You are on page 1of 116

HARIN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY

31111002315610
v> O K> O
VONSENSE
Songs
|
OVER SON GS- 100
j
WORDS AND MUSIC
COLLECTION OF ALL-TIME FAVORITES
ASWELL AS UNFAMILIAR SONGS THAT
WILL MAKE ALL GAY. OCCASIONS GAYER

Edi ted by NORMAN CAZDEN


ILLUSTRATED WITH DRAWINGS BY CHARLES KELLER

H.9S

'**fc^W
i
" -^

!--'' fe > '\

m 5 n\
'
7

ft 3 0"?$
DATE DUE
<$5 d>L k

t)EC22 198lFEB U0
+
. 1 tf* ipp 14 986 1

Wl/JL
- ^.

iS?t
j y _3 fli
U4-4
iN 2 2 19
6 ibbb

^ j V 'i389

^ 'JUL .06
NCV 1 4 1990
1990^

I0V 3 1992 w
iflV 2 + 1992

^ ^ ,> 1
SEP

XJL
5 199! i

tffr
&m.
Wr*
784.4973 A book of nonsense songs; over 100 songs,
words and music. Illustrated with drawings
by Charles Keller. Crown Publishers
[1961]
106p. illus, music.
o cj
Tunes, with chord symbols for guitar.
Words, printed as text, follow each no.

1. Folk- songs, American


2. Humorous songs I. Title
LW 3/70

1
RAL

A Book of 3 ! I I I 00231 5610

NONSENSE
MAY 2 5 10T6

SEP 1 2 197
Songs
OVER SONGS- 100
WORDS AND MUSIC

1
ory

Edited by NORMAN CAZDEN


ILLUSTRATED WITH DRAWINGS BY CHARLES KELLER

GROWN PUBLISHERS, INC., NEW YORK


Third Printing. March. 1966

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 60-15392 1961 bv Norman Cazden


CONTENTS
Introduction iii Jinny Get Around 81
Badger Hill 8 Johnny Booker 76
Ballad Of Hennery White, The 6 Johnny Graw 92
Bannity Dan 22 Kangaroo, The 17
Barbara Totally High 17 Knickerbocker Line, The 74
Barney 60 Knick Knack Cadillac 95
Beezer, The 39 Leaning On The Lamb 58
Black-Eyed Susie 31 Little Pigs, The 20
Blood On The Saddle 43 j LittleRed Hen, The 59
Blow The Wind Southerly 41 Little Wood, The 9
Bold Fisherman, The 70 Lofty Giant, The 44
Bos'n John 61 Long Tail Blue, The 55
Buckeye Jim 49 Lookit Here 89
Buffalo Gals 80 Looky There Now 54
Bulldog On The Bank, The 85 Madeline 37
Calico Pie 11 Marlene 13
Cape Cod Girls 26 Mary's Lamb 91
Captain Jinks 50 Michael Finnigin 77
Cindy 10 Midnight On The Ocean 63
Clear The Kitchen 101 / Monkey's Wedding, The 86
Clementine 56 My Dove 71
Clinch Mountain 73 Noble Duke Of York, The 30
Courting Susan Jane 42 Old Dan Tucker 66
Cute Little Car, The 29 Old Joe Clarke 38
Danbury Mare, The 4 Old King Cole 102
Darby Ram, The 87 Old Tobacco Box, The 88
Dipsycola, The 21 One More River 75
Dixieland 34 Peter Gray 67
Donkey Named Pete, A 94 Pop Goes The Weasel 33
Don't Stub Your Toe On Friday 98 Red Herring, The 48
Duralaydeo 14 Rhinossorheeaguss, The 53
Eddystone Light, The 19 Row De Dow De Dunfer 72
Ee-Rye-Ee Canal, The 16 Sairy Ann 32
Fire Down Below 76 Sally Goodin 97
Flapjacks Tree, The 106 Sam Hall 84
Fooba Wooba John 90 Savin Rock 30
Forty-Eight Bottles 27 Si And I 21
Frisky Jim 40 Simple Little Nancy Brown 57
Game Farm 52 Skip To My Lou 23
Gollycully, The 15 Susie Q 3
Handy Andy 47 Swapping Song, The 28
Haul Away, Joe 65 / Tanglefoot Sue 68
Hello, Susie Brown 45 Tell-A-Me True 64
Hey Hum Diddle Urn Day 62 Three Craw 1
Hi Ho Jerum 12
Three Sisters, The 78
History Of The World 46
Three Times Over 100
Hoggedee Boggedee How Now 82
Timmy Tyes 5
In The Field So Early 24
I Wish I Were A Crank 93
Tom Queer 18

Jarsey Jane 83 Uncle Charlie 2

Jaycee Line, The 96 Unfortunate Miss Bailey 99


Jenny Jenkins 104 Walloping Window Blind, The 36
Jim Along Jo 69 Yard of Pudding, The 7
INTRODUCTION
There are two kinds of nonsense songs: those that make sense and those that
don't.
Nonsense songs make sense when they are songs about nonsense. Their
tales, descriptions or arguments may be outrageously incredible, extravagant
or preposterous sheer nonsense. But they are intelligible. We are not at a
loss as to what they say. Sometimes what they say is deliberately confusing. But
we are alert to the confusion; we can puzzle over it, and feel superior. Some-
times what they say may prove very sensible indeed. Thus "A Yard of Pudding"
teaches the logical principle that anything true of all members of a group is also
true of some unlikely members. The silent hero of "Barney" departs for reasons
with which we can readily sympathize. Even a tall tale like "Row De Dow De
Dunfer" makes us pause over the nature of verifiable evidence.
Sensible nonsense song may of course resemble simple humorous song, or it
may resemble nonsense verse. What distinguishes it is a critical dependence
on music. The contour of a tune may force a non sequitur in the song text.
Rhythmic balance may require a rhyme or an extra syllable out of turn. Thus the
tune structure makes Pennsylvane-eye-ay rhyme in just so many syllables with
"Peter Gray," in defiance of its usual pronunciation.
What this amounts to is that musical sense and language sense do not follow
the same processes. Psychologically they do not match; they are incommensura-
ble. When words or the sounds of words are made to follow musical patterns
rather then their own, the meanings of the words come out funny. Yet our habits
of thinking in words lead us to seek their normal references and meanings just
the same. The result is that special kind of imaginative humor called nonsense,
and nonsense in turn is most delightful when the musical logic of a good tune
makes any incongruities in the sense of the words seem natural and right. In-
stinctively we recognize when literal discrepancy is justified by an appropriate
lilt, and that lilt accounts for most of the hypnotic fascination that nonsense

songs have had for young people of any age range. Nonsense songs show how
poetic rhythm and rhyme originated in melody.
The dominance of music over language forms is more elemental and more
obvious in the second kind of nonsense songs, which are not about nonsense but
which rather consist of nonsense. Whether the texts here are formed entirely of
nonsense syllables or partly of what appear to be real words that are removed
from any reliable reference, the emphasis lies wholly on the sonorous or musical
quality of word sounds, so that only the sound and fury of language remains,
while nothing signifies. Melodious vowel formants and rhythmic consonant
clicks are shaped into music-like sequences of singsong syllables. Try singing
a short declarative sentence about anything at all to a phrase from a simple
dance tune. You will probably find that something like "rum, tee turn, tee turn"
is needed to complete it, and perhaps "hi-oh, and a dumbledee dum" as a parallel
line.
Some such combinations as the rum-and-tea mentioned may drift momentarily
over into unexpected word forms of a given language. Normal usages of the
language familiar to the singer may also delimit and guide the kinds of syl-
lables commonly trolled. But so surely do nonsense syllables serve a purely
musical function that when they do occasionally congeal into true words, or even
into groups of words, these seem accidental, irrelevant, misplaced, and cor-
respondingly ludicrous. I dread the day when some zealous psychiatrist subjects
the text of "Barbara Totally High" to analysis in depth, when it is no more than
a convenient set of vocalizations to an asymmetrical round.
In practice, the two kinds of nonsense songs cannot be separated sharply, for

in
^y^

both trends pervade the same songs. Some of the typical nonsense song is about
nonsense and some consists of nonsense. Thus most nonsense songs have re-
frains or interlinear fillers of nonsense syllables, and many contain little else.
But a song like "The Three Sisters" presents a more or less connected story
interspersed with extraneous jingling "pronounces" (or nonsense), while "Sally
Goodin" has more likely just grown out of foot-tapping improvisations into seem-
ingly intelligible patter. The traditional nonsense song is by nature free and
easy, impudent and imaginative, and any rule prescribed could only become an
incentive to its transgression. Syllable play would be wasted on "Handy Andy"
or under the tale of "The Danbury Mare."
Where do nonsense songs come from, particularly those in this first compre-
hensive collection? Why, they are traditional, which in honest translation means
that we shall forever wonder. They have just been sung around casually by any-
one who enjoyed singing them, and people still learn them mostly by hearing
them and unavoidably singing along. Folklorists call this oral tradition, which
means they haven't yet proved to what extent each song was spread in print,
music hall, school, recording or broadcast, and until they face up to it there is
still time to spin romantic theories about homespun art.

The traditional nonsense song, like all true folk song, may have originated
anywhere, most often full-blown as the creation of an individual, who in turn
borrowed heavily from previous tradition. The eventual forms taken by a song
result from selective preservation and variation, orally but also in stage per-
formance and print, of what somebody took up as a good idea. Anyone feels free
to sing such a song in his own way, to make unwitting changes besides, and to
call all other versions wrong. So everybody participates in the process of dif-
ferentiation and growth of the song, except the self-conscious folklorist, who
refuses to intervene. (A folklorist is an animated recording-machine accessory
that filters out the fun others are having, the better to register its outward ac-
cidents of form. Let two boys choose up sides for a game of ball, and a folk-
lorist will come along to set it down and spoil the game.)
The songs in this collection are traditional among English-speaking people,
mainly in the United States. Many if not most of them have appeared in print,
one way or another. Only the unwary will tick off those not immediately recog-
nized. Yet neither words nor tunes have appeared previously in precisely these
forms, which are, of course, the only right ones. I don't hold with editors who
abdicate editorial judgment or who take being objective to mean lacking ob-
jective. These are tunes and lines to have fun with, singing.
To give in detail where and how each of the songs in this collection originated
and in what variety of forms it has been known would require another book much
larger than this, and would interest only specialists; people who just enjoy sing-
ing together wouldn't read it. A proper bibliography alone would run to several
thousand items, and would deprive scholars of their favorite sport. It would make
no sense to do that, but go ahead
check up on me.
Nonsense songs reflect a range of impulses and activities that defy simple
classification. Some are dance tunes which have been deedled until their
vocalized rhythms vaguely resemble words or perhaps the sounds of instruments.
Some are tall tales or insy-versies, with absurd embellishments and fanciful
tangents. Many portray animals acting almost as foolishly as people. Some are
satires on serious ballads or parodies on humbug, false sentimentality or pre-
tended malevolence. "Clementine" heads a bevy of unlovelies whose model is
the immortal Katisha. The trouble with most collegiate nonsense songs is not
that they are so uppity-clever, but that they rarely carry memorable tunes.
chief principle in selecting and assembling these songs has been musical
My
quality and appeal. A nonsense song must have a sprightly tune capable of
inviting and supporting endless repetition without growing raucous or unfriendly.
(I hope nobody notices my inclusion of a few decidedly gloombrious items: Such
also form the stuff of nonsense.) Musicians in particular may observe that the

k
nonsense song provides the only kind of music to which aesthetic notions about
pure form can conceivably apply. Such pure extract of musical form devoid of
substance is in fact a wholly nonsensical concept, and this book therefore ought
to be the first to explore it properly. But I have yet to discover a nonsense song
without human and humane relevance, for who would sing it?
The versions of the songs in this collection have been chosen and reworked
from among diverse occasional and often careless treatments of the texts and
tunes. It has not made sense to honor old misprints, forgetfulness, conventional-
ity or kindred errors in nonsense songs above their core of poetic and musical
imagery. Enough of slipshod gleanings of any and every bit of song doggerel that
is not nailed down. In spite of TV standards, one may have a conscience about
ways of having fun. I have been critical about songs and song elements that
reflect merely transient or dubious fashions. I have sought to compile full,
chortling texts and laughing tunes that people like to live with. I have not limited
the guitar chordings to routines or makeshifts. In particular I have carefully
weighed the positive roots of certain nineteenth-century minstrel cliches, of
undoubted popular style and origin, against their forced and unfunny lampoons of
social groups. Not musical or poetical or even theatrical purposes, but only the
sorriest commercial incentives, can have been responsible for the tawdry ex-
ploitation of imaginative elements in early American Negro song for the mocking
of their authors. Making fun of anyone goes against the grain of nonsense songs,
for their good spirits come alive only where people have healthy fun together.
As with my earlier Dances From Woodland and The Abelard Folksong Book, I
am much beholden here for some song material, and even more for cordial good-
time attitudes, to my friends and neighbors of the Catskill Mountains of New York
State; specifically to Latius and Mary Avery, Elwyn Davis, Sarah Decker, George
Edwards, Frank Joy, Celia Kelder, Ernie Sager, Harry Siemsen, Mike Todd,
Aaron Van De Bogart and George Van Kleeck. But none of these kind people
bears any blame for the results.
Sine merrily, sing lustily, and have fun! .. _ ,
Norman Cazden
r
Three Craw New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

PP g^ J.
I
G7

J i' J *
Em 0"7

m 07

mm at*
^
t m a
1 Three craw sat upon a wa',
Sat upon a wa'
('Tis a warm night),
There were three craw sat upon a wa'
On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

2 The first craw, he couldna find his maw,


He couldna find his maw
('Tis a warm night),
The first craw, he couldna find his maw
On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

3 The second craw, he couldna flee at a',


He couldna flee at a'
('Tis a warm night),
The second craw, he couldna flee at a'
On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

4 The third craw, he toombled off the wa',


He toombled off the wa'
('Tis a warm night),
The third craw, he toombled off the wa'
On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

5 The fourth craw, he wasna there at a'


He wasna there at a'
('Tis a warm night),
The fourth craw, he wasna there at a'
On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

6 And that's a' I ken about the craw,

I ken about the craw


('Tis a warm night),
And that's a' ken about the craw
I

On a cold and a frosty mornin'.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC.. New York, N Y


!

T
Uncle Charlie New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
07 G D G

m ^^ m
8m D7

^^
Am7

Uncle Charlie walked to town,


^m
D7

^ w
Dragged his eyebrows on the ground,
Never knew he was on his head
Till on his toe he chanced to tread.

Refrain:
Oh, be careful
Oh brothers, do be careful,
Oh, be careful:
Seek Yerushalem.

2 Having lunch one afternoon,


He thought he was a serving spoon,
Wondered why it was so hard
To dip himself in the mustard jar. [Refrain]

3 Lying awake one windy night,


He thought he was a paper kite;
Didn't find out he was no such thing
Till he tried to fly without the string. [Refrain]

4 Once he thought he was a cake,


Into the oven he set to bake;
Climbed out long before he was done:
He'd forgotten to put his frosting on. [Refrain]

5 Uncle Charlie thought how nice


Itwas to be a can of beer on ice,
But he complained he had some doubt
How he'd pour himself all out. [Refrain]

6 Once Uncle Charlie felt quite ill,


He thought he was a vitamin pill;
Took some water and ate some bread,
Never managed to swallow his head. [Refrain]

7 One hot day, when the snow was cool,


He thought he was a counter stool;
But he risked a sad mishap
When he tried to sit upon his lap. [Refrain]

"
I copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.
#

Susie Q New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN


Am7 G

frifr i

r
J ,J Jinuji i
'i'i'J
p
i
i-rrrtf^

*^
m r r *- v J m
JJ i-=^^
tm m
" JJ
>
G

J
'

*-
07

4
Em

J J) J J

*
J

r
1
J J'^

J f
3-^ :?-
f
t.

j-
J J '

-i"S"* ^
*
V, U U MH1/ Dm v I// u

* J', J>lJ J , I f), JmJ h M J J?


#-

f ip ^^
j^ j j_j i

p
^ jy j^

1 Oh, my Susie is the prettiest girl that ever you will see,
For she charms the frogs, the cats and dogs, likewise the honeyhee.
Everybody loves my Susie, and the others love her too,
But you ought to see my Susie when she does the Susie Q.

Refrain [twice]:
Give it a nip up, hop up, hoop de dooden doo,
You ought to see my Susie when she does the Susie Q.

2 It was on a summer evening, when the snow was rather high,

That I went to see my Susie, and the tear was in my eye;


Then she said, "My dear, my duck- eye-dear, a hoop de dooden doo!"
And she took to dancipation with a rattling of her shoe. [Refrain]

3 Now my Susie's in the kitchen for a shelling out the peas,


While the monkey's in the parlor for a tasting of the cheese,
So we'll play upon the fiddle, and we'll play upon the drum,
And we'll play upon your sympathy; Oh, Susie, can't you come? [Refrain]

4 How doth the busy little bee delight to bark and bite ?
For gathers honey all the day, but I meet mine at night.
it

Tell me, what's the matter with Susie; tell me, what's the matter, my dear?
Tell me, what's the matter with Susie, for I'm going to leave you here. [Refrain]

'
c

&5 >

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


The Danbury Mare New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
A

jiH^i-rjjj-n
c
i

G7
**'

j-j j
*"'"

0m7
>i c_r_r

9
Em
cm

G7
JJ J i

^N
C
F
r

( \>
l
'

* ^
1
*
1

-#- 1 +l -#

1 As I went a-walking to Danbury Fair,


A-ridirig my trailer upon a gray mare,
Her coat was so purple that hardly a hair
But what was all brown on my Danbury mare.

2 Met Jimmie and Francie, and a company more,


All driving alone and on foot, as before,
The fog horns were tinkling, the people declared
It's the New Haven Diesel drawn by a gray mare.

3 The girl in the doorway was dressed up so neat,


Had nothing but earrings from her head to her feet;
She gave me some cheese from the old turkey's back,
When I'd eaten it all, put the rest in my sack.

4 Then I strolled on the lawn, where a big pile of stone


On the runway was ready to take us all home,
Looked down at the ceiling, and who should I see
But the Danbury mare shake her finners at me.

5 The moonlight shone through when the rain had begun,


Ibreasted the snowdrifts while I sat in the sun,
When Francie winked at me with a horrified stare
As I tanked up with ethyl my Danbury mare.

6 That same balmy day I stayed out in the storm


With my hat in my hand so to keep my head warm,
She busted her mainspring, I climbed on her face,
And on my tiptoes rode all over the place.

7 So I'll saddle my mare and go fishing once more,


I've never gone fishing for tigers before;
If my mare blows a fuse and her innards should spill,

I'll have one more beer; no, I don't think I will!

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.

L
Tim my Tyes
f lyes New Words and New Music Arrjngeme m bj NORMAN CA2DEN
A D E7 A

fo ** 1
* * 1 1 '

1
|
#
1

'

C*r

4
s lj '
r
'
un n i j

mm
C*m

a ^^ s
P * '

1 Timmy Tyes, wondrous wise,


Goes into the water,
Flounders in and scrambles out
Wetter than he thoughter.

Refrain:
Timmy, Timmy, Timmy Tyes,
Timmy tiny dawring,
Jimp a Timmy, Timmy Tyes,
Timmy tiny dawring.

2 Timmy Tyes, wondrous wise,


Steps into a puddle,
Slips and flails his arms about
And splatters himself with muddle. [Refrain]

3 Timmy Tyes, wondrous wise,


Fights at every meeting,
Rolls up his sleeves and takes a stance
To catch himself a beating. [Refrain]

4 Timmy Tyes, wondrous wise,


Knows what he is after,
If you stop by and tickle him,
He'll explode with laughter. [Refrain]

5 Timmy Tyes, wondrous wise,


Timmy is a wonder,
Puts his things on inside out
And never makes a blunder. [Refrain]

t copyrifht 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


The Ballad of Hennery Whiie New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

G A C Dm G F

i i
J J IJ.IJB j I

m
gj t f fm

^ ^ m
J.
Dm

m 1 1
G7

I
m i 1
1
1
JJ J r M JJI]j 1
1
]
1

Come all you people forlorn and pale,


And you shall hear of a dismal tale;
It's all about young Hennery White,
Who was his patients' sole delight.
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
Who was his parients' sole delight.

Hennery was a cobbuler by trade,


It was soon he had his fortune made,
Till he fell in love with Pollyanna Green,
The prettiest maid that never was seen.
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
The prettiest maid that never was seen.

But when his suit she did deny,


He into a taverrin went to cry,
And there the brew made him so sick,
He thought to pizen her with arsenic.
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
He thought to pizen her with arsenic.

To pizen her straightforth he was verily loth,


So he mixed it in some sheepshead broth,
Which she did eat, while she was able,
Till she fell dead beneath the table.
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
Till she fell dead beneath the table.

One night when he lay fast asleep,


He plainnelly saw the ghost of a sheep,
And unto him it dole-le-fully said:
"What have you done with my poor head?"
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
"What have you done with my poor head?"

Now all young men unmarried,


Take warning by Hennery White that's dead:
Ifhe never had done that sheep any wrong,
He might have been here to sing this song.
Tiddy fol lol lol bim,
Skiddy ki di dol bim,
He might have been here to sing this song.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS. INC., New York, N. Y.

k
The Yard Of Pudding New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

mm WW
D Bm

m ffi 4
9~9

m
Em7 A7

m 13 JJ I

U
9 &

Em7 47
ig

mr rr c_r
i
jjj - |

j- jmj j j>j j^ i
J j jjj
Bm G A7

r p f cj
*9
pum =?

1 It's hard to drink through a broken nose;


When we have no money we are apt to be sad;
People lacking feet have very few toes;
Some crazy fellows may become quite mad.

Refrain:
With a fol dee rol and a didderrum, a put,
A yard of pudding is bigger than a foot,
With a fol dee rol and a didderrum, a hi!
That's the truth, we never tell a lie.

2 Now seagulls seldom wear their gloves on Sunday;


Sailors often never learn to fly;
Competition makes for very poor ice-cream,
Not because the monument is high. [Refrain]

3 Most pork is generally made from pigs;


That gun is over-large for shooting flies;
Lawyers may find themselves involved in cases;
Ketchup isn't tasty used in apple pies. [Refrain]

4 A dog with a wooden leg buys hardly any shoes;


It's usually pleasant when you take a girl out;
We'll probably live until we die,
But not many know what this is all about. [Refrain]

r coovrioM 10*1 hv MriODY TRAIIS INC Nw York N Y

'
Badger Hill New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

07 G

t rr rinrrr t i
rrrr ^
J
r r~ r
i

r r ULL/ i

r r r Lj" i

=+

07 G
d * =:
^ S^^F ^
=3 <=-

i J J !
J J
I

[ J n s=F
Cj i-TJTJ j JiJT^a
1 One fine day I went to the mill,
And I got stuck on Badger Hill;
I hawed my horses, and I gee'd my cart,

But to save my soul, I couldn't get a start!

Refrain [twice]:
Oh, where you come from, help a
body down,
Oh, a wagonful of corn meal, turn
yourself around.

2 There was a frog, lived in yonder spring,


The water was so wet that he couldn't swim;
Hitched his tail to an elm-tree stump,
And he hollered, and he bellered, but
still he couldn't jump! [Refrain]

Applesaucey with a pumpkin pie,


The black cat spit in the white cat's eye;
White cat sang out, "Lookayou here,
Christmas comes but once a year!"
[Refrain]

Away down South, where banana yams grow,


A flea stepped on an elephant's toe;
The elephant cried, with tears in his
eyes,
"Why don't you pick on a feller your size?"
[Refrain]

Big foot up and the little foot down,


Honors to your partners and swing them
all around;
Cornstalk fiddle and a shoestring bow,
If this isn't dancing, show you how.
[Refrain]

Horse and a flea and the three blind mice


Sat on a curbstone, chewing on the ice;
Then the horse slipped, and fell on the flea:
"Whoops!" said the flea, "That's a
horse on me! " [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New YorK. N. Y


. . .

The Little Wood New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em7 A7 D (D) A

ffi*
j.ji jjjjJJ i

tilS*-
j> \ ^j j i flpji,p i j

F*m

,'JJJ JJ]|J ^i^ Lfi '


i
nri I

J,

Now once upon a time there was a Now on this twig there was a little leaf,
wood,
little The finest little leaf you ever did see,
The finest little wood you ever did see, And the leaf was on the twig,
And the wood just stood And the twig was on the branch,
As a little wood should And the branch was on the tree,
While the green grass grew all And the tree was in the wood,
around, all around, And the wood just stood
While the green grass grew all around. As a little wood should
While the green grass grew all
Now in this wood there was a around, all around,
little tree, While the green grass grew all around.
The finest little tree you ever did see,
And the tree was in the wood, Now on this leaf there was a little nest,

And the wood just stood The finest little nest you ever did see,
As a little wood should And the nest was on the leaf,
While the green grass grew all And the leaf was on the twig. .

around, all around, [etc.]


While the green grass grew all around.
Now in this nest there was a little egg,
Now on this tree there was a little branch, The finest little egg you ever did see,
The finest little branch you ever did see, And the egg was in the nest,
And the branch was on the tree, And the nest was on the leaf. . .

And the tree was in the wood, [ere]


And the wood just stood
As a little wood should Now in this egg there was a little bird,

While the green grass grew all The finest little bird you ever did see,
around, all around, And the bird was in the egg,
While the green grass grew all around. And the egg was in the nest. . .

[ere]
Now on this branch there was a
little twig, Now on this bird there was a little

The finest little twig you ever did see, feather,

And the twig was on the branch, The finest little feather you ever
And the branch was on the tree, did see,
And the tree was in the wood, And the feather was on the bird,
And the wood just stood And the bird was in the egg. .

As a little wood should [ere]


While the green grass grew all
around, all around, 10 Now on this feather there was a
While the green grass grew all around. little quill,
The finest little quill you ever did see,
And the quill was on the feather,
And the feather was on the bird. . .

[ere]

11 Now out of this quill we've made a


little song,
The finest little song you ever did see,
And the song was of the quill,
And the quill was on the feather . .

[ere]
copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.
Cindy New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
Bm C D7 G

* 3=1 CJ* c_r i

r
j p i

LTrJ w ### i *#

1nJ] ijJi i P^ij i

j
JJ i

j .n i J'j ^f>^u a
1 You ought to see my Cindy, Her face is of the ruddiest,
She lives a way down South, Her hair a chestnut brown,
And she's so sweet, the honey bees Her eyes just like a thunder cloud
Swarm around her mouth. Before the rain comes down. [Refrain]

Refrain: 6 She kissed me and she hugged me,


Get along home, Cindy, Cindy, She called me sugar plum;
Get along home, She threw her arms around me,
Get along home, Cindy, Cindy, And I thought my time had come. [Refrain]
I'll marry you some day.

7 Iwish I was an apple


2 The first I saw my Cindy, A-hanging on a tree,
She was standing in the door, And every time that Cindy passed,
Her shoes and stockings in her hand She 'd take a bite of me. [Refrain]
And her feet all over the floor. [Refrain]
8 I wish I had a needle
3 She took me to the parlor, As fine as I could sew,
She cooled me with her fan, I'dsew that girl to my coat tail
She said I was the prettiest thing And down the road I'd go. [Refrain]
In the shape of mortal man. [Refrain]
9 Now when I see my Cindy,
4 Oh, Cindy is a pretty girl, Sometimes I have a notion
Yes, Cindy is a peach; I'd love to kiss such a pretty little girl,

She threw her arms around my neck Stop making such commotion. [Refrain]
And hung on like a leech. [Refrain]

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


10

Calico Pie New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

6m F*m Bm l^^-mmm,

* I m m
* "

F*m A7 D G D A7
f\

\ry * _J+ 1 1 Ml ^1 '1 1

9 \
m ci
:-

1 Calico pie, the little birds fly


Down to the calico tree,
Their wings so blue that they sing, tillaloo,
And they never come back to me, to me,
And they never come back to me.

2 Calico jam, the little fish swam


Over the calico sea,
He doffed his hat to the sole and the sprat,
And he never came back to me, to me,
And he never came back to me,

3 Calico fun, the little mice run


To dress in time for tea,
Then, flipperty flup, they drink it all up,
And never come back to me, to me,
And they never come back to me.

4 Calico drum, the grasshoppers come


With the butterfly, beetle and bee,
Over the ground with a hop and a bound,
And they never come back to me, to me,
And they never come back to me.

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 11


Hi Ho Jerum New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
D Em7 A D

i l~U

w
* d

F*m D Em7 A D G

# ra
*
/

D A7 3 C 3 D Em7 A D

# * a
'"> - 1 1
1
*

1 There was a rich man and he lived 5 Now the rich man died, but he
in Jerusalem, didn't fare so wellium,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum, Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
He had a fine house and he lived He couldn't reach Heaven, so he
very sprucium, had to go to Hellium,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum. Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum.
[Refrain]
Refrain:
Hi ho jerum and hi ho jerum, 6 He on down till he got to
fell
Skeedum a rinky doolium, Sheolium,
skeedum a rinky doolium, Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum. The Devil said, "Fine! We'll
shovel on the coalium!"
2 Now on his doorstep stood a human Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum.
wreckium, [Refrain]
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
He wore a bowler hat, but the brim 7 "My soul! I declare, this is a
was 'round his neckium, mighty warm hotelium!"
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum, Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
[Refrain] "This is just a very common, very
ordinary Hellium."
3 The poor man asked for a piece of Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum.
bread and cheesium, [Refrain]
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
But the rich man shook his head, 8 And that's how we know why riches
said, "I'll send for the po- are no jokium,
leecium! Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum. We'll all get to Heaven, 'cause
[Refrain] we're all stony brokium,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum.
4 When the poor man died, his soul [Refrain]
went Heavenium,
to
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum,
And he danced with the saints till a
quarter past elevenium,
Glory hallelujah, hi ho jerum.
[Refrain]

12 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


#

Marlene New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA70EN

J l

r Fr
J,
N jy ji w
gi
w

Marlene went walking down the street while wearing a little green hat,
Marlene went walking down the street while wearing a little green hat,
And some were driving busses, and some were driving cars,
And the G is silent, as in "fish,"
Dilly-o, a rinktum, a laddie.

A man, he had a golf club that hit two tees at once,


A man, he had a golf club that hit two tees at once,
And some were baking apples, and some were baking pears,
And the Q is pronounced as in "electricity,"
Dilly-o, a rinktum, a laddie.

Now what became of Marlene, and what became of the club?


Now what became of Marlene, and what became of the club?
For some were watching the ball game, and some were clocking ties,
And the B is there, as in "humming" or in "honey,"
Dilly-o, a rinktum, a laddie.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC.. New York. N. Y. 13



Duralaydeo New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

m jM j ^^mm
D7

i t-
G

1 , " j tr
'
J- d ' * * 4 * 4 '
j
<= ^ |
M

1 There once was a doctor came out


of the west,
To my duraling, duralaydeo;
He courted a maid who was none of
the best,

Re/rain:
To my dura, lura, biggledy nura,
Jiggledy duralaydeo.

2 She went to bed at eleven o'clock,


To my duraling, duralaydeo,
And she wrestled the moon from the
chimney top. [Refrain]

3 She dressed herself into swaggery


clothes,
To my duraling, duralaydeo,
And down to Manhattan Island she
goes. [Refrain]

4 She sat on the lawn till she caught


a trout,
To my duraling, duralaydeo,
And then on the rocks she went
flapping about. [Refrain]

5 The doctor told her to stand on her


toes,
To my duraling, duralaydeo;
She stood on her toes, and she
tweaked his nose. [Refrain]

6 There's a crust of bread upon the


shelf,
To my duraling, duralaydeo;
If you want any more, you may sing
it yourself. [Refrain]

14 C0pyrl|M 1961 by MELOOY TRAILS INC.. New York N Y


The Gollycully New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

A G*m F*m7

^s
-
E E

gS >
JJJJlf J J JJ I
^JJ "irjtf i

rr'^

A
* ^u
_
*

(Km
<rfm
*

Ffn7
F*m7 E
_jji if
B7
r

E
F*m7

^
j

B7 C<m
^^^ ^ A F*m7

^'m' nil i.i *J jljjliTO^jr^- ^ l


U^^i
C#m A F#m7 G#m B7 G"m F*m

Now you take a gollycully for the turkey soup,


And you take a gollycully for the trolley,
I'll tell you of the scrape I had
To win my loverly Molly.
I asked her, would she take a ride
With me, when the wind was steady,
She jumped up high and cracked her heels,
And declared that she was ready.

Refrain:
It'll never do to give it up so,
It'll never do to give it up, eo get the axe.
I t'll never do to give it up so long,
Go get the gollycully, go get the axe,
It'll never do to give it up so.

On down the river and up the creek,


My boat soon ran a grounder,
When a pine log rolled right to the brim
And stove both ends in 'round her.
I turned about to look for Moll,
And never shall forgotten
To see her making horseshoe tracks
All across the sandy bottom. [Refrain]

And then I saw my gollycully cross the bridge


So she wouldn't get her feet wet,
Well, Molly would have crossed that bridge,
But the bridge, it wasn't built yet.
Once our old horse fell down the well
That was down behind the stable,
Well, that old horse didn't fall clear down,
Just as far as he was able. [Refrain]

I met with a catfish coming downstream;


I asked that catfish, why so mean?
Said the catfish, mind what you're about!
And I turned that gollycully inside out.
For when I was but a little boy,

I liked to go in swimming,
But now I am a bigger boy,

I'd rather go with wimmen. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


.
15
The Ee-Rye-Ee Canal

1 We were forty miles from Albany,


Forget it I never shall,
What a terrible storm we had that night
On the Ee-rye-ee Canal.

Refrain:
Oh, the Ee-rye-ee was a-rising
And the gin was getting low,
And scarcely think we'll get a drink
I

Till we get to Buffalo, oh woe,


Till we get to Buffalo.

2 We were loaded down with barley,


We were chucking full of rye,
And the captain, he looked down on me
With a wicked gleam in his eye. [Refrain]

3 The cook, she dropped her bucket of broth,


She let her ladle fall,
For the waves were running mountainous
On the Ee-rye-ee Canal. [Refrain]

4 The captain then came up on the deck


With a spyglass in his hand,
But the fog, it was so 'tarnal thick
That he couldn't spy the land. [Refrain]

5 The sky was rent asunder


By an eerie lightning flash;
While above there rattled thunder,
At the bow came a horrible splash. [Refrain]

6 All hands leaped forward, then sprang aft

The mainsheet for to haul,


But slap-dash fell our chicken- coop
In the Ee-rye-ee Canal. [Refrain]

7 The cook, she wore a red petticoat,


For want of a better dress;
We hoisted her upon the mast
As a signal of distress. [Refrain]

8 Now the girls are in the Police Gazette,


And the crew are all in jail;
And I'm the only sea-cook's son
That's left to tell the tale. [Refrain]

16 S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Barbara Totally High New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

* C1'^ J l>JJ J m -d+ JlrrrJ^lJ^m


___ . _
X
.
1
. j k.
r^i i
ss i
.

7 ; J
J J I I
w I I
1
J -
[ i

1
I I

i
J I

Jjvi

j,M. i
in r J.|j J'JT] i
j.
r JJijxjnmi
[Wore: a five-part round, each part starting at Z
77?is is
when the preceding part reaches X. The full text runs to
thirty-six verses, each the same as the first. Sometimes
only thirty-two are sung.]

Ber notch a tea bowl a Key,


umberly game:
Barbara totally high ruh.
Ber notch a tea bowl a Key,
umberly game:
Barbara totally high ruh.
Why ruh? My ruh,
Tale a watch a deny ruh,
And a Barbara totally high.
Why ruh? My ruh,
Tale watch a deny ruh,
a
And a Barbara totally high.

The Kangaroo New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

4
4 W fe^
Am7 D7

m ?#
G

I
Am7 07

m^ ^ * 4

g i | * -u 4 4 4 4*-
4 4

1 Our kangaroo is a pretty little bird,


But he finds an oyster fry absurd;
He spreads green cheese on a butterfly;
That kangaroo is apt to die.

Refrain:
Now Jennie, get that hoe-cake done, for one,
Now Jennie, get that hoe-cake done.

2 A salesman came with a stallment plan


When my wife, she felt like a cross old hen;
She pecked his eyes out to the bone
And told him to look nine ways for home. [Refrain]

3 A second-story man came to our house,


He lifted a window still as a mouse,
He stole our piano and our pet seal,
And then he stole across the field. [Refrain]
copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC.. New York, N. Y.
17
-

Tom Queer New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
Em7 A Em7 Dm

fe =
i
J *==? J J)
[

J J J ^=g ' J ^ * =s
_ c
Um f
C Dm F En Dm

1 There's an uncommon fellow, his 4 Tom Queer acts so strangely when


name is Tom Queer; you give him some meat,
If he weren't elsewhere, he'd For, if he is hungry, he will set
surely be here. down and eat;
He was born in the earliest part If you offer him water when he may
of his life, be dry,
And he never was married till he It will probably run down his throat
took a wife. by and by. [Refrain]

Refrain: 5 Tom Queer has a liking to dwell


With a down, down, down, derry on dry ground,
down. And isn't he lucky that he never
was drowned?
2 His face is the oddest there ever Whenever he's healthy, he's fine
has been, for a spell,
For his mouth runs across, twixt But when he gets sick, he is not
his nose and his chin. very well. [Refrain]
Whenever he's talking, he uses his
voice, 6 Tom Queer, may he live from his
And with it he often makes some birth till his death!
sort of noise. [Refrain] He never will die till he runs out of
breath,
3 Tom Queer has an arm on each side And then he'll be buried in the
of his chest, graveyard to molder:
But they rarely are working when If he lives a year longer, he'll be
he takes a rest; a year older. [Refrain]
And he has two legs, which are
fastened so neat
To his hips, and attached at ends
are his feet. [Re/rain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC.. New York, N. Y


18
e Eddy stone Light New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Dm7 G7 C

I 5 00 = $$&=
"rr rji rM-i g i i

Dm7 67 Em G7 _ Dm7

#
F C

Jjjm pp pp | rr ^ S)-"** P
1 My was the keeper of the
father
Eddystone Light,
He married a mermaid one fine night.
From this union there came three,
A porgy, and a porpoise, and the
P^P^ other was me.

Re/rain:
Yo ho ho, the wind blows free,
Oh, for a life on the rolling sea!

2 One night, as I was trimming of the glim


And singing a verse of the evening hymn,
A voice on the starboard shouted, "Ahoy!"
And there was my mother, a-sitting
on a buoy. [Refrain]

3 "Oh, where are the rest of my


children three?"
My mother then did ask of me.
"One was exhibited as a talking fish,
The other served up in a chafing dish."
[Refrain]

4 Then the phosphorus flashed in her


seaweed hair;
When I looked again, my mother
wasn' t there.
But a voice came echoing back
through the night,
"That for the keeper of the Eddy-
stone Light! " [Refrain]

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 19


#

The Little

m
Pigs

Bm
d *
G

^^ s
New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

^_^__ Am7

-# llt r
p

p* ^^ n m i
j. j ^
1 There was an old sow, she had five 3 The little pigs sleep in very clean
little pigs, straw,
Igs [snort] igs [whistle] sh'- Aw [snorf] aw [whistle] sh'-
nannigo digs; nannigo daw;
Oh! there was an old sow, she had Oh! the little pigs sleep in very
five little pigs. clean straw.
Lillibullee, lillibullara, lara, lara Lillibullee, lillibullara, lara, lara
lee; lee;
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man. Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.
An [snorf] an [whistle] sh'-nan- An [snort] an [whistle] sh'-nan-
nigo Dan, nigo Dan,
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man. Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.

2 The littlepigs squeal when they're 4 The little pigs make us the finest
under the gate, of bacon,
Ate [snort] ate [whistle] sh'-nan- Aeon aeon [whistle]
[snort] sh'-
nigo date; nannigo dacon;
Oh! the little pigs squeal when The little pigs make us the finest
they're under the gate. of bacon.
Lillibullee, lillibullara, lara, lara Lillibullee, lillibullara, lara, lara
lee; lee;
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man. Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.
An [snort] an [whisr/e] sh'-nan- An [snort] an [whistle] sh'-nan-
nigo Dan, nigo Dan,
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man. Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.

5 And here is an ending to our little


song,
Ong [snorf] ong [whistle] sh'-
nannigo dong;
And here is an ending to our little
song.
Lillibullee, lillibullara, lara, lara
lee;
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.
An [snorf] an [whistle] sh'-nan-
nigo Dan,
Oh! my daddy's a bonny wee man.

20 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC.. New York. N. Y.


5/ And I New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

t S :

^ ^S r
i

Lr
G rm (ta cet) B7
3ES

r =FFFF

2y ^

9 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y

1 Si and were going to the Fair,


I

Si was kicked in the shin;


Si said I'll get even with the Fair,
So we bought ten tickets, but we didn't go in.

2 Si and I were going on a ferry,


Si was pushed by a horse;
Si said I'll get even with the ferry,
So we bought ten tickets, but we swam across.

3 Si and I went out to the airport,


Si caught a cinder in his eye;
Si said I'll get even with the airport,
So we bought ten tickets, but we didn't fly.

4 Si and I parked at a meter,


Si found the pointer was stuck;
Si said I'll get even with the meter,
So we put dimes in for all the rest of the block.

The Dipsycola New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

tG r
iUJ
D7

!
#

t
G 07 G

m &
D7

0# * * Jj>jj,uj' j'lJJ'j^uj'r j' i


j
pr
J i gggga
r r

1 Put your right hand in, 3 Put your both hands in,
Put your right hand out, Put your both hands out,
Put your right hand in, Put your both hands in,
And you wiggle it all about, And you wiggle them all about, [etc.]
Now you do the coca-cola,
Then you do the pepsi-cola, 4 Put your head in, [eta.]
Now you do the dipsycola
And you turn yourself about. 5 Put your right foot in, [etc]

2 Put your left hand in, 6 Put your left foot in, [efc]
Put your left hand out,
Put your left hand in, 7 Put your both feet in, [efc]
And you wiggle it all about,
Now you do the coca-cola, 8 Put your right hip in, [etc.]
Then you do the pepsi-cola,
Now you do the dipsycola 9 Put your left hip in, [efc.]
And you turn yourself about.
10 Put your both hips in, [etc]

t copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N Y. 21


r
Bannity Dan New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

C (tacet) D

@ copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York,

Now Bannity Dan is my front name,


And happen my last name is the same,
I come from a land far over the seas

Where oysters and clams grow on apple trees.


I've gone ten years without vittles or rest
While trying to find a dooleybird nest,
But all I've found is a crab having fits,
And a gray-headed beetle gone out of his wits.

Now Bannity Dan is my front name,


And happen my last name is the same,
I met an old woman, so stylish was she

That she lived on burnt matches and coolibah tea.


I told her how poor such a diet must be,

And she tossed her hair with a fiddle-eye- fee;


She walloped her cat, and she shaved off its tail
For casting such glances into my milk pail.

Now Bannity Dan is my front name,


And happen my last name is the same,
I once knew a codfish, could not wink his eye,

His mouth was so twisted, he couldn't tell why;


So I up with a jeep, set it down on his head,
Which made him so mournful, he took to his bed,
Then I fixed him some broth; it was not wet enough,
Being made of shoe polish and flavored with snuff.

Now Bannity Dan is my front name,


And happen my last name is the same,
I met with a woman who wrote to the king

That she hadn't a finger to put on a ring,


So they tickled a hole in her toe instead,
And they found that it gave her a cold in her head;
But she thanked the mailman with laughter so clear,
Then she picked up her marbles, skipped off on her ear.

22
Skip To My Lou New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

07 C

m ^ ^ m ji^il
1 Lost my partner, what'll I do? 10 Hurry up, slowpoke, be ahead of you,
Lost my partner, what'll I do? Hurry up, slowpoke, be ahead of you,
Lost my partner, what'll I do? Hurry up, slowpoke, be ahead of you,
Skip to my lou, my darling. Skip to my lou, my darling.

2 I'll find another one prettier than you, 11 When I go a-courtin', I'll take two,
I'll find another one prettier than you, When I go a-courtin', I'll take two,
I'll find another one prettier than you, When I go a-courtin', I'll take two,
Skip to my lou, my darling. Skip to my lou, my darling.

3 Gone again, skip to my lou, 12 Kitten's in the haymow, mew, mew, mew,
Gone again, skip to my lou, Kitten's in the haymow, mew, mew, mew,
Gone again, skip to my lou, Kitten's in the haymow, mew, mew, mew,
Skip to my lou, my darling. Skip to my lou, my darling.

4 Cows in the cornfield, two by two, 13 Gone again, skip to my lou,


Cows in the cornfield, two by two, Gone again, skip to my lou,
Cows in the cornfield, two by two, Gone again, skip to my lou,
Skip to my lou, my darling. Skip to my lou, my darling.

5 Can't get a redbird, bluebird'll do,


Can't get a redbird, bluebird'll do,
Can't get a redbird, bluebird'll do,
Skip to my lou, my darling.

6 I've got a cart and a pony too,


I've got a cart and a pony too,
I've got a cart and a pony too,
Skip to my lou, my darling.

7 Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, fly, shoo,


Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, fly, shoo,
Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, fly, shoo,
Skip to my lou, my darling.

8 Needle in the haystack, I spy you,


Needle in the haystack, I spy you,
Needle in the haystack, I spy you,
Skip to my lou, my darling.

9 My girl wears a number nine shoe,


My girl wears a number nine shoe,
My girl wears a number nine shoe,
Skip to my lou, my darling.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 23


In The Field So Early New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

m
G

T? W
a -& m
AC G 1 )7 a W Am/ D7 G Am7

m' i \
'

h* i
, niB '

Am7

> n
i
. .

i r
J
:

| 1
P P i c c

In the field, in frost and snow, , In the field, near ponds and lakes,
In the field so early, In the field so early,
There we go to milk the cows, There we watch the ducks and
There we milk them cheerily drakes,
With a moo moo here, a moo moo There we watch them cheerily
there, With a quackapack here, a quacka-
Here a moo, there a moo, every- pack there,
where a moo moo, Here a quack, there a quack,
Bonnie lassie, come along with me everywhere a quackapack,
In the field so early. Chickachick here, a chickachick
there,
In the field, all near the fence, Here a chick, there a chick, every-
In the field so early, where a chickachick,
There we go to ruffle the hens, Cluckachuck here, a cluckachuck
There we ruffle them cheerily there,
With a cluckachuck here, a clucka- Here a chuck, there a chuck,
chuck there, everywhere a cluckachuck,
Here a chuck, there a chuck, Moo moo here, a moo moo there,
everywhere a cluckachuck, Here a moo, there a moo, every-
Moo moo here, a moo moo there, where a moo moo,
Here a moo, there a moo, every- Bonnie lassie, come along with me
where a moo moo, In the field so early.
Bonnie lassie, come along with me
In the field so early. In the field, hard by the rocks,
In the field so early,
In the field, along the creek, There we cram the turkey cocks,
In the field so early, There we cram them cheerily
There we go to feed the chicks, With a gibble gobble here, a gibble
There we feed them cheerily gobble there,
With a chickachick here, a chicka- Here a gobble, there a gobble,
chick there, everywhere a gibble gobble,
Here a chick, there a chick, every- Quackapack here, a quackapack
where a chickachick, there. . . [etc.]
Cluckachuck here, a cluckachuck Bonnie lassie, come along with me
there, In the field so early.
Here a chuck, there a chuck,
everywhere a cluckachuck,
Moo moo here, a moo moo there,
Here a moo, there a moo, every-
where a moo moo,
Bonnie lassie, come along with me
In the field so early.

24 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


In the field, before we reap, In the field, and not very far,
In the field so early, In the field so early,
There we go to shear the sheep, There we drive our two-tone car,
There we shear them cheerily There we drive so cheerily
With a beah beah here, a beah With a rattle ping here, a rattle
beah there, ping there,
Here a beah, there a beah, every- Here a rattle, there a rattle, every-
where a beah beah, where a rattle ping,
Gibble gobble here, a gibble gob- Groink oink here, a groink oink
gle there . . . [efc.] there. . . [etc.]
Bonnie lassie, come along with me Bonnie lassie, come along with me
In the field so early. In the field so early.

In the field of rye and oats,


In the field so early,
There we go to tend the goats,
There we tend them cheerily
With a meah meah here, a meah
meah there,
Here a meah, there a meah, every-
where a meah meah,
Beah beah here, a beah beah
there. . . [efc]
Bonnie lassie, come along with me
In the field so early.

In the field, down near the bogs, 10 In the field, when it's hardly light,
In the field so early, In the field so early,
There we go to stuff the hogs, There we meet our heart's delight,
There we stuff them cheerily There we meet so cheerily
With a groink oink here, a groink With a kiss a miss here, a kiss a
oink there, miss there,
Here a groink, there a groink, Here a kiss, there a kiss, every-
everywhere a groink oink, where a kiss a miss,
Meah meah here, a meah meah Rattle ping here, a rattle ping
there. [efc]
. . there [efc]
. . .

Bonnie lassie, come along with me Bonnie lassie, come along with me
In the field so early. In the field so early.

25
Cape Cod Girls New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

F*m


A7 D 6 R
i~~
jHfc
$J
nJ 1

J
1

r J
J
#^ 1 f 5 '

J 4 J '
^ d '1
1
>> 1 | J r-J-l

_ F^m Em7 _^_^__

^j ^ U
D F - A7 D

J ]|.,
-,i. i
rpr- i
' ]
J i
j j

1 Cape Cod girls, they have no combs,


Heave away, heave, away,
They comb their hair with codfish bones,
We are bound for Australia.

Refrain:
Heave away, my bully, bully boys,
Heave away, heave away,
Heave away and don't you make a noise,
We are bound for Australia.

2 Cape Cod boys, they have no sleds,


Heave away, heave away,
They slide down hills on codfish heads,
We are bound for Australia. [Refrain]

3 Cape Cod doctors use no pills,


Heave away, heave away,
They give their patients codfish gills,
We are bound for Australia. [Refrain]

4 Cape Cod cats, they have no tails,


Heave away, heave away,
They blew away in northeast gales,
We are bound for Australia. [Refrain]

5 Cape Cod roosters never crow,


Heave away, heave away,
They can't see the hens in a northeast blow,
We are bound for Australia. [Refrain]

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York. N Y


Forty -Eight Bottles New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

Ffm A7

if M I
wrw ty g^
" b U - U tm7 A7
A

m i^
D

yj.jj, !

r p r i
Ji
Jjj jj i
i

i i

jjji i
j^J u;'j|'ij.i
|

1 There were forty-eight bottles


hanging on the wall,
Forty-eight bottles a-hanging on
the wall.
And if one of those bottles should
accidentally fall,
There'd be forty-seven bottles a-
hanging on the wall.

2 There were forty-seven bottles


hanging on the wall,
Forty-seven bottles a-hanging on
the wall.
And ifone of those bottles should
accidentally fall,
There'd be forty-six bottles a-
hanging on the wall.

[continue similarly to:]

47 There were two bottles hanging on


the wall,
Two bottles a-hanging on the wall.
And one of those bottles should
if

accidentally fall,
There'd be only one bottle a-hang-
ing on the wall.

48 There was one bottle hanging on


the wall,
One bottle a-hanging on the wall.
And if that lonesome bottle should
accidentally fall,
There wouldn't be any bottles a-
hanging on the wall.

I copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS. INC., New York, N. Y. 27


r

The Swapping Song New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

* G Am7 G An? Brt C


0000

W 9 H ^ > n n r^ 1 1

J J J "J J J J J *=9- #3=^


=*
9 w j I

fj 1

1 Oh, when I was a little boy, \ lived 7 So I swapped that mare and I got
by myself, me a cow,
And all the bread and cheese I got, And in that trade I was just learn-
I laid up on the shelf. ing how. [Refrain]

Refrain: 8 I swapped that cow and I got me a


Come a wing, wong, waddle calf,

ding, And in that trade I just lost half.


A John fair faddle ding, [Refrain]
A Jackstraw straddle ding,
A long ways home 9 I swapped that calf and I got me a

To my wing, wong, waddle sheep,


ding, And in that trade I must have been
A John fair faddle ding, asleep. [Refrain]
A Jackstraw straddle ding,
A long ways home. 10 I swapped that sheep and I got me
a hen,
2 The rats and the mice soon led me And wasn't that a pretty cluck I

such a life had then! [Refrain]


That I went off to Boston to find
me a wife. [Refrain] 11 I swapped that hen and I got me a
cat,

3 The streets weren't wide, and the I fed him and I pet him, but he

lanes so narrow wouldn't catch a rat.


I had to bring her home in an old [Refrain]
wheelbarrow. [Refrain]
12 I swapped that cat and I got me a
4 Climbed a tree in the road, but the mole,
limb wouldn't hold, And when I turned around, he went
And down came my wheelbarrow, straight to his hole.
wife and all. [Re/rain] [Refrain]

5 So I swapped my wife and I got me 13 Well, all of my swapping didn't

a horse, take very long,


But then I couldn't get my legs I soon had nothing left but this
across. [Refrain] swapping song! [Refrain]

6 So I swapped that horse and I got


me a mare,
She ate a ton of clams, wouldn't go
anywhere. [Refrain]

28 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, '.<C, New York, N. Y.


The Cute Car

S ^
Little New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

mf
A7 D

^ 9

M Bm Em

i tj J' I
Em7

J J' J J' I
A

J- J J

*fc^ J'pJ
1

j. :j|J > |
J J J J' l J' I J

There was a little car, There was a little ribbon,

The cutest little car, The cutest little ribbon,


The cutest little car you ever did see, The cutest little ribbon you ever
And the car was on the wheels, did see,
And the wheels were on the ground, And the ribbon was on the hat,
And the engine in the car made the And the hat was on the girl,
wheels go round. And the girl was in the car,
And the car was on the wheels,
There was a little girl, And the wheels were on the ground,
The cutest little girl, And the engine in the car made the
The cutest little girl you ever did see, wheels go round.
And the girl was in the car,
And the car was on the wheels, There was a little feather,
And the wheels were on the ground, The cutest little feather,
And the engine in the car made the The cutest little feather you ever
wheels go round. did see,
And the feather was in the ribbon,
There was a little hat, And the ribbon was on the hat,
The cutest little hat, And the hat was on the girl,
The cutest little hat you ever did see, And the girl was in the car,
And the hat was on the girl, And the car was on the wheels,
And the girl was in the car, And the wheels were on the ground,
And the car was on the wheels, And the engine in the car made the
And the wheels were on the ground, wheels go round.
And the engine in the car made the
wheels go round.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 29


Savin Rock New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

G D G

1 At Savin Rock there lives a whale,


And she eats pork chops by the bale,
By the pillbox, by the suitcase,
By the bathtub, by the schooner.

2 Her name is Lynn and she's a peach,


But you shouldn't leave food within her reach,
Nor bankbooks, nor airedales,
Nor coffee ice-cream sodas.

3 She's a hungry young girl, but when she smiles


You can see her teeth for a number of miles,
And her adenoids, and her spare-ribs,
And others too fierce to mention.

4 Now what can you do with a whale like that?


What can you do but stamp on your hat
Or your toothbrush, or your boy-friend,
Or anything equally helpless?

The Noble Duke Of York New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

P? w
km?

$ r r r u m '
u '
r r
*

1 Oh, the noble Duke of York, 4 But if he were only a beagle,


He had ten thousand men, He'd fly those mountains through,
He marched them up to the top of the hill, And he'd trade off his own true love
And he marched them down again. For some rale old mountain dew.

2 And when they were up, they were up, 5 Oh, the noble Duke of York,
And when they were down, they were down, He had ten thousand men,
But when they were only halfway up, He marched them up to the top of the hill,

They were neither up nor down. And he marched them down again.

3 Now if he were only a rocket, 6 And when they were up, they were up,
He'd search this wide world o'er; And when they were down, they were down,
If his true love weren't on board the ship, But when they were only halfway up,
He'd swing her on the floor. They were neither up nor down.

30 S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


J

Black-Eyed Susie

Sg
New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

C D7 G (Ucet)
'
* J Lr l

L'Li
l
' r '
r J '

G (tacet) G (tacet)

fc
it*
P PP
1 All I want in this creation,
Pretty little wife with a big plantation.

/terrain:
Hey, pretty little Black-eyed Susie,
Hey, pretty little Black-eyed Susie,
Hey, pretty little Black-eyed Susie,
Hey!

2 All I need to make me happy

Are two little boys to call me pappy.


[Refrain]

3 Love my wife, I love my baby,


Love my biscuit sopped in gravy.
[Refrain]

4 Susie and the boys went huckleberry


picking,
Boys got sassy and Susie got a licking.
[Refrain]
10 Black-eyed Susie, 'cross the river,
5 Some got drunk and some got boozy, Has got my heart and part of my liver.
I went home with Black-eyed Susie. [Refrain]
[Refrain]
11 Danced all night with a hole in my hand
6 Black-eyed Susie's about half-grown, Looking for a girl that didn't have a man.
She jumps on the boys like a dog on a [Refrain]
bone. [Refrain]
12 Big dog bark and little one bite you,
7 Black-eyed Susie is a sunburnt daisy, Big girl court and little one slight you.
If I don't get her, I'll go crazy. [Refrain]
[Refrain]
13 Down that road, 'bout a mile and a
8 Iasked her to be my wife, quarter,
And she came at me with a kitchen knife. Some old man's gonna lose his daughter.
[Refrain] [Refrain]

9 Jump up, kitty puss, jump up higher, 14 Tell that Susie she'd better get away,
Jump up, puss, your tail's on fire. Listen, honey, it's almost day.
[Refrain] [/terrain]

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 31


*

Sairy Ann New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
Ea

* m *
m 0* m .

1 I
*

j ' i

r u j n n i

j
i j j i
j n
m *=. m
My Sairy Ann is the girl I love, Refrain:
She's the sweetest ever seen; To my row, row, row, to my row, row, row
Her torso measures four feet square, By the light of the silvery moon, so soon,
She is my lissome queen; To my row, row, row, to my row, row, row
She flails her kneecaps all about By the light of the silvery moon.
When her elbows come untied;
Her shoulders are built in the There's a mildew scent about her head,
stairway style, Her face is close to her nose;
Just seventeen inches wide. She has a silk and watery skin,
And feet attached to her toes;
She sports no waist around her belt,
No fingers on her rings;
Her voice is barely forty power,
And her age so gaily sings. [Refrain]

She is freckled in her center eye,


And her other is dark green;
Her ears are shaped for rainy days,
With little space between;
She's a permanented blonde, with straight
black hair,
Her bulbular legs make bows;
She has scorching lashes of such pale pink,
And a humpty-dumpty nose. [Refrain]

You will know her by her two front teeth


Of pearly white that're out;
Her profile looks like a coffee pot,
Her chin could be the spout;
She wears a knitted petticoat,
And a frown on her upper brow;
Oh, fare you well, my Sairy Ann,
I'm going to leave you now. [Refrain]

32 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Pop Goes The Weasel
AD
New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

1
r
J -
n
All around the cobbler's bench
J'J J i

r m m
The monkey chased the weasel.
The monkey thought 'twas all in fun:
Pop goes the weasel.

Refrain:
A penny for a spool of thread,
A penny for a needle,
That's where all the money goes:
Pop goes the weasel.

2 on, my two black sheep,


When night comes
My hen and her eggs are fast asleep,
But into her nest now, who should creep:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

3 So form two lines as straight as a string


Dance in and out and three in a ring,
Dive under like a duck, and sing:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

4 The world and all the rest of mankind


combine
Will ever in this step
Where old and young and ourselves are jined:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

5 Of all the dances that ever were planned


To galvanize the heel and hand,
There's none that moves so gay and grand:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

6 Now Billy used to shake with fear


For speaking out to his only dear,
But, now he's dancing, in her ear:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

7 I have no time to fiddle or sigh,


Ihave no time to wheedle,
So kiss me quickly, or else goodbye:
Pop goes the weasel. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New YorK, N. Y. 33


i

Dixieland New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA7.DEN


F C

?& Iff i=* nn\ iJJJU Ji i

W* mm

G7 c F E G7 C

i n i... m m
^
i

~
j
*

67 c G7 Em c
f\

7f *-.
" - - -^. Vh
'

Away down South, in the land of cotton,


We sang this song, and it's half forgotten,
We did, next week, Now, why don't
you believe me?
The reason why it's hard to sing,
We've had no chestnuts since last spring,
Look-away, Let's agree She won't?
Now, why does she?
We'll never come back from Mobile,
She said we're ahead,
We've just come back from Mobile,
And we don't care for any more coffee,
It's a dry July, and Linda sells the feathers,
It's a dry July, and Linda sells the feathers.

I used to live down on the farm,


And one cold night, when the sun was warm,
I swiped some cheese: Take your

front paws off the table!


The farmer chased me, the floor was damp
And he was seized by a painful cramp
In his necktie, in his eyebrow, so
why live in the stable?
I've just come back from walking
On a bicycle in a dither,
I don't enjoy much walking
And dare not try to set down,
I

Hurree! Hurrah! She's quite a good


sharpshootstress,
Hurree! Hurrah! She's quite a good
sharpshootstress.

34 copyright 1961 by MELOOY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Ilike to set down by the brook
And take my line from off the hook
And fish for clambakes, for fun, or
vagrant sausages,
And whenever I see the sign reads clear,
No fishing when no fish are here,
I dive twice more for fleas or other hossages,

I'm the very boldest huntress,


How near, my dear,
Isometimes dig for mugwumps
When the semaphores are itchy:
tiger! Are you dressed? Just
tell me what's the difference?
tiger! Are you dressed? Just
tell me what's the difference?

1 once went aloft in a stray balloon


To some greenery from the moon,
trim
But the moon wasn't full, would you
rather it was foolisher?
Now wouldn't you guess I'd had a drop?
I fell, kerplop, in a barbershop,

Got a close shave and a pedicure,


that's all I care to tell you.
I'd like to see more of you
Last night, that light,
You can tell me which way not to go,
Just give me the wrong directions
And weep, my child: it was made in
old Kentucky,
And weep, my child: it was made in
old Kentucky.

35
The Walloping Window Blind New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
07 C

* Em I- Dm Dm7 Em

L J- J |
J- -hJ
p
ZZI
tvr rjNJJi i

jj ^pip
A capital ship for an ocean trip 3 The captain sat on the commodore's
Was the "Walloping Window Blind." hat
No wind that blew dismayed her As he dined in a royal way
crew, On toasted pigs, and pickles, and
Or troubled the captain's mind. figs,
The man at the wheel was made to And gunnery bread each day.
feel The cook was Dutch, and behaved
Contempt for the wildest blow-i-oh, as such,
Though it often appeared, when the For the diet he served the crew-i-
gale had cleared, yew
That he'd been in his bunk below. Was number of tons of hot-cross
a
buns
Refrain: Basted round with sugar and glue.
So blow ye winds, hi-oh, [Refrain]
A- sailing I will go;
I'll stay no more on England's 4 We soon fell ill, as mariners will
shore, On a diet so rare and rude.
So let the music play-i-ay; We shivered and shook as we dipped
I'm off on the morning train the cook
To cross the raging main: In a tub of hisgloomeous food.
I'm off to my love with a boxing But nautical pride we laid aside
glove When we ran our ship ashore-i-yore
Ten thousand miles away. On the Gulliby Isles, where the
Poopoo smiles
The bos'n's mate was very sedate, And the rubbidy ubdugs roar.
Yet fond of amusement, too. [Refrain]
He played Hop- Scotch with the
starboard watch,
While the bos'n tickled the crew.
The gunner we had was apparently
mad,
For he sat on the after ray- i- ail
And fired salutes with the captain's
boots
In the teeth of a boomly gale.
[Refrain]

36 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Composed of sand was that fabled On rugbug bark, from dawn till
land, dark,
All trimmed with cinnamon straws, We dined, till we all had grown
And so pink the hue in a close-up Uncommonly shrunk, when a Chinese
view junk
Of the twinkletoe teasel's claws. Came up from the Torriby Zone.
We sat on the edge of a sandy ledge She was chubby and square, but
And shot at the whistling bee-i-yee, we didn't much care
While the ring-tailed bats wore As we cheerfully put to sea-i-yee;
waterproof hats But half the crew stayed behind, to
As they bathed in the shining sea. chew
[Refrain] On the roots of the rugbug tree.
[Refrain]

Madeline New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

h.\nn
=$ m
Am

I
D7

d
w m
6

j/rjfn \uu iltlt '


l/lt iult \

un

My Madeline, she climbs right well,


Take a Mary linkum feedle;
She can't climb like she used to climb,
Take a Sary dinkum wheedle;
So there she sits, just pitching stones
Across the running water.

Refrain:
With a Mary, Sary, a diddle and a bink
With a jary fiddle-um tweedle.

My Madeline, she had a dream,


Take a Mary linkum feedle;
She dreamed she sat up in a tree,
Take a Sary dinkum wheedle,
And there she ate a musharoom
As large as any pumpkin. [Refrain]

My Madeline looks like a crane,


Take a Mary linkum feedle,
Her hair so long and straggerly,
Take a Sary dinkum wheedle;
She says it's incon different,
As it only hides her earrings. [Refrain]

The rain makes all things beautiful,


Take a Mary linkum feedle,
The flowers and the grasses too,
Take a Sary dinkum wheedle;
If the rain makes all things beautiful,
Why won't it rain on you, dear? [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 37


Old Joe Clarke New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

#*H M J1 '- -* *f^=


=y=f4=
1 1
s-
r
1 1

Pr^= a J
Lf '

Am7 D

- 00-
a J- J *

kn7 D Am7 D

w jr i ~X w i J

1 Iused to live on the mountain top,


But now I live i>n town;
I'm staying at the big hotel,
Come a-courtin' Betsy Brown.

Refrain:
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark,
Fare thee well and gone;
Fare thee well, Old Joe Clark,
Goodbye, Betsy Brown.

2 Old Joe Clark, he had a house,


Was fifteen storeys high,
And every room was in that house
Was full of chicken pie. [Refrain]

3 Old Joe Clark had a yellow cat,


Could neither sing nor pray;
She stuck her head in the buttermilk jug
And washed her sins away. [Refrain]

4 Old Joe Clark, he had a mule


That he rode into town,
And every tooth in that mule's head
Was sixteen inches 'round. [Refrain]

5 Old Joe Clark, he had a cow


As never had been born;
It takes a jaybird most of a week

To fly from horn to horn. [Refrain]

6 I went down to Old Joe Clark


And found him eating supper;
I stubbed my toe on the table leg

And stuck my nose in the butter. [Refrain]

7 I went down to Old Joe Clark,


I found him sick in bed;
Irammed my finger down his throat
And pulled out a turkey head. [Refrain]

8 I went down to Old Joe Clark,


* But Old Joe wasn't in;
I set right down on the red hot stove

And I got right up again. [Re/rain]

38 S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


9 I never did like Old Joe Clark,
Don't think I ever shall;
I never did like Old Joe Clark,

I always liked his gal. [Refrain]

10 I wish I had a candy box


To keep my sweetheart in;

I'd take her outand kiss her twice,


And put her back again. [Refrain]

11 The higher up the cherry tree,


The riper grows the berry;
The more you hug and kiss the girls,
The sooner they will marry. [Refrain]

The Beeier New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

li

D
J],'^
Em7
Em7

D
|J'jE|Jj
F*n

j
|J'jJ3|ej [j
Em7

|
Jj
m
J'lfej=*

L'LflJj pU'J J'lLfUlJj jl^J


f
l
J'J
^jf
J |
l J'|%|J. %[J|J'J
Em7 F* m

J l
A7

flljj l

^
Did you ever see a beezer, Did you ever see a pinkin',
A beezer, a beezer, A pinkin', a pinkin',
Did you ever see a beezer? Did you ever see a pinkin'?
I'll tell you what to do: I'll tell you what to do:

Just never stop to please 'er, Just never stop a-winkin',


Or ease 'er, or tease 'er, A-blinkin', a-drinkin',
Just never stop to squeeze 'er And never stop a-thinkin'
Whenever she calls on you! Whenever she calls on you!
So wake up, boys, So wake up, boys,
Now don't you hear my noise? Now don't you hear my noise?
There's nothing like a beezer There's nothing like a pinkin'
Whenever she calls on you! Whenever she calls on you!

Did you ever see a doozer, Did you ever see a lassie,
A doozer, a doozer, A lassie, a lassie,
Did you ever see a doozer? Did you ever see a lassie?
I'll tell you what to do: I'll tell you what to do:

Just never be a loser, Don't let her get too classy,


But choose 'er, confuse 'er, Or brassy, or glassy,
Just never stop to amuse 'er Just entertain your lassie
Whenever she calls on you! Whenever she calls on you!
So wake up, boys, So wake up, boys,
Now don't you hear my noise? Now don't you hear my noise?
There's nothing like a doozer There's nothing like a lassie
Whenever she calls on you! Whenever she calls on you!

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 39


Frisky Jim New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

Em C F C Dm7 C

- 1 -
-
i m=*

F (tacet)

* H J J 1 J "#-

I 3<J
a ^ J
Dm7
-J-
G7
'
P r p

rr

Hm
"i

Tr
I PPf lt r
j ..j

1 I'm Frisky Jim and a nice young man,


Hug that girl whenever I can,
And when we kiss, she calls me sweet,
*But Jimmy, don't be indiscreet!

Refrain:
Run along now, don't come nigh me,
I'm high as a kite, you'll have to fly me,
Can't keep still:
Frisky Jim, just taking it easy,
Frisky Jim, just making it breezy,
Call me Frisky Jim.

2 When that tune begins to ring,


Makes me want to dance and sing:
Skip to the side and land on my feet,
*But Jimmy, don't be indiscreet! [Refrain]

3 You ought to hear my honey laugh,


Turn her under time and a half,
Squeeze her 'round in a curve so neat,
*But Jimmy, don't be indiscreet! [Refrain]

4 When she holds me tight, I feel so queer,


Sets me dancing on my ear,
Till I ask her, won't she share my seat?
*Now Jimmy, don't be indiscreet! [Refrain]

5 You ought to see my honey smile,


Can't get hold of myself for a while,
Bound to swing her off her feet:
*But Jimmy, don't be indiscreet! [Refrain]

6 I'm Frisky Jim and a nice young man,


Marry that girl as soon as I can,
If she says yes, I'll call her dear,
And Lordy, won't I curl her hair! [Refrain]

*Spoken line

40 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


:

Blow The Wind Southerly New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
Bm
07 G

is m P
ft=3=
^ -s^

^ ^J'JjJ J^pp 1
1
i I S

pp* J-J-JNJ. JI J-J.J l

f
=* ^ > -J-
Am7 D7

^G

1 Come all you bold fishermen, 5 The whalefish comes, puffing


Listen me,
to "I'm king of the seas,
And I will sing to you If you want any wind,

A song of the sea. Why, I'll blow you a breeze." [Refrain]

Refrain [rwice] 6 Along comes the codfish


Then blow the wind southerly, And looks out ahead,
Southerly, southerly, Then goes to the main chains
Blow the wind southerly, To heave out the lead. [Refrain]
Steady we go.
7 Then out comes the flounder,
2 Firstcome the herrings, As as the ground,
flat
A-wagging their tails, Says, "Look about, chucklehead,
They man sheets and halyards Mind where you sound!" [Refrain]
And loose all the sails. [Refrain]
8 Up comes the swordfish,
3 Then comes the mackerel, So proud of his teeth,
With his striped back, Climbs on to the foreyard
He flops on the bridge And takes a snug reef. [Refrain]
And yells, "Board the main tack!" [Re/rain]
9 Then up jumps the fisherman,
4 Next comes the sprat, Stalwart and grim,
He's the smallest of all, He casts his big net out
He pipes out, "Haul taut, boys, And scoops them all in. [Refrain]
Now let go and haul! " [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 41


i

Courting Susan Jane New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
A Fi Bn7

jr ifjr n
W ^H !
.

^i ,
^9
J ~ i

A E7 A D

Oh, when I go a-fishing, I took her down to Broadway,


I take my hook and line, The neighbors, they did stare,
But when I go a-courting, I meant to kiss my Susan,

Then I take my Susan Jane. But I couldn't do it there.


Oh, Susan, Oh, Clotilda,
You're so confusin', My heart you bewilda,
The hardest work I ever did The hardest work I ever did
Was courting Susan Jane. Was courting Susan Jane

I went to see my Susan, I wish I had a sweetheart,


She met me at the door, I'd set her on a shelf,
She told me that I needn't come And every time she smiled at me,
To see her any more. I'd climb up there myself.
Oh, Judy, Oh, Daisy,
You are so moody, You drive me crazy,
The hardest work I ever did The hardest work I ever did
Was courting Susan Jane. Was courting Susan Jane.

Iwent to see my Susan, 8 I wish I was a bunch of grapes


She wrung her hands and cried, A-hanging on a vine,
She said I was the ugliest thing And every time that Susan passed,
That ever lived or died. She'd say, this bunch is mine.
Oh, Mary, Oh, Josie,
You're so contrary, You seem so cosy,
The hardest work I ever did The hardest work I ever did
Was courting Susan Jane. Was courting Susan Jane.

Iasked my Susan for a kiss, 9 One day I went a-courting


And what do you think she did? A girl as dear as my life,
Picked up a chunk of firewood When Susan Jane passed by and said,
And hit me on the head. Tell me, how is your wife?
Oh, Nancy, Oh, Hannah,
You're just my fancy, I don't like your mannah,

The hardest work I ever did The hardest work I ever did
Was courting Susan Jane. Was courting Susan Jane.

My Susan is a charmer, 10 There's snow up on the mountain,


She was raised away down South, There's sunshine on the lake,
And the prettiest features on her face I'll never catch that Susan Jane,

Are the lips around her mouth. 'Cause I'm too wide awake.
Oh, Molly, Oh, Emma,
Why be so melancholy? You've set me a dilemma,
The hardest work I ever. did The hardest work I ever did
Was courting Susan Jane Was courting Susan Jane.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


42
Blood On The Saddle New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em C Am G7 C

faZ J J 1
J u J
wsm j '

jj '

io * '
cJ * d

1 There was blood on the saddle,


There was blood all around,
And a great big puddle
Of blood on the ground.

2 Oh, pity the cowboy,


All bloody and red,
For his bronco fell on him
And bashed in his head.

3 Our brave friend, the cowboy,


Will go riding no more,
For his head now is nothing
But a big blob of gore.

4 He once had a sweetheart,


He loved her so well,
And now she is grieving
On the spot where he fell.

5 He had asked her to marry,


One fine night in June,
But now she is somewhat
Distracted with gloom.

6 There was blood on the saddle,


There was blood all around,
And a great big puddle
Of blood on the ground.

G copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 43


:

The Lofty Giant New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

E B7 E f* 6't. B

Mt
&==
1

J
^ J
ri i 1 **
J

t
1
i * ' 4
^mm w
Oh, when I was a little boy, about four inches high,
*=3
s
I went onto Mount Washington to see what I could spy,
Itwas there I met a lofty giant, head was to the sky;
And any of you, if you'd been there, would've seen as well as I.

Refrain [rwice]
Doddy dinktum, dolly, dolly dinktum a loddy,
Doddy dinktum, a dolly, dolly dinktum, a day.

2 He bantered me to wrastle, to hop a fight, or run;


I pushed aside his playthings till we were done,
to wait
Then I took the naper of his neck, I twirled his heels around,
And I gave a heave with all my might, and slung him out of town. [Refrain]

3 The people in that city, for the honor I had done,


They gave me gold and silver notes, about four thousand pound,
So I whittled me a little box, about four acres square,
And I filled it with my money, which I had won so fair. [Refrain]

4 Now when I left Mount Washington, I traveled on an ox,

While into my vest pocket I carried my little box.


I put up to a tavern, and lay down on the floor,

For they would not trust me to a bed, because I was so poor. [Refrain]

5 And then I bought a little bull, about six inches high,


And whenever he would bellow, it made the people cry,
But if they stopped to stare at him, he roared out such a sound
That all the walls in Boston came tumbling to the ground. [Refrain]

6 And then I bought a flock of sheep, the most of them were wethers,
And some will yield me fine wool, and some will yield me feathers,
And they are handsome, grateful sheep, all ready to increase,
For every full and change of moon, they bear nine lambs apiece. [Refrain]

7 And then I bought a little dog, its color honey brown,


I taught him for to dance and sing, and even how to run;
His legs were fourteen meters long, his ears were two feet wide,
And 'round the world in half a day upon my dog I ride. [Refrain]

44 copyright 1961 by MELOOY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


1

8 And at last I bought a little hen, all speckled on her ear,


I me out a hare,
set her on an oyster shell, she hatched
The hare grew up a milk-white steed, full forty handfuls high;
And if anyone tells a bigger tale, take care he doesn't lie. [Refrain]

Hello, Susie Brown New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

A D

"" * 9-9 ^ 99009 9

R
$J J
n J
1 1

L-J - J--J- d

JJ O 9 9 9 9 9 9

G Eib7 *7 D

__
f*|r 1
a 1 * 1

y * * 9 9 9
i

9 i * * fl

1 Had a little horse, his name was Jack,


I put him in a stable,
Put him in a stable and he jumped
through the crack,
Why, hello, Susie Brown.

Refrain:
Chicken on the fencepost can't
dance, Josie,
Chicken on the fencepost can't
get around,
Chicken on the fencepost can't
dance, Josie,
Hello, Susie Brown.

2 One these days before very long,


of
One days I'll tumble,
of these
Grab that girl and home I'll run;
Why, hello, Susie Brown. [Refrain]

3 When we fish, we fish in a pail,


The pail is in the ocean,
For Jonah is the man who swallowed
the whale;
Why, hello, Susie Brown. [Refrain]

4 Coffee grows on white oak trees,


The river flows with brandy,
Choose the one that you love best,
As sweet as sugar candy. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 45


History Of The World New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

D G

I
t
=
f
f J' J J
J' l
,
P
i'

/
4
ft |
L
^ LI
n j _ .-
L
>
I

1 - .

;

m
-
Y
(nr>
iai ^-
=
= m
= 1
= r
\s
-) 1
r
h\
i
1 i i |

y |

y '
1

^^ 1
'\
I
=

Oh, the world was made in -six days and finished on the seventh,
Though according to the contract it should' ve been the eleventh,
JMJ J^J -M J- I

But the carpenters were out on strike, the masons wouldn't work,
So the scabs dug a hole, and they filled it up with dirt.

2 When they finished with the firmament, they started on the sky,
And they hung it out overhead and left it there to dry;
They studded it with stars made out of pretty damsel's eyes
For to give us a little light when the moon forgot to rise.

3 Then they salted down the ocean, and in it they put a whale,
On the land they made a raccoon with a ring around his tale;
Then all the other animals were finished, one by one,
They were stuck against a fence to dry as soon as they were done.

4 Now Adam was the first man that ever was invented,
He lived all alone, so he hardly was contented;
They made him out of clay and stuff, and thought he could get by,
For that's the way they scraped along in all the days gone by.

5 Once Noah built his ark, and he filled it up with sassage,


And he advertised for animals to book a cabin passage;
Now the elephant came last, and Noah thought he must be drunk,
But Oh no, said he, it took me all this time to pack my trunk.

6 Then the wind began to blow and the rain began to fall,
And the water soon came up so high, it drowned the people all;
Then it rained for forty days and nights exactly, by the counting,
Till it landed Noah's ark upon the Allegheny Mountains.

46 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Handy Andy New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

ft)ij>
l jnJT]l]. Si *-* T rj"] ij- 3 -3 j j.

A7 (tacet)

^fPm.^f Mujlj I
r jU 11

My very first job, I remember it yet, 5 A man parked his Cadillac near me
I was sent to the post office, one day;
letters to get. "Keep an eye on it, you'll get a
"What name?" said the clerk; I dollar for pay."
looked him in the eye: But he never paid me, for a
"That's none of your business, you stranger came by,
nosy!" says I. Though I kept my eye on it while
he drove it away.
Handy Andy they called me, I never
knew why; 6 I was reading the paper in the
I went out to deliver for a dairy subway last night,
nearby. It didn't make sense when I held it
"Put the milk in the wagon; why upright,
are you so slow?" So I it upsy-versy; a feller
tried
"It takes time to pour it from the asked, "Why?"
bottles, you know!" "Maybe you think it's easy to read
this way," says I.
One morning there lay about two
feet of snow;
Says my foreman, "Just clear off
the pavement for now."
I rigged up the snow plow and
cleared it complete,
Put the snow and the pavement all
out in the street.

Said the checker, when I worked for


an express shipping line,
"Hitch your cab to the trailer that's
setting out behind."
When saw him next day, he
I

seemed down in the mouth:


"You have the trailer heading north,
and the cab facing south!"

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 47


The Red Herring New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
Em7 D r

m kh- * f

Jl J J l-
!

G D. Bm Em7 A7


r " 1
rl 1

^ 1
* *

1 As I drove by a red herring pond, What shall we do with the red


I spied a red herring, just forty herring's scales?
feet long; Stretch 'em, and patch 'em, and
Forty feet long and near fifty feet whip 'em with flails;
round: Whip 'em, and bag 'em, and stuff
The best red herring that ever I them with quails:
found. Don't you think we did well with
the red herring's scales?
Refrain: [Refrain]
In a rozz the bozz, go rosin
the bolliwog,
Rozz the bozzin to Wendover
Inn;
Tumble, rumble, fly away,
polliwog,
Shilly pap poodle, a dole on
the pin.

2 What shall we do with the red


What shall we do with the red
herring's fins?
herring's eyes?
Flip 'em, and flap 'em, and roll
Forty-eight puddings and fifty-eight
them all in;
pies,
Roll them all in as the story begins:
Mustard and custard and a cherry
Don't you think we did well with
surprise:
the red herring's fins?
Don't you think we did well with
[Refrain]
the red herring's eyes?
[Refrain]
3 What shall we do with the red
herring's heart?
What shall we do with the red
Fold it, and mold it, a wheel for
herring's nose?
the cart;
Hitch it and stitch it to wear on
Wheel for the cart, and the story
our clothes;
will start:
Wear on our clothes when we stand
Don't you think we did well with on our toes:
the red herring's heart?
Don't you think we did well with
[Refrain]
the red herring's nose?
[Refrain]

48 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


What shall we do with the red 8 What shall we do with the red
herring's tail? herring's feet?
Halico, calico, topgallant sail; The very best pickles you ever did
Topgallant sail and a net for a eat;
whale: Pickles, and ladders, and roses so
Don't you think we did well with sweet:
the red herring's tail? Don't you think we did well with
[Refrain] the red herring's feet?
[Refrain]

Buckeye Jim New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

F G7 Em C An Dm C

2 J l
rJ h i
J'UflJ I J. J

mm
C Am 6 C Em Am U C Em

ftj>+ j, p j j j m * J i

j *0

1 Away up yonder, above the sky,


A bluebird lives in a jaybird's eye.

[Refrain]:
Buckeye Jim, you can't go,
Go weave and spin, you can't go,
Buckeye Jim.

2 And away up yonder, above the moon,


An eagle nests in a silver spoon. [Refrain]

3 Away down yonder in a hollow log


A redbird danced with a green bullfrog. [Refrain]

4 And away down yonder, and a long ways off,


An old woman died of the whoopin' cough. [Refrain]

5 Away over yonder, across the sea,


I courted a girl, but she wouldn't have me. [Refrain]

6 And away down yonder, and through the wood,


An old beaver said, he hadn't thought she should. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 49


1

Captain Jinks New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
G

Og x =
f J 9 -Ti /- l ' "
[ u \
? *
1
j)

!f\
pr p
i

r pc-CJ
eh rv-9 m
rl ^ K
C M
u
J.
{y- h J
i
1

1 I
1

I'm Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines,


I often live beyond my means,

Icourt young ladies in their teens,


For I'm the pride of the army.
I teach the ladies how to dance,
How to dance, how to dance,
I teach the ladies how to dance

With an officer of the army.

Refrain:
I'm Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines,
Ifeed my horse good corn and beans;
Of course it's quite beyond my means,
But I'm the pride of the army.

I joined my corps when twenty-one;


At the time I thought it capital fun;

Ifan enemy came, then off I'd run,


For I wasn't cut out for the army.
When I left home, mamma, she cried,
Mamma, she cried, mamma, she cried,
When I left home, mamma, she cried,
"He's not cut out for the army! " [Refrain]

The first day I went out to drill,


The bugle calls made me quite ill;
At the balance step my hat soon fell,
Which hardly will do in the army.
The officers, they all did shout,
All did shout, they all did shout,
The officers, they all did shout,
"That's not the style in the army!" [Refrain]

But when I strut in officer's pink,


It makes an impressive front, I think,

So I swagger along while my buttons clink:


It's the style we promote in the army.
On active service I daily go
Around Times Square to make a show,
Where the smiles I get from the girls, you know,
Are a tribute to the army. [Refrain]

50 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


If I promenade just half a mile,
The simper and smile,
girls surround me,
While civilians grumble and call my style
Unfair, but they don't alarm me.
For my success they'd give their ears
When I stroll off with their favorite dears;
Confounded cheek to them appears
The advantage of the army. [Refrain]

At shows or parties, or driving about,


I always shut civilians out,
And it's half my fun to hear them shout
As if they'd like to harm me,
While upon the light fantastic toe
With the belle of the room I trip it so,
And she can't resist, she can't, you know,
It's the way we have in the army. [Refrain]

The points on a horse I can divine,


Iknow a seegar and a taste of wine,
But the girls are the study in which I shine,
Their variety does charm me.
They may give trouble, those cute little tricks,
Get jealous or cross, but they cannot vex:
When I'm transferred, I'll still adore the sex,
It's a weakness we have in the army. [Refrain]

51
Gome Farm New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

m
Am C7 F Gm C7

3j i
jjJl Jt jffiflrj-J^fl
i i flrj ij i
4

1 We're stopping at the game farm,


Itlooks just like a zoo
Where the animiles are dressed in smiles
That are notjneant for you.

Refrain:
So pay your dollar fifty
When the billboards are so nifty;
You will learn so much about a touch
At the game farm on the road.

2 The whale is made of stuffing


As tasty as you could wish,
Filled with pickled bats and alley cats
And other kinds of fish. [Refrain]

3 That bird's an alligrator,


She's just about to crow
While a dozen sphinx and rabbity minx
Are standing in a row. [Refrain]

4 The kangaroo is diving,


You can tell him by his hump,
Yonder hippopot would rather not,
But you ought to see him jump! [Refrain]

5 The lion calf is purring


At the billy goat wrapped in pink,
While the calomimes and crocodimes
Are sharing a bottle of ink. [Refrain]

6 That furry clam -is an oozley,


Behind him sits his aunt,
And the bird with the fan is a pelican,
Across from the pelican 't. [Refrain]

7 The donkey in the corner


With the tiger stripe on his arm
Comes all the way from Assyriay
Where his father owns a farm. [Refrain]

8 That tortoise trots at a speed


Not equalled by the horse,
And the parrots all can talk in pol-
Lysyllables, of course. [Refrain]

52 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


The Rhinossorheeaguss

BS
$ j'J^

/ fl^ 3
(A-jFi;
A

j
| |

j
G
EJ
CT + M^
D
i

1
New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

ia
G

A7

[
"
p=P
D

Bm7
^
l J * l J 1
* i * -J- -J-

I . i
n i
j~]
J~J 1 J j a j ^^ ^pi
1 I wish I were a rhi-nos-so-rhee-a- 3 I wish I were a hip-po-dot-ty-muss,
guss, [3 times]
I wish I were a rhi-nos-so-rhee-a- And could eat up all the lily pads
guss, in the suburbs, Hallelujah,
I wish I were a rhi-nos-so-rhee-a- And could eat up all the lily pads
guss, in the suburbs.
And could wear an ivory toothpick
in my nose, Hallelujah, 4 I wish I were a dil-ly-bil-ly roach,
And could wear an ivory toothpick [3 times]
in my nose. And could wander around in these
old musty pipes, Hallelujah,
2 I wish I were an el-phan-tie-a-guss, And could wander around in these
I wish I were an el-phan-tie-a-guss, old musty pipes.
I wish I were an el-phan-tie-a-guss,
And could pick up footballs when 5 I wish I were a bee-tle-ol-ly bug,
my nostrils twitched, [3 times]
Hallelujah, And could buzz and butt my head
And could pick up footballs when right through the screen,
my nostrils twitched. Hallelujah,
And could buzz and butt my head
right through the screen.

6 I wish I were a ka-ty-did-n't-did,


[3 times]
And could play the fiddle with my
hind limb, Hallelujah,
left
And could play the fiddle with my
left hind limb.

7 I wish I were a hedg-er-hop-per-


guss, [3 times ]
And could spend my days a-chewing
peanut butter, Hallelujah,
And could spend my days a-chewing
peanut butter.

I copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 53


Looky There Now New Words and Ne\v Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN
G

1 Once we rode out a-hunting, the 5 Again we went a-hunting, the next
first thing we did find thing we did find
Was a chestnut burr upon the grass, Was a frog in the pond, and that
and that we left behind, we left behind,
Looky there now. Looky there now.
One said it was a chestnut burr, One said it was a frog, but the
the other did say nay, other did say nay,
I saw it was a pin-cushion with
I saw it was a canary with its
the pins the wrong way, feathers plucked away,
Looky there now. Looky there now.

2 Again we went a-hunting, the next 6 Again we went a-hunting, the next
thing we did find thing we did find
Was a barn up on a hillside, and Was a horse in the field, and that
that we left behind, we left behind,
Looky there now. Looky there now.
One said it was a barn, but the One said it was a horse, but the
other did say nay, other did say nay,
I saw it was a meeting house with I saw it was a moose with its
the steeple blown away, antlers gone astray,
Looky there now. Looky there now.

3 Again we went a-hunting, the next 7. Again we went a-hunting, the next
thing we did find thing we did find
Was the moon up in the sky, and Was a sailing ship close on the shore,
that we left behind, and that we left behind,
Looky there now. Looky there now.
One said it was the moon, but the One said it was a sailing ship, the
other did say nay, other did say nay,
I saw it was a Yankee cheese with I saw it was a washtub with the
one half cut away, clothes hung out to dry,
Looky there now. Looky there now.

4 Again we went a-hunting, the next 8 Again we went a-hunting, the next
thing we did find thing we did find
Was a donkey at the roadside, and Was a basketball down in the ditch,
that we left behind, and that we left behind,
Looky there now. Looky there now.
One said it was a donkey, the One said it was a basketball, the
other did say nay, other did say nay,
saw it was an elephant with his
I
I saw it was a turtle with its
trunk turned away, flippers tucked away,
Looky there now. Looky there now.

54 S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Again we went a-hunting, the next 11 Again we went a-hunting, the next
thingwe did find thing we did find
Was a monkey in the woods, and Was a juke box up on cart wheels,
that we left behind, and that we left behind,
Looky there now. Looky there now.
One said it was a monkey, the One said it was a juke box, the
other did say nay, other did say nay,
I saw it was your nephew, and his I saw it was a limousine a- rolling
hair is turning gray, down Broadway,
Looky there now. Looky there now.

10 Again we went a-hunting, the next


thing we did find
Was a junior politician, and that
we left behind,
Looky there now.
One said he was a junior, the
other did say nay,
I saw was a jackass that had
it

never learned to bray,


Looky there now.

The Long Tail Blue New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
D F*m

4
* w w

. E m7 D A D Eo>7 47

4 1
-J


d-

There were four and twenty men,


Just four and twenty men,
There were four and twenty great big men
Went rolling 'round the Bowling Green,
Go steady on the long tail blue.

Well, the monk and the chimp did fight,


They fit all day and night,
And in the morning the chimp was seen
A-dragging that monk 'round Bowling Green,
Go steady on the long tail blue.

Oh, to breathe that morning air


That's played upon the flute,
I dressed myself so neat and clean

To meet my Johnny on Bowling Green,


Go steady on the long tail blue.

Heading south on that rocky road


They are singing at the door:
Oh, never put off till yesterday
What you can do the day before,
Go steady on the long tail blue.

So I set my table high,


I set my table low,
I set my table in the middle of the floor
And eat sheep shanks and say no more,
Go steady on the long tail blue.

1 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N Y 55


Clementine New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

A
BB
95

*
i u >r
p# W
fM .1 H\
Am

mH
r r

*=?= iE^Efcf iigl

m ^s 1
F P n
In a cavern in a canyon,
i

?r J
jl s
Excavating for a mine,
Lived a miner, 'forty-niner,
And his daughter, Clementine.

Refrain:
Oh, my darling, oh, my darling,
Oh, my darling Clementine,
You are lost and gone forever,
Dreadful sorry, Clementine.

2 Light she was, just like a feather,


And her shoes were number nine:
Herring boxes without topses
Sandals were for Clementine. [Refrain]

3 Once the wind was blowing fiercely,


I took her down some cherry wine,
Just to hear the flute-like warbling
Of my sunflower, Clementine. [Refrain]

4 Saw her ducklings near the water,


To drive them back she did incline,
Stubbed her toe upon a splinter,
Plunged into the foamy brine. [Refrain]

5 Luscious lips above the water


Blowing bubbles soft and fine,
But alas! I was no swimmer,
Tried a piece of Digby pine. [Refrain]

6 Called the Boy Scouts to the rescue


With a hefty length of twine,
Couldn't reach her under water:
So I lost my Clementine. [Refrain]

7 In a graveyard near the canyon


Where a myrtle doth entwine
There grow rosies and other posies
Fertilized by Clementine. [Refrain]

8 And the miner, 'forty-niner,


Soon began to peak and pine,
Felt he oughter jine his daughter,
Now he's with my Clementine. [Refrain]

56 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


9 In my dreams she still does haunt me
As a ghostess soaked in brine;
But though in life I used to hug her,
Now she's dead, I draw the line. [Refrain]

10 All you rascals, take this warning,


Don't give your sweetheart too much wine,
Or, like as not, in this wet weather,
She'll share the fate of Clementine. [Refrain]

11 How I missed her, how I missed her,


How I missed my Clementine,
Till I kissed her little sister
And forgot my Clementine. [Refrain]

Simple Little Nancy Brown New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

F'm G*m

gi WW ^f 4 4 ** *
'
r e r
'


ASfiEj^ ^ Id m ^ 4 *

m
t&
j jj jmj M i

rf m -^-^ J
1

r
J' i
j' j.
j
i i

Nancy's sister from 'cross the way,


She fainted in her bath one day;
Nancy didn't know what to do,
But how do you think she brought her to?
La tidelee idelee-um,
Tidelee idelee idelee-um,
La tidelee idelee-um,
She slapped her on the ankle.

Polly Brown went out to skate,


Never thinking she ought to wait,
She struck the ice and flew so high,
When she came down again, oh my!
La tidelee idelee-um,
Tidelee idelee idelee-um,
La tidelee idelee-um,
Polly had a cracker.

Nancy went to dance one night


And twirled around with all her might,
She rolled her best coquettish eye,
But when she tried to kick too high,
La tidelee idelee-um,
Tidelee idelee idelee-um,
La tidelee idelee-um,
She fell and broke her contract.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 57


Leaning On The Lamb New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

G D

^J-J-J ^ i ^^ J ^-
J J N J J * Ji !
J J. Ji

1 Here we sit like birds in the wilderness,


Birds in the wilderness, birds in the wilderness;
Here we sit like birds in the wilderness,
Leaning on the Lamb.

Refrain :

Rip, slap, standing up again,


With a high jing jing, with a ho jing jing;
Rip, slap, standing up again,
Just leaning on the Lamb.

2 Here we sit and flap our wingserin,


Flap our wingserin, flap our wingserin;
Here we sit and flap our wingserin,
Leaning on the Lamb. [Refrain]

3 Here we sit and brush off the flieserin, [ere]

4 Here we sit and wiggle our finserin, [ere]

5 Here we sit and shake off the leaveserin, [ere]

6 Here we sit like birds in the wilderness, [ere]

58 @ copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


The Little Red Hen New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

B7

1 Said the big fat rooster to the little


red hen,
You haven't laid an egg since the
Lord knows when,
Said the little red hen to the big fat
rooster,
You haven't been around as often
as you useter.
Said the big fat rooster to the little
red hen,
I'll meet you in the barn at half
past ten,
So they diddled and they dawdled
till they reached the barn,

And they did as they useter since 2 Oh, Ihad a little chicken, and she
the Lord knows when. wouldn't lay an egg,
So I poured hot water up and down
Refrain :
her leg.
Turkey in the straw, turkey in Didn't the little chicken cry and the
the hay, little chicken beg!
Just dance all the night and But that little chicken laid a hard-
sing all the day, boiled egg.
We'll roll 'em up and twist 'em Oh, I had a red hen, and she had a
up a high tuckahaw, wooden leg,
And we'll strike 'em up a tune Just the best old hen that ever laid
called Turkey in the Straw. an egg;
Why, she laid more eggs than any
hen on the farm,
And another wooden leg wooden do
her any harm. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 59


Barney New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
G*m B E F*m7 87 E

1 Barney, leave the girls alone,


Why don't you leave the girls alone?
Now be quiet and sit down,
We'll all have tea.

2 Dolly, set the table out,


Why don't you set the table out?
Set the places all about,
We'll all have tea.

3 Put the muffins in to roast,


Why don't you put them in to roast?
Plug the cord in, make some toast,
We'll all have tea.

4 Judy, warm the ginger cake,


Why don't you warm the ginger cake?
Baste the pan and let it bake,
We'll all have tea.

5 Slice the bread and butter fine,


Why don't you slice the butter fine?
Slice enough for eight or nine,
We'll all have tea.

6 Pass around the pumpkin pie,


Why don't you pass the pumpkin pie
And the fritters made of rye?
We'll all have tea.

7 Barney, leave the girls alone,


Why can't you leave the girls alone?
Now be quiet, do sit down,
We'll all have tea.

8 Polly, put the kettle on,


Why don't you put the kettle on?
Polly, put the kettle on,
We'll all have tea.

9 Sukey, take it off again,


Why don't you take it off again?
Never know what ails the men,
For Barney's gone away.

60 S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Bos'n John New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

- ^ 1 1 .
i^^m I

N
T k

J
I k I

J
n il r~ ^^^^" j
p ^^

J J J J
J'
l
J J J JJ J I

f f
1 J JJJJIJ J'JJ ^

jj j'
i
j- j J'icjjr pir r C-Lj
'

r ^ p
i

r
Em7 F*m Bm

LLTLLT i

rFrLMr^' Mr i
Jl
^5
F#m

n j j' i

r
J'u g j'lj i
r
Jr F
'

r
ni
J J
'J
'r i

1 It was high and dreary sky,


in the dark
He was aches and pains,
full of
When he said goodbye to the cheering crowd
And dashed out all his brains.
But as soon as he found his brains were gone,
So wisely he agreed
To be put on the ticket for Congressman,
Where brains he wouldn't need.

Retrain:
Bos'n John, and are you gone away,
Oh Johnny, are you there?
Bos'n John, and are you gone away,
For I've begun to care.

2 Once a tomcat sat on our backyard fence,


With his feetall covered with blisters,
His head went under, his teeth went over,
The wind blew through his whiskers.
Now Willie has a purple monkey
A-climbing on a stick,
But when he eats off all the paint
He might be deathly sick. [Refrain]

S copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New YorK. N. Y 61


Hey Hum Diddle Um Day New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

C*m B7 E

1 Chickens a-crowing on Sourwood Mountain,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
So many pretty girls, I can't count 'em,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

2 My true love lives 'cross the river,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
Hop and a skip and I'll be with her,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

3 My girl's waiting at the head of the holler,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
She won't come and I won't call her,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

4 My true love is a sunburnt daisy,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
She won't court and I'm too lazy,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

5 My true love is a blue-eyed dandy,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
A kiss from her is sweeter than candy,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

6 Big dog bark and little dog bite you,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
Big girl court and little girl slight you,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

7 'Round the stump with my sugarlump chasing,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
Come on, honey, our time's a-wasting,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

8 Geese in the bog and ducks in the ocean,


Hey hum, diddle-um day,
Devil's in the girls when they get a notion,
Hey hum, diddle-um day.

62 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y


:

Midnight On The Ocean New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em G7 C

jfc*% r r i. j> i
j & 4 # -&- ^ *

Dm7 67

I * 0-0
^^ m i **

t w*- w j j j j
J J
^ a
(C)

=23
ppa
I
'J p
b ir; i fr i=il i ^ <? =zt
3P

I 32
^ ^
1 It was midnight on the ocean,
Not a trolley car in sight,
And the sun was shining brightly
As it day that night.
rained all
Now some people dive down deep
To play among the flowers
While the sprightly pigs and sportive cows
Leap lightly through the bowers.

Refrain [fwice]
Wait for the wagon,
Wait for the wagon,
Wait for the wagon,
And we'll all take a ride.

tormy night, the rising


Was setting in the west,
And all the fishes in the tree
Were cuddled in their nests.
The barefoot girl took off her boots,
Came rolling down the street;
Her pants were filled with pockets
And her shoes were filled with feet. [Refrain]

The boy stood on the burning deck,


His baggage checked for Troy;
The ship went down, his cap flew off,
His name was my only joy.
So I spent the fifty dollars
To have a new bridge made
Across the Atlantic Ocean
So the fish could swim in the shade. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 63


Tell-A-Me True New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN
Em G

J
foil J 1
J ' ' II
J M J. J j.
J ^ I

f l r'[fl'IJJ J
G7
F G7 C F

^^^^r- 1 -

<-
^

^
--#- "

Dm7 G7

*=F
P f
JTJ p a
S
i

r r p
Dm7 Em

?=P <^TT * r J'JTi'


1 How do you do? Tell-a-me true! 3 How do you do? Tell-a-me true!
There once was a beautiful Bul- This Bazhee Bazhook said, "Lady,
garian, don't tarry
Oh! such a light and dainty airy You shall be mine, I mean to marry
'un, you!
With a complexion marble-airian If you don't answer soon, I'll harry
Nicely filled out with food vege- you,
tarian. And off to Turkey I will carry you!
[Refrain]
Refrain:
She lived in Phillip-pop-pop- 4 How do you do? Tell-a-me true!
popolis, Said the fair Bulgarian, "Well,
Near the Acrop-pop-pop-pop- jiggamy!
popolis, All you Bazhooks believe in big-
Had a monop-pop-pop-pop- amy !

popolis Some of you go so far as trigamy,


Of all the gents in that metrop- I can't indulge in that sort of
olis. polygamy " ! [Refrain]

5 How do you do? Tell-a-me true!


"Why, if you don't consent, I'll

foller you,
And I am very certain to collar you;
Then it won't matter how much you
holler,
You'll be somewhat bruised by the
time I swaller you!"
[Refrain]

6 How do you do? Tell-a-me true!


$<zy v. ,v x x > jq Now a Bazhee Bazhook is not
particular;
At such a murder he's no stickular,
2 How do you do? Tell-a-me true! So when he threatened to cut up
A Bazhee Bazhook, a great, big, and pickule 'er,
hairy 'un, Somehow the notion didn't quite
Oh! such a hulking, skulking, tickule 'er. [Refrain]

scary 'un,
Hardly well-bred, and most vul-
garian,
Set out to win this fair Bulgarian.
[Refrain]

64 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


7 How do you do? Tell-a-me true! 9 Then a nice windproof lighter she
"Fill me a pipe!" he said quite handed him
merrily; As with a gracious air she blanded
"When I have finished smoking, him,
verily, Then with a smile she sugar- canded
If you don't wed with me volun- him:
tarily, "I'll step aside; light up!" she
Your situation will be a bit commanded him.
perilly!"
10 She took a distance; he lit (ab-
8 But when his pipe-bowl, she did surd of him);
gammon it, Who is to say what next occurred
Bal-lasting pow-why-der she did of him?
ram in it, She hasn't seen, she hasn't heard
Dy-yan-namite she also did cram of him,
in it, Nobody else seems to have any
Left him no leisure to examine it. word of him. [Refrain]

Haul Away, Joe New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

C F Em

J'
I

[_[/)
Jl
W ^P
^^^ i
a v r tm urn Am om t urn

Refrain: But now I have a Yankee girl


We'll haul away the bowline, And she is just a daisy,
The bully ship's a-rollin' Away, haul away,
Away, haul away, We'll haul away, Joe. [Refrain]
We'll haul away, Joe.
And away, haul away, 3* King Louis was the king of France
We'll haul away together, Before the Revolution,
Away, haul away, Away, haul away,
We'll haul away, Joe. We'll haul away, Joe,
But then he got his head cut off,
1* Oh, when I was a little lad, Which spoiled his constitution,
It's so my mother told me, Away, haul away,
Away, haul away, We'll haul away, Joe. [Refrain]
We'll haul away, Joe,
That if I did not kiss the fzirls, 4* The cook is in the galley now
My would soon grow moldy,
lips And fixin' duff so handy,
Away, haul away, Away, haul away,
We'll haul away, Joe. [Refrain] We'll haul away, Joe,
While the captain's in his cabin now
2* Oh, once I had a Southern girl, A-drinkin' wine and brandy,
And she was fat and lazy, Away, haul away,
Away, haul away, We'll haul away, Joe. [Refrain]
We'll haul away, Joe.
*Same tune as refrain

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 65


Old Dan Tucker New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

m w
J J 1 J \
'

JJ ^ 'J '

JJ '

G (tacet)

1 Old Dan Tucker was a mighty' man, 4 Old Dan Tucker came to town
He washed his face in a frying pan, Riding a billy goat and leading a
He combed his hair with a wagon hound;
wheel The hound, he barked, and the billy
And he died with a toothache in his goat jumped,
heel. And throwed old Dan right straddle
of a stump. [Refrain]
Refrain:
So get out the way, Old Dan 5 Old Dan Tucker climbed a tree
Tucker, His Lord and Master for to see:
You're too late to come to The limb, it broke, and Dan got a
supper; fall,

Supper's over and dinner's He never got to see his Lord at


cookin', all. [Re/rain]
Old Dan Tucker just standin'
there lookin'. 6 A woodpecker lit on a hollow tree,
Poked his bill in for to see:

2 Old Dan Tucker is a nice old man, A lizard catched him by the snout,
He used to ride our darby ram; Called Old Dan Tucker for to pull
He rode him down to the bottom of him out. [Refrain]
the hill,
If he hasn't come back, he's down 7 Old Dan Tucker went to run his
there still. [Refrain] horse,
He couldn't reach his legs across,
3 Old Dan Tucker, he got drunk, So he lay right over like a bag of
Fell in the fire and kicked up a meal
chunk; And he spurred that horse with his
A red hot coal got in his shoe, big toenail. [Refrain]
And oh, Lordy, how those ashes
flew. [Refrain]

66 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Peter Gray New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
B E* B--> A

fcp
^Nt jJJJ
glLjJj i
I
' I

j P^P "Eh? -*
f
A Bi Em Bm A Bm Em Bm F*m7 Bm

1 Once on a time there lived a man,


His name was Peter Gray,
And he lived down in that 'ere town
Called Pennsylvane-eye-ay.

Refrain:
Blow, ye winds of morning,
Blow, ye winds, eye-O.
Blow, ye winds of morning,
Blow, blow, blow.

2 Now Peter fell in love, all with


A very nice young girl:
The first three letters of her name
Were Luciana Pearl. [Refrain]

3 Just as they were about to wed,


Her father did say no,
And quincicontly she was sent
Beyond the Ohio. [Refrain]

4 When Peter found his love was lost,


He knew not what to say;
He'd half a mind to jump into
The Susqueehen-ny-ay. [Refrain]

5 But he went trading to West


For furs and other skins,
Where he was caught and scalp-eye-ed
By several in-jy-ins. [Refrain]

6 When Luciana heard the news,


To bed went straightaway,
And wept, and wept, and wept-eye-ed
Her poor sweet life away. [Refrain]

7 Ye fathers all, a warning take,


Each one as has a girl,
And think upon poor Peter Gray
And Luciana Pearl. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 67


Tanglefoot Sue New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

C G

$ w~m PP? P 9=*

m
1 If you listen with all your ears
For a couple of million years,
I will tell you of a girl

With a tooth that had a curl


Whom we always gave three cheers.

2 We called her Tanglefoot Sue


From the glue that she used to chew
With her alabaster jaw
And her double-edged claw,
And the empty socket in her view.

3 Her eye was like a soft shell clam,


And her voice like fruit juice can;
She could chin for an hour
At a hundred horsepower,
And her ear was like a ten-inch fan.

4 Her hair was an indigo blue;


She was graceful like a kangaroo;
And you should have heard the rustle
Of her cast iron bustle;
She could coo like a ferryboat, too.

5 She ran off with a handsome boy


With a double-breasted squint in his eye,
And the webs on her feet
Soon covered up the street
While she smiled like a crack in a pie.

6 With her purple cemetery laugh


And her head like a month-old calf,
She's an ice-breaker sailing
With some oil on her railing
And a feather on her topmast aft.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


68
1

Jim Along Jo New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
Am Em C Am C

3=m fc
G7 Am7

frg^i m Bmm ^
c c G7 C G C E

'y 1
1 * #
[>J.
G7 C

1 Chase that squirrel 'round the tree,


You won't catch him there;
If you see that Josey home,
She'll catch you for fair.

Refrain:
Hey jim along, jim along, Josey,
Hey jim along, jim along, Jo;
Hey jim along, jim along, Josey,
Catch that pretty girl, jim along, Jo.

2 Two dollar for taxi fare,


Walked down by the bridge,
Told that Josey seventeen lies,
Couldn't tell her age. [Refrain]

3 Why so shy? Jim along with me,


Not there for a lark;
Never saw such a pretty little girl,
Didn't know how to spark. [Refrain]

4 Passed a trailer on the road,


Driver said it's free,
Blinked his lights and shifted gears,
Ran right over me. [Refrain]

e copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 69


^

The Bold Fisherman New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

jftMjjjJJlflJ] N j
i

l J J j .I jjj j JJ lJlU!
A A7 D G A7 D G

J
\J ^ 1 1
^ -
I T r r r
J o I a

fe=^ n
d 7 i
** i
f]
w
, Ji i n
w^m n
,
ji i
j ,

Bm7 A7 D Ei7 *7 D

^-i
ft) y J i ^^ i ^ M -1 ^ 5 1

J
-J*J
' [
' I

1
1 j Li

There once was a bold fisherman who sailed forth from Barneygat
To slay-o-slee the wild codfish and the bass mackerel;
But when he arrove off Glorrister, the Nor'easter began to blow,
And hislittle boat, it wibble-wobbled so, slick overboard he fell
'Mong the Conger eels, and the Dover soles,
And the whitebait, and the blackbait,
And the kippered herrings, and the 'mato herrings,
And the ticklebats, and the bricklebats:
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um was the highly interesting song he sung;
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um sang the bold fisherman.

First he wriggled down, then he striggled down through the water so


wet and briny-o,
While he bellowed out, and then he yellowed out for help, but in vain;
Then downward he did gently glide to the bottom of the silvery tide,
Though previously to that, he cried, "Farewell, Mary Jane!"
On arriving, he took to diving,
Found it difficult 'midst the seaweed,
Hard to comb his hair; took a deep breath,
Took a cough lozenge, and gently murmured:
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um was the refrain of the lovely song
he sung,
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um sang the bold fisherman.

70 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


His ghost bubbled up that very night to the bedside of his Mary Jane;
He told her how sopping wet he was, so she felt somewhat sad.
"Since my love's drowned, alas, alack, I'll go a-raving luniack;
All joy from me has fled," said she; whereupon she went mad.
She tore her clothes to smithereens,
Danced the cannycan on the waterbutt,
Joined the Temperance Society,
And frequently she edifies
The members thereof, by softly chanting:
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um was the plaintive, soul-inspiring
strain she sung,
Dinkle doodle-um, dinkle doodle-um, Oh! my bold fisherman.

My Dove New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN


Bm

p Bm
J i

j. jJJ r
J]

A
I
HT]
n
j n |
jjjj
Em7
uu pp=ppg
fh Bm

hf
vpr^r 1 J a 1
1 \T*

g -J
'

I n-

! IB

1 The horsey stood around with his feet upon the ground;
So why do they build the shore so near the ocean, my dove?
Just hand me the axe, there's a fly on baby's chest,
For a boy's best friend is his mother, my dove.

2 While looking through the knothole of grandpa's wooden leg,


Tell me, who will wind the clock when I'm awayer, my dove?
Why, a snake's belt will slip, 'cause he's small around the hip,
And he's apt to wear the necktie 'round his middle, my dove.

3 She's the girl that I adore, with a face like a horse and buggy;
The onion is a sprightly vegetable, my dove;
Now who cut the sleeves out of dear old daddy's vest
And dug up Fido's bones to build the subway, my dove?

4 The boy fell out the window, a seventh story window,


He injuried his eyebrow on the pavement, my dove;
Please go in behind the door, don't leave me here alone;
The collar pin for Willie's in the freezer, my dove.

5 She spanked him with a shingle and made his panties tingle;
Who was it made the moonlight feel so sunny, my dove?

Leaning up against the lake, Oh, fireman! Save my child!


But no peeping, cried the robin; doesn't' matter, my dove.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 71


Row De Dow De

wm m
Dunfer

^
New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
6m

m
^ TJ iJ'r r
j '

^
J J
j j i
J J J
'

r i

^ E_^_r
J"T3 &3 F
i

r f
J J *-i r p r p

'
T F
J J '
'? ?
Am

m
C7

i j. j a

1 Now Dunfer was an admiral of the seventh Nebraska fleet,


Ifyou did not find him drinking, he was looking for something to eat,
Had plenty of muscle around his head, he would neither bounce nor fly;
You'll find him there, down towards the rear, now why do you say it's a lie?

Refrain:
With a row de dow, bow de dow, and a row de dow de Dunfer,
With a row de dow and a bow de dow, why do you say it's a lie?

2 One day he swam from Chesapeake Bay to the top of the Oregon Trail
With seven ensigns on his back and one manicuring his nails;
He met a shark in South Dakota, and bunged up his left eye:
That's Dunfer wearing the sharkskin, now why do you say it's a lie? [Refrain]

3 In Ohio he met with a tanker in distress among the rocks,


He lifted her up and set her afloat and towed her to the docks,
Refreshed himself with a barrel of oil and an ox and a half on rye,
Till soon he ran short on mustard, now why do you say it's a lie? [Refrain]

4 He taught the mermaids how to dance on the prow of a submarine,


They twirled so fast, it scattered the men/ and one has never been seen;
They became so hot that the ocean boiled and the fish began to fry,
So Dunfer passed the Tartar sauce, now why do you say it's a lie? [Refrain]

5 By way of dessert, he took a harpoon and toasted a whale on a fork,


Drank thirty-two martinis by the time you could draw the cork,
Then he picked his teeth with a Texas derrick that happened to float nearby:
He found it flavored with peppermint, now why do you say it's a lie? [Refrain]

72 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS. INC.. New York, N. Y


Clinch Mountain New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN
G

AiJ l r J
w r i

r
J ' i

* w WW ^m
i ^^ a r
j j i

j 4 j
i^^ w^-^o-

1 'Way up on Clinch Mountain


I wander alone
I have left my dear Polly,

And a long way from home.


I'll eat when I'm hungry,

I'll drink when I'm dry;


If a tree don't fall on me,
I'll live till I die.

Rye whiskey, rye whiskey,


Iknow you of old,
You have robbed my poor pockets
Of silver and gold.
Rye whiskey, rye whiskey,
Rye whiskey, I cry,
If I don't get rye whiskey
I surely will die.

It's beefsteak when I'm hungry,


Rye whiskey when I'm dry,
Take a greenback when I'm hard up,
Go to Heaven when I die.
If the ocean was whiskey,

And I was a duck,


I would dive to the bottom
And never come up.

Now when I drink rye whiskey,


The money's my own,
And those who don't like me
Can leave me alone.
I'll eat when I'm hungry,

I'll drink when I'm dry;


If a tree don't fall on me,
I'll live till I die.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 73


I

The Knickerbocker Line New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
*7 3

p-*
^ 1

f^^-
| M } ^ r

I I ''
i^
' f f '
r 1
^
'
I

' J J J *
MM__| _

A7

IT) T
*-r
S
5
z 0' * #
-: :
#
#' # :
'
:~m j J
1 m 1
g "' " '#-. W
1~
" ;
'

$mmm m \g n i

m- mi n I w.
+ *mm J- d

1 Oh, I wrote my love a with a weafer,


letter, and I sealed it

Oh, I couldn't seal it with sealing-wax for fear


it wouldn't go safer,

And I couldn't send it with the mail for fear it wouldn't reach in time,
So I skipped across the gutter on the Knickerbocker Line.

Refrain:
And the rig, jig, the rig, jig, jig,
Go a-skinny-me-dig, a honey dew, a 'bye away to me, do,
D'ye go away to my honey dew and never will come back,
It's a weary road to travel and the car jumped the track.

2 As went down the street just the other afternoon,


I

It's thereI chanced to meet her in a lager-beer saloon:

Oh, there I saw the prettiest girl that ever has been seen,
And she took the humper-bumper from the Jersey Cow machine. [Refrain]

3 Oh, my girl, she is by trade,


she is a tailor, a tailor
And many request she's made,
a pair of pantaloons at my
She'd begin them in the morning and she'd have them ready by nine,
She's a regular don't-you-touch-her on the Knickerbocker Line. [Refrain]

4 Ifyou want to see this pretty girl, you want to go down Broadway,
For she promenades the Bowery from eight to ten each day,
But if anyone should tease her a little before the time,
She's a regular skip- the- gutter for the Knickerbocker Line. [Refrain]

74 copyright 1958 by ABEIARD-SCHUMAN LTD.


f

One More River New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

m m m mm
D7 G

j h

j
ft p" *==9
>

t t r p

# F
^^ i'JT] | J. j |

1 Old Noah built himself an ark, 7 The animals went in five by five,
There's one more river to cross, There one more river to cross,
's
He made it all of hickory bark, They waited for several trunks to
There's one more river to cross. arrive,
There's one more river to cross.
Refrain: [Refrain]
One more river,
And that's the river of Jordan, 8 The animals went in six by six,
One more river, There's one more river to cross,
There's one more river to cross. The monkey was up to his usual
tricks,
2 Old Noah had to load his stock, There's one more river to cross.
There's one more river to cross, [Refrain]
So he anchored to a mighty rock,
There's one more river to cross. 9 The animals went in seven by
[Refrain] seven,
There's one more river to cross,
3 The animals went in one by one, Said the ant to the antelope, who
There's one more river to cross, are you shovin'?
The elephant chewing a caraway There's one more river to cross.
bun, [Refrain]
There's one more river to cross.
[Refrain] 10 The animals went in eight by eight,
There's one more river to cross,
4 The animals went in two by two, Some were early and some were
There's one more river to cross, late,
The crocodile and the kangaroo, There's one more river to cross.
There's one more river to cross. [Refrain]
[Refrain]
11 The animals went in nine by nine,
5 The animals went in three by three, There's one more river to cross,
There's one more river to cross, Old Noah shouted, cast off that
The bat, the bear and the bumble- line!
bee, There's one more river to cross.
There's one more river to cross. [Refrain]
[Refrain]
12 The animals went in ten by ten,
6 The animals went in four by four, There's one more river to cross,
There's one more river to cross, If you want any more, you must
And one hippopotamus stuck in the sing it again,
door, There's one more river to cross.
There's one more river to cross. [Refrain]
[Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 75


r p I

Johnny Booker New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
6 D G D G Bm

1 As I was walking 'long the road 3 The other day I said hello,
With a tired feeling and a heavy Went out with Sue for the corn to
load, hoe;
The tadpole winked at the polli- We hoed it down with toe and heel
wog's daughter '
Till the ground was so hard, it
And kicked the bullfrog plump in wouldn't peel. [Refrain]
the water.
4 I went to the woods to split some
Refrain: rail
And it's ooh, Johnny Booker, I To make a stone fence up on the
do, I do, hill;
It's ooh, Johnny Booker, I do. Ifound a rattler under a log,
So I split it up into live bullfrogs.
2 I rode to the river so my horse [Refrain]
could swim,
He brushed me off on a buttonwood
limb,
I hugged that limb and gave him
such a crack
That he put my legs between his
back. [Refrain]

Fire Down Below New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

fa j
1

i r~* _n i jj i 1 &n i i ,]p. _hi i n i i _n =Fi

D f m G C En D E m7 ftm a; D

$*f 1r r~
'

^ i
o 1)

1 There's fire in the galley, 4 The flying fish begin to jump,


There's fire in the hold, The snails begin to roar;
Now fetch a bucket of water, girls, The fire in the hold, girls,
There's fire down below. Woke me at half-past four. [Refrain]

Refrain: 5 I spoke up to that old boat,


Fire, fire, Now let's have no tricks;
Fire down below, I fired up her boiler,
Go fetch a bucket of water, girls, She blew at half-past six. [Refrain]
There's fire down below.
6 Now we travel under sail,
2 A bully boat and a bully crew, There's fire down below,
There's fire down below, We're hitched onto a commuter whale,
And a bully roaring captain, too, That's why we run so slow. [Refrain]
There's fire down below. [Refrain]

3 I'll fire this trip


And then I'll fire no more;
Just pay to me my money now,
And I will swim to shore. [Refrain]
t>

76 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N Y


#

el hi nr11 9"i New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA20EN

G Am D7

fa
'

Hj 1 i 1

1 1
M

mmm m M ^^ m m
1 There once was a man named Michael Finnigin,
He grew whiskers on his chinnigin,
The wind came up and blew them innigin,
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

2 There once was a man named Michael Finnigin,


He got drunk from too much ginnigin,
So he wasted all his tinnigin,
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

3 There once was a man named Michael Finnigin,


He kicked up an awful dinnigin
Because they said he must not sinnigin,
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

4 There once was a man named Michael Finnigin,


He went fishing with a pinnigin,
Caught a fish, but he dropped it innigin:
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

5 There once was a man named Michael Finnigin,


Climbed a tree and barked his shinnigin,
Took off several yards of skinnigin,
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

6 There once was


a man named Michael Finnigin,
He grew and he grew thinnigin,
fat
Then he died, and we have to beginnigin,
Poor old Michael Finnigin! (Beginnigin!)

copyright 1958 by ABELARDSCHUMAN LTD. 77


The Three Sisters New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

E E dm

!*s

A E G**m dm E dm A E

^JJljUimi j. JWrr l
iU- JJJJ JI H j^j I 11

1 In some time to come,, I remember it well


With a ding ting,
In some time to come, I remember it well,
And a ring,
In some time to come, I remember it well,
There was a fair maiden in Brooklyn did dwell.

Refrain :

With a ding ting over a ring ting


Ding tingle a ringle a ding.

2 She lived all alone with her parents in Queens


With a ding ting,
She lived all alone with her parents in Queens
And a ring,
She lived all alone with her parents in Queens,
Her age was quite red and her hair was nineteen.
[Refrain]

3 Then unto this maiden her lover did sigh


With a ding ting,
Then unto this maiden her lover did sigh,
And a ring,
Then unto this maiden her lover did sigh,
Though I'm lame in both ears and tongue-tied in one eye.
[Refrain]

4 Said he, fly with me by the light of yon star,


With a ding ting,
Said he, fly with me by the light of yon star
And a ring,
Said he, fly with me by the light of yon star,
For you are the eye of my apple, you are.
[Refrain]

5 She answered him sadly, Oh, my only dear


With a ding ting,
She answered him sadly, Oh, my only dear,
And a ring,
She answered him sadly, Oh, my only dear,
See the passion you rouse in my cosmetic tear.
[Refrain]

78 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


6 Nay, fly not tonight, but go yesterday noon
With a ding ting,
Nay, fly not tonight, but go yesterday noon,
And a ring,
Nay, fly not tonight, but go yesterday noon,
If you never return, it will yet be too soon.
[Refrain]

7 Then this fly-by-night lover went courting next door


With a ding ting,
Then this fly-by-night lover went courting next door
And a ring,
Then this fly-by-night lover went courting next door
And the fair maiden's laughter availed her no more.
[Refrain]

8 How tragic the tale of the maiden so fair


With a ding ting,
How tragic the tale of the maiden so fair
And a ring,
How tragic the tale of the maiden so fair
Whose age was quite red, and nineteen was her hair.
[Refrain]

79
i

Buffalo Gals New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
c G7 C

d * ' -0-
4* * '
"
* 1 1

G7 C Dm7 G7 C 0i7
En G7
A

Eal pp.r -J0-0


-J

^
\fV)
- 0- j m * '
J
J ~
1 ,

C Dm7 G7 c Em G7 C
A -

r~*f-4
T*TT m
r r r a ~+ 9 " _ > j
rf *

1 As I went walking down the street,


Down the street, down the street,
A pretty gal I chanced to meet,
It was under the light of the moon.

Re/rain:
Oh, Buffalo gals, won't you come out tonight,
Come out tonight, won't you come out tonight,
Oh, Buffalo gals, won't you come out tonight
And dance by the light of the moon.

2 I asked her, would she stop and talk,


Stop and talk, stop and talk;
Her feet covered up the whole sidewalk
All under the light of the moon. [Refrain]

3 I balanced hole in her stocking,


to a gal with a
And her heel kept a-rocking and her knees kept a-knocking,
I balanced to a gal with a hole in her stocking,

Just the prettiest gal in the room. [Refrain]

4 Idanced with a gal and she has a wooden leg,


She has a wooden leg, she has a wooden leg,
And I guess that's why they call her Peg,
Just the prettiest gal in the room. [Refrain]

5 I danced with a gal with freckles on her face,


With freckles on her face, with freckles on her face,
I asked where she got 'em and she's got 'em every place

All under the light of the moon. [Refrain]

80 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS. INC., New York, N. Y.


Jinny Get Around New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
Em Em ^^^mm Am B7 Em

1 J I *si * m d d

1 Now don't you see that pretty little girl, 5 I took that girl out Saturoddy night,
And don't you think she's nice? And I told her to keep cool:
Well, don't you think that she and I Of course I'd like to kiss you here,
Might marry once or twice? Do you take me for a fool? [Refrain]

Refrain [twice]: 6 I went to see that pretty little girl


Oh Jinny, get around, around, I say, To take her for a ride;
Jinny, go on around, I had that car so polishinied up,
Dance a get around, round again, It wouldn't just go, it'd slide. [Refrain]
I'll follow you so soon.

7 I went to see that pretty little girl,


2 I clambered over the big stone wall; All a-courting her I went;
When she saw me, didn't she run! She asked me what I'd come there for,
I never saw such a pretty little girl And what it was I meant. [Refrain]
But what I loved her some. [Refrain]
8 Well, you can drive the bypass road
3 Her cheeks as red as a violetta rose, And can drive through town,
I

And her eyes a diamond brown: But you get there before I do,
if

I'm going to see that pretty little girl Just leave my girl alone! [Refrain]
Before that sun goes down. [Refrain]
9 I went up on the mountain top
4 My true love is a pretty little girl, And she came down the side;
My true love, she is young, I flipped my hat to a telephone pole

My true love has such a tenderizing look So down that cable I'd ride. [Refrain]
When she doesn't bite her tongue. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 81


1

Hoggedee Boggedee How Now New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

.
j3
B
i
J7]j"ji
C7 F
i rnn~\
C

m F

On -
Am

F p
mm
F

Arr

\!y * 1 '
m m |
1- ~1
V
"1
Bj |

1 I married a wife on the seventh of June,


. With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
And I must have married a little too soon.
<

Refrain :

With a high jig jigger me,


whistle a toggery,
Hoggedee, boggedee, how now?

2 When she arose, and the work to be done,


With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
She prettied her hair till the color
ran down. [Refrain]

3 She put down the phone at the end


of the week,
With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
And that is what made her to smile
so sweet. [Refrain]

4 She set the cheese to cure up on


the shelf,
With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
And she left it there to turn of itself.
[Refrain]

5 The cheese soon turned, and it fell

to the floor
With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
Stood up on its legs and walked out
the door. [Refrain]

6 Itwalked till it came to Centrial Park


With a hoggedee, boggedee, how now?
It didn't come home until after dark.
[Refrain]

82 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Jarsey Jane New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

m
F*. Fifcn D

* 4 n m m :=g
P * ' ^

r j '
g " r j i
j ^ I*.

#-* f rrnr
i
F*


77 1
9^ ^
1
zzz

She promised she'd meet me when the clock struck seventeen


1
~f-
I
,
J === '
i

At the stockyards just nine miles out of town, Jarsey Jane,


Where pig ears and goat tails and tough old Texas steers
Sell for sirloin steak, two dollars for a pound.
She is my darling, my daisy, she is humpbacked and crazy,
She is knock-kneed, bowlegged and lame with the rheumatiz,
Both her teeth are false, too much drinking buffered salts,
She's my freckle-faced, consumptive Jarsey Jane.

2 I took her to the clam bar, the juiciest in town,


She prefers to eat such circumstantial food, Jarsey Jane,
Where the turnips soaked in wine sauce, with whalebone on the side
Turned her greener, though you must not think her rude.
She is my honey, my daisy, she is cross-eyed and lazy,
Hollow-chested, quite scraggly and lean, forty-nine,
With a figure like a stork, she's the terror of New York,
She's my freckle- faced, consumptive Jarsey Jane.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 83


Sam Hall
fa// New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em B7 Em B! Em

V u i*
'
lT> ~t -i ^ *
If*
J iJ J
* -'
m 1
'

51
^ a ^ s
1 Oh, my name is Samuel Hall, 5 Oh, the sheriff, he came too,
Samuel Hall, he came too,
Oh, my name is Samuel Hall, Oh, the sheriff, he came too, he
Samuel Hall. i
,
came too.
Oh, my name is Samuel Hall, and I Oh, the sheriff, he came too, with
hate you, one and all, his little boys in blue,
You're a bunch of muckers all, And I hope they sizzle too, damn
damn your eyes. their eyes!

2 Oh, I killed a man, 'tis said, so 6 To the gallows I must go, I must
'tis said, go,

Oh, I killed a man, 'tis said, so To the gallows I must go, I must
'tis said. go.

Oh, I killed a man, 'tis said, for I To the gallows I must go, with my
filled him up with lead friends there down below
And I left him there for dead, damn Saying, "Sam, I told ya so!" Damn
his eyes! their eyes!

3 Oh, they took me to the quod, to 7 I saw Nellie in the crowd, in the
the quod, crowd,
Oh, they took me to the quod, to I saw Nellie in the crowd, in the
the quod. crowd.
Oh, they took me to the quod, and I saw Nellie in the crowd, hope to
they left me there, by God, see her in a shroud,
With a ball and chain and rod, damn I yelled, "Nellie, ain't ya proud?"
their eyes. Damn her eyes!

4 Oh, the preacher, he did come, he 8 Now they ring the final bell, final
did come, bell,

Oh, the preacher, he did come, he Now they ring the final bell, final
did come. bell.

Oh, the preacher, he did come, and Now they ring the final bell, I will

he looked so bloody glum see you all in Hell,


As he talked of Kingdom Come, And I hope you sizzle well, damn
damn his eyes. your eyes!

84 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


The Bulldog On The Bank New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
Am7

^m #^
D7 G

r d * 1
J JW I
1 Y
|^J
1 Jl-=

rj-LT T J
-'i:;LJ'rLr [j- i
# |J
i

[j^ i
m
L;"
J i
J i'

1 Oh, the bulldog on the bank,


And the bullfrog in the pool,
The bulldog called the bullfrog
A green old water fool.

Refrain:
Singing tra la la la la,
Singing tra la la la la,
Singing tra la la la, tra la la la,
Tra la la la la.

2 Oh, the bulldog stooped to catch him,


And the snapper caught his paw;
The polliwog died a-laughing
To see him wag his jaw. [Refrain]

3 Says the monkey to the owl,


"Now, what'll you have to drink?"
"Since you are so very kind, sir,
I'll take a bottle of ink! " [Refrain]

4 Oh, the bulldog in the yard


And the tomcat on the roof,
They are practicing the Highland Fling
And drinking ninety proof. [Refrain]

5 Says the tomcat to the dog,


"It will set your ears aflame!
There's that pretty girl a-sparking
With that college man again." [Refrain]

6 Says the bulldog to the cat,


"Oh, what do you think they're at?
They're just studying to be friendly,
And where's the harm in that?" [Refrain]

7 Pharoah's daughter on the bank,


Little Moses in the pool,
She fished him out with a telephone pole
And sent him off to school, [/terrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New YorK, N. Y. 85


The Monkey's Wedding New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN
Di>7 G7 C

i i

uU ' r " i

LU U i

U"

'
"U m mm w P
1 The monkey married the baboon's 3 What do you think they had for
sister, supper?
Smacked his lips and then he kissed Black-eyed peas with bread and
her, butter,
Kissed so hard, he raised a blister, Ducks in the pond caught all in a
She set up a yell. flutter,
The bridesmaid stuck on some court Pickled oyster stew,
plaster, Chestnuts raw and boiled and
Stuck so hard, it couldn't stick roasted,
faster. Apples sliced and onions toasted;
Wasn't that a sad disaster? Had two bands in the corner posted,
But it soon got well. Never got a cue.

2 What do you think the bride was 4 What do you think was the tune they
dressed in? danced to?
White gauze veil and a green glass Drunken Sailor more than once, too,
breast pin, Tails in the way, and some were
Red kid shoes, looked quite in- pinched, too,
teresting 'Cause they were too long.
She was quite the belle. What do you think they used for a
The bridegroom sported a blue shirt fiddle?
collar, Old banjo with a hole in the middle,
Black silk socks that cost a dollar, Tambourine and a worn-out griddle,
Large false whiskers, fashion to That's the end of the song.
foller,
He cut a monstrous swell.

86 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


9 3 a 'I

The Darby Ram New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

9
9 9*9 '

J- -I -L' '
9 J.
" *-*
'

* V~\ 7
"

A Em7 A7 D G 11 A7 D

W 4 r* J '
1

d t
. -


* J
~~n V fs

As I was going to Darby, 10 The backbone of this ram, sir,


'Twas on one market day, Made the mainmast of a ship;
I saw the largest ram, sir, That ship could carry the largest sail
That ever fed on hay. In all the whaling fleet. [Refrain]

Refrain: 11 The man that owned this ram, sir,


Sing oh tiddle-ee eye oh day oh day, Was counted very rich,
Sing tiddle-ee eye oh day. But the man that sang this song, sir,
Was a-lying down to sleep. [Refrain]
That ram had sturdy feet, sir,
As needed his weight to stand,
And every time he set one down,
It covered an acre of land. [Refrain]

3 The wool upon his back, sir,


Reached up to the sky;
The eagles built their nests in it,

I heared the young ones cry. [Refrain]

4 The horns upon his head, sir,


Reached almost to the moon;
One man climbed up in January
And didn't get down till June. [Refrain]

5 That ram had one broad tooth, sir,

That held a bushel of corn,


And one other such tooth, sir,
Made a fine bugle horn. [Refrain]

6 The wool that grew upon his tail,


If you had clipped it off,
'T would have done for spinning and weaving
A hundred yards of cloth. [Refrain]

7 It men in Darby
took all the
To him when he was young,
tie
Took all the boys and all the girls
To wrap around his tongue. [Re/rain]

8 And ifyou think I'm joking,


Or if you think I lie,
Just travel down to Darby,
You'd see him as well as I. [Refrain]

9 The butcher that killed this ram, sir,


Was drownded in his blood,
And passengers from here, sir,

Were carried away in the flood. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 87


The Old Tobacco Box New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN
F*ff A7 D E*7 A7

F* 1 E "7 A7 1

J J J J i
i

1
* " ==i
'

J i a r 1
'

"
1

3

1 There was an old soldier, and he


had a wooden leg,
And he hadn't no tobacco, nor
tobacco could he beg;
There was an old miser, he was
slyer than a fox,
And he always had tobacco in his
old tobacco box.
"Say, old miser, won't you give me
a chew?"
"Why no, old soldier, I'll be hanged
if I do!
Just save up your scrapings and
earn a few rocks,
And you'll always have tobacco in
your old tobacco box."

2 Well, that old soldier was feeling


very bad,
Said, "I'll get even, I will do
that!"
So he went to the corner, took his
rifle from the peg,
And he stabbed the old miser with
a splinter from his leg.
He had an old hen, and she had a
wooden foot,
And she fixed herself a nest by a
mulberry root;
She laid more eggs than any hen on
the farm,
And another little drink won't do
us any harm!

88 @ copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


*

Look it Here New Words and New Music Arrangement NORMAN CAZDEN

^^
by

m 1*
^
Am7 Bm

# ^5
*=

Em
# F^m

* S ^ I J- B M 1
I
J
K
"]
J. i> mm*njr i
mjj.ii

1 I married with a scolding wife


The fourteenth of November;
She made me weary of my life,
'Twas long before December.

Refrain:
Now lookit here, and lookit there,
And look 'way over yonder,
And can't you see the old gray goose
A-smiling at the gander?

2 Then every night when I came home


She my ears asunder,
split
Then beat my head with the nearest jug
And slapped me with a flounder. [Refrain]

3 Then my good wife went out one night,


Iknew not where she'd wander,
But feared she would return to me
With another witch behind her. [Refrain]

4 I heard a rumbling in the sky,


It imitated thunder,
If that weren't my wife back again,
'T would surely be a wonder. [Refrain]

5 Long did I bear the heavy yoke,


With many griefs attended,
But to my comfort be it spoke:
Now, now her scolding's ended. [Refrain]

6 Last Saturday night my good wife died,


On Sunday she was buried,
And Monday was my courting day,
On Tuesday I got married. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 89


. . . . .. . ..

Fooba Wooba John New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN
Dm7 Em

j.BjL-1 iH \JIUM -J- -m-S-


Hi l

U^j
U r
[f
J i

l' u' EJLr


J i
J^ TJ ^
Saw a flea kick a tree,
Fooba wooba, fooba wooba,
Saw a flea kick a tree,
Fooba wooba John.
Saw a flea kick a tree
In the middle of the sea,
Fooba wooba, fooba wooba,
Fooba wooba John.

Saw a crow flying low,


Fooba wooba, fooba wooba,
Saw a crow flying low,
4 Saw a whale chase a snail . .
Fooba wooba John.
All around a water pail . . .

Saw a crow flying low


Several miles beneath the snow,
5 Saw a louse run a mouse. . .

Fooba wooba, fooba wooba,


Down the chimney, through the house. . .

Fooba wooba John.


6 Saw two geese making cheese..
Saw a bug give a shrug,
One would hold and the other would squeeze,
Fooba wooba, fooba wooba,
Saw a bug give a shrug
7 Saw a mule teaching school . . .

Fooba wooba John.


To some bullfrogs in the pool . .

Saw a bug give a shrug


In the middle of the rug,
8 Saw a rat bait a cat..
Fooba wooba, [ere.].
Cinnamon butter and licorice fat. .

9 Saw a bee off to sea . .

With his fiddle across his knee . . .

10 Saw a sow heave a cow . .

Just to show her piglets how . . .

11 Saw a hare chase a deer. .

Ran it all of seven year. . .

12 Saw a hog chew a log. . .

Fished it out from under the bog. . .

13 Saw a bear scratch his ear. .

Wonderin' what we're doing here. .

90 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Mary's Lamb New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

m J J I

E
J J <
B

F* m7 B7
m
E

E
G*m

-jhA
*
(fa i !
..i
=^ t111 ^ J==ii __ 1 1

a i=u
& \

1 Mary had a little lamb,


Little lamb, little lamb,
Mary had a little lamb,
Her father shot it dead.

2 And now it goes to school each day,


School each day, school each day,
Now it goes to school each day
Between two chunks of bread. 7 Mary had a little lamb,
Little lamb, little lamb,
3 Mary had a little lamb, Mary had a little lamb
Little lamb, little lamb, For whom she did not care.
Mary had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow. 8 But everywhere that Mary went,
Mary went, Mary went,
4 And everywhere that Mary went, Everywhere that Mary went,
Mary went, Mary went, Little lambie paid the fare.
Everywhere that Mary went
She generally took the bus. 9 Mary had a little lamb,
Little lamb, little lamb,
Mary had a little lamb,
The doctor was quite surprised.

10 And everywhere that Mary went,


Mary went, Mary went,
Everywhere that Mary went,
That's citronella in the tea.

5 Mary had a little lamb, 11 Mary had a little lamb,


Little lamb, little lamb, Little lamb, little lamb,
Mary had a little lamb, Mary had a little lamb,
And he was wondrous wise. She also had a bear.

6 And everywhere that Mary went, 12 I've often seen her little lamb,
Mary went, Mary went, Little lamb, little lamb,
Everywhere that Mary went, I've often seen her little lamb,
Hard trials and tribulations. But I've yet to see her bear.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 91


Johnny Graw New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

m
A

m m * C7

=*
A

"' u
6

* SI ninf] \ n } \
k i
rj r -
riJJ i

m 1
^m m^ m
Haven't seeVi Johnny for half a day,
Tell that Missouri I can't stay.
m m
Put on his coat afore his shirt,
Because he had no shirt there first.

Refrain:
Oh, Johnny Graw from Chickawgaw,
Strangest fellow you ever saw,
Now come along, John, and
sing me a tune,
Won't ever get your day's work done.

2 Johnny took oats to feed the hoss,


Ate them himself, and the boss was cross.
What did the hoss eat? Where is he at?
Ate nothing at all, and not quite that!
[Refrain]

3 Johnny had turnips to feed the sheep,


Instead he gave them tobacco leaf.
What did you do with the turnips,
glutton?
Keep them till I get some mutton.
[Refrain]

4 Boss setting out for a fancy toot


Ordered Johnny to clean his suit.
Johnny said it'll be ready in a
minute,
Beat that suit with the boss still in it.

[Refrain]

5 Johnny lay down on the railroad track,


Engine came by and slapped his back.
Johnny didn't cry, didn't wince,
didn't whine:
If you do that again, it'll tickle my spine.
[Refrain]

92 copyright 1961 by MELOOY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


/ Wish I Were A Crank New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

1 I wish I were a crank;


could marry some king's daughter;
I

I'd patent my new hydroplane


that travels under water;
I'd have a scheme to live a thousand years, and never dying
Till Congress passed my proposal ending advertisers' lying.

Refrain:
With a bow, wow wow, bow-wow, wow wow,
We'll all go out a-Maying with a whack! Row dee dow.

2 I wish I were a crank;


oppose fluoridization;
I'd
I'd point out every neighbor I thought dangerous to the nation;

My eggs would set to boil for just two minutes and eighteen seconds,
And when I paid a fare, I'd want to know how it was reckoned. [Refrain]

3 I wish I were a crank; join a dozen associations


And learn their by-laws all by heart, to tie up operations;
I'd scan the TV programs, and protest all deviations;
I'd teach the mayor how to may, and the minister salvation. [Refrain]

4 Iwish I were a crank; I'd complain of pain to animals,


Of ladies in a restaurant, or sterile-seed perennials;
The traffic board would hear my views on vital some improvement
Which could be guaranteed to freeze all vehicular movement. [Refrain]

5 I wish I I would write to every editor


were a crank;
To prove how juggling funds around can stymie every creditor;
I'd say, get rid of busybodies, the world will be the roomier
Just follow my pet diet, and you never will feel gloomier. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y 93


A Donkey Named Pete New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
F C

k trn r pr p
i

r r p P
^ '
m 1

I S^fe
m i pqj i
j j'jjj i j j-
j p 11

1 In Scarlett Town there lived a donkey, his maiden name was Pete;
He grew moss upon his back, but he was lightning on his feet;
One day he drank too many oysters, which made him cross and thin,
Till hisbones weighed seventeen ounces, counting the dew upon his shin.

2 Singing a once a more, a dunce a more, and once a more around,


Put the snowballs on his tombstone and postcards by the pound;
Singing a once a more, a dunce a more, and once a more around,
With the water so cold, it makes us shy; for Pete's sake, do sit down.

3 That donkey named Pete kicked the bucket when the bucket was full of glue;
He rose high into his stockings when a spark fell in his shoe;
He couldn't run the terminal railroad, he ran it into the ground,
But after he ate the manganese, not much of Pete was found.

4 Singing a once a more, a dunce a more, and once a more around,


Put the snowballs on his tombstone and postcards by the pound;
Singing a once a more, a dunce a more, and once a more around,
With the water so cold, it makes us shy; for Pete's sake, do sit down.

94 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Knick Knack Cadillac New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
F$m

^^ #
D A7 D

JJ J JJ JJ jjj
I IJJJJ-t l##Jjp
1 This old man, he played one,
He played knick knack on his thumb.

Refrain:
Come a knick knack, Cadillac,
Give your dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

2 This old man, he played two,


He played knick knack on his shoe. [Refrain]

3 This old man, he played three,


He played knick knack on his knee. [Refrain]

4 This old man, he played four,


He played knick knack on the floor. [Refrain]

5 This old man, he played five,


He played knick knack on a drive. [Refrain]

6 This old man, he played six,


He played knick knack with some tricks. [Refrain]

7 This old man, he played seven,


He played knick knack up to Heaven. [Refrain]

8 This old man, he played eight,


He played knick knack on his plate. [Refrain]

9 This old man, he played nine,


He played knick knack all the time. [Refrain]

10 This old man, he played ten,


He played knick knack now and then. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 95


New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Bm D7 Am7 Q

07 Q

w -0--*- 9 ri -J. 9

There's a girl in the diner on the If for bumblebees on the


you look
Jaycee Line, Jaycee Line,
There's a girl in the diner on the If you look for bumblebees on the
Jaycee Line. Jaycee Line,
There's a girl in the diner, If you look for bumblebees,

And her cheeks are made of chiner, There are hundreds in the cheese,
You may kiss her if you find her on You will bite them through their
the Jaycee Line. knees on the Jaycee Line,
[ftefrain]
Refrain [twice]:
Come a rig-a-jag-a-jig jag, a Once we made a clammy pie on the
rig-a-jag-a-jig, Jaycee Line,
Come a rig-a-jag-a-jigger on Once we made a clammy pie on the
the Jaycee Line. Jaycee Line.
Once we made a clammy pie,
And the crust rose to the sky,
But itisn't safe to fly on the

J aycee Line. [Refrain]

96 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Sally Goodin New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

E7 G

D G

a i
i i i r J J J d J I .

I looked down the road and I saw You can't fool a bee on a huckle-
my Sally coming, berry blossom,
I thought to my soul I would kill You can't fool Sally with the lies
myself a-running, you're tossin',
I looked down the road and I saw You can't fool a bee on a huckle-
my Sally coming, berry blossom,
I thought to my soul I would kill You can't fool Sally with the lies
myself a-running. you're tossin'. [Refrain]

Refrain: I walked her down the road when


Have a piece of pie and have the road wasn't muddy,
a piece of puddin', I hugged Sally Goodin till she
Have a little care when you couldn't stand steady,
hug Sally Goodin, I walked her down the road when
Have a piece of pie and have the road wasn't muddy,
a piece of puddin', I hugged Sally Goodin till she
Have a little care when you couldn't stand steady.
hug Sally Goodin. [Refrain]

Well, you go in and dance and I'll

sit down beside her,


Oh Sally, won't you have a taste
of this cider,
Well you go in and dance and I'll

sit down beside her,


Oh Sally, won't you have a taste of
this cider? [Refrain]

A sheep and a cow were walking


in the pasture,
The sheep said to the cow, can't
you walk a little faster,
A sheep and a cow were walking
in the pasture,
The sheep said to the cow, can't
you walk a little faster?
[Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., f.'jw York, N. Y. 97


a
- & 1

Don't Stub Your Toe On Friday New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

V a --

m -.
1

-i
9 1 1

Cm7 Dm G C G 07
^mmmm ^
6

fy^ yp #u J rr b
1
1

Ionce had a horse, his name was Bill, I'm going out in the woods next year
And when he ran, he couldn't stand still, To hunt for several kinds of deer
Ran away for a day, that Friday I With molasses, with a tight- rope,
ran with him. and several other fellers.
He he could not stop
ran so fast, At trapping birds I am a beaut,
Till he ended up in a florist shop, There is no bird I cannot shoot
Fell exhaustionated with his eyeteeth In the haunches, in the ear-lobes,
in the florister's left shoulder. in the teeth or lower finners.
Don't stub your toe on Friday, Don't stub your toe on Friday,
Don't stub your toe on Friday, Don't stub your toe on Friday,
Don't stub your toe on Friday, Don't stub your toe on Friday,
It's green, it's square, and it's Those skates for plates, they make
chewing on the apples. me feel so sleepy.

Ionce had a girl, her name was Daisy, Once I went up in a fog so big,
When she sang, the cat went crazy, The people on earth looked just
Delirious with viruses and all sorts like a pig,
of cataleptics. Like a mice, like a katydid, like
One day she sang that song about flyses or like fleasens.
The man who turned himself inside out, The fog churned up with its bottom
He's never been to Watertown or side higher,
lots of other places. Fell on the wife of a country squire,
Don't stub your toe on Friday, She made a noise like a crankcase
Don't stub your toe on Friday, with ecstatic cherry syrup.
Don't stub your toe on Friday, Don't stub your toe on Friday,
Look here, it's queer, that leaky Don't stub your toe on Friday,
patch in the icebox. Don't stub your toe on Friday,
I'm glad you're glad I'm glad the
dance is over.

98 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


1
Unfortunate Miss Bailey New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN

(ht p
m 0-0 m
07

*
nn ufJ i

m =t # J
'r Mltu' cj g^
gf p

A captain bold of Halifax who lived in country quarters


Seduced a maid, who hanged herself one Monday in her garters.
His guilty conscience smited him, he lost his stomach daily,
He took to drinking ratafee and thought upon Miss Bailey.
Oh, Miss Bailey, unfortunate Miss Bailey.

One night, as he lay on his bed, 'cause he had got a fever,


Said he, "I am a handsome man, but I'm a gay deceiver!"
At twelve o'clock that very night his candle burned quite palely,
A ghost stepped up to his bedside and cried, "Behold, Miss Bailey!"
Oh, Miss Bailey, unfortunate Miss Bailey.

"Avaunt, Miss Bailey," then he cried, "Your face looks white and mealy."
"Oh, Captain Smith," the ghost replied, "You've used me ungenteely,
The coroner's quest goes hard with me, because I've acted frailly,
And Parson Briggs won't bury me, though I'm a dead Miss Bailey."
Oh, Miss Bailey, unfortunate Miss Bailey.

"Dear ghost," said he, "since you and I accounts must once for all close,
There one-pound note in my regimental small-clothes,
is a
'Twill bribe the sexton for your grave." The ghost then vanished gaily,
Saying, "Bless you, wicked Captain Smith! Remember poor Miss Bailey! "
Oh, Miss Bailey, unfortunate Miss Bailey.

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York. N. Y. 99


Three Times Over New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZOEN
O^m E G*B

1 I've been to Harlem, I've been to


Dover,
I've traveled this wide world all
over,
Over, over, three times over,
Balance to the pretty girl and turn
your glasses over.

Refrain:
Sailing east, sailing west,
Sailing over the ocean,
You'd better watch out when
the boat begins to rock,
Or you'll lose your girl in the
ocean.

2 Ihad a dog, his name was Rover,


When he died, he died all over,
Over, over, three times over,
Balance to the pretty girl and turn
your glasses over.
[Refrain]

3 Fall of the year comes in October,


Often down and seldom sober,
Sober, sober three times over,
Balance to the pretty girl and turn
your glasses over.
[Refrain]

100 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


Clear The Kifchen New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em Am G7

V=M
U Ulj ^

c S7 Am G7 C 87 Am Em Dm

1
;

r * ^ 1

r r rrrr
There was an old horse lay down in the road,
And on his hip sat a hump-backed toad,
He raised his voice to the woods around,
And hark! From the tomb came a doleful sound.

Refrain:
So clear the kitchen, old folks, young folks,
Clear the kitchen, old folks, young folks,
Old Virginny never tire.

2 I went to the creek, and I couldn't get across,


Had nobody there but an old blind horse,
But Old Man Dillon came riding by,
Says he, "Your horse will surely die!" [Refrain

3 That horse fell down right on the spot.


Says he, "Can't you see, his eyes are shot?"
So I took my knife and off with his skin,
And when he came to, I could ride him again. [Refrain]

4 A jaybird sat on a hickory limb,


He winked at me and I winked at him,
Then I picked up a stone and I hit his shin;
Says he, "You better not do that again." [Refrain]

5 A bullfrog dressed in soldier's clothes


Went out in the field to shoot some crows;
The crows smelled powder and flew away,
And wasn't that frog mighty mad that day? [Refrain]

6 I have a sweetheart, she lives uptown,


And whenever she meets me, she wears a frown,
And when she strolls the streets around
The hollow of her foot makes a hole in the ground. [Refrain]

copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y. 101


mg Co/e New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN

Em Ar I 1 Em C

(M|i J >w J B

^

m
*
1 |l
S
, i.
\4
i\
!
'
A
!

i
*-*

#=*
P^P at* '
J4 '
J j J J
^p

p r H i
r r r r *^T3 J77] 1
J J
j
j I
^J J J J"3 j
4
I jl

Now Old King Cole was a merry old Now Old King Cole was a merry old
soul, soul,
And a merry old soul was he; And a merry old soul was he;
He sent for his pipe and he sent for He sent for his pipe and he sent for
his bowl, his bowl,
And he sent for his fiddlers three. And he sent for his trumpeters three.
And the fiddlers fiddled feedledee And the trumpeters trumped a
and tweedle, tweedle, trumpatata tada tada tada
tweedle, tada trumpa,
And the fiddlers fiddled tweedle And the trumpeters trumped a trumpa
deedle dee, tada tada tee,
Feedle feedle, tweedle tweedle, Trumpa trumpatata tada tada, trumpa
deedle tweedle, feedle tada tada tada tada trumpa,
feedle, Tata trumpatada trumped the trumpet-
Feedle deedle played the fiddlers ers three.
three.
Now Old King Cole was a merry old
Now Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
soul, And a merry old soul was he;
And a merry old soul was he; He sent for his pipe and he sent for
He sent for his pipe and he sent for his bowl,
his bowl, And he sent
for his drummers three.
And he sent for his fifers three. 'And the drummers drummed a bump
And the fifers fifed a fyodle and a bump ditty, pom pom
ditty
toodle, toodle, toodle, pom pom bump ditty,
And the fifers fifed a fyodle toodle And the drummers drummed a bump
dee, ditty pom pom dee,
Fyodle fyodle, toodle toodle, toodle Bump ditty, bump ditty, pom pom
toodle, fyodle fyodle, pom pom, ditty bump pom pom
Fyodle toodle fifed the fifers three. pom ditty bump pom,
Bumpaditty pom pom drummed the
drummers three.

102 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


,, ,

Now Old King Cole was a merry old 7 Now Old King Cole was a merry old
soul, soul,
And a merry old soul was he; And a merry old soul was he;
He sent for his pipe and he sent for He sent for his pipe and he sent for
his bowl, his bowl,
And he sent for his clarinets three. And he sent for his mandolins
And the clarinets mewled a noodle three.
noodle, oodle, oodle, oodle, And the mandolins picked a picka-
And the clarinets mewled a noodle tickle, eedlelicka needle-
oodle-iddle lee, licka pickatickle,
Noodle noodle, oodle-iddle oodle, And the mandolins picked a picka-
canoodle oodle-iddle noodle- tickle nee,
iddle oodle, Nee nee pickatickle eedlelicka
Noodle-iddle oodle mewled the needlelicka, peedlelicka
clarinets three. needlelicka pickatickle
eedlelicka,
Now Old King Cole was a merry old Pickatickle eedlelicka picked the
soul, mandolins three.
And a merry old soul was he;
He sent for his pipe and he sent for 8 Now Old King Cole was a merry old
his bowl, soul,
And he sent for his tromboners And a merry old soul was he;
three. He sent for his pipe and he sent for
And the tromboners toned a tome- his bowl,
bada dome dome, bomebada And he sent for his 'cellos three.
bomebada borne borne, And the 'cellos zoomed a zoozee
And the tromboners toned a tome- nigha, zwigha, zwigha nigha,
bada borne borne bee, And the 'cellos zoomed a woozee
Tomebada tomebada, borne borne nigha zee,
bomebada, bomebada tome- With a pizzicato zoozee nigha,
bada dome dome domebada, zwigha, zwigha, woozee,
Bomebada domebada toned the Nigha zwigha zoomed the 'cellos
tromboners three. three.

Now Old King Cole was a merry old


soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He sent for his pipe and he sent for
his bowl,
And he listened to his orchestra
play.
And the [fiddlers fiddled. . .
, fifers
fifed. . . , trumpeters trumped
. . . , drummers drummed. .
.

. . . clarinets mewled. . .

. . . tromboners toned. . .

. . . mandolins picked. . .

. . . 'cellos zoomed. . . ]

And he listened to his orchestra


play.

103
Jenny Jenkins New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CA2DEN

# "W
#--# 3i3 pp ^ G

r [; trr
Bin C

ir r
D7

Bm Em7 G

g
P J J J J J ^ -g
f J W

1 Oh, will you wear red, Oh my dear, 5 Oh, will you wear purple, Oh my
Oh my dear, dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear red, Jennie Oh, will you wear purple, Jennie
Jenkins? Jenkins?
No, I won't wear red, it's a color I No, I won't wear purple, it's the
dread. the color of a turkle.
[Refrain]
Refrain:
I'llbuy me a foldy-roldy tildy- 6 Oh, will you wear brown, Oh my
toldy seek-a-cause-a dear, Oh my dear,
Use-a-double roll-the-find-me! Oh, will you wear brown, Jennie
Roll, Jennie Jenkins, roll! Jenkins?
No, I won't wear brown when I'm
2 Oh, will you wear white, Oh my going downtown. [Refrain]
dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear white, Jennie 7 Oh, will you wear blue, Oh my
Jenkins? dear, Oh my dear,
No, I won't wear white, for the Oh, will you wear blue, Jennie
color's too bright. [Re/rain] Jenkins?
No, I won't wear blue, for it
3 Oh, will you wear black, Oh my wouldn't match you.
dear, Oh my dear, [Refrain]
Oh, will you wear black, Jennie
Jenkins? 8 Oh, will you wear pink, Oh my
No, I won't wear black, it's a dear, Oh my dear,
color I lack. [Refrain] Oh, will you wear pink, Jennie
Jenkins?
4 Oh, will you wear green, Oh my No, I won't wear pink, for what
dear, Oh my dear, will people think? [Refrain]
Oh, will you wear green, Jennie
Jenkins? 9 Oh, will you wear yellow, Oh my
No, I won't wear green, it's a dear, Oh my dear,
shame to be seen. Oh, will you wear yellow, Jennie
[Refrain] Jenkins?
No, I won't wear yellow when I
want to catch a fellow.
[Refrain]

104 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


10 Oh, will you wear gray, Oh my
dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear gray, Jennie
Jenkins?
No, I won't wear gray, it would
rain all the day. [Refrain]

11 Oh, will you wear tan, Oh my dear,


Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear tan, Jennie
Jenkins?
No, I won't wear tan when I'm
looking for a man.
[Refrain]

12 Oh, will you wear chartreuse, Oh


my dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear chartreuse,
Jennie Jenkins?
No, I won't wear chartreuse, for it

isn't any use. [Refrain]

13 Oh, will you wear orange, Oh my


dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, will you wear orange, Jennie
Jenkins?
No, orange I won't wear, and it
rhymes, so there! [Refrain]

14 Oh, what you will wear, Oh my


dear, Oh my dear,
Oh, what will you wear, Jennie
Jenkins?
Well, what will you care if I just
go bare? [Refrain]

105
The Flapjacks Tree New Words and New Music Arrangement by NORMAN CAZDEN
A D

fW
1 Oh, the praties, they grow small
over there,
Yes, the praties, they grow small
over there.
Why, the praties, they grow small,
For we plant them in the fall,
Then we eat them, skins and all,
over there.

The mosquitoes are so mean in July,


Yes, mosquitoes are so mean in July.
The mosquitoes are so mean,
When they've picked your bones clean,
They will chew your boots and
jeans as they fly.

Don't you wish that you were me


when I sleep?
Don't you wish that you were me
when I sleep?
Don't you wish that you were me,
Then you'd see what I can see,
Flapjacks growing on a tree in the deep.

How I wish I were a geese all forlorn!


Yes, I wish I were a geese all forlorn!
Oh, I wish I were a geese,
Then I'd live and die in peace
While accumulating grease night
and morn.

106 copyright 1961 by MELODY TRAILS, INC., New York, N. Y.


$1.95

A Book of
NONSENSE SONGS
Edited by NORMAN CAZDEN
Illustrated by CHARLES KELLER
A wonderful collection with both words and music of over
100 of America's favorite nonsense songs, A BOOK OF
NONSENSE SONGS is guaranteed to make gay occasions
gayer.

Norman Cazden, composer and musicologist, has empha-


sized the values- and the "singable" qualities of the songs in

making his selections and arrangements for this book. Mr.


Cazden has also done research on the background for the songs

and has provided complete texts for old favorites. Guitar


chords are given for all of the songs. Uniform in format with

The New Song Fest.

$1.95

THE NEW
SONG FEST A
Edited by DICK AND BETH BEST
Illustrated by DAVID HUNT
This collection of favorites contains the words and music to
800 songs. It also has an index to the complete list of songs and
to the first line of each.

CROWN PUBLISHERS, INC.


419 Park Avenue South New York City 16