You are on page 1of 6

INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING TEMPLATE

Overview and Context

Your name(s): Gabrielle Houska


Grade level and school: Bach, 2nd
Title of lesson/activity: Comparison: Simile and Metaphor
Teaching date(s) and time(s): April 11 12th 10:45-11:30
Estimated time for lesson/activity: 45 min
Overview of lesson: Day 1: Students will be introduced to the definitions of simile and
metaphor and examples of each within poems. Afterwards,
students will go outside and complete an outline on clipboards
that will help them create a poem on our playground on Day 2
Day 2: Using their outline, students will make a poem on the
Bach playground
Context of lesson: Students are nearing the end of their poetry unit. They have
already been introduced to the language of comparison why they
learned to look through poets eyes. This lesson will really focus
on comparison and make sure that every student is practicing this
technique.
Sources: Lucy Calkins

Learning Goals and Assessments

Connection to Standards Learning Goals Type of Assessment Connection to


activities
CCSS Language Students will be able to Students will create Students will go on a
(knowledge of language): use comparison poetic an outline and a poetry walk in order
Choose words and devices such as simile and poem using a simile to create an outline
phrases for effect. metaphors in their poem or metaphor and a poem using a
simile or metaphor

Attending to the Learners

Anticipating student ideas: Students may be confused at to the differences between a simile
and metaphor (or remembering them). They may also have a
hard time making comparisons from one thing to another object.
Some students may have a hard time coming up with a
comparison, or not thinking too literally about them looking
exactly a like. They should be reminded to think about what it
sounds like, feels like, looks (color, shape) like, etc.
Making the content accessible to I will show an anchor chart to help relieve the working memory
all students: on the differences between simile and metaphor. I will also give
them real life context (on the playground) so they can make
comparisons easier, and give them an outline so that they can jot
down their ideas before working on their poems. Chunking the
poem into easier steps will make this learning goal more practical
and less cognitively overwhelming.

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 1 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014
Instructional Sequence

Materials: Clip boards, graphical organizers

Time Steps Describing What the Teacher and Students Will Do Notes and Reminders (including
management considerations)
INTRODUCE If they need further
Today we will learn how poets make comparisons in their understanding:
poetry before practicing it ourselves
Similes Examples
When poets make a comparison, that means that they The day was as hot as the
think about a property of one object, and then think of
another object that also has that property and they tell
sun.
the audience about that similarity He could swim like a fish.
Her sneeze was as loud as a
For example, a poet could say they these desks are as train whistle.
hard as granite
I felt like a fish out of
What two things did they compare? Yes, to show just how
hard the desk was water.

Or Metaphor Examples
The stars were diamonds in
Her hair was like yellow sunshine
the sky.
What two things did they compare? Yes, to give us a
visual of her hair Her smile was a ray of
sunshine.
He couldn't stand because
his legs were rubber.

ANCHOR CHART When displaying mentor texts,


underline the like or as words or
Explain the difference between simile and metaphor point out the absence of them to
(simile uses like or as) help students understand the
sentence structures of
Use the Anchor Chart example to help define comparing

Pull up mentor texts

Berkley
Black as midnight,
With eyes like pieces of dark chocolate,
He thinks hes king of the world,
My dog Berkley.
Hes very much like a pig
With his pudgy stomach and all.
Like a leech, hes always attached
To his next meal.

Even though hes as bad as the devil,


Berkley is my best fellow.

The Basketball

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 2 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014
The basketball is an airplane,
It flies down the court heading
Straight for the basket.
The basketball is like a heartbeat
Pounding rhythmically on the
Gymnasium floor.
The basketball is as smooth as butter
As it slides out of my hands and
Into the basket.
GRAPHIC ORGANIZER Tell E and J that they can draw
pictures of the two things that
Display the worksheet (attached at bottom) on the lady they are comparing
bug.

This will help us keep track of our ideas as we brainstorm


phrases for a poem on the playground, which we will
actually go outside to brainstorm

Explain the structure of the worksheet, and go through


the example.

PRACTICE WITH ORGANIZER You do not have to use all of the


object spaces
Practice filling one of object lines. Think out loud about
how you would make a comparison

-Object: Turtle
-Hmmm green, bumpy, hard, large
-Im going to focus on the fact that its bumpy
-These bumps are big
-What is something that has big bumps?
-The turtle is bumpy like_______? Hmmm?

OUTSIDE EXPECTATIONS

Follow me in a single fine line out to the echo area


You will sit on the concrete little wall as you write
Even though we are outside, I will have inside classroom
expectations. You are working quietly and independently,
you are going outside to see your objects better, not to
have an extra recess. I expect the same awesome work
that you do doing or normal writing time.

When I see a quiet table with pencils out I will call them
to come up and get a worksheet and a clipboard before
lining up

Time Steps Describing What the Teacher and Students Will Do Notes and Reminders (including
management considerations)
REVIEW

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 3 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014
Yesterday, we brainstormed phrases for incorporating
comparisons into our poems (simile and metaphor
reminder)

Give a few examples

SET UP TASK Dont forget their poetry


sunglasses for seeing through a
Today, we will be using the ideas that we came up with poets eyes
yesterday to help us write a poem.

Think about line breaks, stanzas, maybe rhyming

Think aloud how you may take those ideas and begin
writing a poem

May edit one, not write one, decide that each stanza will
be a new object

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 4 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014
NAME: ______________________________

Ideas for Playground Poem That Uses Comparison

Object:
Monkey Bars

Simile:
The monkey bars are as cold as an ice cube

Metaphor:
The monkey bars are a prison for those afraid of heights

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Object #1:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________
Object #2:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 5 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014
Object #3:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________
Object #4:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________
Object #5:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________
Object #6:

_______________________

Phrase (Using Simile or Metaphor):

____________________________________________________

University of Michigan, Elementary Teacher Education Program page 6 of 6


For interns beginning the program in Fall 2014 and beyond Rev. August 2014