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Running head: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 1

Experiential Learning Project

Lillianna Franco, Trebby Ellington, Kristina Garcia, & Moira Phippen

Loyola University Chicago

ELPS 430

Dr. Patrick Green


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Curriculum Rationale and Overview.p. 3-6

Group Reflection ...p. 7

Learning Outcome Grid p. 8

Session 1-Leadership & Identityp. 9-14

Session 2-Leadership, Identity & Civic Engagement ...p. 15-20

Session 3-Facilitation Techniques & Classroom Management.p. 21-27

Session 4-Facilitating Multicultural Spaces...p. 28-36

Session 5-Reflection in the Classroom ..p. 37-42

Session 6-How to Facilitate Critical Reflection & Social Justice (Part 1) p. 43-47

Session 7-Fear of Offending Others (FOO) ..p. 48-51

Session 8-Tying Up the Semester .p. 52-58

Session 9-How to Facilitate Critical Reflection & Social Justice (Part 2) p. 59-63

Appendices p. 64-74
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Curriculum Rationale and Overview

Curriculum Rationale- Order

In order to create curriculum that would take into consideration scaffolding toward

transformative learning for undergraduate student-workers, our group considered various orders

in topics, but ultimately decided on combining topics into one session. By pairing like topics into

one session, we are able to begin a process of learning that can be reflected on and revisited in

order to assure significant learning.

For example, to bring leadership and social justice to the forefront we decided they would

be combined in the first unit. For this position, the topics of leadership and social justice are

considered essential and should be highlighted as such to the student-workers. Beginning with

these substantial topics was done in order to quickly start the process of transformation. Students

are not expected to complete this transformation within the session, but they can begin to

consider these two topics as a backdrop to all future topics introduced. Students now have the

opportunity to self-reflect and discover their strengths as well as where they need to begin to

improve. Both of these topics are ones that rely on time and practice to completely understand

and integrate in daily life. Therefore, by beginning with these topics, we are beginning the

process of transformation early and are more likely to see progress by the time we revisit the

topics again in a later unit.

While other topics would be nice to cover in the first few units, they are not essential to

the profound purpose of this position, particularly as the first several weeks of the position are

more administrative/organizational based than facilitation focused. Moreover, the other topics,

while important, can be learned fairly quickly. Additionally, having contextual knowledge on

these areas can frame and deepen their understanding of more detailed sessions like classroom
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management. Finally, while the leadership and social justice unit in our curriculum is the first, it

is not the first session these student-workers will be a part of for this position. Our hope is that

orientation will help become the first point of contact in which student-workers can begin to

open up with each other and that our first unit will be an extension to that.

Curriculum Rationale - Activities

Our activities for this training curriculum were developed with Finks Taxonomy of

Significant Learning in mind. Most activities utilize multiple approaches to individual and group

reflection including frequent self-assessments, partnered sharing, and group discussions. For our

activities, we made a conscious effort to offer opportunities drawing from a diverse range of

approaches and structures to discussion and assessment. Furthermore, activities are structured

according to where students may be in their roles as student leaders throughout the semester.

Activities within weeks one and two are meant to serve as a foundation for students as they enter

their new positions, providing a framework through which to view their roles as student leaders.

During weeks three to four, students begin to prepare for classroom environments and group

facilitation. Activities in this section are focused on public speaking and classroom management

and are meant to provide students with the necessary skills to effectively engage peers in a larger

group environment.

Sessions taking place during weeks five and six contain activities designed to deepen

students understanding of their practical work and how they can better contribute to students

learning through the co-creation of activities. Activities within this section create space for

significant discussion of students classroom experiences as well as brainstorming strategies on

how to navigate potential issues in the classroom. Weeks seven through nine contain activities
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designed to further explore potential issues students face within their group experiences,

encouraging them to reflect on the practical aspects of their work and draw on the experiences of

their peers. In this section, students understanding of social justice and their connection to civic

engagement comes full circle as students reflect on the semester, identify strategies to further

support their work, and craft a plan to further refine their facilitation skills.

Curriculum Rationale Rubric (see Appendix E)

We created a single rubric for the semesters student professional development. Our

suggested implementation for the rubric is to invite students to self-evaluate at the beginning and

end of the semester, sharing their reflections with their supervisor. We recommend that students

not only complete the rubric, but also provide a brief reflection and rationale expanding upon

their responses. Additionally, we suggest that the students supervisor(s) complete the rubric for

each student at the midpoint of the semester. This will allow students and staff opportunity to

contrast their self-perception against outside perceptions. The rubrics will be highly subjective

and we do not recommend their use for re-hiring decisions, etc., but rather they should be a tool

for reflection on the students progress.

The rubric itself divides our professional development plans learning outcomes into

three overarching categories (Leadership Skills, Social Justice Awareness, and Facilitation

Ability), while also recognizing these categories may overlap. Each category is further divided

in accordance to the learning outcomes listed in our curriculum sessions. For each outcome,

students can score beginner, apprentice, satisfactory, or excellent. Students are not

expected to meet excellent, rather this is considered truly exceptional - a goal that we hope our

professional development plan moves students towards, but that it cannot accomplish
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independently in isolation. As a result, many outcomes allude to an intention or commitment to

continue learning outside of the space. The individual stages suggested by our four-category

rubric often may seem very close, but with attention to detail, it is visible that the model is

heavily influenced by the Leadership Identity Development Model (2006) and K.E. Edwards

Aspiring Ally Development (2006). Students move into stages more closely affiliated with

commitment, responsibility, self-reflection, critical self-awareness, confidence, and intentional

inclusion of others.
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Group Reflection

As a result of creating this professional development curriculum, two major themes

impacted the layout of our design and how we processed the overall project. The two themes

were the importance of scaffolding and situational factors. It was essential for us to create a

curriculum that would provide a holistic experience and development of the whole student. We

knew it was important to use various instructional techniques to move students progressively

towards a deeper understanding of each topic and essentially gain a greater independence in their

learning process. To do this, it was imperative that we avoid isolation of each topic. We wanted

to ensure that skills gained from each topic built upon one another as the curriculum progressed

and that each topic was interwoven and revisited throughout the curriculum. Furthermore, we felt

that social justice and identity work should serve as the foundation of the curriculum in the sense

that this concept informs how people approach each of the additional topics addressed in the

curriculum. Lastly, situational factors such as pre-session knowledge on topics, social identities,

and beliefs were important to acknowledge in the development of each session so that we could

create spaces where students could also learn from one another and not just from the instructor.

These situational factors were important because they helped us recognize how we could meet

the students where they are at.


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Learning Outcome Grid

Topic(s) #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9

Critical Reflection / / X / /

Team Building X X

Multicultural Spaces X X

Leadership X X

Creative Educators X X

Classroom Management X X

Facilitation / X

Social Justice X X / X X

X indicates the main topic(s)/concept(s) of the session

/ indicates the subtle topic(s)/concept(s) of the session

Session Name: Leadership & Identity (#1)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):


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In this session, participants will reflect on their personal social identities as they relate to

leadership.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

__X__ Social Justice

____ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team Building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

__X__ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 1, participants will/will be able to...

1. Form a personal definition of the term social identity; (Foundational Knowledge)

2. Form a personal definition of salience; (Foundational Knowledge)


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3. Identify the impact of their salient identities on their approach to leadership; (Application,

Integration, Human Dimension-Self)

4. Respect the variety of stories held by their peers. (Human Dimension-Others)

Assessment Activities

1. Production of a worksheet listing personal social identities (Criteria and Standards)

2. Identifying individual salient identities (Self Assessment; Forward looking assessment)

3. Debrief with in-time feedback from facilitator (FIDeLity feedback)

Learning Activities

1. Brainstorming community definitions

2. Individual reflection

3. Partnered sharing

4. Large group discussion

Budget required (if any)

Nominal/Office Supplies

Outline of Session:

I.Check-In (10 Minutes)

II.Establishing Community Guidelines (10 Minutes)


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A. Acknowledge that participants are coming from a variety of backgrounds with different

expectations.

B. Invite participants to share community guidelines that have been helpful for them in the

past; guidelines which have led to productive and healthy sharing. Write down student

suggestions on large post-it paper.

C. Add additional guidelines as necessary until the list includes key points such as:

1. Step up, Step Back/Share the floor.

2. Active Listening: Listen to someones whole story (how they feel about it,

their motives throughout the story, etc.), not just the surface of their story,

and how to demonstrate one is listening with their body language.

3. Brave Space: Push yourself to challenge others, welcome being

challenged, refrain from behaviors such as hateful comments.

4. Oops/Ouch: Acknowledge when you have been hurt by the words of

another (ouch) and when you realize you have hurt someone else

(oops) and/or.

5. Intent vs. Impact: When hurt by the words of another, try to understand

their intent behind the words they spoke. When someone is hurt by words

you spoke, own your impact, apologize, and strive to not create the same

hurt again.

6. Speak from your own experiences, share only the stories you own.

D. Note that these guidelines will be used throughout the semester.

III.Defining Terms (10 Minutes)


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A. Acknowledge that many of the terms we will be discussing in this session have varied

definitions or may be unfamiliar to students.

B. Pass out a notecard and pen to each participant. Invite participants to write their personal

definition of leadership on one side. Provide them a few minutes.

C. Instruct participants to write their definition of social identity on the other side. Give a

few minutes of time.

D. Collect note cards, shuffle, and redistribute.

E. Invite students to share definitions that resonated with them.

IV. Salience Worksheet (15 minutes)

A. Pass out the Salience Worksheet (See Appendix A). First, direct participants to the side

of the sheet that contains a list of social identities - let them know that there could be many more

social identities, but these will be the ones focused on for this session. Read aloud the provided

definition of salience. Emphasize the connection of social identity to systems of oppression and

expand upon this definition if necessary.

B. Instruct students to turn to the other side of the worksheet. Work through the worksheet

together, providing time for each individual prompt.

C. Once participants are done, assign them to pairs and ask them to respond to the following

questions: What identities showed up most often for you? What identities showed up least

often?

V. Debrief (25 minutes)

A. Invite participants to share out.


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B. Pose the following questions to the group:

1. For the identities that showed up less often, did they tend to be identities

where you hold privilege or where you are targeted? (Generally

speaking, they will be privileged identities. Invite sharing and then

confirm this trend with the group).

2. What could the impact of thinking predominantly only about our targeted

identities be on the choices we make and how we show up? Facilitate

discussion.

C. Direct participants back to re-read their definitions of leadership. Ask: What relevance

does salience have to our leadership? Particularly push students to share personal examples of

times where they missed a problem others noticed or they saw a problem others missed related to

their social identities.

D. Prompt participants to consider how they might see or miss problems that may come up

in future dialogues they facilitate or their work with community partners.

E. Ask: What can we do to minimize this risk? Steer conversations towards action-

oriented suggestions, such as soliciting feedback of others, bringing diverse voices to the table,

researching and learning about issues other identities might face, etc.

VI. Remaining time for business & reminders (20 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. Appendix A worksheet (Session1.Worksheet.pdf)

2. Post-it papers
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3. Markers

4. Notecards

5. Extra pens

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Recognizing the situational factor of participants coming from a wide range of experiences in

conversations about diversity and identity, we constructed this design to allow those with more

experience in these conversations to share their knowledge, providing ample context and

definitions of all necessary terms - while still learning new ideas they may be less familiar with

(ie. salience). In this session, students are actively involved in producing the learning for each

other, with very little explicit direction from the facilitators. Ending the session with a long form

debrief/dialogue allows opportunity for the facilitator of the meeting to provide feedback with

participants on an ongoing basis.


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Session Name: Leadership, Identity, and Civic Engagement (#2)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):

Often people will discuss their target identities when examining which are salient to them so in

this session, participants will explore their agent identities and their influence on civic

engagement and leadership.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lilliana

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

_X___ Social Justice

__/__ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team Building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

__X__ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)


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By engaging in professional development session 2, students will/will be able to

1. Identify agent identities; (Foundational Knowledge)

2. Articulate the privileges of their agent identities; (Application)

3. Analyze how privileged identities impact civic engagement; (Application)

4. Connect the impact of agent identities on civic engagement to leadership. (Integration)

Assessment Activities

1. Formation of ones own understanding of terms - agent identity and privilege (Self

assessment)

2. Activity and dialogue debriefs (Forward looking assessment)

3. End of session quiet written reflection and sharing connecting identity and civic

engagement to leadership (Self assessment; Forward looking assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Sticky note activity

2. Facilitated dialogue on civic engagement

3. Individual, partner and large group debrief/reflection and sharing

Budget required (if any)

Minor sticky notes; about $3

Outline of Session:

I.Check-in (5 minutes)
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II.Review of community guidelines from Session 1 (5 minutes)

III.Define Agent Identities and Privilege (5 minutes)

A. Have participants write on a scratch piece of paper their own understanding of agent identities.

B. Have participants also write on a scratch piece of paper their own understanding of privilege.

C. Ask for 1-2 volunteers to share out their definitions or understanding of agent identities and

privilege.

D. Provide participants with the definitions that will be used:

1. Agent: The perpetrator or perpetuator of oppression and/or

discrimination; usually a member of the dominant, non-target identity

group (Office of Multicultural Affairs).

2. Instructor should give a personal example of one of their agent identities

3. The concept of privilege refers to any advantage that is unearned,

exclusive, and socially conferred (Johnson, 2013).

4. Instructor should give a personal example of how one of their agent

identities is privileged

IV.Identify Agent Identities and Unearned Privilege (25 minutes)

A. Pass around sticky notes and instruct participants to take a few sticky notes (at least 2)

B. Have participants identify at least 2 (or more) of their own agent identities and write 1 per sticky

note

C. Have participants put the sticky notes on the front of them (i.e. Shoulders, arms, stomach)

D. Instruct participants to spread out across the room and find a partner
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E. In their pairs, each participant will pick 1 sticky note from the other person and pull it off

F. Taking turns, each participant of the pair will share, in regards to the identity written on the

sticky note that was pulled off of them:

a. How did you come to understand this identity for yourself?

b. How does this identity provide you with unearned privilege? (2 minutes for each

participant)

G. Participants will then find a new partner and repeat the same process, discussing another identity

from one of their sticky notes (2 minutes for each participant)

H. Debrief as a large group answering the following questions:

a. What was this experience like for you to have to talk about the identities that bring

you privilege?

b. What were some surprises or things you found interesting in sharing how you came to

understand certain identities?

V.Define Civic Engagement (15 minutes)

A. Individual and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public

concern. Civic engagement can take many forms, from individual voluntarism to organizational

involvement to electoral participation. It can include efforts to directly address an issue, work

with others in a community to solve a problem or interact with the institutions of representative

democracy. Civic engagement encompasses a range of specific activities such as working in a

soup kitchen, serving on a neighborhood association, writing a letter to an elected official or

voting. Indeed, an underlying principle of our approach is that an engaged citizen should have
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the ability, agency and opportunity to move comfortably among these various types of civic acts

(American Psychological Association, 2016).

B. Facilitate dialogue about how civic engagement relates to their work and how their agent

identities (mindful of their unearned privileges) allow them to show up in these spaces (ie. during

facilitation, working with community partners, engaging with students, etc.)

VI.Reflection Connection to Leadership (10 minutes)

C. Have participants individually write down their reflections to how their agent identities

impact on civic engagement influences their leadership (5 minutes)

D. Have participants volunteer to share with the larger group (5 minutes)

VII.Remaining time for business & reminders (25 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. https://www.uml.edu/docs/Glossary_tcm18-55041.pdf - defining agent identity (Office of

Multicultural Affairs)

2. http://www.agjohnson.us/glad/what-is-a-system-of-privilege/ - defining privilege

(Johnson, 2013)

3. http://www.apa.org/education/undergrad/civic-engagement.aspx - defining civic

engagement (American Psychological Association, 2016)

4. Block of sticky notes

5. 15 markers
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Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Understanding that unpacking ones own privileges based on certain identities can be difficult,

this session provides spaces for participants to do some of this unpacking in pairs prior to large

group sharing and discussions. This session provides an interactive activity that while maybe

uncomfortable, it may also be fun and thought provoking. Participants are provided with multiple

opportunities to reflect before, during and after different parts of the session outline so that there

is consistent assessment of individual and group understanding. This session provides multiple

educative assessment tasks - forward looking assessment, self assessment and FIDeLity

feedback. Also, this session builds on the first sessions material to begin the progressive and

comprehensive development of the entire professional development curriculum.


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Session Name: Facilitation Techniques & Classroom Management (#3)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences): This session will allow participants to engage

with each other as they practice their facilitation techniques and classroom management.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

_X__ Classroom management

_/___ Facilitation techniques

____ Social Justice

____ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

_X__ Team Building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 3, participants will/will be able to...

1. Identify effective public speaking skills; (Foundational Knowledge)


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2. Critique each others public speaking skills and classroom management techniques;

(Application, Human Dimension- Others)

3. Relate how effective classroom management can create healthy environments and

dialogue; (Integration)

4. Identify their strengths and weaknesses in terms of classroom management and public

speaking skills; (Human Dimension- Self)

5. Value working together to improve their skills; (Caring)

6. Create a learning plan to depict what they must work on and practice to improve their

skills (Learning How to Learn).

Assessment Activities

1. Discuss and share criteria and standards they believe are useful to being good public

speakers. (Criteria and Standards)

2. Share peer-to-peer feedback providing it frequently, immediately, discriminating (based

on standards), and delivering it lovingly. (FIDeLity Feedback -should be described to

students before engaging in this part of the activity)

3. Reflect on their strengths and weaknesses. (Self assessment)

4. Create a learning plan about what they must practice more to improve their skills.

(Forward looking assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Large Group Discussion

2. Public speaking skills and classroom management activity


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3. Individual reflection

4. Partnered sharing

Budget required (if any)

Office Supplies

Outline of Session:

I.Large Group Discussion (20 minutes)

A. Participants are asked to discuss what they believe are important effective public speaking

skills. Write down students suggestions on a large post-it paper.

B. Participants are asked to discuss what they believe are important and effective classroom

management skills. Write down students suggestions on a large post-it paper.

C. Participants are asked to discuss how effective classroom management can create healthy

environments and dialogue.

II.Public Speaking Skills and Classroom Management Activity (30 minutes)

A. Participants are asked to get into teams of three to perform this next activity. Each team will

get 2 opportunities to perform the activity in front of their peers. Depending on the number of

total participants, each group will have about 3-4 minutes (for each opportunity) to complete

the task.

B. In the first opportunity, participants will receive a simple subject to speak about.

i. Examples of First Opportunity Subjects:

1. Describe what college is like.


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2. Describe how one decides on a career.

3. Describe what it means to serve others.

C. In the second opportunity, the subject will be more difficult.

i. Examples of Second Opportunity Subjects:

1. Speak about public housing.

2. Describe what gentrification is.

3. Explain racism.

D. Members of the team will line up and from left to right each participant will get about 1

minute to speak to the subject given. However, they will not get any time to prepare and will

not hear the subject until a second before their time starts. As soon as their minute is up, the

participant to their left will continue exactly where the last participant left off with the subject

adding more information for 1 minute and so on until time is up for the entire group. (1

minute per participant)

E. The object of this activity is to work together to speak about the subject given by utilizing the

effective public speaking skills and practice classroom management skills.

F. Their peers are asked to pay close attention while participants are speaking on a topic and to

snap their fingers when they notice public speaking and/or classroom management

techniques not being used or, used ineffectively and/or when something is said

inappropriately (facilitators can see examples of ineffective public speaking techniques and

inappropriate comments below). The point of their peers snapping their fingers is to begin to

give the speakers some idea of what a rowdy classroom might be like.

i. Examples of Ineffective Public Speaking Techniques:

1. Participant says UMM or UGH.


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2. Participant does not make eye contact with their audience.

3. Participant stays quiet for too long.

4. Participant makes no sense or is not engaging.

ii. Examples of Inappropriate Comments:

1. Participant makes a generalization on race, gender, etc.

2. Participant blames others or does not include ones self in

the conversation.

3. Participant focuses on negative issues of a certain topic.

G. After each group completes their second opportunity, the entire group will share peer-to-peer

feedback. Peers are informed about and prompted to provide FIDeLity feedback by providing

frequent, immediate, discriminating (based on standards), and delivering it lovingly.

Delivering this feedback lovingly is essential. Facilitators should encourage affirmations

more than anything. (3-4 minutes)

H. After completion of the activity, the facilitator should host a short debrief of the activity. The

facilitator should note that all students are all still learning and that if mistakes occurred, it is

only human.

III.Individual Reflection (10 minutes)

A. Participants are given a few minutes to reflect on the activity and identify their own

strengths and weaknesses in terms of classroom management and public speaking

techniques.

B. Participants are then asked to create a learning plan (see Appendix B) to depict what they

must continue to work on and practice in the next couple of weeks to improve their skills.
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IV.Partnered Sharing (10 minutes)

A. Participants will pair up and share their plan with their partner and discuss how they can

support one another as they work on achieving their goals.

V.Remaining time for business & reminders (0:70-0:90)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. Appendix B (Learning Plan Worksheet)

2. Large Post-it Papers

3. Markers

4. Paper

5. Pens

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Recognizing that the situational factor of these participants is that they might have little to no

experience with public speaking with difficult conversations, we designed this unit to give the

participants an improv experience to practice. Participants will discuss and teach each other

effective facilitation and classroom management skills. They will utilize the activity to practice

these skills. Next, they will give each other FIDeLity feedback by providing frequent,

immediate, discriminating, and delivering it lovingly after the activity. Participants will support

their learning goals by producing a learning plan about how they will progress in terms of
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classroom management and facilitation skills upon reflection of their strengths and weaknesses.

The personal reflection and partnered sharing allows students to work on their human dimension

learning goals and to value teamwork and support.


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Session Name: Facilitating Multicultural Spaces (#4)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):

In this session, participants will explore how to navigate multicultural spaces using various

facilitation techniques. This exploration includes a social justice lens of ones self and others.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

_X__ Facilitation techniques

__/__ Social Justice

____ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team Building

_X__ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session number 4, participants will/will be able to


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1. Identify different techniques for approaching facilitated learning; (Foundational Knowledge)

2. Articulate ones understanding of multicultural spaces and facilitated learning; (Application)

3. Use critical thinking to assess how ones personal biases and facilitation methods impacts

their navigation of multicultural spaces; (Application)

4. Articulate their identity as a student facilitator who challenges and participates in the

learning; (Human Dimension Self)

5. Identify at least two ways in which ones own personal biases shapes their facilitation;

(Human Dimension - Self)

6. Document and reflect upon their understanding of facilitated learning and multicultural spaces

beforehand compared to their new explorations of each topic upon completion of the session.

(Learning How to Learn)

Assessment Activities

1. Poster Pre-Assessment (Self assessment)

2. LARA activity debrief (Criteria and Standards; Forward looking assessment)

3. End of session quiet written reflection and sharing (Self Assessment; Forward looking

assessment)

Learning Activities

1. LARA facilitation technique activity

2. Individual, partner and large group debrief/reflection and sharing


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Budget required (if any)

$15-20 for materials for pre-assessment and learning activities

Outline of Session:

I.Check-in (5 minutes)

II.Poster Pre-Assessment (10 minutes)

A. 2 Posters should already be hung up in the meeting room, one with Multicultural

Spaces written in the middle and one with Facilitated Learning

B. Participants will visit each poster and write 2-3 words or small phrases that come to mind

as they think of each topic

C. Facilitator will read off some of the words and/or phrases from each poster to share with

the group

D. Participants are then asked to volunteer to share to the large group what word(s) or

phrase(s) they wrote for Multicultural Spaces and their reasoning behind writing them

E. Participants are then asked to volunteer to share to the large group what word(s) or

phrase(s) they wrote for Facilitated Learning and their reasoning behind writing them

F. Participants are then asked to think about why we may be discussing multicultural spaces

and facilitated learning together; ask for 1-2 participants to volunteer to share their thoughts

III.Define Facilitated Learning and Multicultural Spaces as large group (10 minutes)
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A. Facilitators will first validate that the words and phrases participants wrote on the posters

help describe multicultural spaces and facilitated learning through the various

experiences in the room

B. Facilitators will provide group with these definitions in addition to poster comments to

think about throughout the session:

1. Multiculturalism is the co-existence of diverse cultures, where culture

includes racial, religious, or cultural groups and is manifested in

customary behaviors, cultural assumptions and values, patterns of

thinking, and communicative styles (IFLA.org).

2. May connect back to some examples given on the poster to integrate

3. Facilitated learning is where the students are encouraged to take more

control of their learning process. The Trainers role becomes that of a

facilitator and organizer providing resources and support to learners. In

turn, the participants learn with and from each other as they identify and

implement solutions to challenges, problems or other developmental

issues (Crockett and Foster, 2005).

4. May connect back to some examples given on the poster to integrate

5. Also important to note the following in supporting why the session is

exploring facilitation and multicultural spaces together

a. Will operate and facilitate in multicultural spaces

b. Encourage dialogue

c. Promote understanding
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 32

d. Develop communication skills (questioning and

listening)

IV.Facilitation Technique LARA (25 minutes)

A. Have participants pair up and spread out across the room

B. Share example scenario with the large group.

1. Ex A student, who is very religious, seems upset because they have just

learned that in their service placement they have to work with someone

who identifies as part of the LGBTQ community.

2. Explain LARA guidelines of respectful dialogue (Bonnie Tinker pdf)

3. Listen listen closely to what one is saying without interruption,

challenge or judging. Listen until you have enough information to

understand them in terms of what you can hear to be true (summarize key

points, emotions, etc.)

a. Ex Student: I dont want to work with someone

who is gay. I feel weird when I am around a gay

person.

b. Ex Facilitator: What Im hearing is that you feel

uncomfortable around people of the LGBTQ

community?

Note - Realizing that sharing what youre hearing from the student may prompt them to then

provide more details/insight


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 33

4. Affirm support ones perceptions, principles and values to appreciate

where the other is coming from. Use I language; avoid you language!

a. Ex Student: Gay people make me uncomfortable

because being gay is against my religion so I do not

believe it is right.

b. Ex Facilitator: I understand that religion is

important and impacts values and perspectives.

5. Respond A direct answer to the concern expressed.

a. Ex Student: My religion means a lot to me so its

going to be hard to work with someone who my

religion describes as doing wrong.

b. Ex Facilitator: Yes, navigating these types of

situations are often challenging.

6. Add Some new fact or something from your personal experience that

gives a different point of view.

a. Ex Student: I just dont understand how someone

can like the same sex.

b. Ex Facilitator: Personally, I have befriended co-

workers who identify as part of the LGBTQ

community who are amazing, caring, and

hardworking. What their preferences are in their

personal lives shouldnt impact their work


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 34

relationships or capabilities and through my

experiences, it hasnt.

C. Facilitators will pass out 1 scenario card to each pair in which there are 3 different

scenarios (See Appendix C)

1. Partner 1 is to act as the facilitator practicing LARA while Partner 2 is

to act as the participant who will act out their response/reaction to the

scenario (about 5 minutes)

2. Switch Partner 2 will now act as the facilitator practicing LARA

while Partner 1 is to act as the participant who will act out their

response/reaction to the scenario (about 5 minutes)

3. Large group sharing, where participants will be asked to volunteer to

share their responses to the following debrief questions (15 minutes):

a. What was this experience like for you in terms of

Listening? Affirming? Responding? Adding

information?

b. How might your own identities and/or biases have

shaped your facilitation of the conversation?

c. How might you see the LARA technique playing

out in larger group settings?

4. Show participants Jay Smooth - How To Tell Someone They Sound

Racist video (3 minutes)


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 35

a. How might you connect the message(s) from the

video to the LARA technique? To facilitation?

To operating multicultural spaces?

IV. Reflection (10 minutes)

A. All participates will do a quiet individual, written reflection to the following

questions (not to be turned in, rather, for themselves):

1. Now that youve thought about how your own personal identities

and/or biases shaped your facilitation in the LARA activity, how might

these impact your navigation of multicultural spaces?

2. How does this relate to your responsibilities as a student worker?

3. What are some takeaways from this session in terms of balancing

being a facilitator who will promote and challenge student dialogue on

sensitive topics, but also as a student who will participate in the

learning?

B. Time permitting, participants will then be asked to volunteer to share with the

large group their thoughts and reflections to the aforementioned questions

V.Remaining time for business (30 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. 2 poster boards (pre-assessment)

2. 15 markers (pre-assessment)
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 36

3. Appendix C (Session 4 - LARA Scenarios.pdf)

4. http://www.ifla.org/publications/defining-multiculturalism - defining multiculturalism

5. http://www.ica-sae.org/trainer/english/p13.htm - defining facilitated learning

6. http://www.quakerpi.org/QActivism/Compassionate%20listening.pdf - LARA guidelines

with credit to Bonnie Tinker

7. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0Ti-gkJiXc - Jay Smooth: How to Tell Someone

They Sound Racist

8. Computer/Projector (to show the Jay Smooth video on)

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Realizing that participants may have minimal experience with facilitation, this session is

designed to provide all participants with a simple, feasible and effective technique that anyone

can use for facilitating dialogues. Participants are also assessed multiple times throughout the

session to understand what their current level of understanding is, to promote peer-to-peer

education, and to foster reflection. The session allows for practical application of techniques as

well as partner and large group conversation. It was also important to integrate their learning

from sessions 1-3 to continue a more comprehensive development.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 37

Session Name: Reflection in the Classroom (#5)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):

This session is designed to expand participants understanding of how to facilitate critical

reflection as well as how to navigate common classroom/group facilitation scenarios. Activities

are structured so that both new and returning participant leaders co-construct learning activities

and classroom management strategies in order to further foster participants understanding of

themselves as creative educators.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lilliana

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

__X__ Students as creative educators

__X__ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

____ Social Justice

__X__ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Teambuilding

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 38

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 5, participants will/will be able to

1. Identify strategies for classroom management; (Foundational Knowledge)

2. Develop their own critical reflection activities using multiple modes of reflection

(Application)

3. Articulate the function of reflection in service-learning (Integration)

Assessment Activities

1. Brainstorm: Reflective Brain Web Game (Criteria and Standards)

2. In the Classroom: Debrief (Self-Assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Facilitator Overview

2. Debrief: In the Classroom

3. Brainstorm: Reflective Brain Web Game

Budget required (if any)

$10 for additional posters and markers (if white board is not readily accessible)

Outline of Session:

I.Facilitator briefly outlines the scope of todays session: (5 minutes)

A. This is intended to map out the purpose of the weeks session and allow participants to be

more mindful of their learning.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 39

II.Debrief: In the Classroom (10 minutes)

A. Students are prompted to reflect on what they have noticed from observing/preparing for

facilitation and classroom sessions.

1. What have you noticed? What has stood out to you?

2. How do you see students reflecting on their experiences in those sessions?

Is this evident to you?

3. What behaviors do you notice in the classroom/facilitation group?

III.Brainstorm: Reflective Brain Web Game (20 minutes)

A. On a large whiteboard (or multiple poster-boards depending on location restrictions), the

facilitator will name multiple bubbles with reflection formats/topics.

B. These bubbles will be scattered across the board with ample space between bubbles.

C. These bubble topics can include:

1. Written

2. Verbal

3. Physical/Movement

4. Props/Items

5. Expectations

6. Realities

7. Mystery

D. Participants will be placed into groups to compete for a prize. Participants will work in

their teams to create as many unique activities. (15 minutes)


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 40

E. Each group will collaborate to develop as many unique reflection activities as they can.

They will earn one point for creating a reflection activity that connects to one of the topic

bubbles. Two points for a reflection exercise that connects to two, and so on.

F. When drawing on the board/poster, participants will provide an abridged title for their

activity. An example can be provided to participants (see below):

1. Guided Imagery Exercise

a. Participants led through exercise.

b. Picture arriving at site, what they expect

G. The purpose of this activity is to help participants draw connections between different

types of reflective practices and generate their own approaches to reflective styles.

H. In the remaining 5-10 minutes of this activity, groups will explain their activities in more

detail. Scores are tallied and winners will be announced.

I. Participants will be encouraged to further develop these activities for their own exercises.

The facilitator will take a photo of the Brain Web and share it with the rest of
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 41

IV.In the Classroom Strategies (20 minutes)

A. In this activity, participants will be prompted to share any concerns or anxieties they

currently have (or for returning participant leaders recall experiences) as they approach

facilitating a classroom/group discussion.

B. It may be useful to reach out to returning leaders prior to this session to encourage them

to share their experiences as it can help ease the anxieties of newer team members.

C. From there, the facilitator may pose the following questions/prompts:

1. Are there any classroom-related issues that make you anxious? If so, what

are they?

2. Have any of our returning members experienced this? (Share)

3. How might we respond to those issues?

D. This approach will allow returning and new team members to reflect on their experiences

or potential challenges and use their existing knowledge to generate classroom

management approaches. This will aid students in co-constructing their approach to

facilitation rather than relying solely on the expertise of facilitator (professional staff).

V.Remaining Time for Business (35 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. Guided Imagery Exercise (referenced as an example for Brain web): http://www.k-

state.edu/counseling/student/biofedbk/guideim.html
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 42

2. The Brain Web activity is loosely inspired by the practice of mind-mapping. However,

this activity has been adapted to draw direct connections to multiple modes/topics of

reflection. A link to how mind-mapping works is provided here:

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-use-mind-maps-to-unleash-your-brains-creativity-

1348869811

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

This session is designed to prompt participants to connect their knowledge of reflection activities

to their practice of dialogue facilitation with other students. Additionally, participants will utilize

components of reflective dialogue to delve into their practical experiences in the classroom and

connect their experiences to past, present and future learning. In the Brain Web activity,

participants will take on the role as educator and creator in designing reflective activities that

touch on multiple components of their learning.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 43

Session Name: How to Facilitate Critical Reflection & Social Justice (Part I) (#6)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences): In order to help participants understand how they

can facilitate critical reflection, they must first critically reflect on their own social justice action

plan.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

_X__ Social Justice

_X__ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team Building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 6, participants will/will be able to...


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 44

1. Analyze their own degree of knowledge about social justice issues; (Application; Human

Dimension- Self)

2. Assess their own degree of confidence in addressing social justice issues; (Application;

Human Dimension- Self)

3. Compare how their knowledge of social justice issues relates to their skills in confronting

corresponding issues; (Integration)

4. Identify sources of information they need to learn about in order to gain more knowledge

and take action in these issues. (Learning How to Learn)

Assessment Activities

1. Completion of Identity Action Planning Grid (see attached worksheet named Identity

Action Planning) to self-reflect on their own social justice action plan. (Self assessment;

Forward looking assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Icebreaker Discussion

2. Individual reflection to fill out the Identity Action Planning Grid

3. Partnered sharing

4. Large Group Discussion

Budget required (if any)

Office Supplies
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 45

Outline of Session:

I.Icebreaker Discussion (5 minutes)

Facilitator will ask participants the following teaser question:

1. What techniques do you currently use to reflect on your understanding of

different identities and/or social justice as a whole?

II. Individual Reflection to Fill Out the Identity Action Planning Grid (see Appendix D) (25

minutes)

A. Participants will be given the Identity Action Planning Grid and will be asked to fill it out

honestly on their own. They will be informed that this will not be collected and they will not be

forced to share what they do not feel comfortable sharing.

B. They are to review the identity group and reflect on their own experience regarding that

identity group. Participants should choose 1 if they feel they have little knowledge about the

identity group or 5 if they feel they have a lot of knowledge. Participants should choose 1 if they

feel they have little skill in confronting people/self about the identity group or 5 if they feel they

have a lot of skill in confronting. Confronting should be described as engaging further in a

conversation that may be difficult or uncomfortable to hold with others or self.

C. Then, they must describe what they can do to improve their knowledge about and/or

skills in confronting that specific identity group.

III.Partnered Sharing (10 minutes)

A. Participants are now asked to discuss what this critical reflection exercise was like for

them. They are not required to share what they wrote, but are welcomed to if they feel
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 46

inclined to. The object of this part of the session is to discuss the act of critical reflection

so they can begin to understand what they are truly going to be asking others to do when

they facilitate critical reflection (*Note: Part II of this session will allow them to reflect

further and begin to learn how to facilitate it).

IV.Large Group Discussion (30 minutes)

A. Participants are now asked to discuss, in large group, each identity topic. The object of

this part of the session is to share what each person knows (Knowledge) about each

identity group. This is done to help everyone learn as much as they can about each

identity group and grow in their comfort and confidence in confronting and taking action

in social justice issues.

V.Remaining Time for Business & Reminders (20 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. Appendix D (Identity Action Planning)

2. Pens

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Our participants will have difficulty facilitating critical reflection in others if they themselves

have never done it before. We can infer, that in terms of situation factors, they have little to no

experience in critical self reflection about social justice issues. We will encourage them to
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 47

engage in critical self reflection as a learning activity. Additionally, we will allow them to share

their feelings, in partnered sharing, in order to have them assess the act of critically reflecting.

Finally, in order to achieve the learning goal of obtaining foundational knowledge we will give

participants the opportunity to share and identify their knowledge about each identity topic to co-

construct the learning.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 48

Session Name: Fear of Offending Others (FOO) (#7)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):

The purpose of this session is to prompt participants to think critically about the role of FOO in

group facilitation. Team members will reflect on their own relationship with offense and how

they can facilitate dialogue to challenge students to lean into learning and difficult conversations.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lilliana

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

__X__ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

____ Social Justice

____ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team Building

__X__ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 49

By engaging in professional development session 7, participants will/will be able to

1. Develop strategies of how to support challenging dialogue; (Application)

2. Value peers perspectives throughout the learning process; (Caring; Human Dimension -

Others)

3. Articulate the role of power, privilege, and oppression within multicultural spaces.

(Integration)

Assessment Activities

1. Fear of Offending Others (FOO) Discussion (Self assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Fear of Offending Others (FOO) Discussion

Budget required (if any)

N/A

Outline of Session:

I.Facilitator briefly outlines the scope of todays session: (5 minutes)

II.Fear of Offending Others (FOO) Discussion (40 minutes)

A. The facilitator will open discussion around what offense really means. From there,

participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences with offending others what

theyve witnessed, what theyve experienced themselves. Then, the discussion can shift towards
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 50

how facilitators can structure and support honest discussion and foster spaces for growth and

development. Some potential questions for the facilitator are provided below:

1. What does it mean to offend someone?

2. Have you recently offended someone? Share a bit about what that looked

like?

3. Where might a fear of offending others come from?

4. Throughout this semester, weve discussed important issues surrounding

power, privilege, and oppression. How do these components of social

justice link to offending others?

5. Do you sense that the students you work with are concerned with

offending others? How might this be shown?

6. What can we do to encourage group members to lean into discussion and

share?

7. What strategies have you found useful to encourage others to lean into

learning?

B. For this discussion, it is important for the facilitator to encourage participants to expand

on their answers and give language to uncomfortable issues/concerns. When drawing

connections to participants facilitation work, it may require the facilitator to further probe and

solicit specific examples of what students have seen.

C. This particular discussion may flow across multiple topics, incorporating multiple

components of past sessions topics including leadership and social justice concepts.

III.Strategies (15 minutes)


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 51

IV.Remaining time for business (30 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

N/A

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

This session is designed to allow participants to examine how they themselves experience the

topic of offense, prompting students to acknowledge their relationship with learning and apply

that to their work as a facilitator of (often) challenging dialogue. This departure from traditional

lecture-style formats allows team members of varying experience to come together and discuss

the realities of difficult discussions in multicultural spaces and examine how they as facilitators

can take an active role in fostering learning. Additionally, by acknowledging the situational

factors influencing students classroom experience (i.e. that this may be the first time students

engage in difficult dialogue - both participants and facilitators), participants will be able to

deeply understand their classroom environments and how to identify and address discussion

challenges. This session allows participants to jointly construct strategies to foster brave

dialogue, helping them to demonstrate their knowledge of subject matter and apply their

learning.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 52

Session Name: Tying Up the Semester (#8)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences):

The purpose of this session is two-fold. The first is to critically recognize the teams strengths

and weaknesses over the course of the first semester, situating them for a stronger second

semester. By openly airing concerns and taking steps towards action, the group will also be team-

building. The second purpose is designed towards strong staff retention and practices the spirit of

affirmation and appreciation to ensure student staff feels recognized and appreciated by each

other and the office.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Moira, Trebby, Tina

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

____ Social Justice

____ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

_X_ Team Building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 53

____ Leadership

Depending on the direction of the conversation and group strengths and weaknesses, other topics

within this list will likely come up as well.

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 8, participants will/will be able to...

1. Recognize the value of their contribution to the offices overall success; (Caring)

2. Assess their teams areas of growth; (Learning How to Learn)

3. Practice showing appreciation for their team members. (Human Dimension - Other).

Assessment Activities

1. Participants will privately read and publicly hear the concerns of their team members.

(FIDeLity feedback; Forward looking assessment)

2. Participants will self-assess their own form of participation in the group. (Self

assessment)

3. Note cards (see activity) can be collected to provide the facilitators a stronger idea of

participants self-awareness and areas of improvement. (Self assessment; Forward

looking assessment)

4. Students will provide each other real-time feedback and affirmations. (FIDeLity

feedback)

Learning Activities

1. Note card reflections and debrief


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 54

2. Large and small group brainstorming

3. Dedicated time to provide affirmations

Budget required (if any)

$10: note cards, beads or marbles, containers (e.g. bowls or vases - at least 3)

Outline of Session:

I.Group Check-In or Icebreaker (10 minutes)

II.Business & Other matters (20 minutes)

III.Note card Activity (20 minutes)

A. Pass each participant a notecard and a pen.

B. Instruct participants to choose a side to write on and label it (A)

C. On side A, ask participants to write down a concern they have for the group,

anonymously. It might be a way they have felt while working or during team meetings, it might

be a larger scale concern about reflections, an observation about sites, anything that relates to

their team functionality. (3-5 minutes).

D. Pass the note cards forward. Shuffle them and redistribute.

E. Invite participants to share out any concern they read that they resonate with.

F. Invite participants to share out any concern they read that they were surprised by.

G. Ask participants to turn the card to the other side and label it (B)

H. On side B, ask participants to write down a potential solution that they have agency to

contribute towards the group. It does not need to be a solution to the problem on their cards side

A - it could be a solution to the problem they wrote, or one they heard shared aloud by others.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 55

The most important thing is that it is a solution they can contribute towards. (e.g. if a problem

shared was I want to get to know my coworkers better, a participant might write I want to be

more diligent about inviting my coworkers to on-campus events outside of work that I am

passionate about, or if a problem shared was I am insecure about my facilitation skills, a

participant might write I will meet with others more extensively before facilitating to ensure we

all feel prepared going in, OR if a problem shared was I have felt triggered by my co-workers

in this office during facilitation, someone might write I will seek to educate myself about

topics I am not familiar with, and apologize for my wrongdoings etc.). (3-5 minutes)

I. Pass the note cards forward. Shuffle and redistribute.

J. Invite participants to share out any solutions they could see themselves contributing to

also.

K. Debrief the overall activity. Emphasize how many problems were able to gain progress

towards being solved by communicating about them. Build the team by highlighting their

willingness to serve each other. This activity can reinvigorate a group and help team members

realize their responsibility toward each other.

L. Collect notecards for facilitator examination at a later date.

IV. Group Assessment & Brainstorm (20 minutes)

A. Ask participants to identify the three key areas of growth they heard in the previous

activity, respective to the entire office

B. Label each container with a new notecard representing that issue. Position the containers

at a side of the room that offers relative privacy.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 56

C. Provide every student 10 beads. Ask participants to determine which issues demand the

most pressing attention, and put more beads into that container. They can ratio the beads out in

any way they see fit (e.g. they might evenly distribute them so much as is possible, or if they

only see one issue as important they might place all in that container, etc).

D. Once all votes have been casted, bring the containers forward and note the distribution of

beads. Recognize that not all problems may be able to be solved by the participants alone and

some may need more support from the staff team in order to be addressed.

E. Split the participants up into groups of 3-4. Groups must discuss the distribution and

identify several examples of times when that theme could have been lived better by the team.

Groups must then brainstorm methods the office might use to address it or resources the staff

could provide to support participants in addressing it. (10-15 minutes)

F. After the discussion, invite groups to share out. Participating in this activity will help

participants build some critical hope for their perseverance in the program, as they must envision

a future that is realistic and grounded, but where the obstacles they are facing are at least

mitigated.

V.Silent Affirmations (20 minutes)

A. Form a spacious, sitting circle if possible, easily accessible to reach each person from

the center.

B. Instruct participants to close their eyes. Play music during this activity if possible.

C. Inform participants that you will be tapping someone on the head, then reading a series

of statements. The person who is tapped by you will be able to open their eyes and move

quietly to the center of the room. For each statement you read, they can tap every person
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 57

for whom they believe it applies on the shoulder. All others must keep their eyes closed -

they will not know who is tapping them. Explain that not being shoulder tapped does not

mean they do not qualify for the statement, and that each student is welcome to pick

several people for each statement, but does not need to pick all.

D. Provide each participant a chance in the middle of the circle. Every student should be

read the same series of statements. If you notice some members getting tapped much

less often than others, consider giving yourself a round in the middle.

E. You can edit this list as possible, but a beginning list of affirmations to read is as

follows:

1. This person has said something today that I deeply appreciated.

2. This person has said something in a previous staff meeting that I

appreciated and has stuck with me.

3. This person helped me when I needed it.

4. This person can make me smile.

5. There was a time I could have done more to support this person, and I

wish I had.

6. I want to learn more of this persons story.

7. I admire this persons facilitation skills and ability.

8. I hope to get to know this person more closely next semester.

F. After all individuals have gone silently, invite participants to share their feelings about

the activity as well as any affirmations they want to say more publicly.

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 58

N/A

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Realizing that at this point in the semester relationships between team members could be tense or

happy, morale could be high or low, we wanted to create a session that acknowledges this

situational factor with the flexibility to address both positive and negative issues. The assessment

is seamlessly built into the learning activities themselves, assuming the facilitator both observes

the activities as they are taking place and reviews the notecards later. This serves the learning

goals, which at this time are simple, but much more relational - a significant period of time is

dedicated to students having space to be with each other. Planning can be one of the strongest

forms of team building when done productively.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 59

Session Name: How to Facilitate Critical Reflection & Social Justice (Part II) (#9)

Brief Description of Session (1-2 sentences): Now that students have participated in critical

reflection, it is now time for them to engage in a follow up critical reflection to see their growth.

Additionally, they must now discuss how they can facilitate critical reflection.

ELPS 430 Group Leader:

Lillianna

ELPS 430 Group Members:

Trebby, Tina, Moira

TOPIC(S) covered in Professional Development meeting:

____ Students as creative educators

____ Classroom management

____ Facilitation techniques

_X__ Social Justice

_X__ How to facilitate Critical Reflection

____ Team building

____ Operating in multicultural spaces

____ Leadership

Learning Outcomes (based on Finks Taxonomy)

By engaging in professional development session 9, participants will/will be able to...

1. Identify methods they can use to facilitate critical reflection; (Foundational Knowledge)
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 60

2. Assess their knowledge of various social justice issues and skills in confronting those

issues; (Application, Learning How to Learn)

3. Compare their first Identity Action Planning Grid to their second; (Integration)

4. Analyze where they have grown and where they have yet to grow; (Human Dimension-

Self)

Assessment Activities

1. Completion of Identity Action Planning Grid (see attached worksheet named Identity

Action Planning) to reflect on their own social justice action plan and self-assess how it

has changed. (Self Assessment)

2. Creation of a list of ways in which they can best facilitate critical reflection. (Forward

looking assessment)

Learning Activities

1. Individual reflection to fill out the 2nd Identity Action Planning Grid

2. Individual reflection to compare both grids

3. Large Group Discussion

Budget required (if any)

Office Supplies

Outline of Session:

I.Individual Reflection to Fill Out the Identity Action Planning Grid (30 minutes)
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 61

A. Participants will be asked once again to revisit the Identity Action Planning Grid (see

Appendix D) and will be asked to fill it out honestly on their own, once more. They will be

informed that this will not be collected and they will not be forced to share what they do not feel

comfortable sharing.

B. Participants are to review the identity group and reflect on their own experience

regarding that identity group. Participants should choose 1 if they feel they have little knowledge

about the identity group or 5 if they feel they have a lot of knowledge. Participants should choose

1 if they feel they have little skill in confronting people/self about the identity group or 5 if they

feel they have a lot of skill in confronting. Then, they must describe what they can do to improve

their knowledge about and skills in confronting that specific identity group.

II.Individual Reflection to Compare Both Grids (10 minutes)

A. Participants are asked to bring the grid they completed a few weeks ago. They are to

spend this time comparing both grids and seeing where they have improved and where they must

still grow. It is important for the facilitators to acknowledge that the previous week we spoke

about how to improve the team and this week we are focusing on our individual contributions.

III.Large Group Discussion (30 minutes)

A. Participants are now asked to discuss, as a large group, the ways in which they can

facilitate critical reflection. The first question a facilitator can ask to get the ball rolling is, Do

you believe the past activity was helpful and why or why not? That could be followed with,

What other reflection activities can we think of in order to achieve effective critical reflection?

The object of this part of the session is to come up with creative ways in which critical reflection

can be done. (*For example, instead of creating a grid, participants can be asked to make a video
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 62

that helps them reflect on a certain issue.) Write down participants suggestions on a large post-it

paper.

B. Next, participants will be asked to come up with a list of ways in which they think one can

best facilitate critical reflection. The object of this part of the session is to come up with effective

tools that can be helpful for everyone to use when facilitating critical reflection. (*For example,

ask participants open ended questions that make them think and dont lead them to a certain

answer.) Write down participants suggestions on a large post-it paper.

IV.Remaining Time for Business & Reminders (20 minutes)

Resources or artifacts needed for lesson plan (e.g., links, etc.)

1. Appendix D (Identity Action Planning)

2. Pens

3. Large Post-it Papers

4. Markers

Connection to Integrated Course Design (ICD) Model (brief narrative how this lesson plan

relates to the ICD)

Our participants will have a better understanding about what critical reflection is because they

did it in a previous session. We can assume that the situational factor will be that they will feel

more comfortable with the idea of leading a critical reflection on their own. Now that they might

have more confidence, we are asking them to come up with creative ways in which they can ask

other peers to critically reflect. Additionally, we will encourage them to come up with a list of
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 63

facilitation tools. These teaching and learning activities will allow them to have more ideas and

knowledge about how to facilitate critical reflection. By sharing with each other their ideas, they

will be able to constructively give each other feedback and improve upon their ideas about

facilitating reflections. In order to achieve the learning goal of integration students will compare

and analyze their Identity Action Planning Grids to see the importance of critical reflection since

it can allow one to see their growth.


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 64

Appendix A

Session 1
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 65
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 66

Appendix B

Session 3

Learning Plan
What are some areas of growth you believe you should work on?
Write down measurable, detailed, and time-bound goals about how you can achieve your growth.

Area of Growth Area of Growth Area of Growth

Goals: Goals: Goals:

Created by: Lillianna Franco


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 67

Appendix C

Session 4

Scenarios for participants to act out their responses/reactions to:

#1: You are facilitating a dialogue with race as the topic. The group of participants is
predominantly white. Participants have transitioned to talking about at-risk youth and
their experiences in the middle schools in town. While on the topic, the participants
address the minority students in the class for answers.

#2: Your supervisor tasks you and your co-workers with visiting three different galleries
as a group to bring back ideas for a program you all will be constructing for students.
The galleries are located in different areas of the city with varying prices. Your
supervisor tells you all They seem affordable before leaving the room.

#3: You are working with a community partner to coordinate a team building activity for
the students at their site. The community partner, while ignoring your suggestions, is
dead set on having all of the students participate in a low ropes course. Before hanging
up the phone, the community partner says Low ropes should be easy enough for
everyone to do.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 68

Appendix D

Sessions 6 & 9

Identity Group Knowledge Skill Confronting What can I do?

People of Color 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Queer, 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
Asexual, et. al.

People with
Disabilities 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

Low Income 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

Size and Image 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5


EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 69
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 70

Appendix E

Service Learning Student Worker | Professional Development Rubric

Leadership Beginner Apprentice Satisfactory Excellent


Skills

Understanding Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


of identity in does not considers considers considers own
the context of consider leadership and leadership and social identities in
leadership leadership and social justice to social justice to understanding of
social justice be connected be connected. leadership,
connected at all, broadly and Student Worker including an
nor do they take aims to be recognizes ways awareness of the
into inclusive. that experiences impact of their
consideration they have had areas of power and
the identities of related to identity privilege. Student
themselves or have affected Worker is self-
others while their leadership aware of the
leading. style. Student identities they hold
Worker is in their process of
committed to inclusive
inclusive leadership and
leadership. considers them in
their actions.

Recognition of Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


community views recognizes the recognizes meets
leadership leadership as a value of an leadership as a Satisfactory
personal entire team as group process. terms and
capacity, as part of a Student Worker additionally pays
defined by leadership views special attention to
specific process. Student challenging and the sustainability of
leadership roles Worker sees educating others, the leadership
(e.g. leadership as a or mentoring process, lets go of
supervisor) process rather others in support control over the
than an of their process, and seeks
identifier. leadership to understand
development, as a greater
form of complexities in the
leadership. workplace

Works Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker is


effectively as is not is generally an is an active group an active group
part of the contributing active group member. Student member. Student
larger team effectively to member, but Worker offers Worker seeks
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 71

the team and is may not pull support to other opportunities to


not a regularly fair weight. group members involve other group
active team Alternatively, when they are members and
member. Student Worker struggling. frequently extends
may try to Student Worker support to other
support others, seeks feedback group members.
but do so in from others. Student Worker
ineffective seeks feedback
ways, such as from others and
taking over responds well.
others projects.

Social Justice Beginner Apprentice Satisfactory Excellent


Awareness

Knowledge of Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker is


social is unfamiliar is familiar with is familiar with familiar with terms
identities with terms such terms associated terms associated associated with
as agent with social with social social identity, can
identity, identity, but identity and able articulate them to
targeted may have to articulate them others, and actively
identity, difficulty to others. Student seeks to learn more
privilege, and articulating the Worker can about social
oppression. definitions of identify their own identities as a
Student Worker those terms to privileged and whole. Student
is not able to others. Student targeted Worker can
identify which Worker may identities. identify their own
identities they have difficulty privileged and
hold that are identifying targeted identities,
privileged or which of their and demonstrates
targeted. identities are an understanding of
privileged or those identities on
oppressed. their lived
experiences and
perceptions.

Understanding Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


of the role of has not recognizes that considers the role meets the same
privilege in previously interpersonal of their own standards as
service considered any biases may privileges in the satisfactory, but
learning. connection affect behavior work that they is additionally
between at a service do. Student committed to
privilege and learning site. Worker continuing to
service learning. encourages others unpack their
to reflect on the privilege,
recognizing that
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 72

relevance of their mistakes are both


privilege. normal and
impactful.

Commitment Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


to ongoing does not engage is responsive to is intentional continuously seeks
education in any form of educational about continuing new opportunities
self-education. opportunities to learn about to learn and
when they are social justice. challenges
provided, but They solicit and themselves.
does not take welcome Student Worker
efforts to feedback and honestly assesses
educate may be their areas of
themselves particularly growth and targets
outside of strong at opportunities to
structured educating improve. Student
spaces. themselves across Worker has a
certain social strong degree of
identities (e.g. comfort with
race, gender, etc). intersectionality
Coordinator and solidarity and
honestly assesses seeks to be familiar
their areas of with a broad range
growth and of social justice
targets issues.
opportunities to
improve.

Facilitation Beginner Apprentice Satisfactory Excellent


Ability

Public Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


speaking does not feel is able to generally feels feels confident in
ability confident in identify confident in public speaking
public speaking effective skills public speaking ability. Student
ability and is and strategies to ability. Student Worker can
not able to public speaking, Worker is able to identify effective
identify but does not feel identify effective skills and strategies
strategies to confident in skills and to public speaking.
effective public own public strategies to Student Worker has
speaking. speaking ability. public speaking reflected on their
as needed. personal needs and
which strategies
work best for them,
and is able to
implement them.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 73

Classroom Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


management is not is not generally feels addresses
skills comfortable comfortable comfortable disruptive
addressing addressing addressing classroom behavior
disruptive disruptive disruptive proactively and
classroom behavior, but behavior. Student follows up with
behavior (e.g. does not allow Worker has involved parties
interrupting, this discomfort planned later. Student
talking over to prevent them techniques to Worker is assertive
others, from utilizing a help them and caring with
monopolizing range of intervene during participants.
space). Student techniques with these scenarios. Student Worker is
Worker is varying degrees Student Worker self-aware of areas
uncertain of of success. is assertive. they struggle to
own skills or Student Worker address and plans
areas of growth seeks feedback ahead with co-
related to from supervisor facilitators or
classroom and requests help otherwise to
management. when needed. mitigate risk
Student Worker
seeks feedback
from supervisor
and requests help
when needed - after
attempting to tackle
the issue
independently.

Encouraging Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


critical does not easily sees the value in employs and views reflection as
reflection identify the role reflection and utilizes tools for a critical function
of reflection in engages in reflection in their of service learning.
dialogue and reflection dialogues. Student Worker
service learning. themselves, but Student Worker provides time and
does not recognizes the space for
necessarily value of individuals holding
know how to reflection and a variety of
create makes time for learning styles to
opportunities their own reflect. Student
for others. reflection. Worker feels
Student Worker Student Worker confident and
may dominate is generally very prepared
dialogue space. effective at facilitating
facilitating reflections.
reflection.
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING PROJECT 74

Facilitating Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


multicultural is unsure of is somewhat engages people does not expect
spaces. how to cautious or with multiple perfection from
approach overly nervous identities themselves or
facilitating a approaching comfortably and others and while
space with facilitating with confidence. they recognize
multiple conversations Student Worker nerves can be
identities and around may be nervous normal, is not
perspectives. identities they around certain incapacitated by
Student Worker do not hold. topics and have them. Student
may feel Student Worker difficulty leading Worker appreciates
hesitant and wants to some facilitating
insecure. improve in this conversations. intercultural
area but may conversations and
not feel ready. is able to critically
identify and
challenge less
visible micro-
aggressions, etc.

Innovates Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker Student Worker


creative relies strongly utilizes familiarizes self familiarizes
education exclusively on a a script when with script and is themselves with the
methods script for facilitating comfortable script, but does not
dialogue dialogue, but is suggesting need to reference it
facilitation. comfortable changes to the virtually at all
going off script script as they during
as needed. have new ideas. presentations.
Student Worker Student Worker
is prepared and innovates unique
rarely needs to methods of
reference the educating others on
script during a topics related to
workshop. social justice,
leadership, and
service. Student
Worker is
confident
employing their
ideas directly.

Reflection and comments: