Constants

Power
T (ft-lb) RPM T (in-lb) RPM Horsepower x 0.746 = Kilowatts
HP = -------------------------------------- = ---------------------------------------- Horsepower x 42.43 = BTU/Min
5250 63025
Metric Horsepower x 0.9863 = Horsepower
Disp (Gals) RPM PSI
HP = -----------------------------------------------------------------
1714 EFF
HP 63025
T (in-lbs) = ------------------------------- 12
RPM

HP X 5250
T (ft-lbs) = ----------------------------- x12
RPM

Miscellaneous
Average Absolute Atmospheric Pressure Heat of Fusion of Water = 144 BTU/Lb
Altitude above Sea Level Heat of Vaporization of Water = 970 BTU/Lb
Feet PSIA IN Hg
0 14.7 29.9
500 14.4 29.4
1,000 14.2 28.9
1,500 13.9 28.3
2,000 13.7 27.8
3,000 13.2 26.8
4,000 12.7 25.9
5,000 12.2 24.9
6,000 11.7 24.0
7,000 11.3 23.1

Metric Prefixes
Mega = 1,000,000 Deci = 0.1
Kilo = 1,000 Centi = 0.01
Hecto = 100 Milli = 0.001
Deca = 10 Micro = 0.000,001

Viscosity Conversion (approximate)

Absolute Viscosity (Centipoise) = Kinematic Viscosity


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Specific Gravity (Centistokes)
SSU@ 100 F x 0.2158 =
Saybolt Furol x 2.123 =
Redwood Std x 0.255 =
Redwood Admirality x 2.3392 = Centistokes
Engler-Degrees x 7.4389 =
Ford Cup # 4 x 3.53 =
MacMichael x 0.415 =
Stormer x 2.802 =

02/2015 MM 604 Page 135


Chemical Compatibility of Pump Materials Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Chemical Compatibility of Pump Materials


The following table is a partial list of common fluids which can be handled by Waukesha pumps of the
materials indicated.
The list is based primarily on acceptable corrosion rates. Rates of 0 to 0.010 inches per year (ipy) are
considered acceptable for even low viscosity fluids, as pump clearances, and thus pump performance will not
change greatly in normal service.
Corrosion rates of 0.010 to 0.020 ipy can often be tolerated with higher viscosity liquid (above 1,000 CPS).
Corrosion rates are greatly influenced by concentration, temperature, and fluid viscosity. Mixtures of liquids,
aerated liquids, or liquids with certain ions present (i.e., chloride) may have considerably different corrosion
rates, and should be investigated in references, or by actual test.
Unless otherwise indicated, the temperature for the fluid is 70F, concentration 0 to 100%.
Many other liquids can be handled at a variety of conditions. Corrosion tables, such as the Corrosion Data
Survey of The National Association of Corrosion Engineers can be consulted for an indication of material
acceptability, and Waukesha Cherry-Burrell will be happy to furnish recommendations for your fluid. This table
is intended as a guide only and Waukesha Cherry-Burrell reserves the right of approval of all applications.
A Acceptable, C Conditionally Acceptable, X Not Recommended

Stainless Ductile Stainless Ductile


Steel Iron Steel Iron
Fluids Pumps Pumps Fluids Pumps Pumps
Acetone Anhydride A X Ammonium
Acetone A A Chloride below 20% A X
Acetylene A A Hydroxide below 50% A X
Acid Nitrate A X
Acetic below 50% A X Meta-Phosphate A X
Boric below 30% A X Analine Dyes A X
Carbolic above 80% A A Animal Fats A A
Citric A X Asphalt A A
Fatty Acids A A Beet Juice & Pulps A A
Fruit A X Beer A X
Lactic below 10% A X Beer Wort A A
Nitric A X Benzene A X
Oxalic X X Black Liquor A A
Palmitic A X Blood A X
Phosphoric below 85% A X Butadiene A A
Pyroligneous below 10% A X Brines A X
Sulphuric below 25% A X Butter A X
Tannic A A Carbon Disulfide A A
Adhesives A A Carbon Tetrachloride A X
Alcohol Carbonated Beverages A X
Butyl A A Calcium Carbonate A X
Ethyl C C Cane Sugar & Liquor A A
Methyl A C Chocolate Syrup A A
Propyl A A Chlorine (Dry) A X
Aluminum Sulphate A X Clay Slurries & Coatings A A
Anhydrous Ammonia A A

Page 136 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Chemical Compatibility of Pump Materials

Stainless Ductile Stainless Ductile


Steel Iron Steel Iron
Fluids Pumps Pumps Fluids Pumps Pumps
Castor Oil A X Methane A A
Catsup A X Methyl Ethyl Ketone A A
Cellulose Acetate A X Milk A X
Cheese A X Molasses A A
Chloroform below 80% C X Naptha A A
Coffee Extracts A X Oil
Corn Syrup A A Most Types of Mineral &
A A
Cottonseed Oil A A Vegetable
Creosote A A Paint A A
Detergents A X Plasticizers A A
Dextrose A A Polyvinyl Acetate A X
Dyes A X Polyvinyl Chloride A X
Eggs A X Potassium Chloride A X
Ether A X Propane A A
Ferric Sulfate below 20% A X Rosin A A
Formaldehyde A X Sewage A A
Fruit Juice A X Soap Liquors & Solutions A A
Freon A A Sodium Acetate X A
Furfural (below 20%) A X Carbonate A A
Gasoline A A Sodium Cyanide A A
Gelatin A X Hydroxide below 0.25% A X
Glucose A A Bisulfide A X
Glue A A Sulfate A X
Glycerin A A Peroxide X A
Glycols Ethylene A C Phosphate (Neutral) X X
Hydrazine A X Silicate A A
Herbicides A A Nitrate A A
Hydrogen Peroxide Starch A X
below 10%, above 90% A X Styrene A A
Insecticides A A Sucrose A A
Ink A A Sugar Solutions A C
Ketones A X Tallow A A
Lactose A X TomatoJuices,
A X
Lacquers A A Concentrate, Catsup
Latex A C Trichoroethylene A X
Linseed Oil A A Toluene A A
Lubricating Oils A A Turpentine A A
LyeCaustic below 25% A X Waxes & Emulsions A A
Magnesium Sulfate A A Wine A X
Margarine A X Xylene A X
Mayonnaise A X Yeast A X
MeatsGround A X Zinc Sulfate below 25% A X
MeatsFats A A

02/2015 MM 604 Page 137


Pump Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Pump Dimensions

IMPORTANT
The pump dimensions provided in this document are for reference
only and may not be current. Contact your Waukesha Cherry-Burrell
representative for a copy of our most up-to-date information.

Page 138 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Dimensions

02/2015 MM 604 Page 139


Pump Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Page 140 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Dimensions

02/2015 MM 604 Page 141


Pump Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Page 142 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Dimensions

02/2015 MM 604 Page 143


Pump Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Page 144 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Dimensions

02/2015 MM 604 Page 145


Pump Dimensions Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

Page 146 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-Burrell Pump Dimensions

NOTES

02/2015 MM 604 Page 147


Waukesha Pump Selection Work Sheet Waukesha Cherry-Burrell

EFFECTIVE VISCOSITY REQD PRELIMINARY PUMP


REF: PGS 5, 131, 132 GPM SELECTION PG 47

FRICTION LOSSES FRICTION LOSSES


PG 51 PG 57

STATIC PRESSURE REQMT. EQUIPMENT PRESSURE DROP


PG 13, 14, 51 (Z x 0.433 x S.G.)

EQUIPMENT PRESSURE DROP STATIC PRESSURE REQMT.


PG 13, 14, 57 (Z x .433 x S.G.)
TOTAL DISCHARGE PRESSURE TOTAL INLET PRESS. DROP

PUMP SPEED

DIFFERENTIAL PRESS STATIC PRESS


PG 13, 60 PG 13, 14, 57
HORSEPOWER

TORQUE

DRIVE SELECTION
PG 64

For assistance from Waukesha Cherry-Burrells Application Engineering Department in selecting a drive, please send us your requirements on application data
sheet.

Page 148 MM 604 02/2015


Waukesha Cherry-
Burrell
E N G I N E E R I N G M A N UA L

S PX F LOW, I n c .

611 Sugar Creek Road


Delavan, WI 53115
P: (262) 728-1900 or (800) 252-5200
F: (262) 728-4904 or (800) 252-5012
E: wcb@spxflow.com

SPX FLOW, Inc. reserves the right to incorporate our latest design and mate-
rial changes without notice or obligation.

Design features, materials of construction and dimensional data, as described


in this bulletin, are provided for your information only and should not be relied
upon unless confirmed in writing.
Please contact your local sales representative for product availability in your
region. For more information visit www.spxflow.com.

The green > is a trademark of SPX FLOW, Inc.

ISSUED 02/2015
COPYRIGHT 2015 SPX FLOW, Inc.