The Life, Memories, and Stories of Nathaniel and Lydia Smith

Preface
The stories contained in this book were compiled, in the spirit of love and fondness, for the Smith Family Reunion in July 2010. The first section, Memories of Nathaniel A Smith, is a reproduction of his own book of memories written by him. In the process of scanning and digitizing the content, minor edits or modifications have been made, such as: inserting photos, the sizing of some of the documents, and formatting the text. Lydia’s self written history was very brief. As such, we have taken the liberty of integrating memories written by Marie Mason, a school report written by her granddaughter, Susan Mason Fackrell, and pieces of related history as prompted by the Personal Historian software, and the Personal Ancestral file on the Heinigers. - - Linda Marie Allen Acknowledgement: This compilation of previous works (Grandpa's journal, Marie's written memories, Grandma's own brief life history) together with the additional information from many public and private sources is the work of Cherry Jeanne Allen. This last year Cherry, Lydia's great granddaughter, began on a quest to connect with her roots. She has labored tirelessly in researching, gathering information and editing the materials in this book. We thank her for her efforts and for the love she has expressed through this edition.

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Table of Contents
Preface ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Table of Contents ....................................................................................................................... 3 ****** .................................................................................................................................................... 5 Memories of Nathaniel Aikins Smith ...................................................................................................... 8 Preface ........................................................................................................................................ 8 Chapter One ......................................................................................................................................... 10 1900 - 1910 ....................................................................................................................................... 10 The Day my Father Left ............................................................................................................ 13 The Mail Must go Through! ...................................................................................................... 14 A John Bushman Legacy ........................................................................................................... 17 Chapter Two ......................................................................................................................................... 18 1910-1920......................................................................................................................................... 18 My first and last ride on a motorcycle...................................................................................... 19 1914- Patriarchal Blessing given by Hyrum Smith .................................................................... 24 June B. Smith--Scribe1920 Patriarchal Blessing given by Joseph H. Smith .............................. 25 Chapter Three ....................................................................................................................................... 26 1920 to 1930..................................................................................................................................... 26 Confronting the advocate of the devil; .................................................................................... 30 “The Mormon Menace” ........................................................................................................... 31 A Missionary’s Homecoming .................................................................................................... 37 1927 - Patriarchal Blessing given by Hyrum G. Smith .............................................................. 39 A Great Event in Our Lives ........................................................................................................ 48 Chapter Four......................................................................................................................................... 49 1930 to 1940..................................................................................................................................... 49 1942 Petition for Beloved High Councilman ............................................................................ 54 Chapter Five.......................................................................................................................................... 56 1940-1950......................................................................................................................................... 56 A law suit .................................................................................................................................. 64 Chapter Six............................................................................................................................................ 68 1950 to 1960..................................................................................................................................... 68 My Testimony ........................................................................................................................... 72 Contributions from 1953 – 1955 for the East Ensign Ward ..................................................... 74 Acknowledgement and Testimony ........................................................................................... 74 The Hay Flour Float................................................................................................................... 78 (A Shocking Experience) ........................................................................................................... 78 Chapter Seven ...................................................................................................................................... 81 1960-1970......................................................................................................................................... 81 A Letter to Dr. H.D. Nordberg ................................................................................................... 96 The last letter I wrote Cherry before she passed away............................................................ 98 Special Priesthood Blessing for Geraldine .............................................................................. 101 Her Last Great Adventure ....................................................................................................... 103 Seventh Member of the John Bushman Family Dies Within a Year ....................................... 105 A Very Sacred Experience ....................................................................................................... 106

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From Maida Spuit, a dear and close friend of Cherry- ........................................................... 106 Chapter Eight ...................................................................................................................................... 108 1970-1980....................................................................................................................................... 108 Two Great People in my Life .................................................................................................. 116 A tribute to my ancestors on my Mother’s side,.................................................................... 120 A John Bushman Prayer for Us ............................................................................................... 122 Tribute of my Father............................................................................................................... 128 Up Date 1977 Nathaniel A. and Lydia H. clan. Marriages, Births, Missions. ......................... 130 Tribute to my big brother-Walter F. Smith............................................................................. 130 Tribute to my brother Wickliffe ............................................................................................. 131 Our Sincerest Sympathies....................................................................................................... 132 A Tribute to my Brother Phill -1977 .................................................................................... 133 A Tribute to my brother Homer Bushman Smith ................................................................... 134 ****** ................................................................................................................................................ 155 The Life of Lydia Heiniger Smith ......................................................................................................... 156 Preface to Lydia’s Story .......................................................................................................... 157 Chapter One ....................................................................................................................................... 158 1900-1910....................................................................................................................................... 158 Chapter Two ....................................................................................................................................... 160 1910-1920....................................................................................................................................... 160 Lydia’s Baptism ....................................................................................................................... 160 The Bieler Quartet .................................................................................................................. 161 Chapter Three ..................................................................................................................................... 162 1920-1930....................................................................................................................................... 162 A blessing given by William Hyde, .......................................................................................... 163 Patriarch, upon the head of Lydia Heiniger, ........................................................................... 163 Memories of Grandma & Grandpa Heiniger in America ........................................................ 166 Chapter Four....................................................................................................................................... 171 1930-1950....................................................................................................................................... 171 Chapter Five........................................................................................................................................ 181 1960-1980....................................................................................................................................... 181 Chapter Six.......................................................................................................................................... 185 1980-1990....................................................................................................................................... 185 Chapter Seven .................................................................................................................................... 188 1990-1995....................................................................................................................................... 188 Lydia’s Slipper Instructions ..................................................................................................... 190 Reflections: On my mother, Lydia H. Smith By: Marie Smith Mason ..................................... 193 MEMORIES OF MY YOUTH, MY MOTHER LYDIA HEINIGER SMITH, AND MY FATHER. NATHANIEL AIKENS SMITH.................................................................................................................................. 196 GRANDMA and GRANDPA HEINIGER GO TO AMERICA .......................................................... 198 ****** ................................................................................................................................................ 199 Memories of Nathaniel and Lydia Smith June 2010 ........................................................................... 200 Memories of Nathaniel and Lydia July 2010 .................................................................................. 201 Cathy Eliason (Sanders) ...................................................................................................................... 201 Jennifer Turcsanski (Eliason) .............................................................................................................. 202 Linda Allen (Sanders) .......................................................................................................................... 202 Cherry Driscoll (Allen) ......................................................................................................................... 203 Cindy Sloan (Sanders) ......................................................................................................................... 203

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Carolee (Leelee) Sanders .................................................................................................................... 204 Stephanie (Stevie) Graham (Sanders) ................................................................................................ 204 Alison (Allie) Trounce (Sanders) ......................................................................................................... 204 Marie Mason (Smith).......................................................................................................................... 205 James O Mason .................................................................................................................................. 205 Susan Fackrel (Mason)........................................................................................................................ 205 Ralph Mason ....................................................................................................................................... 207 Sarah Wankier (Mason) ...................................................................................................................... 207 Gordon Smith ..................................................................................................................................... 208 Jodee Smith ........................................................................................................................................ 209 Lori Pantuso ........................................................................................................................................ 210 Fred Smith .......................................................................................................................................... 211 Claudia Smith...................................................................................................................................... 211 Brad Smith .......................................................................................................................................... 212 Adam Smith ........................................................................................................................................ 212

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*****MEMORIES**** OF NATHANIEL AIKINS SMITH

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Memories of Nathaniel Aikins Smith

Preface
A brief record of important events in my life that have influenced my actions and the course I have taken. Based upon personal knowledge and lasting recollections. I gratefully acknowledge the hand of providence in my life, thankful for my heritage of being born of goodly parents. For a sweet faithful and wonderful companion in life who has stood by me in all our efforts together in bringing up our wonderful children, for which I am very proud, I could not ask for more. I am thankful for the degree of intelligence I have had to cope with the vicissitudes of life, and for the degree of success I have had in providing for their need and support. I am grateful for the comforts of life and the financial security I have been blessed with, to be free of any debt to any man or obligations any one. I acknowledge my weaknesses and mistakes in life, and have gained strength in overcoming them. I can truthfully say I have harmed no man, but evil men have tried unsuccessfully to harm me or take advantage of me. I have been called to many positions of trust and leadership, both in the church and out. I am proud of my record. Now as I sit alone with my thoughts, somehow the impressions that come to me are that the only true record that will ever be made will be the record written in the hearts and lives of those with whom I have served and labored, both within and without the church. My thanks be to God.

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Chapter One

1900 - 1910
I came into this world on the 14th day of September 1900. My mother was Lois Bushman Smith, my father was John Walter Smith. My birth place was Snowflake Arizona, in a little frame house later used for a chicken coop. I was attended by a mid wife which was the custom in that day. When I was eight days old my grandfather blessed me and gave me the name of Nathaniel Aikens Smith, for my great grandfather Nathaniel Aikens. I was a normal healthy baby, weighed 11 1/2 pounds at birth. I had an abundance of dark wavy hair and mother permitted it to grow to my shoulders and would put it in ringlets until I was 4 or 5 years old. When I was 2 years old my mother gave birth to another baby boy they gave him the name of Phillip Otto Smith. We grew up together and were pals and playmates all our lives. We always got along well together both at work and at play. Phil was always a steady dependable boy and I was always fond of him as a brother. The land my father had acquired for his home was the west half of a city block, with a street on each end with an irrigation ditch running thru about the center which was ideal for the plan of living in those early days, with the barnyard and live stock on one side of the ditch and the dwelling, garden spot and orchard on the other, separated by the ditch, it was considered a choice location. About this time a well planed new brick home was being built on the location reserved for it. When I was about 3 1/2 years old we moved into the new home, with a garden and fruit orchard all under irrigation. The family felt secure with a 20 acre farm and a good herd of milk cows, a good team of horses and equipment some chickens and pigs, for meat in the winter and now 6 children. When I was about 3 1/2 years old my father received a call to go on a two year mission for the church, and leave his little family. He was called to the north western states with head quarters in Portland Oregon. My mother’s brother Jessie came and lived with us to run the farm and attend the Snowflake Academy at Snowflake. The Lord opened the way and the family prospered during the next two years and when Father was released and returned home the new home was all paid for and a happy family was together again. I was about 6 years old when

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Father was released, the world’s fair was being held in Portland at that time and Mother went to meet him and they took in the Fair together. I recall the excitement when they came home, and the home coming at church. Father immediately started to find gainful employment and the only cash available was in freighting supplies from Holbrook to Fort Apache, a government army post in the White Mountains. Father soon rigged up a freight outfit and started freighting which took him away from home again, and we children missed the companionship of a father. But mother kept thing going with the children as usual, and all the time father was looking for something better. I recall a little custom we had at milking time I would go to the corral with a large tin cup and as they were milking they would fill my cup right from “Father’s Birth Place Parowan” John Walter Smith was one of the son’s of Jesse N. Smith who served as Mayor of Parowan, the cow and I would drink it on the spot. It was nice Utah in 1859, as a member of the Utah Territorial and foamy and so good. Legislature in 1856 and 1878-9, and in the Arizona Territorial Legislature's 19th session in 1897. His work for the LDS In those early days of the church the worthy Church included serving as a missionary to Denmark, members were asked to practice plural marriage, a Mission President in Denmark, and then he was called to and large families were the order of the church. My serve as Stake President in Snowflake Arizona. grandfather Jessie N. Smith had five wives and 44 children. It seemed the town was all related, at least it was a compact community, with some jealousies and criticism and back biting. But Jessie N. Smith, as the stake president was a real leader and a humble servant. He ruled with a firm hand and was respected by all and he controlled his large family as well. They all seemed to prosper. In the year 1906 a great tragedy came to this small town and new country. Jessie N. Smith passed away; I recall the event so well. I recall being lifted up to look in the casket to see him the last time, and the large funeral service and long funeral procession of covered wagons going to the cemetery, everyone went. How the stake had to be reorganized and as the town was nearly all related to him, it as a touchy decision that had to be made. After the long process of selecting the new leader was over, it was decided that Samuel F. Smith, a son and a younger brother to my father was selected. He was living in the town of Woodruff, about twenty miles north east of Snowflake. Since snowflake was the stake center he would have to live in snowflake and would be given the job of managing the town store, the ACMI — and of course he would need a nice home to house the visiting authorities of the church, and maybe the Prophet if he ever comes. The most likely house in snowflake was the new home of his brother John Walter Smith who had just returned from a mission and was in full harmony with the idea as well as all his relatives over the objections of my mother with her young family. The 1900 - 1910 11

pressure was on from all the relatives and my poor father was on the spot. Mother was eventually out voted and a deal was made that she would get a new home, to be built, but Samuel needed this home at once to take care of the business of the stake. There was an old log house that she could move in temporary while the new house was being built. It almost tore mother’s heart out to move out of her new home. I recall the move to the old log house, and then delays in the construction came and more delays and finally we were asked to vacate the log house for some reason and although the new house was only up to the square with the sub floor on the second story, father got a tent and attached it to the side of the wall and we moved to the new home without a roof on, and used the tent as kitchen and dining area and everything else. The wind always seemed to be blowing and the sand and gravel would fly. We slept in the house without a roof, and in this condition of living my mother gave birth to her eighth child, with the help of a mid wife in the room with a sub floor as a roof. I don’t know how Mother stood it, but somehow we managed to grin and bear it and mother was praised for being such a noble person. The relatives were sorry but Samuel F. got his home. The baby was named Homer Bushman Smith. I was now 8 years and recall this experience vividly. The injustice of it never left me. Strained family relations followed, and inconveniences untold were heaped upon this little family all due to family interference and pressure. These are my lasting impressions. September 14 1908 was my 8th birthday and Father took the family in the wagon down the long lane to the silver creek and after a family prayer he took me into the water and baptized me in the creek. I was confirmed by my Uncle, Homer P. Bushman, the next day. Now in the new home we had to adjust to the different accommodations. We had no water and had to haul water on a sled for three blocks by placing two large barrels on the sled and hitching a team to it. We would go to the irrigation ditch and fill the barrels and drag the sled back. This water was used for laundry purposes. The drinking water was carried two blocks from a neighbor’s, in large buckets and was good well water. Now we had to drive all the cows and horses three blocks to water every day and sometimes it took two are three of us to control them from running away. A new barn and grainary as well as corrals and coops had to be built and all this time the house was not finished. Living in it was very rough, especially for mother and the babies. All of Mothers people lived in Joseph City, about 40 miles to the north. Grandfather John was about the greatest strength she had. It was a great day when we would go to visit them and be loaded up with fresh fruits and vegetables from their garden. We children would take turns living with our grandparents in the summer time to help out with the chores and have a vacation from the chores at home.(see addendum) The new home was located on a dry hill with no trees and above the irrigation ditch. So we had no garden and had to plant a garden at the field two miles away. We finally had a well "drilled” but for some reason in did not work, and we still had to drive the stock to water and carry our drinking water. A relative refused to give us water because he did not want the kids coming on his property.

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Father bid on a contract to carry the mall from Holbrook to Fort Apache, for a four year term and his bid was accepted. Then his family wanted in on it and as the pressure mounted he gave in and took in his older brother Silas D, as a partner. This was a sad day, as he turned out to be dishonest and almost wrecked the business. Mother had just about had it and demanded he get out. After some hard feelings they finally did, but not until he insulted all of us, including my mother. My Brother Walter and I went to Holbrook to pick up the last of his holdings and he really showed his character. But, Walter stood up to him until we got what we went for. Then our dear uncle Silas wrote a nasty letter to my parents and said to call their dogs off. My Father and Mother together with all the boys pitched in and ran this mail service to a successful conclusion. The family spirit and the action of brother Silas D. was now deteriorating rapidly and discrimination against our family was high, but we struggled on. Five years after, Homer was born and two more babies. The family interference was enough and Mother asked for a divorce and was granted a civil divorce. Here were two good people, clean and pure, with 10 wonderful children, were driven apart by relative interference. The children lost the companionship of their father, not only that, they had to take abuse and be discriminated against by school and church leaders. Father left the farm and ten children with mother and moved to southern Arizona where he took up farming with a relative. The relatives in Snowflake launched a bitter attack on mother accusing her as being at fault. Some predicted the children would go, to hell and never amount to anything, but they failed to reckon with the faith of that little mother and her determination to see that it did not happen. None of the brothers could match the record of John Walter Smith. Thanks to a Noble and great Mother. ~~~~~~~~~~

The Day my Father Left
I have choice fond memories being with my Dad the last few years before he left. I was always handy with horses and he would take me with him to drive a team on the freight road and to haul supplies for the mail stations along the route from Holbrook to Ft. Apache. I was with him, together with my brothers, in closing down the operation when the mail contract expired. When we camped out he would cook the meals and I would round up the horses when it was time to hitch up. He was always quiet never talked much. I never heard him swear or curse, when he was angry he would say, “By thunder". I shall always remember the day he left. Little did I realize that I would not see him again for 20 yrs. When I was about 13 years old I stayed around while he loaded the big wagon with all his belongings and hitched up his four big horses to the wagon and got up on the wagon to drive off. As I stood there watching, then he got down and took me in his arms and kissed me good bye. I can never remember of him kissing me before or since. Then he got back on the wagon and said, “you shut the gate and be a good boy” and then he drove out. I shut the gate and was supposed to go on to school as I was late already, but I just stood there and watched him until he was out of sight. I remember the sadness that was in my heart as I stood there watching him go and pondering about his future and mine. My Dad was gone out of my life. Little did I realize what a tragedy it was to have a broken home. I was too young to realize much of the emotional feelings of my mother but I soon realized the relatives blamed her for the separation. Soon their wrath was turned on the children to make sure they would go to hell with their father, now gone. And so the struggle for survival of this little woman and her

1900 - 1910

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children began in a small town of Smiths. And thus the impressions on our young lives were made, of our-- relatives.

The Mail Must go Through!
It was sundown when we pulled into our station barn in Sholow. The 4 horse hitch had pulled the 2 big wagons loaded with baled hay and sacks of oats the 20 miles from Snowflake with no problems. I was going along just to keep my brother company. There we found the empty mail buckboard in the yard and an unfed team in the corral. What had happened to the driver? The mail was late! The reason we were concerned was because our father had the mail hauling contract. The whole family lived by the words, "The mail must go through." Here was a problem. My 15 year old brother Nat proceeded to solve it like a man. What's more he included me in those plans despite my tender 7 years. "Unhitch, Feed. I'll see if I can find that darned Jerry" Nat ordered, as he started up toward the hotel. I pulled the harnesses off the freight team and turned them into the corral with the mail team, then proceeded to throw hay in the mangers and a measure of oats in the feed boxes. A bit later Nat walked in saying, "Well I found him. Dead drunk. He's sleeping it off up at the hotel." It was then he revealed his plan. "We'll unload tonight so as to get an early start in the morning. I'll pick up the sack of local mall at the Post Office and make a fast drive to meet that stage coach in Snowflake. You bring the freight outfit." I gulped. I'd have to drive the four-horse hitch by myself! Without fuss or fanfare I was handed a man-size job. I knew I would do it, cause my Dad, as well as Nat, depended on me. Next morning, I climbed up onto that high seat, gathered up the lines, kicked off the brake and clucked to the team. Nat's partial was: "Be careful on Solomon Dugway." I wished he hadn't said anything about that bug-a-boo stretch of road ahead. I felt pretty heady as we started off, and looked down on those four beautiful horses. Enough to make a fellow's head swell 'til his hat wouldn't fit. Those leaders were right out there against their bits with their heads high. Jack, the fractious brown, was, as a teamster would say, off side. Roan was his mate; not matched in color but they were the same size and temperament. The wheelers were bigger. A lot depended on them as they were hitched on either side of the tongue and so guided the wagon. Also, they helped stop the wagon. Grace on the near side was white, a brood mare because she had good Morgan blood. She was a family pet. Queen, a regal dappled grey was a perfect working mate for Grace. I tried to keep the lines reasonable taut. Remembered hearing Dad say, "A horse gets a message from his driver by way of those lines. Never drive with slack lines." By mid-morning we were at Solomon Dugway, the area I dreaded. This narrow road was dug out of the side of the mountain. It snaked down a steep grade with a cliff or high bank on one side and a sheer drop off on the other. Two miles of this and you were at the bottom, Shumway Valley. Procedure here was to set the brakes as tight as possible and for added safety use a stay chain tying one wheel to the frame. This done, I started the team down. That grade was steeper than I had ever remembered it being. Even though everything was going smoothly, there was a fear gnawing on me. We were about half way down when it happened. The wagons surged forward. I knew in an instant the chain had broken. I pulled on the lines calling, "Whoa, whoa boys, whoa hold it, easy now!". By pure instinct I pulled those frightened horses hard against the inside bank hoping to jam the right front wheel into that bank to stop us.

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We stopped alright, but what a predicament. Queen was on bad footing up the side of the bank thus lifting the wagon tongue at a high crazy angle. This lifted the leader's stretchers way up over their rumps and scared them, I kept talking to then trying to calm them but ay voice came out squeaky. I was scared. Didn't take me long to get down off that high, tipping seat. Grace was bravely holding back. It was those darned leaders that worried me. They were both doing a little dance and bucking up their rear ends. I pulled Jack's head down and tried to calm him. Instead of a quiet, calm voice, just some more squeaks. First things first. I climbed up that slanting, tilting tongue using Queen's harness and mane to steady myself and with some mighty stretching and straining, I got those leaders' tugs unhitched. The worst was over. "You're a pair of the dumbest sons' of biscuit eaters this side of the Reservation, You're dumber than a day old jackass." These and more such talk aimed at those leaders relieved the tension. When this lead team was tied to the end of the second wagon I got the ax out of the jockey box and soon had a cedar pole fashioned to make a cross block. I had seen my Dad use this cross block idea. The pole was shoved between tied the spokes of one rear wheel across the running gear on through the spokes of the opposite rear wheel. Now both rear wheels on the lead wagon would drag. My heartfelt thanks were murmured over and over to those grand old mares as I led them back onto the road. At the bottom of the grade I pulled the cross block out, hitched those leaders back on front and went on up the road as though nothing had happened. The remaining nine miles were walked off at a good clip. When I pulled into the yard at home and started to unhitch Nat came up from the house and said to me, simply; "Well I see you made it.”

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Geraldine Smith’s grandchildren (Linda & Craig Allen’s children) were fascinated to learn that their great grandmother Watkins (Ida Perkins) on the Allen side of their family had this memory of their great great grandfather Smith’s home on the opposite side of their family tree …

1900 - 1910

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A John Bushman Legacy
Obedience learned by the things suffered
It was sixty seven years ago - I remember it like it was yesterday. We lived in Snowflake, I was about nine years old. It was my turn this year to spend the summer with my grandparents in Joseph City and help out with the chores. I could hardly wait. My first assignment was to take the milk cows to the pasture. I was to ride old Bess so I could hurry back, as the horse was needed to work getting the hay in before it rained. Down the lane to the pasture, I met Ross and Leo McClause, the neighbor boys. We immediately became friends. They were going my way and on across the river to move some calves to another pasture. It would only take about a half an hour and they could return with me. I then would get to see the river. I was worried about grandpa waiting, but I was assured grandpa always had plenty to do, and after a little persuasion, I yielded. Time passed. We could not find any calves. After spending most of the day we decided to give up. It was late afternoon when I rode in to the barnyard. Grandpa was waiting, but calm. After I gave a brief explanation Grandpa said, “You have disobeyed me. I must give you a spanking.”- It didn't sound so bad then, but when he took me in the barn and procured from a shelf a large wood paddle, I suddenly became horrified. I recall the great turbulence of guilt that came over me. I had never had a real spanking before. Grandpa knew his business, and apparently had used that paddle before. He lost no time in turning me over his knee. Although the paddling was effective, my pride and feelings seemed to hurt the most. I recall it lasted so long, with my screaming and kicking. When it was finally over, I was completely exhausted. I suddenly discovered that during the ordeal I had lost control and wet my pants - and how!. I felt completely dejected. Now, I had to face grandma in this embarrassing condition. She understood, but did not sympathize. She gave me a pair of pants and warned never to disobey grandpa again. Grandpa said, “It hurt him worse than me, but he had to do it for my sake.” He taught me that day the greatest lesson of my life.

P.S. A pat on the back at the proper time is effective providing it is low enough. Grandpa. knew that too! and that is the truth!

1900 - 1910

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Chapter Two

1910-1920
When my father left Snowflake he moved to southern Arizona and took up farming with a son, Wickliffe, who was enticed to go down there to farm as the climate was better for row crops. Wick left him later and moved to Globe Arizona and started his own dairy business and Father stayed on in the Gila Valley with some relatives. He had a struggle to make any headway. He finally sold all he had and went on a short term mission for the church and was assigned to the central states. He was able to be my brother Pratt’s, companion for 6 months. Pratt enjoyed that association very much. It must have been very hard for him to get any cash. While I was on my mission he only sent me $10.00. He would liked to have sent more but did not have it. His health started to fail him and I did not see him until in the spring of 1935 when he decided to come to Salt Lake to be near his children. He felt his days were numbered. He had cancer of the liver. Although he had 2 sisters and several nephews and nieces in Salt Lake City, none of them wanted him. He stayed with his children all he could, but he spent most of his last days with his daughter, Sadie S.Greaves. She gave him the tender care he needed. He finally had to be taken to the hospital where he died, May 7, 1936, and was buried in the Salt Lake cemetery. His nephew and brother-in-law talked at the service, which was attended only by relatives. They spent their time berating his children for neglecting their father. All his brothers were present except Samuel F., who got the home that caused the break in our family. This was significant to me. My mother was brave and had great courage and faith. She knew she had to prove she could raise this large family with the help of the lord, in spite of the opposition. The leaders of the stake and ward were among the opposition and she could get only criticism from them, but she had some good friends and her Father, John Bushman, although living in Joseph city forty miles away- was her great strength. She decided to Homestead a 1/4 section of land on the outside of Snowflake and build a new home she could keep. We organized and the boys, with the help of a contractor, we would build our mother a home. My brothers, Walter, Phill and I built an adobe mill at the farm and set up to make all the adobes for that house. Walter would fill the moulds and Phill and I would cary them out to the drying yard and dump them to dry. We were hardly big enough to carry a mould full of wet mud. I remember how our backs would ache and we had to lay on our backs and rest. Then each day we had to turn them to dry on the other side. It must have taken thousands to build this 6 room house, but we did it. Then we dug the basement by hand pick and shovel also the foundation trench. Those were long hard days but it did not hurt us. My little brothers, Pratt, Homer, Justin and sister win, helped but were to small to do much heavy work. The adobes hauled to the site on our wagon and stacked for the builder to lay them up. When the house was built it was plastered inside and outside with a white plaster that made it stand out like a beacon light on a hill. We were all very happy with it and proud of our efforts as a family. Then to improve the homestead -we had to fence the section. My brother, Walter and I went into the mountains and cut cedar posts sufficient to fence the entire tract and the we had to haul them in about 25 miles, after which my brother Phill and I dug most all the post holes and set the post so we could put a 4 strand wire fence in place. Our little brother, Phill, helped some on this," but I should at that my brother Wick 'and John were away on jobs to bring in the money while we were on this project. Their help was financial. They helped when they were at home. Snowflake saw a demonstration of faith, courage and family unity,, never to be forgotten.

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My first and last ride on a motorcycle
During this period of time, about 1913, in the little country town of Snowflake, the mode of transportation was by horse and buggy or on horseback. To see a bicycle on the street was a novelty to the town people, not to mention a motorcycle. Although there were a few bikes around, which was the envy of all who could not afford one. Even though the streets "were not conducive to bike riding”, but when my rich cousin got a motor bike he was the envy of all the kids in town. The horses were afraid of them, the dogs would chase them and they would kick up a big dust as they roared along those country streets. My cousin, Ernest, liked to show off his skill and would race it around the streets to get attention. One day I asked him to let me ride on the back with him. Although he was not to sure of himself he decided to let me have a ride. There was a sort-of a seat behind him but no place for my feet but I hung on to him and we sped around town while making a lot of noise and kicking up a lot of dust and mostly making a lot of noise which attracted attention. With my legs dandling on each side while hanging on for dear life Ernest decided to go up a little one lane dug way on the side of a hill. As we started up the dugway we noticed an old Model T Ford putting along up the dugway as though it was having trouble. There was no room to pass and Ernest must have been a little confused as we got closer to the car. Instead of the car speeding up it suddenly stopped, and Ernest didn’t expect that so we plowed into the rear with a bang. Ernest was trapped with the handle bars and was smashed up pretty bad but I was free to fly. My legs were already flying as we hit I was shot like an arrow right over Ernest’s back and I landed on the top of the car. Which in those days was a convertible type top made of canvas that could be folded back in fair weather. I recall how surprised I was and how surprised the people in the car were to see me on top of their car. I slid off with a grin for being so lucky because I found Ernest to be in real bad shape and the motor bike was almost a total wreck, no one else was hurt. Ernest went back to his bicycle and I decided I’d rather ride a horse. For some times they will stop when you say Whoa whoa I have never trusted a motor bike since. A horse would never..run into the rear of a car. N.A.S. During this time I had graduated from the 8th grade and was attending the high school which was known as the Snowflake Academy and is supported by the church. Accepted credits as a 4 year high school. I was very fond of school and had good marks. In the summer I always looked for work, to make a little money to help support the family. I would always turn my check over to mother and she would put it down in a little book to my credit. She did this to all the boys when they gave her any money. When I got in my 2nd year in high school I was doing very well but could not get a chance to play basket ball on the team or even practice with them. In those days the basket ball courts were out side and it was cold to stand around in your gym suit. The coach was my cousin, he would let

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other kids play but not me. One day an old friend was watching the practice, as many often did, and he noticed what was going on. He yelled out so everyone could hear, "Why don’t you let Nat play?" He kept yelling that at the coach and it made him mad and from then on he wouldn’t let me play. This was typical of the discrimination I was beginning to get used to, not only in sports but other school and church activities as well. I soon became discouraged, and felt inferior. I soon fell in with a group, mostly cousins, that treated me as equal and we sought other interests. We started to tamper with tobacco. You could buy a sack of bull durham for 5 cents and get a lot of smokes out of it. One day about eight of us were in a neighbor’s barn smoking bull durham and someone tipped off the school. As it was against the rules to smoke and attend school. So we were all caught in the act. We didn’t worry too much, as some of the kids had influential dads. The school board met that week and the President was my father’s brother- Samuel P. Smith, and the majority of the board was relatives and I knew all about the family trouble. It was agreed that this could not be tolerated and the best way to impress the school was to make an example out of one of the group, and the Pres. said it should be me because I would not make it anyway. After some discussion it was decided that I was to be expelled immediately with no hearing or recourse, (this action was related to my mother by one in attendance) The school principal was H.R. Atkins. He was instructed to take care of the matter. Many of the teachers were shocked and up in arras on this action. For some reason Mr. Atkins did not want to face me. To make it easy, he wrote me a letter while I was in the very next room, known as the study room, preparing my lessons for my next-class. In the letter he stated the action of the school board, and that as of that moment I was expelled from that school and was considered no longer a member of the student body. Then the brave man called the student body president in and handed him the letter and said deliver this to Nat Smith, and then he stepped back in the office and watched through the little window they had for observing purposes. (so the secretary related to my mother later) Orley Peterson the student president walked to where I was sitting and handed me the letter. Not knowing what was in it and left. I read the letter, put it back in the envelope picked up my books and walked past the office to look in, someone then shut the door. Not even a cold goodbye from the brave principal or his staff. Mother was heart broken. She said it serves you right and did not condone to any degree what I had done. But, she felt I should have another chance since the other boys were not expelled and could stay on and get there high school education. And so she went straight to the principal of the school. He said he was only following orders. So she went to the bishop who is my cousin and also a member of the faculty, thinking he could influence the Stake Pres. and he also said he was following orders. So then we went

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together to see Pres. Samuel F. Smith. I recall he kept us waiting and waiting and finally he came in and said I know what you came for but the action has been taken and approved by the authorities. The decision was final. I was literally kicked out, not only of school but out of Snowflake as there was nothing I could do there and that was what Pres. Samuel F. had predicted would happen and he did what he could to make it happen. This was just before thanksgiving. The next morning I went to Holbrook and got a job driving stage from Holbrook to Keams Canyon for my Brother Wick -who needed some help in the winter. I had just turned 17 and had to leave school, but I was glad to have work with my brother Wick. He operated a passenger car stage and carried the U.S. mail from Holbrook north to Keams Canyon on the Indian reservation, about 90 miles. A very wild and barren country with only Indian settlements along the way. There were three stops, to pick up mail or passengers.-Indian Wells trading post,- Ha Ha Te trading post and Sharps trading post. The roads were just common wagon roads and very rough and dangerous. No cars or service stations along the way. It took all day to make the 90 miles one way and the next day return to Holbrook. He used a Ford Model T for the stage. This year, the winter was extremely cold with lots of snow. We would go together when the weather was bad, other wise, because Wick had so much to do in Holbrook to keep things going I would go alone. On one trip we were together in a heavy snow storm and we had to break the track all the way. The snow was so deep the front axel would drag the snow. We could creep along and sometime one of us would have to get out and push. When we were about 12 miles from Sharps trading post and it was getting dark on a long hill, our car broke down and it was bitter cold. We could just see the trace of the road the snow was so deep. We knew if we stayed there all night we could freeze to death, so we decided to walk the 12 miles in about 14 inches of snow and feel our way in the dark to the trading post. The wind from the north came up and it was bitter cold, also the moon came out to help us. We were dressed warm, except for out feet and legs, we were thankful we had each other. Wick was a great courageous brother and we knew there was no stopping. Then the coyotes caught our scent and they began to follow us and howl, after walking about all night we finally arrived at the post, about 4 o’clock in the morning and began to pound on the door. The manager was a friendly old man named Felix. He said, “Who is it?” I called back “It’s the mail man and we are freezing to death!” He kept a big vicious dog, he said, “Wait till I tie the dog”, and then he let us in. When I saw the dog I was glad he tied it. Felix soon had us warm and comfortable with some hot food and fixed a bed on the floor of Indian blankets. and we were thankful for a needed sleep and rest. The next morning Felix sent an Indian runner with a letter to the Indian agency in Keams Canyon, about 10 miles, to bring a truck and the spare parts we needed to fix our car and to come as soon as possible. About noon they arrived and we were on our way to our broken down car. With their help we soon had the car fixed and headed back to Holbrook and sent the mail on to Keams Canyon with the truck driver. Wick and I often talked about that experience and were thankful we were safe from a very hazardous trip. Wick was a very resourceful brother, he had to be. I should relate an experience I had with the Indian that winter while driving stage to Keams Canyon. I was returning from Keams Canyon when I ran into a heavy snow storm. The car began to slide and skid so I decided to stop and put on the chains. I was about a mile from HA HA TE trading post. While I was putting on the chains, a Buck Indian came up on a horse and put his rope on the radiator cap and thought he would pull me up the hill. I told him no but he just sat there.- I thought, “He can’t hurt any thing I’ll push him up the hill!” His horse slipped and skidded until we got up the hill, he had never tightened the rope. When we stopped, he took off the rope and held up one finger and said “one paco”, and I said “no” and went on into the trading post. While waiting for the mail this Indian came to me with an interpreter and told me I owed him a dollar for pulling me up the hill. I told him he did not pull me up the hill, then he left. After I had finally gotten my load I started out down the winding canyon out of the area. It was getting dark and cold, as I came around a curve in the road I saw a large fire in the middle of

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-the narrow canyon road and about 6 Indians trying to stop me. I knew I could not stop and I could see the fire was just a brush fire so I quickly decided to run through it. I laid on the horn and stepped on the gas, full speed down the canyon road. I went through the fire and scattered it in all directions and I could see in the mirror the Indians scrambling in all directions. I kept right on going and luckily there was no damage to the car. The next day when I came back to the trading post this Indian was there and I gave him fifty cents and told him to beat it. I have often thought what that bunch of Indians would have done to me if I had stopped. I spent 3 1/2 months working for my brother Wick. It was a long hard winter, mostly alone on the road, but I enjoyed especially to be away from the relatives that seemed to be on my back for everything that happened. While I was gone it seems a hue and cry went up to the powers that be in my behalf, saying a great injustice had been done to me and a great deal of pressure was on the Stake President. The first of March I was told I would be forgiven and could come back to school and if I would work hard I could make up for time lost, and of course Mother was all for it. I was a little frustrated, all of a sudden I was something. I had been ordained a Deacon when I was 13 and ordained a teacher when I was 16 and now thy would ordain me a Priest. So in March I came back to try to pick up where I left off. I was out of tune and had a hard time to adjust, and it seems the old teachers were indifferent, except one or two, and then the same old coach (the Bishop) would insist on me suiting for gym and then have me stand on the side line in that cold march wind to watch his boys practice, I decided if I was going to watch and not play I would come in my warm cloths. At this the bishop said, “I can’t give you any credit if you don’t suit up”, to which I remarked, “I didn’t want to freeze”, and on another occasion this same man was my theology teacher and on each test I felt I had as good a paper as the others. They received a big ”A” and all I got was a “B”. When I asked him about it he looked at me a minute and then said, “Well, I guess I can give you an A", but I never new why, this was a blow to me, I became discouraged and when an opportunity to go to Flagstaff , with my Brother John, and work in the logging camps for good money, I went. John and I went to the logging camp and worked the rest of the winter to help out the financial situation at home. John soon got his call to go on a mission and I decided my help was needed for support. I was out of school for 5 years, finally got back in high school, thanks to my brother, Walter, at St George and finished my 3rd year. When mother moved to Salt Lake City I went to the LDS University, which was a high school and I graduated in 1923. My job at the logging camp in the mountains was skidding logs by team of horses over to a spur railroad to be loaded on a train to go to the saw mill in Flagstaff. The snow was very deep and cold, but I enjoyed the work. It was such a pleasure to work with those wonderful horses they and I knew just what to do. My brother John and I roomed together in a cabin for two, furnished by the company and we took our meals at a company mess hall. I recall how we used to tank up on the good food. That close association with my brother John was a choice experience for both of us. John was always so much taller than me and although only 2 years older, he ran with the older kids and we were not as close as I was to my younger bro Phill. When the snow melted we were out of work. We then found work in the logging camps at McNary Arizona, about 40 miles south of Snowflake, which was closer to home. Money was very scarce and work cheap but we took it. We used to work all day cleaning the irrigation ditches for $1.00 per day. When my brother Walter came home from the Navy, a job was offered to him as a veteran, to work on a prairie dog control program with an old friend from Snowflake (Tre Rogers). All he had to do was ride a horse around to find a prairie dog hole and drop some poison oats at the hole. Soon the dogs would eat the oats and die. They were taking over the cattle range and the government had to step in. Typical of Walter, he had just gotten a good job driving truck, and decided I could handle that job. I took

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the train at Holbrook to Sligman and met the agent. He asked me if I had been in the Navy, I said, “no, but I could ride a horse,” that my brother could not come, but I also was a good friend of the foreman.I was sure I could do the work. He hesitated a little and then decided to give me a chance. I worked on this job 3 months with this so called friend of Walters. Which proved to be the most miserable 3 months I ever spent and when we finished I was sent to a make shift job temporary work. While there, I was poisoned with that dog poison, to see how it would effect a human. This was a conspiracy. I suddenly became violently ill and by vomiting and drinking water I was able to cough it up, but not before it took hold. I stayed in camp for 2 weeks not mentioning a word about poison as I feared for my life. My guarding angel was with me then and my constant prayers were answered. After I had recovered sufficiently they took me to Sligman and I took the train for home. I talked to a doctor about my experience and he said I was indeed poisoned and if I had accused them of the deed they may well have disposed of me to protect themselves. My brother Walter had work in Mesa Arizona, and was sure I could find work down there, which I did and we roomed together. I soon found work in the Ford Garage as a tire boy and assembling new cars when a shipment came in. This work was to my liking and I was treated very well. I liked the work so much that I would go the extra mile, and they soon noticed that. When I left later they gave me a standing invitation to come back any time. While I was in Mesa there was drive on to join their National Guard of Arizona and enjoy some military training and a summer encampment in Texas for 6 weeks and get good pay. I was 18, I could get time off so I joined the Arizona National Guard in the Field artillery division. At that time they used horses to move the field artillery guns. We were sent to fort Bliss Texas and assigned to the regular army quarters and use the regular army equipment and horses. Six horses and three men were assigned to a cannon-- 2 horses to a man. Those old army horses were smart and mean. I had one that tried to bite me and kick me and every time I would mount up he would try to buck me off. The officers knew that horse and they watched me close. This horse soon found out I was not afraid of him and soon found out I was the boss when I was on him. When we went out to drill I gave him a real work out, and at the end of our stay me and that horse were best of friends. At the end of the encampment they passed out a few prizes and I was surprised to be awarded first prize for being the best horse man in the company. My brother, Walter, soon got better work away from Mesa and left me staying at a fine home with a room on the enclosed porch. I paid $11.00 per week, board, room and laundry and would send the balance home to mother. (and then a moocher came along) -Bill Porter, an old friend from St. Joseph, I met in school at Snowflake came to Mesa and looked me up and wanted to stay with me while he found a job, I told him he could sleep with me, but would have to pay for his meals. He stayed around 2 weeks and disappeared without paying. He also took off with some of my best clothes. I’ve never seen him since and I don’t want to. I paid the Land Lady.

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1914- Patriarchal Blessing given by Hyrum Smith
May 25,1914 Snowflake Ariz. A Patriarchal blessing given by Hyrum Smith upon the head of Nathaniel Aikens Smith, son of John Walter Smith and Lois Evelyn Bushman Smith. Born at Snowflake, Ariz. Sept. 14,1900. My dear nephew, Nathaniel. In the office and calling of a Patriarch in the Church of Christ, I place my hands upon thy head and give unto thee a blessing. Thou art descended from that great man Joseph, through Ephraim. And thou art endowed with many of the qualifications possessed by this great progenitor. Thou wilt be strong in the hour of temptation. Thou wilt be trustworthy and will show wisdom and foresight in the temporal, as well as the spiritual things of life. Tis thy duty to yield obedience unto thy parents that thy days may be long and that thou mayst inherit all blessings promised unto the obedient. If thou wilt magnify every duty and calling of the Priesthood thou wilt be advanced to high and responsible positions in the Church of Christ. Thou wilt be called to carry the gospel to the nations of the earth and thou wilt perform a great work in this important calling. Thou wilt be blessed in all of thy ecclesiastical duties whether at home or abroad. Thou wilt bear in honor thy family name. Thou wilt be blessed with sons and daughters who will bless thy memory and who will be faithful workers in the Church of Christ. I seal upon you the blessings of glory, of immortality and eternal life. For thy name is written in the Lambs Book of Life, from which it will never be effaced. Thou wilt rise in the time of the Great Resurrection to receiver the crown which awaits the faithful. I seal these blessings upon thee in the authority of the Melchizedek Priesthood and in the Name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

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June B. Smith--Scribe1920 Patriarchal Blessing given by Joseph H. Smith

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Chapter Three

1920 to 1930
• • • • • • • • • Move to Utah--School at St. George Work in the Nevada Mines-salt Lake Graduation Mission Call, Hospital, met my sweetheart Southern States, Alabama Conference President South Georgia District Home Coming, School at Flagstaff Creamery, Head butter maker Marriage, Grocery Business Our First baby, Geraldine a doll.

After working on a road construction job hauling gravel all summer, the family felt I should get back and finish high school. My brother, Walter, had just married a St. George girl by the name of Eleanor Segmiller, she was teaching school and Walter was finishing his schooling at the Dixie College. (I worked for my board and room by hauling hay and wood, milking cows and taking care of the stock.) It was decided I could go to the Dixie high school a year towards getting my high school education. I finished my 3rd year high school at St. George. When school let out for summer my brothers Phil and Walter, packed in the old ford and headed for Nevada mines for work. We were all broke. We stopped at Peoch, Nevada and got jobs in the led mines. The pay was not to good and the working conditions were terrible. We would come out at the end of the shift looking like black men. I nearly lost my life in the Peoch Mine. We soon decided to go on to the Ruth mines near Eily Nevada. These were copper mines and they had company boarding houses. Phill and I got on but Walter had to go to the Kimberly mines about 3 miles away, and got on there. The pay was good and the food was good. We got together with Walter every night after work. I got a job in the mine running a jack hammer drilling holes to blast the ore loose. That jack hammer would shake me up all day and the noise was hard on my ears. My ears would ring all night. This was the beginning of my hearing loss. I talked to the boss and he put me on the ore train hauling the ore down to the hoists where it was taken up. I soon got to be the motorman on that train and it turned out to be the best job I ever had. Phill and Walter left me in the fall to return to school but I stayed with my good job for another year. Then I returned to Salt Lake City to attend the L.D.S. University, and that year I finally graduated from High School with a class of 290. The graduation exercises were held in the Assembly Hall where President Heber J. Grant passed out the diplomas. Which was a thrill to me-(after my difficult high school experience). While attending school in Salt Lake I had a job dish washing in a Café and also night work as a stock boy at Kress Store to earn a little money. The year I was in school in SLC I became very active in church and Bishop Thomas A. Clauson was like a father to me, and of course my Mother told him she wanted me to go on a mission. When school was out in the spring I returned to the mines and the boss gave me my old job back, which made me very happy. This was one of the best paying jobs in the mine and also the safest. I could send mother a good check each month and save a little for more school. I thought I wanted to go into the electrical field as I

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was running an electrical ore train. My hopes were high and I was in good with the company. Then all of a sudden my plans were changed. I received a letter from President Heber J. Grant, dated Nov.15, 1924, as follows; Elder Nathaniel A. Smith;

Dear Brother;

You have been recommended as worthy to fill a mission, and it gives us pleasure to call you to labor in the southern states. The date appointed for your departure is December 3, 1924. You will be expected to present yourself at the church office, 47 East South Temple Street, at 9 A.M. the day before your departure to make arrangements for your transportation and to be set apart. Please let us know your feelings with regard to this call and have your reply endorsed by your Bishop.

Praying the Lord to guide you in this matter. I remain Sincerely your brother

signed Heber J. Grant President of the Church

It was one mad scramble but I was on that train, December 3,1924, with 35 other missionaries headed for the southern states and other points along the way. Since I was the oldest missionary in the group I was made the captain. Thus was the beginning of a marvelous experience and a complete change in my life for which I thank the Lord. During my days in Salt Lake City and my activities in the church I met a beautiful girl from Switzerland, then living with a good friend of Mother, Mrs. Marie Senn. Through that connection we met and it was “love at first sight!” Her name was Lydia Heiniger. We seemed to be perfect for each other. We went to a dance just before I left, and danced every dance together. That night she promised to wait for me and I had a manifestation in a dream that she was meant for me. (she appeared to me in a beautiful white dress. It was as a dream or a vision. I awoke and sat up in bed as she seemed to vanish, but it was enough for me!) Which was a great comfort to me. The day of our departure, December 3, 1924, there was a huge crowd, as usual for missionaries farewells gathered at the great Union Pacific Depot. The only ones with me were mother and my sweetheart, Lydia. After a big hug and kiss from each of them I climbed on the train. For the first time I realized this was for real, and I had a lump in my throat and did not look back for fear they would see some tears.

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It was an exciting time, 35 missionaries all chair seats. It took us 3 days and nights to get to Atlanta, where we were met by some missionaries and taken to church, it being that the evening meeting was still in session. Since I was the captain I was called on to speak by President Chas. A Callis, the mission President. This was my introduction into the mission field. The next day we were all assigned to our fields of labor. Elder Kimble Fisher, a very young missionary, and I were assigned to the Alabama conference -which included West Florida. We were to take the train to a little town in West Florida where we were to meet our senior companions. It seemed such a long trip, due to the changing of trains and the waiting. Each train we changed to seemed to be more ancient. Then our last change, was an old Wood burner, and very rickety, only two cars. We thought we were completely out of the U.S. The little town of Telogia was a small settlement in the swamp area of west Florida. We found the family of saints by the name of Schulster. He was the branch president and they treated us royal. The houses were on stilts, due to the swampy land, and the wild pigs sleep under thy house at night. Sometimes there is a real commotion going among the pigs and then in the morning brother Schulster would would get out his famous hog call to feed the pigs. A real back woods area, but the saints had hearts of gold and would give everything to make us comfortable. I enjoyed it all, but Elder Fisher was really worried until our companions finally came. I was assigned to labor with my first companion by the name of Rulon Epson, a wonderful missionary, and I love him to this day for the things he taught me and for his example. We got along so well together and could sing duets and harmonize together. Elder Epson and I were sent to Mobile, Alabama, a beautiful city on the gulf on the Mobile bay, but a strong Catholic city. Holy Ghost, a revelation through a dream. Two great personal experiences came to me while laboring in the city of Mobile which influenced me all through my mission. A personal confrontation with the adversary -the Devil. (see addendum on Lula Shepherd attached) A personal manifestation in answer to my earnest prayers from the Holy Ghost, a revelation through a dream. Mobile had seen little missionary work, due to a lack of missionaries, and also due to the bitter opposition to the church in that area. After our arrival, the mission President decided to concentrate more on that city and sent 4 more missionaries, including the district President- Ralph Richards- who was soon to be released. We set up head quarters and house keeping, batching, and a strict study course and work schedule, and tracting. Three of us were new in the work, and adjusting to this rigid routine was rough, along with the opposition we ran into from tracting. It seemed the power of the devil was doing everything to stop us. Not only the Catholics, but all the Protestants in the city had banded together in a campaign to resist. They brought in Mrs. Lula Loveland Shepherd- a noted speaker against the Mormons- and they put full page

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adds in the papers inviting her to the protestant churches to hear her (so we went too). It made my blood boil, to say the least, and the tracting became almost impossible. Nearly every door was slammed in our face. The other new missionaries were getting more discouraged than me, and one night Elder Oldum said he was going for a walk and he never came back. We were all excited that something like foul play had happened. We checked with the police and everyone possible and notified the mission headquarters in Atlanta, but no Elder Oldum. Then, in a few days, we received a wire that he was home in Kurry Utah- safe and sound, and did not want to come back. He didn’t. This was a great disappointment to me and made me very sad, as we all loved this fine missionary. We were taught a great lesson that discouragement is a great tool of the Devil and to take heed. I pondered surely that would not happen to me and I prayed for strength to stand the test. Surely the Lord is mindful of his servants and due to my great concern over this event he chose to reveal to me, in a dream, the great danger of being tempted to go home. After saying my secret prayers I climbed into bed and soon was fast asleep. Completely unconscious of my companion, who was on the other side of the bed, also asleep. During the night a very vivid dream came to me and all of a sudden I was in Snowflake Arizona, a place I had not been for 5 years. But, it was my old home and all my relatives were there. It was Sunday and of course I went to church. Hoping no one would see me I sat on the last bench sort of behind a post under the balcony. I noticed that the Bishop spotted me and after the preliminary exercises he announced that Nat Smith (as they called me) was back from his mission and would I please come forward and report my mission. I was horrified but responded and walked to the stand with all eyes on me. I recall I took hold of the pulpit and just stood there and could not speak a word. I struggled and twisted, and was in complete agony and embarrassment. When all of a sudden, I awoke. I looked around and thought, “where am I?” it was so real and when I realized I was still in the mission field I was so thankful I got out of bed and on my knees! I poured out my soul to my Father in Heaven for being there in Mobile Alabama where I was there to be a missionary! Thanked him for that means of communicating with me, a warning, which would have brought untold regret and embarrassment to my mother. I had told her about Elder Oldum and I am sure she too was praying for me and now our prayers were answered. When I related this experience to my Mission President he said it was a revelation especially for me through the Holy Ghost, a very sacred experience. I suddenly forget all about homeland. My mission became more meaningful and also more effective and I soon became a good speaker. I loved my assignments, my companions and the people in general and I never got homesick, thanks be to God. I spent 5 months in Mobile and made many friends some to the point of coming into the church but never saw that happen. But other missionaries finished up the work. Now they have strong active branches of the church and maybe a ward or two.

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~~~~~~~~~~

Confronting the advocate of the devil;
Manifestation of the power of the spirit to subdue the enemy.
March 5, 1925, while laboring as a missionary in Mobile Alabama, I witnessed the power of the Holy Ghost in protecting the humble missionary. Mobile was a strong Catholic city and missionary work there had very little success, due to bitter opposition from the protestant and catholics. When it was learned the mormons were sending missionaries to work the city a strong concerted effort to oppose our efforts was instituted by the combined forces to stop us. All the churches got excited and joined in to bring in Mrs. Lula Loveland Shepherd, to stir up hatred. Full page adds in the paper advertised her message, and the citizens were told to not listen or accept our tracts. Elder William Cook was my senior companion, a sweet humble Elder and somewhat timid. He was just finishing his mission and I was fortunate to have him as a companion. We worked hard at tracting but the campaign was on against us and we met nothing but doors closed in out faces.(see copy of her speech attached) We initiated another system to get the message to the people by going to the working men at the railroad shops and talking to them at their lunch hour. Mobile is a large industrial city and has 4 large railroad shops and several cotton mills and factories with a lot of people employed. We soon found this to be a good source of contact and were holding a meeting every day at noon with a different group six days a week. We had about forgotten about Mrs. Shepherd until this day, as we were walking down the tracks to our appointment with the workers at the M.& 0 Rail Road shops. As we approached we noticed a large crowd had gathered and we were elated thinking they had gathered to hear us. Then we noticed some commotion indicating some kind of excitement. We then perceived that Mrs Shepherd was there a head of us, a little fear came over us and-we stepped between two box cars and removed our hats and bowed our heads in solemn prayer, asking for guidance and protection, that his spirit would go before us. Then we continued on. All fear left us as we walked toward the crowd. We saw Mrs. Shepherd on a truck platform preaching and when she spotted us coming she shouted out, so we could hear, “And there they are! Protect me! Protect me!" and then she disappeared into a waiting car to see what would happen. She had tried to incite them to attack us, but they just stood there staring at us. Although Elder Cock was my senior companion I was 3 years older and he leaned on me at this time and asked me to go ahead. As we arrived at our usual spot I removed my hat and greeted them as cheerfully as I could, as they continued to stare at us. I stated we were there for our appointed meeting, but we could wait if they were not thru. I then announced that we were there only to bring them a message of the gospel of peace and there was nothing to fear. I spoke with a certain calmness that radiated to them and I noted a sudden change in the tenseness in the atmosphere and attitude. Instead of walking away most of them sat down and began to listen to what I was saying. I then announced that Elder Cook would give a prayer and as he prayed the evil spirit just seemed to fade away. He gave a most fitting prayer. We then sang one verse of “Israel, Israel God is Calling”, which they seemed to enjoy. Then he gave a short but effective talk. He assured them we had no quarrel with Mrs. Shepherd and we were there only to bring a message of the gospel. Then he bore a strong testimony, which was very impressive and forceful. When I began to speak, I felt the power of the spirit upon me and I discarded my notes and began to speak with great ease. I seemed to speak their language. I stated I was a working man, that 6 months

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ago I was working in the mines out in Nevada and that I had left a good job just to come and bring a message of the gospel. That if it was not true I would not be here. That I was paying my own way and no churches were paying me to go out and slander any one for what they believed. I told them I did not care what Mrs. Shepherd had said. All I wanted to say was what the Lord had sent me there to say. That they could be the judge. That if this work was of man it would come to naught, but if it was of God, she could not overthrow it, but would fail in her efforts. I invited them to investigate her work and compare it with the Lords work. I gave them my testimony and then offered a closing prayer, in which I blessed them for their kindness. After I was through, their reaction was amazing. Many of them came forward and complemented us and said what a contrast. They were very friendly and invited us back. We said good-bye and started back down the road rejoicing and thanking the Lord for this wonderful manifestation of the spirit and for the answer to our humble prayer. We never heard of Mrs. Lula Loveland Shepherd again. ~~~~~~~~~~

“The Mormon Menace”
By Lula Shepherd
Opening remarks by the presiding Baptist minister: The South has its Negro menace, California has its Japanese question and now we are confronted by this Mormon menace which has rapidly grown in the last few years until now it threatens to overthrow our Government! We are indeed fortunate in having Mrs. Shepherd with us tonight. She is in a position to give us much information on this Mormon-question and also the best methods in combating this evil which threatens our beloved Country. I take great pleasure in introducing Mrs. Lula Shepherd, who has spent twenty years among the Mormons. Mrs Shepherd The Mormons are doing great harm to our Nation. Their aim is to control all the governments of the world. Joseph Smith claims to have received revolution to that effect. They are a menace to everyone. No one is safe. They work quietly among the women and the young girls, they don't want the men. They have you all deceived, you people of the South. The South is full of these Mormons who are seeking to break up your homes. They are the greatest foe to the American home in existence today. Many homes are broken today because these Mormons have taken the mother or daughters and sent them to Utah. Only the other night in one of my meetings a young man burst in tears, and said, "Oh if you had only come a little sooner and saved our home from being broken.” I have never been a Mormon, but I have spent twenty years among them as a leader of prohibition and other movements. I have spoken in hundreds of Mormon churches. Three times under my leadership we affected dry legislation in Utah and the government vetoed it. Do you know that there are less than five thousand Christians in Utah and the rest are Mormons. I have found many Mormons in Alabama. In Montgomery, a street car conductor disturbed my meeting, I found them in Selma, in Birmingham, and all small towns. I think there are some here tonight. Yes, I think I have one spotted now. Why, many of you are paying your hard earned money to the Mormon Church and don't know it. I found one Mormon who was receiving a salary for singing in one of your Christian Churches. In many of 1920 to 1930 31

your churches, you will find them teaching the primary grades in the Sunday School. Oh they are smart, they will deceive you if possible. The Mormon church has the most perfect spy system in the world. They have spies everywhere. Day after tomorrow, my speech will be printed in a Salt Lake paper, How will it get there? Will the Methodist or the Baptist report it? No! but these spies they have here in this meeting will! They have a spy in every college in the United States. Nothing goes on but what these Mormons know about it. You people of the South have been fooled by these Mormons. Do you know they have made more converts in the South than anywhere else. Well they have and it is your own fault! For you have let them pull the wool over your eyes. You have let them into your homes, to steal your wives and take away your baby daughters. They don't work with the men, but come to your homes while the men are away. Why? Because they don't want the men, they want the girls. The church depends for it's growth upon it’s high birth rate. This is why they want you girls. They ship them to Utah and force them to raise large families. This Church started in Vermont. Joseph Smith was the leader. The Mormons have erected a huge statue in honor of him. It was so big it took special trains to carry it. The Church had its origin in Joseph's mother's home. She believed in witches, charms and dreams. Joseph's father was digging a well and Joseph found a peach stone which by looking through he could find lost things. Thus he found the lost plates in the hill, and carried them home. A total weight of 260 pounds and fought 6 men who attacked him, but reached home in safety. (Laughter from audience). This Joseph admitted he was a very wicked man, also very religious. These two go together. (More laughter) He claims to have prayed in the woods and to have talked to the Father and the Son. He claims that the gospel was lost for many years and it was to he restored by him. This Joseph Smith was also a gold digger. He called in a school teacher to help him write from the plates he found. Did you know that these Mormons don't accept your bible! They believe the bible, only as far as it is translated correctly and also claim that it is not as complete without the Book of Mormon. Joseph Smith stole the manuscript from which he found the book of Mormon from solomon Spaulding. They got their name of Mormon from the Prophet Mormon which they claim wrote in the Book of Mormon. That is the whole story of the origin of the Mormon Church. They will tell you that Christ's mission failed for 1800 years till the Mormon Church was organized with seven members and took the name of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They built their first temple in Kirtland, Ohio, it was there that Joseph Smith walked upon the water. They later found the plank under the water which he walked on, this they removed, and the next time he tried it before many thousands of people he fell in. (Laughter) A great harm was done when Joseph & Hyrum were killed while trying to escape. If they had of lived,- they would of killed Mormonism themselves. I find two classes of Mormons here in the South, but I am only after those who followed Brigham Young to Utah and practiced Polygamy. The, chief danger to you people of the South lies in their missionaries. They are over the whole county. They travel as book agents, sell silk hosiery, coffees and teas, take magazine subscriptions and etc. Every woman boy & girl must fill a mission and they are sent out here without purse or script. They have to support themselves. They must either beg, borrow or steal. You can fight this great evil by refusing them anything to eat, by refusing the transportation from one town to another, by refusing them permission to hold street meetings. I found in the northern part of the State that only two weeks before, they had been there holding meetings and distributing literature. I am told they were here in Greenale a short time ago tracting. They have a missionary in every college in this land. Last year, they took from our Christian churches 85,000 people. Isn't it terrible? We must do something! The Mormon church is the wealthiest church in America. They got it through tithes. when one joins the church, they must turn over one tenth of their possessions to the church. The church doesn’t trust this to them, but send collectors, who even count the eggs.

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All the tithes go to the President who does not even give a repor of where it goes. Lest year 12 million dollars was paid to him. This tithing supports the large families of the Mormon bosses. They have great granaries all over the country where part of the tithes are stored. The Mormon church owns millions of acres of the richest land in Canada. Millions of acres of valuable land in the isles of the sea. If any of you were to start a factory in Mexico, you would find that the Mormon Church controls all of Mexico. They are also getting control of all sugar cane raising land here and abroad. Their aim is to control all the governments. The President of the Mormon Church is president of 20 branches. The church controls 65 % of the stock in the railroads. They actually own 3,000 miles of railroad and every official on it is a Mormon. There are three big insurance companies all under Heber J. Grant. The power of the ACMI is felt all over the U.S. They crush out all competition in Utah, because of their power. They have a monopoly on sugar. They planted the Desert in sugar beets, then went to Germany and sent converts over to top them. There are 16 Sugar factories in Utah all owned by Mormons. Their 12 leaders were indicted in 38 different courts when the sugar scandal was on during the war. They also have a monopoly on the salt market, which salt they obtain from the Salt Lake. They have a wonderful resort there where they go in bathing, I saw 15,000 in it at one time. They make everyone take a shower after bathing so that they won't carry off any salt. If you don't you are liable to be arrested for stealing. They have great dancing floors where they dance all the latest dances. You can imagine what goes on. They have a free organ recital at noon. They look the doors and allow no children under six, then a good looking man drops the pin (hints at trickery) the tourist is charmed by music and pin dropping) . These Mormons teach that Jesus married their women and that Joseph Smith is a descendant of one. They teach that a woman can't be saved if single, that she must wait in her grave till her husband calls her forth. They guarantee every girl that joins the church a husband. She may have to share him with a dozen more, but she has a husband just the same. They still practice polygamy, even in the Sunday School. Brigham Young had 20 wives. Joseph F. Smith lived with five after they promised to quit. He stood before the senate and defied them to stop him. Their power is great today. Reed Smoot is next in line for power to President Coolidge. Smoot practices polygamy. I had a talk for one hour with President Harding. I told him I could not prove it, but I knew it. He said I had made some very startling statements. Smoot and King are working to become Vice President, then if the President of the U. S. should die, we would have a Mormon President. Don't you see the danger we are in. Every official in Utah is a Mormon. They hold a balance of power, in eleven States of the Union and are rapidly gaining more. They are so strong now that the Republican party prays them for their votes, When Joseph F. Smith forty or fiftieth child was born, he was taken to the police court and fined $300.00 by a mormon judge and jury. You can't convict them, they have too much power. They will also lie to you. They don't think it any sin to lie to a gentile, only a sin for one mormon to lie to another. They don't even worship the same God as we Christian people. They worship a God with body, parts and passions, while the bible tells us that God is a Spirit. Every apostle in the Church has many wives. Every High Priest has or is entitled to ten, I can't prove this but it is a fact. I lived in their homes, I know. They have an under ground entrance to their temple. We can’t go in it. I have never been there, they denied me entrance. Out there, Heber J. Grant issues the marriages licenses. You can marry as many as you please. These Mormons wear a secret garment next to their skin. When they come to your house, just ask them about this garment, and they will quickly leave, for they can't stand to be questioned about it. The church today is fighting this law against polygamy which I am trying to get passed. They quickly raised a million dollars to back up their fight. They have control over all newspapers and magazines in

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the country so that it is impossible to publish anything against these Mormons. Dr. James E. Talmage writes articles for these papers and receives pay for doing it. I am the only woman working for the W.C.T.V. all the rest are men, but there are some things that men can’t tell women. I talked to the ladies this afternoon on "The secrets of the Mormon Temple". How it is up to us to pass a bill against these mormons. That is my job to see it passed, stopping polygamy, and then we must convert them to Christianity. Now pass the cards around and sign the amount you will pay this year to fight this Mormon Menace. If there are any mormons present, they will refuse the card, Now pass the plate and take the free will offering for the benefit of humanity. We must put this over and I must report and answer for everything I say. Let us arise and be dismissed with prayer. ~~~~~~~~~~ Elder Clag and I, we arranged our travels in a sorta cricute in three counties so that we called back every 3 weeks to see our contacts and each time around we were invited in and it was like renewing an old friendship that was most rewarding. We walked everywhere through the country and were recognized everywhere we went. We never had to pay for a meal or a nights lodging, and had to promise we would come back. In most cases, truly that Southern hospitality is for real. During those 4 months we were at our best. The love and concern we had for each other was strong and a binding force. Our singing and harmony with each other was manifest for good with those people. The only money we spent was for postage and tracts and books, about $5.00 per month. Surely the Lord looks after his servants. We followed council and received the reward many fold. The December district conference was called for Birmingham Alabama. I had now been out one year and was having a wonderful mission. It was a joy to meet all the missionaries in conference and especially my old companions. President Callis called on all to report and then, he called on me last. After I got through, he announced that I was being sent to Georgia, and I was to meet him in Waycross Georgia next Sunday. He said no more. He left for Atlanta right after the meeting and left us all stunned. I had no idea why I was going. It was a sad farewell to all my companions and I took the train for Waycross Georgia, an all

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night ride. There was no one to meet the train; I had the address of brother Will Bennit in Waycross. I found my way to his home and was told they were going to divide the Georgia conference and make two districts, the north Georgia and the South Georgia district and a conference was to be this Sunday. Great preparation was made. It was to be held in the main big theater in Waycross, which was rented for that purpose that some missionaries from the Florida district were going to be there as well as all the missionaries from Georgia. I still had no idea why I was the only one from Alabama there and why. All the missionaries gave short talks. I was so frustrated I gave a lousy talk. In the afternoon session the plan was announced and the territory designated to be the new district and 16 names were listed as assigned, and that Nathaniel A. Smith was called to be the District President with head quarters in Waycross Georgia. I was stunned, to say the least. A complete stranger, did not know any of the missionaries, or the Saints or the territory. I wished I was back in Alabama. After the meeting President Callis had to catch the next train for Atlanta and he asked me to walk to the train with him. I was praying for some instructions, council or anything on what to do and how to go about it. I’ll never forget that day. When we got to the depot we still had a few minutes and he said, “lets walk down the track a little and back,” and still he did not say a word. Finally, as he stepped on the train he said, “keep yourself aloof from the others, the Lord will bless you, and you, the first president of South Georgia district, will be a good one. God bless you, good bye.” I couldn’t have felt flatter if the train had run over me. I was a very humble missionary and I knew I had to go to the Lord for guidance. I walked and walked out of town and into a secluded area and spent some time in humble prayer. After which I felt fortified for the great task before me. When I returned I called all the Southern Georgia missionaries together and asked them to meet with me the next morning to get their assignments. Elder Vivian Jenson was laboring in South Georgia at the time and was acquainted with the saints and the territory better than any other of the missionaries now assigned to the new South Georgia District. So I asked him to assist me in making the assignments both to the

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various districts and pairing off the Elders. We had eight pair including myself, and I assigned a Young Elder to work with me. We had no large cities in the district so it was all country work and small towns. We sat up most of the night and next morning as we met I gave out the assignments. I instructed them to be humble and live close to the lord and they would be blessed and protected in their travels. They were to report to me every week. My headquarters was Waycross, Georgia. Everything went fine, I thought I had a wonderful group of boys, until a junior Elder told me he was having trouble with his companion and wanted a change. I visited with a different pair of Elders each week to see how they were getting along. This problem elder was a very capable man but did not want to work. He had plenty of money and just wanted to take little and go to shows and goof off. His Name was Shiblon Hatch. I’ll never forget him. I changed his companion and assigned him to another older companion and the same thing happened. So then I made the mistake and asked him to labor with me. I would not goof off with him and so he would take little trips by himself and at night when we had cottage meetings, he would slip and go to a show. I warned him of the mission rules and he was running counter to all regulations. He would just argue. It was in Albany Georgia, we were to meet with Elders Jensen and Webb, for some special meetings with some investigators. We were staying at some saints, when meeting time came, there was no Elder Hatch. We went ahead with the meeting and had a wonderful outpouring of the spirit and a fine discussion after. That night long after midnight, Elder Hatch came in and crawled in bed, very careful not to wake me. I was glad, at least I knew where he was. I had breakfast with the family and Elder Hatch stayed in bed. I was to meet the other Elders at the Y. M. C. A. where we always went to shower and write letters and make out our reports. It was nearly noon when he came walking in. I told him I had just written a letter to President Callis in Atlanta, and he was going in to report to the mission president that we did not need him in the South Georgia district . He was furious and used some abusive language and then begged me to give him another chance, but I said, “You are a little late, I just mailed the letter.” All missionaries had a holy fear for President Callis and I heard from the mission secretary that President Callis threw the book at him and then sent him up into North Carolina and made him a district president. I have never heard of him to this day. South Georgia district prospered and a wonderful spirit prevailed among the Elders. In the year that followed we organized 5 branches and had wonderful activities going in all branches. The missionaries had great love for the work. In December a new L.D.S. Chapel, in Jacksonville Florida, was to be dedicated. One of the finest,to include an apartment for the missionaries. David 0.McKay,of the council of the twelve, was coming. A great conference was called for Florida, South Georgia, Alabama, and North Georgia. Elders were all in attendance three days and reports. The South Georgia Elders paid me many high complements and Elder McKay commented on the fine tributes the elders gave. The last session the President announced a number of elders that were to be honorably released, and when my name was called out I wept openly. My two years were up all to soon. ~~~~~~~~~~

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A Missionary’s Homecoming
This is a footnote I think worthy of mention at this point. In the year 1926 the South Georgia District was organized as a separate district in the Southern States Mission, with 16 full time missionaries. Nathaniel A. Smith was called to be the first district President. In the year 1976 just 50 years later the South Georgia district was organized into a Stake of Zion, known as the Douglas Stake with 5 wards. What a satisfaction it is to see this happen to the district I had learned to love so much and that perhaps my labors were in some way a part of this great thing that has happened, surely those good people deserve it and more. Surely the church marches on. An honorable release was what I always prayed for. Now what? A new and different life. I didn’t want to go home. I realized I had to make some adjustments. I must go back to South Georgia and thank all those wonderful saints for what they had done for me and then I wanted to go back to Alabama and see once again those saints that were so wonderful to me. After a last farewell to all my friends and companions I took the slowest train, one that stopped at every town. I wanted to think and ponder my future, and I did love to travel, as I had been doing the last 2 years. I knew my Sweetheart was waiting for me, as we had corresponded regularly, and now my thoughts turned to her and our plans. I could hardly wait to see her again. Another problem was that my mother now had moved back to Snowflake Arizona. I was not sure I should go there or to Salt Lake City and report my mission first. I finally decided I should go to Snowflake to report to Mother first. I routed my trip home through Pine Bluff, Arkansas, to visit my brother N. Pratt who was serving a mission in the Central States Mission. He had now been out one year and it was happy reunion. I spent 2 days with him and went on to Holbrook Arizona, where I was to catch a ride to Snowflake- about 28 miles. I scouted around town a while and met two truck drivers from Taylor- about 3 miles from Snowflake. I knew these fellows from years back and they seemed glad to see me and would be glad to give me a ride if I could wait for them to play a few games of pool. It was late already but I did not want to go to a hotel. So, I waited. We got home about midnight and what a ride. They tried to impress me how tough they were and they made big asses out of themselves with their foul talk, but they wouldn’t charge me anything. Mother was surprised and we knelt, with the three youngest, and thanked the Lord in family prayer- thankful for my safety.

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It was wonderful to be home with my dear Mother, Homer and Justin and Winifred, to find them all well. We talked long into the night and made plans. We went into my finance account and found that I had $50.00 left to my credit. I had paid for all my mission from the money I had sent home to mother and she had dished it out to me as I needed it on my mission. Little did I realize, the money sent home would come back to me on a mission. That money really worked. Mother did that for all the boys, but I was the only one with enough credit to pay all. I was anxious to get back to work to build up a credit again. My homecoming report was the next Sunday and I was very humble as I knew the Smith relatives would be watching close. I fasted and prayed for guidance to say the right thing. I walked up to the old home we boys built for mother and was sad to see it was gone, not even a splinter. The basement and foundation that I helped dig were left, I wept a little and asked God why these people would allow this to happen to a property owned! and tax payer.? I had a hard time to contain my feelings, I prayed for wisdom. Sunday afternoon was my test and I was never more humble. The old stake house was packed. But the man I wanted to see most was not present. President Samuel F. Smith found it convenient to go to Taylor for church that day. Perhaps it was because he had had a hand in my ouster from school about ten years earlier. Elder Leonard Fillerup had just returned and he was to give his report also. The bishop appeared very nervous to me for some reason, and asked me if it would be all right if Elder Fillerup would talk first. I was a little puzzled at that but said for him to suit himself. Well, he talked for 30 minutes on salvation for the dead. Every one nearly went to sleep.(some report) After a musical number by the choir the Bishop came over to me and asked if I wanted him to introduce me as Nat Smith? I snapped, “you can introduce me as President Smith, President of the South Georgia district in the Southern States Mission.” He appeared a little shocked. I stood in the pulpit a minute and I recall how tense the air seemed. I had a hold of the pulpit just as I did in my dream 2 years ago and it all flashed back through my mind. Then I said, “The Lord gives unto men weaknesses that they may be humble, and if they will humble themselves sufficient before him he will make things stronger unto them. I know my weaknesses and pray that I

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may be humble enough to give my report that it will be acceptable to him and pleasing unto you." At that moment the spirit overcame me like I have never experienced before. I began to speak under the influence of the Holy Ghost and it seemed words came with power and force and my voice rang with the power of the spirit. The tenseness was gone, everyone seemed in harmony with the spirit. Surely the Lord was with me and had answered my prayers. I paid great tribute to my dear Mother and her great faith. The congregation wept, they laughed, the spirit seemed to stir them up to such a point. What a glorious feeling it is to be endowed as I was for that 15 minutes, and what a great climax to a wonderful mission. I know now why I went to Snowflake to give my homecoming. After the meeting I was swamped with well wishes and the Bishop had me go with him to his home to tell his wife what a good talk I had made, as she didn’t attend the meeting. I recall he told her it was because my Father was such a good speaker. I never could figure that out. ~~~~~~~~~~

1927 - Patriarchal Blessing given by Hyrum G. Smith
October 3, 1927 A blessing given by HYRUM G. SMITH, Patriarch, upon the head of Nathaniel Aikens Smith son of John Walter Smith and Lois Evelyn Bushman Smith. Born Sept 11,1900 at Snowflake, Arizona Brother Nathaniel A. Smith, my dear kinsman; by virtue and authority of the Holy Priesthood and according to thy desire I lay my hands upon thy head and give unto thee a blessing, which I pray the Lord to direct for thy comfort and benefit throughout this life because of thy faithfulness. Thou art of the linage of Ephraim, who was chosen son of Joseph, who was sold into Egypt. Thou wast born of goodly parents. An heir through faithfulness to the blessing, gifts and privileges which have been promised unto the faithful according to the New and Everlasting Covenant. Thou hast also been magnified in thy youth with the power and blessings of the Holy Priesthood. And if thou wilt continue to honor thy blessings, and the giver thereof, thou shalt be further magnified and blessed with the discharge of duty. And thy duties will be made plain to thy understanding. Thou shalt be comforted in the answers to thy prayers. Thou shalt be blessed with health and strength of body and of mind. And if thou wilt harken unto those sweet and peaceful promptings they will be thy guide by day and by night. And through them doubt will be removed from thy mind and thou shalt have power to go forth and work out thy righteous desires. For it is thy privilege to live and fill up the full measure of a worthy mission on the earth. To rejoice further in the kindness and mercy of the Lord. For thou shalt be blessed in thy efforts to gather around thee the comforts of life and meet thy righteous obligations, and in due time be crowned as a worthy father in israel and rejoice in the blessings of a worthy posterity. Therefore, prepare thyself for the responsibilities of life. be honest with the giver of thy blessings in temporal as well as spiritual affairs. Keep thy trust in the giver of thy blessings and thou shalt be magnified in the discharge of duty. And in time, be advanced in the Holy Priesthood and be called into places of trust and leadership. And shall enjoy further of the preserving, protecting and providing care of the Lord. For it is thy privilege to live and enjoy the blessings which have been promised unto the faithful.

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Therefore, be true to thy duties. For where much is given, much is required. And thou need not lack for friends nor suffer want for the necessities of life. But, shall be so strengthened in testimony and in faith as to go forth in triumph in the fulfillment of thy righteous desires in the mission that has been given thee. And rejoice in the mercies and the favor of the Lord, that shall attend thee by day and by night. And magnify and strengthen and preserve thee even until thy mission upon the earth is fully accomplished. I seal these blessing upon thy head through thy faithfulness. And seal thee up to come forth in the morning of the first resurrection . A Savior in the House of Israel with thy kindred and loved ones, among the redeemed and the glorified of Israel. By virtue of the Holy Priesthood and in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen. ~~~~~~~~~~ What to do was the big decision, no job, no trade, no money, and in the midst of a big depression. Mothers brother, Uncle Homer Bushman, recommended that I go to my sweetheart and from there work out plans. My Smith relatives thought I should go back to school at the Northern Arizona Teachers College. I could get a teachers certificate in 2 years, and then teach school. I sent letters to Lydia to see how she felt about it. She seemed to agree that in the long run it may be the thing to do, and she would stay on working for a while there in San Mato, Calif. We both were somewhat confused. At any rate we scraped up a little money to get me to Flagstaff. With some good luck I got a job in the mess hall-washing dishes for my room and board. Also, I landed a job as a night clerk in the new Monte Vista Hotel in town for a little cash, an all night job. I studied, went to class and slept in between. I was usually to tired or bored to go to church on Sunday, and I never dated. This spring quarter was a big bore and disillusionment. I had a hard time to concentrate on my school, and I wondered how much a school teacher made for all this monkey business. I vowed I could make as much as a school teacher in most anything I now was qualified to do and I soon decided at the end of the spring quarter I would leave and find my own way. I was broke when I left school and had to have a quick cash job. I went down to Phoenix. The cantaloupes were coming on fast and they needed packers and paid good money. I grabbed a job in the fields and hot Arizona sun and for 6 weeks saved up enough to go on to Tucson, Arizona where my brothers, Wickliffe and Phill were working at a dairy. Phill had received his call to go on a mission to Germany that fall and would sell me his old car in time to help out on his mission. Also my brother Pratt would be coming home from his mission and everything seemed to be working out. After a few days visit with Wick and Phill I headed for Salt Lake City, and notified Lydia to meet me in Salt Lake City. The old car was not in very good condition and I managed to keep it going after a fashion. I recall I picked up a hitchhiker. I told him I would be glad to give him a ride but I was low on gas and money, if he would put in some gas we could go on to Phoenix. He filled it up and we became good friends. I thought I would never get to S.L.C. My brother, John and Sally were living in the old home mother had lived in and they gave me a bed until I finally got located. My sweetheart was living again with her old friend, Mrs. Senn, in the Covey Apt. just a block away. I was worried what she would think of me and if our absence would make any difference. I called her and she wanted to see me that night. When I got there she met me in that beautiful white dress she wore when we danced all night together nearly 3 years ago- and the same white dress I saw her in the night she appeared to me in a dream. I knew then

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she was for me and we had a long fond embrace. How thankful I was for that wonderful girl for waiting for me. I promised I’d never leave her again. The next big worry was to get a job and it seemed like there was no such a thing. I gave my long overdue home coming address in the l8th ward- and Bishop Clauson was just wonderful to me. He wanted to help me find a job. I walked the streets early in the morning, finally at the railroad station a man told me if I would go to the Arrow creamery at once I might get a job. But not to tell the Boss he sent me. I rushed up there and got on and worked all day in my best clothes - but very thankful for a job. The working conditions at the Arrow were bad, but I dug in. 10 hours a day, Sundays and all. The old man was a slave driver. I was supposed to be the butter makers helper but I was doing everything else trying to please the boss. After three months we got the word that 3 of us-new men-were going to be let out. I was sick about it and started to look around and felt my best chance would be to stay in the creamery work as I was now experienced. I called on the largest creamery and applied and gave the Arrow as reference. They called the Arrow to confirm my work and the old boss gave me a wonderful recommend and said I had been with him for three years. So he did me a favor after all. My hard work had paid off, now, I had a better job and more money. I was started out as the butter makers helper. He was a very overbearing miserable man to work with. I bit my tongue and tried to be nice to him in order to get along, and I was praying that somehow I would not have to endure this environment to long. In six months the big man was taken out of the churn room and I was made head butter maker. One of the top paying Jobs in the creamery. I was thrilled and thankful and worked hard to prove myself. We had two huge churns with a capacity of 1000 pounds each, and we turned out ten churns a day or 10,000 pounds per day. To take care of that much butter in a day was real work, but I loved it. I was the head butter maker for two years and calculated in that time I had made 1,000,000 pounds of butter at the Nelson Ricks Creamery. The brand name was Banquet Better Butter. It is still around and one of the leading brands. The opportunity came along and I went into the Grocery business, which proved to be a good move and more to my liking. While working at the creamery things started looking up for me. I was able to get caught up on my financial affairs and make plans to get married. I had moved into a boarding house with my future Brother-in-law Ephraim Fankhauser, who had just come from Switzerland, and was planning to marry Rosa Heiniger, the sister of Lydia. We roomed together and enjoyed each others company. We also dated and went out together, which was good for all of us. It was so good to be close to my sweetheart after so long away. Now we could make plans. She was everything to me and seemed to be a part of me. I was so proud of her. Everywhere we went, her talent in music, she played the Zither and yodeled, was to the delight of everyone- especially me. She was always a very dignified lady. Very neat and attractive, I saw in her everything I could ask for in a future companion for life. In short, I was madly in love.

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We planned for a home and picked out and purchased, on credit, the furniture for our future home. (We bought a bedroom set a dining room set and front room set. I (Lydia had saved some money and paid down $600.00 on the furniture and then we paid the balance of it in monthly payments for awhile). Although we did not know where we were going to live. At last the great day came, nearly 4 years after we first met and two years after I returned from my mission. June 14, 1928 we were sealed for tine and eternity in the Salt Lake Temple, by George P. Richards of the council of the twelve. Lydia’s sister, Fredia Toiler, gave us a reception with our closest friends and relatives, in her home. It was very delightful. My brother, Walter and his wife Eleanor were the only ones from my family there. Mother was still in Arizona. The way was opened for us to find the house that fit our furniture our first home, a 5 room brick, located at 653 "D" St. Salt Lake City. At $25.00 per month, I had $100.00 cash, but the happiest man ever. ~~~~~~~~~~

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(This is a copy of a letter to my mother about our wedding) Salt Lake City 653 D. St June 26 1928

Dearest Mother; Your nice letter and lovely wedding present arrived safely and we surely enjoyed them. Especially the lovely hand made quilt. It is so extremely nice, because it is so artistic in design and workmanship and it so characterizes you as a lover of handmade beautiful things. We truly think it wonderful and beautiful and thank you very much. Mother we know you must have put in many long hours working on this just for us. Yes, we finally made the riffel, but I don’t think it was none to soon. We both were ready for companionship and ready for a home of our own. Now that we have both, our happiness cannot be exceeded. I tell you mother it sure does seem good to have a home and a sweet little wife to go to after a long days work. I think I can fully appreciate these things because I have been running around so long without a home base. We were very glad that my brother, John and Uncle Hyrum Smith could witness our marriage in the temple, but our impossible wish was that you were not able to be there also. We hope that some day soon you can visit us in our home. It’s a regular paradise and my sweetie is a regular paradise maker. We certainly don’t envy you in the big task of moving to Tucson Arizona. But, we do extent our faith and prayers that your trip will be safe and successful, even more than the one over the mountain once before. Yes mother, another year has passed for you in this great struggle of human existence. We remember you with a wish for many more happy returns of the day. Under separate cover we are sending you a wedding picture for your birthday. We shall send Wick and Pratt one a little later. We are to poor to afford one for Homer, Justin and Winnie. I expect they will feel like I did when my older brothers passed around their pictures and left me out because I was young and had no place to set it. But, perhaps you can explain. Anyway we can always make more as we have the negatives. Give our love to all the folks and except a prayer and blessing for your welfare and happiness.

From your loving children Lydia and Nat

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Dearest Mother I wish to, add a few lines to Nat s letter as I do want to thank you sincerely for the sweet congratulations and more so for the beautiful present we just recently received from you. I cannot begin to tell you Mother how I admire the work done on the quilt to think of all the thousands of stitches were made by your own dear hands thrills ray heart through and through as 1 know everyone of these stitches have a loving mother thought for us. The whole quilt is so pretty, we both think the world of it and especially its maker. Yes mother we are settled at last and we both enjoy the comforts of a real happy home. Our wedding day was a perfect day. We went to the temple at 8 o'clock in the morning to be married. It was simply wonderful. I will never forget it. Cur wedding reception took place the same day in the evening at the home of my sister, Mrs. Yoller. The whole affair went off just beautifully. We received a lot of nice presents and also many good and sincere wishes for a happy long life. There was something though we missed dreadfully and that was you, dear mother. We both would have been twice as happy that day had you been able to be with us. But, we look forward with the happy thought maybe soon you will have a chance to come to Zion and visit with us for some time. Our home is located at 653 D St. and 13th Ave. The street car only takes us to 9th Ave. and D St, then we have to climb up the hill to 13th Ave. It’s quite a climb but nothing to hurt us and after once up here we have the most gorgeous view over the whole valley and excellent air. The house is well built and has a lovely front and dinning room a very good sized bedroom and a most cheerful kitchen. A fine pantry and bathroom and a nice sleeping porch. We certainly think we have a cozy love nest and we want you to see it one of these days. We both feel greatly blessed in many ways and thank our Heavenly Father for the progress we are continually making. I think Nat forgot to tell you that his boss complimented him last tuesday on his work and raised his wages $10.00 per month. That brings his check to $145.00 per month. We feel that we can get along just fine on that, as we only have to pay $20.00 rent per month. Not bad is it? Well, I think I have said enough for this time. Awaiting a sweet letter from you soon. I remain lovingly your daughter, Lydia ~~~~~~~~~~

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1929 was another eventful year. Our home was located at 13th Ave and D St. in the Ensign Ward on 9th Ave and D St. We soon became active in church activities I was called to be the 1st councilor to the M.I.A, president, Wilford Brimley. We became good friends. He was a part owner in the Brimley Bros. chain of small Grocery stores. This was my opportunity get into the grocery business, and an opportunity to get out of the creamery work. I had never worked in a store before, but he had faith in me and made me manager of the new store, located at "36" 12th East S.L.C, known as Brimley Bro. Cask Market. I managed this store successfully for 2 years, and then the Brimley's got in financial difficulty and it looked like they would go under. A real depression was on. Stores were being closed, and the jobers were watching all accounts closely. The managers were being paid $25.00 per week. Not only was I manager, but I went to the farmers market every morning at 5 am to buy produce for three of the stores and I was cutting meat for two of the stores, besides managing my place. They decided to save themselves. They had to cut overhead and would start on wages, as there was plenty of men out of work and would take the job for less. When he told me I would be cut to $15.00 per week I threw the keys on the counter and told him, if I took that I'd have to steal to make it and before I'd steal I would quit. It had not dawned on him, and I'll never forget that look. He just stood and blinked his eyes at me and walked out. They never cut my wages. A Mr. James Anderson, who was supplying me with eggs, offered to buy the business from Brimleys and have me as a partner at 50-50 and we changed the name of the store to Smith and Anderson. He lasted 3 months and said if I would pay him out at $35.00 per week that he would get out. And so I became the proud owner of the N.A. Smith Cash Market.

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A Great Event in Our Lives
October 24, 1929 a sweet little spirit came to our home. She had lots of black hair, Geraldine was to be her name. We called her "CHEERY". Sometimes we liked to call her our little Cherry Blossom. She was born in the Holy Cross Hospital in the morning of the 24th (which was only about 2 blocks from my store). After she was born, I went to the store all day and didn't get back to see Lydia until after closing time which was after visiting hours. When I got there, Lydia was in tears. She thought something had happened to me. So our life and pattern of living changed to conform to a new situation. I was glad at that time we were living in the little house next door to the store which made it convenient. Although the location was convenient it was a dump and I couldn't expect my wife and baby to live in such a place even if it cost me my job. It was situated on a sunken lot. There seemed to be moisture under the house. It had a coal range for heating and cooking in the kitchen, and a coal space heater in the front part. Mr Brimley didn't like it when we told him we had to move. I asked him if he would put his family in it? I knew I was risking my job to move, but I also knew that Mr Brimley needed me in that store. He had tried to transfer me to another store for a week and have his brother run this store and about lost all the trade and was glad to bring me back. We finally found a first class place on 6th South and 11th East, and decided to take it.

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Chapter Four

1930 to 1940
• • • • • • • • • • • • • Move to 1106 East 6th South Another Baby Girl Lydia Marie Pres. MIA Emmigration Ward Move to 428 Douglas St A Son is born Gordon Nathaniel Sunday School teacher A Son is born Frederick Aikens Purchase second West property President of the Elders quorm President 301 Quorm of seventy Call to Salt Lake High Council Call to be a Stake Missionary Promoted 2nd West Street lights

1930 we moved to a lovely duplex apartment at 1106 East 6th South. Also, that year I acquired full ownership to the little store and we began to get ahead. I purchased an old ford panel truck and had my name painted on the side to advertise my store when I delivered grocers to the customers. That was our source of transportation both for business and pleasure for sometime. I would go to market every morning for my own store and after getting the store in order for the day, I would call my customers for their orders. I had a steady list of customers-about 50- including several frat houses and sorority houses on the University campus. I became very proficient in cutting meat, which I always enjoyed. That way I did not have to hire an expensive butcher. On June 13, 1931 another precious little girl was born to us. She was given the name of Lydia Mare, for her mother and Mrs. Marie Senn, a foster mother to Lydia when she first came to America. We were very happy now with two beautiful little girls. In spite of my long hours at the store I was appointed the president of the Emigration ward MIA. It was a rush to get there from the store on Tuesday, but the Lord opened the way, and I was blessed. My activities in the church and my willingness to serve always brought me many blessings. I would like to acknowledge here that it was while in the presidency of the MIA, in the Ensign Ward that I was led to the contact that got be in the grocery business. When we lived by the store I was also active in the 12th-13th ward and served as M.I.A. President and made many friends. It was in this ward that our first baby, Geraldine, received her name and fathers blessing, and we were prospered. When we moved to 6th South, I was also called to the M.I.A. president, and in this ward our 2nd daughter, Lydia Marie, received her name and fathers blessing. I suppose it was because of my experience in the MIA, that I was called to serve there so much. In 1932 we moved to a lovely little home at 428 Douglas Street, located in the 33rd ward, where again I was called to be the MIA President and a Sunday School Teacher. Again, we made many friends

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and were prospered. It was here in this little brick house, on Feb. 9, 1933 that a son, was born at home and his name was to be Gordon Nathaniel, and he like Marie, was born at home with doctor coming to the house and a nurse attendant stayed night and day for a week. It was in the 33rd ward that our son received his name and fathers blessing. Our family doctor was late for Gordon so the nurse delivered him without a hitch. The doctor came when it was all over and said he could not have done it any better. We had great faith in our doctor, his name was Dr. Edmonds he delivered and cared for all our babies. His fee was $35.00, including office calls. It was through my church association and friends that made it possible for us to finally acquire the property at 721 North 2nd West, where we later moved and were prospered. We prospered in our little store and in the ward and made many friends. In 1935 I purchased a new car, a chocolate brown Pontiac. How proud we were to take the family for a ride and visit relatives. We would always go by Bill’s Hamburger stand a get a few 5 cent hamburgers. What a treat for all of us! I was renting the store at $75.00 per month, which was considered a very good high rent. The owner, Wilford Brimley, decided to sell the property to Dr. Cooley, of Brigham City. He had big ideas and immediately doubled my rent. I told him I could not pay that, but he said you will pay it before you walk away from this good business. I started to look for another place, although I had no reserve cash, the merchandise on the shelves was clear and I could move it to another location. I looked at several possible sites. I even went to Logan, Utah to see some places. I was praying for guidance everyday. On March 5, 1936 another son was born, his name was to be Frederick Aikens. He was born in the LDS hospital, he also received his name and fathers blessing in the 33rd ward. I was now under some pressure. I could not stand to let this Dr. Cooly have all the net profit. Then the way opened up, as always. My next door neighbor was in the real estate business and had just what I was looking for. A store, practically the sane size as my old one, all equipped. A 7 room brick home next door and 3 partly furnished apartments over the store - a Barber shop and a vacant store with 4 garages and a beautiful big lot. Located at 721 North 2nd West Street, Salt Lake City. Located on a bus st. one block from the St. Marks Hospital and 3 block from the railroad shops. The three previous operators had gone broke and now the property was to be sold. The sale price was $8,000.00, which seemed like a lot of money. But we could get it for $1,00.00 down and $100.00 per month @ 6% interest. The apartments were rented at $35.00 each and the barber shop at $20.00 per mo. It seemed like a natural to me. The store and dwelling would be free if I could keep the apts. rented. I was on a cloud, I knew this was the answer to my prayers. But as usual, a busybody neighbor talked to my family and said this was a bad neighborhood to raise my family. So I promised we would move when the children

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got in to high school. At any rate we finally made the deal I borrowed from my Father-inlaw, $1,000.00. The only time I ever borrowed and I paid him back with interest in one year. I moved my stock out of Dr. Coolys store and I also took my costumers. I would call them every morning and send the order just as usual and in the meantime I was building up the local business. After 6 months, I gave up the delivery business and we continued to prosper. This location was a hot spot. 6 stores in close proximity were all competing for what little business there was. They all stayed open on Sunday and until midnight and even cut prices. I closed on Sunday. We closed at 8 pm. I cut my own meat and that was my leader. The local butchers just could not meet my prices. They came from far away just to get meat. The rail road workers would stop on there way home to get their meat. Two of the stores lost there butchers. When we opened the Variety Store in the vacant store and Lydia managed that. We seemed to have a corner on neighborhood business and the Lord blessed us abundantly. We also got a U.S. post office sub station in the Variety store which brought in a lot of people to the store. Lydia made a very attractive and interesting store, which was the talk of the town. The opening of the Variety Store in connection with the grocery store was a very successful addition to our already thriving business. Also, getting involved in community projects was boon to our success in the business, such as spear heading the drive to get vapor street lights on 2nd West Street, which was a main artery in the approach to the city. It was also very dangerous at night time. When we moved there i saw the danger in crossing the street at night. I immediately contacted all the business men on the street to back a petition to get the lights. They all were glad to support the move. They said they were just sort of waiting for someone to lead out. A lawyer resident drew up the petition and we got the boy scout troops in the area to take it to every home on the street. From the warm springs at 8th North to 9th South. They obtained over 2000 signatures. Then, Mr. Tomy Tompson the Barber, Mr. Gray, of Gray Motor on 2nd west, and myself, presented the petition to the city commission. Commissioner William Murdoch, a former grocer and a good friend of mine, came to our support and the petition was accepted without opposition and soon we had the lights on

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2nd West. Which makes it today as one of the most beautiful approaches to the city at night. We had a big parade the night the lights were turned on from warm springs to 9th South. All the business on the street were in the parade, and they insisted that I lead the parade. We had a big rally in front of the West High School with the school band and speeches. They called me the Mayor of 2nd West and everyone was happy to see what a little united effort would do for a community. This was a great boon to our business. The lights are still there and was the beginning of many more that were installed in the city later.

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This was a busy time of our lives with a young family. We got an elderly lady from Germany to come and live with us and do the housework while we both worked in the store next door.I would tease the children and say they were raised under the counter. But, I was glad to have then there and that they grew up to be a great help and learned at an early age to meet the public. The older ones soon were able to wait on trade. With it all we had church assignments, which proved as usual a great blessing. Lydia was called to be the music director in the Primary and I was called to be the President of the Eders quorum, and a Sunday School Teacher. Later, Lydia and I were called to be Stake Missionaries in the Salt Lake Stake, under the leadership of President Hyrum W. Valentine. We had great success two nights a week. But with our long hours in the store and our young family at home it was felt unwise for both of us to be away from home at evening time. So, Lydia was released after giving excellent service to the mission. I was in demand as a speaker at cottage meetings. I also baptized a fine couple neighbors and also costumers, who later sent a son an a mission. I was called to be a seventy in connection with the missionary work and later was called to the presidency as one of the 7 presidents of the 301 quorum of seventy. After my mission release, I was called to the Salt Lake Stake High council where I served for 5 years under President Wilford A. Beesley. As such I had many assignments to speak in the various wards and I would often take Lydia along to sing as part of the program. She had a beautiful voice and put real feeling and meaning in her songs. She soon was in demand for her talent.

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1942 Petition for Beloved High Councilman
From the Bishopric and the complete staff of officers and teachers of the Twenty Third, of the Salt Lake Stake. Taken from the original document. GREETINGS TO THE SALT LAKE STAKE PRESIDENCY Dear Brethren; We the undersigned signed members of the 23rd ward respectfully petition and ask, if it be possible that we may continue to have the service of our beloved High Councilman, Nathaniel A. Smith, for another year. We feel we need the help, the council and the advice of this fine brother. He understands our many problems,and thru his fine cooperation his generosity his willingness to help in every way, he has indeed been an inspiration to us all, and has helped to get under way that which we think will make for a better ward in the years to come. Sincerely your Brothers and Sisters. signed Bp. John F. Nielson 1st C- Orle Verl Dastrup 2nd C- Evan M. Homer Clerk - Don Ray Wagstaff together with the signatures of all officiers and teachers of the ward.

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To my Family, I earnestly request of my wife and my children and my descendants that they steadfastly decline to sign any bonds or obligations of any kind as a surety for any other person or persons’ that they refrain from anticipating their income in any respect, that they refuse to make any loans except on the basis of first class well known securities, and that they invariably decline to invest in any untried or doubtful securities or property or enterprise or business. Nathaniel A. Smith

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Chapter Five

1940-1950
• • • • • • • • • • Paid off property Remodeled home-4 new garages Purchased new Chrysler Leased the business out Purchased new home at 724 10th Ave New York Life Ins. made top club Salt lake investment co Grocery store in murry Carrol realty, Cook realty Church assignments East Ensign Ward

During this period of time in our lives we were active in the church with our young family and participated in all the activities and assignments. But our business called for extra effort to keep abreast of the times and competition. A group of independent grocers banded together to make better buys on merchandise. We called it the “Progressive Grocers Association ‘. I was appointed secretary and later the president. Although it was extra work, the contact was educational and helped us to compete with the big chain stores. Later, the grocers of Salt Lake City organized into an independent grocer association, to include every grocer in the county. I was elected the president. From that nucleus the Associated Food Stores was organized as a whole sale house owned and operated by independent grocers. By this means the large suppliers were forced to give us the same price as the other stores, and we were able to survive. I was a charter member and one of the directors of the Associated Food Stores, which is still going strong with upwards of 800 members. The demand on our time was terrific and we noticed we were neglecting our precious children and we began to wonder if money was everything and our health was another. We pondered the possibility of getting into another type of business.

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10/23/80
Associated Food Stores, Inc. P.O. Box 30430 Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 Attention: Mr. Eldon Belnap et al; Dear Sir: At the request from your office which is gathering information from former members of the Associated Food Stores for the purpose of preparing a history of that association, I am herewith submitting two pictures and brief account of my activities with the A. G. My business property was located at 721 North 2nd West in Salt Lake City, consisting of two stores know as Smith’s Market and Smith’s Variety Store. (see photo). Although they had separate fronts, they were connected together in the rear. My wife, Lydia, was the manager and buyer of the variety store and I was the manager of the meat and grocery department, hence I am submitting our pictures as owners and operators together. This combination proved to be very successful and we soon had a thriving business. Lydia not only kept a very attractive variety store but she also operated a U.S. Post Office sub station in connection with it which induced traffic to both stores. We purchased this business property in 1936 and soon became associated with a group of local grocers and formed a buying organization know as the Progressive Grocers Association. By pooling our buying power we could compete with the large chain stores. I later became president of the P.G.a,, but our buying power was limited to a degree due to our small volume stores and lack of facilities to distribute merchandise. I was later elected to be the president of the Salt Lake Butchers and Grocers Association which included all the grocers of the county. the movement to pool the buying power of all independent grocers began to catch on and soon the movement started under the leadership of Donald P. Lloyd and others to form an associated buying company and own our own wholesale house. And thus the Associated Food Stores was born; but not without a lot of opposition from the other wholesale houses and some manufactures. Donald P. Lloyd was appointed General Manager. The directors and officers were elected from the membership. I was honored to be elected to the first board of directors. Each member had to have a share of stock which was issued to charter members at $300.00 each and that was the extent of the operating capital at that time. In spite of the small beginning with close cooperation and loyalty to a great cause, the A. G. began to grow and the members became good friends and not competitors. Donald p/ Lloyd proved his skill and ability to organize a group of independents and we all admired and respected his judgement and success. I sold my business in 1945 and had to sell my stock as I entered another field of business. I shall always cherish my friends and associates while at the A.G. and the dedicated people who held together to make it work. No one could have imagined the magnitude of the present status of the great A.G. from such humble beginnings. I am proud that I was instrumental in the beginning of this great organization. I would like a copy of the book when it comes out. Also, would you please return the pictures to the following address-thank you. Respectfully yours, Nate and Lydia Smith 1148 East 27th South Salt Lake City, Utah 84106

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Government regulations and food rationing was a time consuming task and was a nuisance to normal business. In short, we were weary and need a vacation. We knew it would be hard to find a buyer, because this was a family operation and you had to live with it to manage the place. When Harold Brinton, a wholesale house salesman learned I was thinking of getting out, he was interested and eventually leased the property and business for three years with option to purchase, which he exercised later. We consummated a deal that was satisfactory to all concerned and I moved my family out to a lovely home at 724 10th Ave in 1945. With the lease as a good income to ease the tension while adjusting to a new field of livelihood. Not until we moved did we realize how much time we were devoting to the business. We now had time for our family and enjoyed some pleasant trips and enjoyed being together without interference. Which after all, was what we had planed. ( a note in passing, the Brintons business went into receivership in a few years due to mismanagement. It made me heart sick to see this wonderful business go down the drain). My old missionary companion Sterling W. Sill was manager of the New York Life Insurance Co. and he talked me into joining him. I worked at it for one year and was successful. I made the top club by selling a quota prescribed. Lydia-was given a free trip to Colorado Springs all expenses paid for one week! But I was not quite satisfies in this type of work and started in the real estate business which was more to my liking and it seemed natural for me to put a deal together and was very successful. I became licensed with the Salt Lake Real Estate Investment Co. The Broker and owner was Roy M. Hill, a former Bishop who I had worked with when I was on the High Council in Salt Lake Stake and I had great confidence in him. I learned then and since that sometimes you find wolves in sheep clothing. Hiding their real character behind the skirts of the church. To my great disappointment he was one. Although I ha good business and sold many large apartments and income property, he was like a mill stone around my neck. I turned in my license and was attracted to a Grocery store in Murry, by the name of Smiths Market. All equipped and going strong. I thought I would like to try my hand at it again and leased the place on a percentage lease. Here again things were misrepresented and I had made a bad deal. for one year I struggled and finally got rid of it and was glad to go back in the real estate business. This time with Carrol REalty. I almost came to the conclusion that every man was a crook until he was proven honest. I was afraid to trust any man. Carrol Realty was honest, and I soon recovered what I had lost in the store in Murry. I consoled myself to charge that experience off. Although I did well with Carrol I was not satisfied with the office procedure and decided to go to another office where I felt I could get better training in this field. Carrol begged me not to leave. He said he would rather lose any two of his men than me. I took my licensee and joined the Cook Realty, a very efficient office. I did very well here also and earned more commission than any other place. While here I decided to take the exam for a Broker. Harry Cook endorsed me and I became a broker with my own business- again known as Nate Realty.

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A law suit
By an old and trusted friend – I still can’t believe it. I leased the Smith Market in Murray From William Smith (no relation) partly because it was a Smith Market and partly because I was in a business slump and I still had the grocery business in my system. Also because I was completely deceived about conditions at the store. I soon saw the situation and began to get out as best I could, after some considerable loss. After returning to the Real Estate business and joining the Carrol Realty, this Mr. Smith wanted me to list his property for sale or trade. I still had some confidence in him and worked on the deal. We worked on a trade deal and signed up the deal on both ends. I had to share the commission with another office as they had one of the listings. After all the transactions were finished Mr. William Smith refused to preform and lost the property by default. He later decided to serve me for misrepresenting the property.(A full copy of the procedure in contained in my files elsewhere). I was then a bishop and I engaged a good attorney, also a bishop. He couldn't conceive of it ever coming to trial, but this young attorney was getting experience-and it dragged out for 6 years. Even after Mr. Smith asked his attorney to withdraw. Finally, it was tried before a jury. Despite the judge denying some evidence, which was positive proof, the jury returned a verdict in my favor. Then the judge sent the jury back and said that they had not followed his instructions. The jury returned in 15 minutes with a guilty verdict. We appealed to the Supreme Court, and were denied a hearing.(see the answer by my attorney). A great miscarriage of justice and a lot more. I will always feel the Lord was with me in spite of it all and caused that thru my efforts to get ahead honestly, my investments were protected and in the long run, the expense of this law suit was deductible from taxes on capitol gains on a sale of some income property I had on 5th south which I disposed of shortly after this suit and the expense off set the tax which was a legitimate deduction. I felt some consolation in this.(For the sake of this record I would like to here with insert the history of this investment which was one the better investments I made in my life time.) In 1951 I purchased some income property located at 358 East 5th South in Salt Lake City. Purchase price $13,000.00 with $1,000.00 down and $100.00 per month @ 6% int. The property showed a gross income per month of -$320.00 after monthly payment and expenses indicated net $150.00 not including management and vacancies, estimated net income per year $1,800.00. Ten years estimated net income = $18,000.00 1961 sale price-$ 32,000.00 after interest on contract and collection fee and selling comm. indicates a net value and income and sale over 10 years from a $13,000.00 investment to be $41,000.00 value or a capitol gain of $27,000.00.

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Richards, Bird and Hart
Attorneys and Counselors at Law 716 Newhouse Building Salt Lake City h, Utah April 9, 1959
Lynn S. Richards Richard L. Bird, Jr. Harold H.Hart Clarence J. Frost Ronald C. Barker Lon Rodney Kump

Mr. Nathaniel A. Smith, North Heights Realty Company, 10 South 8th East, Salt Lake City, Utah. Dear Nate,

I felt crushed to the point that Maria asked me what was the matter, upon receiving notice from the Supreme Court that they had denied our petition for rehearing. I feel completely frustrated and disappointed to the point that I am compelled to question our judicial process. From the beginning until now I have been completely unable to understand the attitude of the judges before whom we have been. They have had the idea that you misrepresented something to the damage of Mr. and Mrs. William Smith. It has always impressed me as a case where you had offered to go the second mile, i. e. to do more than was required of you under your sales agency agreement, in order to satisfy your customer. I have done my best to win this case and have spent more time on it, I know, than was justified, except for the fact that I felt very strongly that you were getting a bad deal, first, from Carroll Realty Co. since they were insolvent, and secondly from the trial judge and now the supreme court has refused to look at what I consider the merits of the case. Sincerely yours, RICHARDS, BIRD & HART

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When we moved into our home on 10th Avenue, we were in the East Ensign Ward which shared the chapel with the West Ensign Ward located on 9th Avenue and "D" Street. We all soon became active in the ward. Lydia and I were in the choir and the children soon made new friends. I was teaching Sunday School. We had 3 children mutual age, and soon we learned the M.I.A. was to be organized. Again I was called to be the president! I think I'll never forget that day, it was so amusing. Our bishop, a very capable young man, reported to be the youngest bishop in the church, he was also an executive in one of the local television stations. It was rumored that due to the U.S. drafting of young men that they would be exempt if they were ministers. So he was made a bishop because of his ability as an executive there. At any rate I was called to come to his exclusive office to be interviewed. I had no idea what for. I was announced and then waited, then I was ushered thru several offices and then in to meet my bishop. I was indeed impressed, to say the least, which was what he wanted. After the preliminaries I was seated in front and he began to inform me that I was called to be the Pres. of the MIA. The thing that stuck me was that he did not look at me, but at the floor. I was instructed that I was not to come to him for anything. If I had any problem, I was to go to the 2nd Counselor and that I was on my own and he did not want to be bothered with the MIA. All the time looking at the floor. I left his office with the feeling that now I knew what an executive was! That was as close as I ever got to that man, or any sign of a report to him, a most unsatisfactory association. I was glad to be called to a Stake Mission. After 2 years as MIA pres. I was called to be a Stake Missionary in the Ensign Stake and released from all ward activities. I always enjoyed missionary work, this was my 2nd Stake mission and 3rd mission for the church. After which I was appointed to be the secretary to the High Priest Group in the East Ensign Ward. I was required to write the minutes of all the proceedings of each meeting and prepare them to read to the group for approval the following Sunday. This was a task for me, as some always had some corrections to register which annoyed me. I kept a faithful record of the proceedings for three years, and then was appointed to be the instructor. ( note here with--I kept three books full of the minutes for the three years I was sec. and inquired what to do with these records. No one seemed to know-and no body wanted them. I pondered what a waste of time and effort for a sec.) The ward was reorganized and a new Bishop was called. He ask me to head the home teaching program. I organized with two assistants and introduced the calendar plan- which was a calendar with all the main events for the month and a message from the bishop. For the calendar to be effective they were to be placed in the home the first week of every month. It was very successful and the home teaching was always done the

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first week. We led the Stake in Home Teaching percentage. Always near 100%. ( note againHere was a new bishop, and a bit glamorous. At the next ward conference he made a flat report of his stewardship and the only thing of an outstanding nature in the year was the home teaching, and he did not even mention it. Here I was tested. (and felt a little hurt)

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Chapter Six

1950 to 1960
During this period of time I obtained my real estate brokerage licensee and was accepted in the Salt Lake Board of realtors listing with full multiple listing service. My first office was in the Hooper Bldg. and later 1 moved to the building at 48 on 4th East, which had parking. I had two large rooms and soon had 8 sales people licensed under my brokerage, known as NATE REALTY. During this time I was called by the Salt Lake Temple President to serve at the baptismal font in the temple to assist in work of baptizing for the dead. I was ask to be there 2 hours a day 2 days a week from 4pm to 6pm to accommodate the youngsters who came at that time of day. This was a rewarding experience. I was acting recorder and was to give the proper pronouncement of each name of the person to be baptized. It was a thrilling thing to be able to give out those names with the proper pronouncing especially those from the foreign countries. I had never seen them before or had any knowledge of that language but it seemed someone was helping me and I'm sure that person was at my side to help me to do it right. Observers often commented how I could pronounce those names with such ease. This was a great testimony to me that the work for the dead is being assisted from the departed spirits. I served there for 2 years, we did about 200 each day. I shall always cherish that spiritual experience to work so close with those people and under the influence of the spirit of the Lord.

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Although all the men were approved worthy the suddenness was too much for them, and had they had a little time to think it over they would have accepted. I'm sure. But maybe it was best for me as it turned out. (The Lord has a way of doing things.) John H, Nicodomus was called to be my first counselor, and Harold T, Kitterman was called to be my 2nd counselor. I shall always thank the Lord for those wonderful men. We worked with a bond of love for each other that was unsurpassed. There was never any friction, and I like to think the Lord had a hand in their selection. In Sacrament Meeting on that 25 day of Feb. 1953 I was sustained together with my counselors, as the bishopric of the East Ensign Ward of the Ensign Stake. Apparently, there were some surprises. The Lord blessed me with a calmness, as well as my councilors, as we gave our acceptance talks. Which I felt put some at ease. (Note: I would like to narrate here the reaction that was noticeable to me, at least, and I pondered if indeed I would be accepted) Immediately after the meeting closed, the Relief Society President came up on the stand and said she wanted to be released!--NOW! The Primary President called me at 7 am the next morning and said the same thing, NOW!! The MIA President said the same thing, NOW!! Two ward clerks said, they wanted to resign, and I suddenly found myself bishop of a ward that was in a disarray and floundering. I told these good people that I could not release them now. Three bishops had proceeded me with the same group of workers. They were all discouraged and due to their loyalty to the former leaders they hung on. I don't see how they stayed so long. I prayed mightily for strength. I knew he would make me strong enough to meet the problem and be magnified in the eyes of the saints. We called a meeting of all the officers and also the clerks and told them we were going to release every one that wanted to be released, but that they still had their responsibility. If they could not be there it was their responsibility to have a councilor take over while they were away and the Lord would hold them responsible. We told the clerks we had to have an up date on all the funds and receipts and reconcile the accounts, the cash on hand with the amounts receipted. Then I received the shock of my life! The Finance clerk had not had time to enter all the receipts on the day it came in. So for "safe keeping" he was taking all the funds home with him and had been doing this for some time. I said we are going to do this now, and put the funds in the night deposit, if it takes all night!! We all worked till midnight and counted it all up and found the clerk had been carrying over $7,000.00 around with him and at home. After all this was accomplished I made him the Sunday School Superintendent. The other clerk had been in charge of the petty cash and funds from the road shows and other fund raising events, he had that money at his home. We went with him to get it, and he brought a bag full of small change and dumped it on the pool table in his basement. We found over $200.00 there. I was shocked at the looseness of handling the ward money. I wondered out loud "How long could a man stay in business with this kind of management?" As we checked further we found an outstanding account with the Stake Welfare, for more than 5 years in the amount of $3,500.00. It was long past due from the Bp Hardy administration. We were urged to get this account paid as soon as possible. We also discovered the ward statistical and historical reports were more than two years behind. On top of it all, we were to build a new church house and be able to move in one year- if possible. As the "old Ensign ward house" was literally bulging with 2 large wards using it. The West Ensign had upwards of l400 members, and the East Ensign Ward had upwards of 1200 members. Both wards needed to be divided. There had not been a new building in this stake for over 40 years. The saints just did not realize what was about to happen and they would actually have to dig down. I should say here that the condition of the ward at the time I was appointed bishop was due to several circumstances. Bp. Hardy was called to a position in Washington DC and was released on short notice. Bp. A Palmer Holt, his 2nd councilor was called to be Bishop. He held on to the same people and hardly got his feet under the table when he was called to the Stake Presidency, only after one year as bishop.

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Bp A Stanton the former 1st councilor was called to be the Bp. He was a sick man afflicted with cancer. He struggled on leaving most of the details to his assistants and had to be excused a great dealdue to his physical condition. He was truly a great man dedicated to the work of the Lord. He was only able to serve 3 years. As a result, the ward sort of deteriorated, and the officers became discouraged. Plans for a new ward house had been in the process for about 5 years. A lot had been purchased on the corner of 9th Ave and K Street. The architect was Bp. Geo. Cannon Young, of the West Ensign Ward. Some funds had been raised and construction was to soon be started. Then someone though they should wait until things come down a little, but instead they just kept going up. So things were at a standstill. There was a building committee composed of 27 people, each with his own opinion. After two meetings I saw we were just spinning our wheels and not getting anywhere. We decided to release all of them and appoint a single chairman with two assistants. Brother Lyle B. Nicholes was appointed Chairman, with Archie McNeal and Sidney Chalker assistants with the bishopric as the committee. The church building committee appointed me as the building contractor to save a fee. We asked the architect for some changes and he flatly refused. So I fired him. Imagine, a fellow bishop. But we were just fed up with him telling us everything we had to do. The new architect was Ted Pope, and we have a fine building we are all proud of today. We released all the ward clerks and some of the leaders of the Auxiliary Organizations, that wanted to be released. The choice men I called as ward clerks I shall always be grateful to for their loyalty and devotion to their work, William L. Gittens, Goetleb Schneeble and Joseph Clark. What a great team they were. Sister Susie Winward was called as Relief Society President. I called her my 4th councilor! What a great blessing she was to me and to the ward. I will always be grateful to her. During this period of time it seemed my business was secondary. I didn't seem to worry about it. Deals just came to me and we prospered and were always busy. Our family was growing up fast. We did not dream that during this 10 year period they would all be gone on their own and we would be alone in our lovely home. August 28,1950, our sweet daughter Geraldine was married to Donald H. Nordberg. They were married in the Logan Temple and a beautiful wedding reception was held at the Salt Lake Country Club. They moved to Denver where Don was attending Dental Lab school. December 29,1952 our sweet daughter Lydia Marie and James O. Mason were married in the Salt Lake Temple. A beautiful reception was held in the Bonneville Stake Center. They stayed in the city until Jim graduated and then they moved to Baltimore for his internship. In 1953 our son, Gordon Nathaniel was called (drafted) to serve in the US Army, to give 2 years to his country. He was sent to Fort Ord Calif. for basic training and then shipped to Germany for the rest of his time. When he returned he was married to his sweetheart Joanne DeHaan in the Salt Lake Temple- October 28, 1955. Their reception was held in the Bonneville Stake Center. October 21, 1956, our son, Frederick Aikens was called to the Swiss Austrian Mission for 2 and 1/2 years. He returned in 1959, attended the University and married

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Claudia Maralyn Dewsnup- March 16, 1962- in the Salt Lake Temple. Their reception was in the Ensign 3rd Ward. After Fred left for his mission in 1956, we were practically alone in our home and our family was gone all too soon. But in a way we were closer to them than ever, absence make the heart grow fonder. I was ordained a Bishop, Feb.28 1953, by Elder Mark E.Peterson of the twelve. Together with my councilors: John H. Nicodemus and Harold T. Kitterman. It seemed the ward was about to fall apart before the reorganization and when it came it practically did. Everybody knew we had an assignment to build a church and everybody wanted out, as mentioned earlier. The next 30 days were hectic, we had to get the old click out. A complete reorganization was made. Some feelings were hurt, some vocal members sounded off. I knew the Lord was on my side and this was a very humbling time. The speed and the smoothness of the transition was amazing. We just let some of the "know it alls" set in their stew and wag their tongues. We went ahead like they were not there. In one month we had a ground breaking celebration which was what was needed to convince every one that we indeed were going to build a church. It seemed from that day on a spirit of cooperation started to take hold. The Bishopric from the West Ward treated us like we were some sort of a "step child" and everyone felt it. As a result, we worked hard to get the building far enough along so we could move into our own building. On the 22nd day of December 1953, Just 10 months after we took office we moved into the new building and held church in the cultural hall while they were still working on the rest of the building. In Feb. One year after, we held our first ward conference. What a thrill it was to be in our own home. What a revolution in spirit.

My Testimony
It is my testimony that the Lord works unto the children of men according to their faith. One of the great blessings of my Lifetime was to be numbered among a group of people who exercised great faith. Willing to make sacrifices and look to him for the blessings and then receive them in humility. This was the spirit that seemed to prevail during the time I served as bishop. I am grateful I was part of the worthwhile project of building a chapel. I shall always be grateful for the humble men who served as my counselors and clerks in the Bishopric. Their willingness and devotion made for perfect harmony and a bond of love that existed among us. Also the great men who served on the building committee were always closely associated with the Bishopric. I shall always be grateful for the auxiliary leaders and teachers for their love and devotion to their callings. Above all, I am deeply grateful for my wonderful sweetheart and family that supported me in this great assignment. Although my sweet wife Lydia had a long illness that was very discouraging for her, she always insisted that I go and do my duty. This period of time was for her a sacrifice, especially after our children married and moved away from home. With her husband gone on church duty or business most of the time, it made for many lonely hours. This together with her inability, due to illness, added to her discouragement. But she kept the home fires burning. A most wonderful mother end wife for which I will always cherish. Her faith in the work I was assigned to do and her great love never wavered through it all. Without her it would have been impossible to accomplish the work. This I humbly acknowledge that these promises were fulfilled with us as we united our efforts in a great assignment. I gratefully acknowledge His hand in all that was accomplished.

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Disappointments to this point in the building program were many. But, we adjusted to them.Along with the disillusions we had from the church building committee. We learned the hard way that everything was not as it seemed. All men are weak. We were told by the chairman of the building committee that we could have gas heat if the Mountain Fuel Gas Co. would approve our application. We applied and were approved for gas, and had an 8 inch line installed on the strength of the approval. Then, the church policy changed to coal heat, and all chapels were to have coal heat. The chairman of the building committee denied that he gave us permission to put in the gas. We were held up for 3 months. We went to everyone but President McKay. Finally we got to him and he said "let them have it". The presiding bishop called me down to his office and said the chairman just happened to remember that he did give us permission. I wanted to cry, I was so happy, and said "that is what I have been trying to tell him for the last 3 months!" I went home rejoicing, and the saints once again had confidence in me. Next- a pure case of conflict of interest. Our specifications called for a tapestry brick bldg. But bishop Carl Beiner of the PBO thought it would be good to have a Biener block building and had the blocks sent out instead. I said "send them back" and called the PBO and said "there was a mistake" and the presiding bishop this time called me and said the specifications had been changed to block. I objected on the basses of experience, but I was over ruled. The blocks were used and we had nothing but trouble with them. Cracks over every opening and continual painting required. I have never seen another block chapel in the church building program. But WE got stuck with them. The ward activity was the greatest in its history. Members literally swarmed over the building project. We led all the wards in the stake in auxiliary activities, a great spirit of cooperation came over the ward. The great amount of donated labor was amazing. Bro Sid Chalked did an outstanding job in directing the work and keeping track of the time. The building committee met every Wednesday evening; Lyle Nicholes chairman, A.K. McNeil sec., Sid Chalker, Work director, Art, Allen as building superintendent, together with the bishopric. Once every month a meeting of all the officers met for reports and to discuss new problems. They acted as a broad of directors, and this was the secret of our success. The construction was moving faster than the funds were coming in. A great fund raising program was instituted, which proved most successful. Each auxiliary and each priesthood quorum were assigned to put on a fund raising dinner and a program. Although we were all dealing with the same people, each organization had a different approach and more people became involved, and the spirit was most stimulating and rewarding. I here with wish to insert the results of those assignments. ~~~~~~~~~~

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Contributions from 1953 – 1955 for the East Ensign Ward
From the time the East Ensign Ward was first organized, plans for a new ward house were instituted in 1946. By the time I was called to be the Bishop in Feb. 1953 there had been a total of about $ 24,000 raised toward the new building. The following is a list of the activities. Contributions from 1953 to 1955 special events, Ward dinners, Concerts, Parties, Luncheons, Relief Society Bazar, Christmas Party 1953 Receipts Jan. $1,624.00 Feb. $6,568.00 Mar. $5,964.00 Apr. $4,933.00 May $2,283.00 June $4,536.00 July $2,330.00 Aug. $2,401.00 Sept. $1,506.00 Oct. $3,065.00 Nov. $10,284.00 Dec. $2,928.00 1954 Receipts Jan. $1,446.00 Feb. $12,457.00 Mar. $2,278.00 Apr. $2,374.00 May $1,976.00 June $2,907.00 July $4,028.00 Aug. $2,335.00 Sept $702.00 Oct. $2,276.00 Nov. $1,484.00 Dec. $3,274.00

Total receipts for special events in 1955 final drive Jan. $1,269.00 Ward Dinner Feb. $2,364.00 Ward Dinner Mar. $3,769.00 Ward Dinner Apr. $3,029.00 Ward Dinner In addition the ward members donated 11,255 hours of donated labor towards the construction of the building. Total cost complete with furnishings--$275,000.00. Paid for and dedicated June 19,1955, by President David O. McKay. ~~~~~~~~~~

Acknowledgement and Testimony
These things were made possible by faith in the promises. ' Most new bishops soon become apprehensive of the magnitude of the responsibilities thrust upon them and are anxious to learn and understand their duties; sometimes troubled by fear and uneasy moments. When this bishopric was installed, many ward leaders seemed to want out during the transition to the new administration. The great assignment of building a new ward house was high on the agenda as

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the first order of business. It was these circumstances that made the new bishopric the most humble men in the ward. After much fasting and prayer I sought a special blessing from the Apostle of the Lord who had ordained me a bishop. He was most gracious and kind and was understanding of my concern. He promised me that the grace of God is sufficient for all men that humble themselves before Him. That if I would humble myself before the Lord and have faith in Him that these things I had been assigned to do would be accomplished and 1 would be stronger unto them. (Whet a great promise! and a sacred moment.) The spirit of humility and faith soon spread throughout the ward - upwards of 1200 faithful souls. New people were called. Some said they were expecting it. Some said they were hoping they would be asked. Others said they were happy to be called, and some were surprised at who was called. Diamonds in the rough were discovered. With s little polish and the help of the spirit they soon took on a luster that was contagious and enthusiasm spread throughout the ward. It was a joy to behold. The promises were being fulfilled. All put their shoulder to the wheel and received the blessings of participating in a great cause. The beautiful chapel was completed and paid for in two years, then dedicated to the Lord. A lasting testimony to a humble and faithful people that gave all praise to the Lord. By Nathaniel A Smith ~~~~~~~~~~ The dedication service was a fitting climax for a united and dedicated people, to see a task completed and presented to the Lord by his living Prophets a gift from the saints of East Ensign was a thrill. President McKay was magnificent and his sweet wife. The building was over flowing, with P A system speakers installed in the halls, Junior Sunday School and Relief Society rooms. Estimated over 1000 in attendance. The choir, under the direction of Florance Allen was most impressive. The new pipe organ was thrilling. The spirit of the Lord was there in rich abundance and everyone felt to rejoice in the great accomplishment in such a short time. I felt a great assurance of love and confidence from the saints for the unity that existed among us.

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In the meantime my business was moving along slowly but surely, although I had 8 sales people, none of them seemed able to put a deal together without my help and I found myself doing most of the work and then splitting the deal with them. Not only that, but some of them were interfering in my own deals. I decided to close the office on 4th East and move to the basement of my home, and fire all the sales people. Some did not like it but it was the best thing I ever did to control my business. I had a good following and was doing fine. I had another telephone line installed and did away with the answering service. Lydia would take the calls when I was out and we prospered. During this time we had sent our son Fred on a mission and I was concerned about the uncertainty of the business to support him when a group of developers of the high avenues asked me to be their broker and change my Company name to the North Heights Realty. They offered me a salary of $500.00 per month a new office with a secretary and all equipment, also 50% of all the commissions. It seemed like an answer to my prayers and it was until some of the sons came in and usurped the authority, I could see that things could not go on. Eventually I sold out to them, except my brokerage. I learned again that a partnership is no good and you cannot trust everyone no matter what position in the church they may hold. After the completion of the ward building everything seemed to be going along without asking for money from the saints to meet deadlines, and I was determined to give them a rest from making heavy ward donations. When the Stake Presidency was reorganized, the new presidency wanted to start with a clean slate. They decided to pay off the stake farm. Of course, the only place they could go for the money was the bishops. They also wanted to stock the farm with registered black angus cattle as a stake project. So once again, we were hit for big donations for a stake assessment. Once again, the ward responded to the call. A minor incident happened that has always sorta stuck. A family moved into the ward, seemed well to do, were active and had teenagers M I A age. We needed a president for the Young Mens Mutual and felt impressed to ask him to take the job, but he turned me down. He said he had turned bigger jobs than that! I thanked him and told him, that was the biggest job I had at that time. Another incident of an unusual nature. The presidency of the Young Ladies M I A were not satisfied with the brother that was the president of the Young Mens. They came to me and said, that if I did not release him they would quit, and NOW! I told them I would release them and save them the trouble! that we don't work in the church with a club over our head. They were shook up some and said a stake board member had advised them to do that. They regretted their action. I told them as long as I was Bishop they should come to me with their problems, a rare experience! At last, the time had come to divide the East Ensign Ward, which now had over 1300 members. The name would be changed to the Ensign 3rd and Ensign 4th Wards. The boundary line would be 10th Ave., which meant the 3rd ward was South to 7th Ave and had a membership of approx. 800 members, and the 4th ward was north to the top of the hills with a membership of approx., 500 + It also meant that I would loose my first counselor and some of the other key officers in the ward. It was sorta like splitting my family. It was a sad day when we had to part, although we were meeting in the same building. It took some adjusting. Once again I was called to be the Bishop of the 3rd ward. I had served 4 years and thought I had done my job, but they said I was needed now more then ever, as the saints needed my strength. I called my former 2nd counselor, Harold T, Kittermen, to be my 1st counselor, and Henry W. Edwards, to be my 2nd counselor. I was fortunate to keep my clerks. Some of our auxiliaries were affected and had to be re-organized but we were soon going strong with full organizations. On the 23rd day of Jan. 1957, I was ordained the bishop of the Ensign 3rd Ward; with Harold T. Kitterman as first and Henry W. Edwards second, by Elder Marion G, Romney, of the council of the twelve. Both wards were now out of debt and a very good feeling existed between us. A very good

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friend and a fine man was called to be the Bishop of the 4th Ward, Bp. C. Clearence Neslen of the High Council. We always got along well together.

The Hay Flour Float
During the time we were rushing to build the new chapel, the walls were about up to the square, we got a request from the stake that the days of 47 committee were requesting a float from our stake to be in the parade on the 24th of July, and that our ward was selected to do it. It was unanimous by the high council action, we would receive a partial reimbursement for expenses. I said “why us?” and I felt indignant that we were being imposed upon with all our worries already. But my great son-in-law James 0. Mason ,husband of our daughter Marie, came to my rescue and said, “Dad let me take that off your hands! I will get some of the young people of the ward and we will build a float that will take 1st prize!”. What a blessing he was. The name of the float was the "Hay Flour", immigrating the saints to America. He generated the enthusiasm into the young people and the front of the church yard was transformed into a ship yard. Young and old swarmed over that project until it was completed in time for the parade. Of all the floats we were awarded 3rd prize. But, I will always say, “Ours was the best”. and my spirit and attitude was reassured again, which is to say, never get discouraged. Somebody will come along. ~~~~~~~~~~

(A Shocking Experience)
A ROTTEN APPLE CAN RUIN A BARREL FULL IF GIVEN ENOUGH TIME.
While serving as Bishop I was faced with a problem that I did not think could happen. I had never heard of it when I was a boy. The more I investigated the more shocking it became. In fact, we had a homosexual in our midst running loose as a great menace among our Aaronic Priesthood boys, under the guise of being a good church member. Several years older than the boys he was entertaining. (I will not mention any names for fear of hurting any family name involved, but merely want this experience to be recorded as a warning to all fathers of sons and bishops to beware. ) I became aware of this growing menace partly by accident. The missionary spirit was strong in the ward and all the young boys were looking forward to the day when they could go on a mission. As mentioned elsewhere in these memories, we had sent upwards of thirty missionaries during our tenure in office, and we felt we had the backing and full support of the membership for this great-program. When a boy became of missionary age he seemed to get the bug to go. Our Aaronic Priesthood leaders were doing an excellent job of preparing them for their call. This young man was eligible for the army and or a mission, due to his age. I learned that the army had rejected him, due to a cyst he claimed he had. He then approached me about a mission. He came from a good family, he was the last child. Both of his parents worked and all the other children were married. The boy was left to find his own way of entertainment and the entire basement of the house was his living quarters and amusement area without any supervision! He was a loner, with no friends his age, and he sought young innocent boys for companionship. He was a great persuader and put all kinds of ideas into their heads, even to the rebelling against their parents and the church leaders. He was

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likable, and almost persuaded me. But, he seemed at times to talk out of both sides of his mouth, which bothered me to some extent. I learned that he had as many as twelve little boys -Aaronic Priesthood age- meeting with him, in his secluded apartment to treat them and have some real bull sessions, as he called them. His parents were happy to keep him on a mission, or any where else, just to get him out of their hair, or so it seemed to me. They did not attend church regularly and he also was inactive and came only when he felt like it. I felt he needed some time to prepare himself and I started to encourage him. I had many long talks with him, to the point that he confided in me to the extent that he was loose with his morals. At this point, I had not suspected him to be a “Homo” but I counseled him to work hard to prepare himself for a mission. He kept after me to speed up the “call". The more he urged me, something told me to “let him wait a little longer”. Finally it came down to a “face to face” of the facts. When I asked him about his morals he began to brag about his experiences with different boys. When asked if he would give me their names, he not only said he would, but that he would testify in front of them, that he had relations with them. Then I received the shock of my life when he named twelve boys age 12 to 14 from the best families in the ward. I had to struggle to control my anger. Now I was utterly outraged and disgusted with this menace among our innocent boys, that he had contaminated for life. I told him I wanted to interview each of these boys. He bragged more and said he would back me up, in as much as to say it was “their” fault as well as his. I prayed mightily before I told my counselors more. We counseled together and decided we had to protect these families (as this could be a real scandal if it got out, and great harm would be done to many innocent people). We decided that to get to the bottom we would announce that a general interview with each boy in the ward would be held by the Bishop, and perhaps it would uncover some others. I started with the interviews, insuring them it was confidential. So far as I know, it is to this day. I started with these 12 boys named by their accuser and when asked about their morals and relations with a "homo" they all denied it. But when asked if they would still deny it if the person was brought in to meet them, they all confessed of the act, to the last boy. After each interview I got a little sicker and could hardly go on. I was thankful that through our first interviewing no other boy was involved. However, word got out that I was holding interviews with the boys and some of the parents were concerned what it "was all about”. I would always say that it was a “routine practice” for the bishop to do. Then I would ask them if they had ever asked their sons about their morals? Not one had ever done that! One irritated mother called me out of a bishops meeting and demanded to know what I was asking her boy and why. I told her that it was confidential, but, had she ever ask her son about his moral conduct? She excused herself and left. Of course the mission call was off for this young man and he was told in no uncertain terms. It seems that this type of person is possessed with an abundance of plain gall, and he kept on persisting. I reported this incident to the Stake President in all confidence(as I knew I was soon to be released as the bishop). I had a great concern for those 12 boys and what would happen to them. Now this is for the record. This young man persisted and was eventually sent on a mission, with the Stake Presidents blessing and the new Bishop’s. He was given a dishonorable release and sent home in less than a year. About half of the twelve boys were sent on missions. Some of them stuck it out, and some of them were sent home with a dishonorable release. Some of them left the church and some of the have never married and live the life of a hippy. They seem to be marked for life. This young man, that is the subject of this addendum ,finally married a fine girl but that did not last long. Now, he hates everyone, including the boys he dragged down with him. My heart aches for all of them. What a sad omen. The idle mind is the devil’s work shop and he made good use of this one. What about the proud parents with their high

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hopes and dreams for an outstanding son? It has to be bitter disappointment maybe you can answer that.

There may be a rotten apple in your neighborhood!
~~~~~~~~~~

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Chapter Seven

1960-1970
• • • • • • • • • Released as Bishop-after 8 years Lydia and I called to Salt Lake Temple Fred and Claudia’s Wedding Cherry’s Re-Marriage Sale of Old Homestead in Arizona Grand Children Brother-Wick Death Moved to East Mill Creek Area Home building, Appraising

After 8 years of intense activity and service as a bishop I was released on March 12, 1961, a little more than 8 years. It was a sad day, in a way, to leave the close association with those good people and not being called to do anything but a home teacher. My Dear wife, Lydia, was suffering from a depressed condition due to her health, and we were in a anti-social-state not wanting to be with others for some time. The adjustment for me was discouragement and more discouragement. .' A call to be ordinance workers in the Salt Lake Temple was a blessing. We served there for 2 years. Our youngest son, Frederick A. was married to a lovely ward member, Claudia M.Dewsnup. The reception was held in the ward relief society room, where all our old friends came to se us again. During the time I was bishop, I called and sent 30 full time missionaries, I conducted 4O funerals, and preformed numerous weddings, as well as visited the sick at the hospital almost every day on my way home, and I cherish those memories. Due to Lydia’s depressed condition we felt it wise to move to a new neighborhood and purchased a new home on Loran Heights Drive in the East Mill Creek area, after 17 years in the home at 724 Tenth Ave. We lived in this lovely new home for 9 years and then moved into the Graystone Condeminum at 1148 East 72nd South, where we are very comfortable, and all paid for! A good place to retire.

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1962 I became a staff appraiser for the Department of Highways for the State of Utah. Right of way acquisition. This was a great blessing for me and an opportunity for more learning and experience. To broaden my knowledge in the real estate I had already developed myself in through my brokerage and selling experience. I kept my brokerage on an in active bases but still in force, if and when I ever needed it again. The state sent me to the Utah State University, at Logan Utah, and paid for an appraisal course offered there. Sponsored by the American Institute of Appraisers on range grazing lands and cattle ranches. I was sent to the University of Utah to take a course #1 by the American Institute of Residential Appraising. Also, to the University of Utah by the Society of Real Estate Appraisers on residential and income property. Also at the U of U a course by the American Right of Way on acquisition and condemnation. This work I thoroughly enjoyed and also dealing with the people in behalf of the State in acquiring their property. I served as staff appraiser for 4 and 1/2 years and appraised property in 18 counties. I have written over 4OOO appraisals and appeared as a witness in court as a qualified witness, in many of the courts in the state. What a great experience and development for me. I was past the retirement age, but they kept me on one year over. I was having trouble with my prostrate and needed surgery so while still insured with the State I went to the hospital and had that taken care of. Now I wonder why I waited so long. After recuperating from my operation I became associated with a former State Appraiser and took work with people up and down the State, who felt they did not get a fair deal, and were suing for a fair market value. We were hired by the attorneys representing the property owners and had a great deal of success in this work. I made more than I had ever made before, and I was a free agent. This was another great experience, to work with attorneys and with the courts. My hearing had been failing me for some time and finally I concluded it wise not to take any more court work, so I just continued on as an independent fee appraiser. While I was with the state I had a record of having more appraisals approved and settled out of court than any other staff appraiser at that time. The qualifications to appraise for the Bureau of Public Roads was very rigid, strict procedures and documentation had to be followed. As a result it developed me into a complete appraiser. As a result I was assigned to big projects with many facets and angles to consider to arrive at the fair market value. My work became known among the Dairy Men Association and received requests to appraise large dairy operations, in Lyman Wyoming, Burley Idaho and Driggs Idaho. Also a large dairy in Smithfield Utah and Mt. Pleasant Utah. I was also assigned to do large Hotel-motel operations, which I considered a compliment to my work.

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During this period of time tragedy came to the home of my dear brother, John C. Smith, who lived in LaVerne, California. He had not been well for some time and we were all very concerned about his health. When all of a sudden his dear wife Sally collapsed and passed away almost without notice, and left him practically bed ridden. We buried his wife Sally in March 196l, in a beautiful spot near their home in California , all the living brothers and sisters attended the sad occasion. I was called on to be one of the speakers, as well as my brother Wickliffe. It was hard for us to leave our dear brother John, but his daughters and son were near and would give him more than any of us. Then in July 1961, just 4 months after Sally died ,our brother John, passed away and joined her on the other side. Again we all met to hold another beautiful funeral service Once again I was one of the speakers and a great crowd came to pay their respect to a wonderful family. We all felt the Lord was good to him, not to let him suffer any more in his terrible physical condition. He followed his older brother Walter on the other side, and is the 2nd in our family of children to go. Our thoughts and prayers were always with our children and even more so when they moved away from us. We wanted so much to see them happy and successful. Our dear daughter, Cherry, was always so anxious and proud of her family and wanted her marriage to be a success. After their marriage, they went away to school for her husband, and then in the army. He began to lose interest in his family and became untrue to her and broke the covenants he made with the Lord. Finally, he asked for a divorce, so he could marry another woman. This was a horrible experience for our dear Cherry and this nearly did her up. She loved him so much and now they had two sweet children Cathy, and Linda Marie. We were all heartbroken, but our son in law would not have it any other way, and they were divorced. The church excommunicated Harry Donald Nordberg from the church for adultery. A disgrace to his fine family, let alone his children. I shall never forget when I flew to Fort Smith Ark. to get Cherry and her children, and

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see my dear daughter literally kicked out. She was almost in hysterics and near a nervous breakdown. We rented a U-haul trailer and loaded it with all her belongings. I had the sad task of bringing my sweet Cherry, broken hearted, and her two sweet children home to our home in Salt Lake City. We concluded, she was much to good for him. Now, somehow she must start over again. But, she was concerned she would be a burden on us. It was never that way! She was still our daughter and we would not let her down, as she needed us more than ever and we tried hard to make her feel secure again. All through out this ordeal she was true to her covenants and gospel teachings. She was active in the church where ever she went and this was her salvation and strength to stand it all. We enjoyed having our dear Cherry and her sweet children home with us for a short time. She worked hard to get rehabilitated and was active in the ward where I was Bishop. She worried about being a burden to us and was wanting to get on her own again. In the meantime she met a fine man, and an old neighbor from childhood days, John P. Sanders. He was home at the time from dental school. He became in love with her and wanted to marry her with the children. It was finally decided that they would marry and we would keep the girls while she went with him back to Chicago to finish his schooling. When he finished, they came home and he had to serve his country 2 years, so he joined the Air Force. He was sent to Vandenberg Air Base near Lompoc, Calif. After 2 years, now doctor John P. Sanders, opened his office in the city of Lompoc, and established a very successful practice. Our daughter bore him 4 beautiful daughters,Cynthia, Carolee, Stephanie, and Allison. Now she had 6 lovely daughters, and what a joy they have been. She went on to be a great leader in the Lompoc Ward and the Santa Marie Stake, until she was stricken with the dread disease cancer. She was taken from us on November 2,1972. It nearly tore our hearts out to see her leave a beautiful family, and all of us. But, we consoled in the thoughts she had lived up to the full measure of her creation and was a worthy and honorable child all her life. We were most proud of her and her family. All of her brothers and sister and parents were at her most touching funeral. She was the first of my children to pass on. No one knows how it pulls your heart strings until you have the experience.

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THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
EAST ENSIGN WARD BISHOPRIC
ENSIGN STAKE

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

January 8, 1960 Bishop N. A. Smith Ensign 3rd Ward Salt Lake City, Utah Dear Bishop Smith: I would like to apply at this time for clearance to obtain a Temple Recommend, due to my recent divorce from Dr. Harry Donald Nordberg. The reason for my divorce from Dr. Nordberg, was he proved himself to he immoral, and was affiliating himself with women for sometime. When he went so far as to bring this one woman into our home, declaring his love and desire to marry her, and the next day the police reported to me that my husband and Mrs. Helen Freeman were found indecent I proceeded to take action for divorce on the grounds of immorality. Our Branch President, Jay L. Kirby, Ft. Smith, Arkansas, and our Mission President S. R. Carpenter, Central States Mission, took up his case end upon their findings he was excommunicated from the Church in June 1959. All during my married life I have been active in the Church, it has meant a great deal to me; during this trial- It has been the source of great strength that has held me together. I fulfilled my requirements for my Golden Gleaner Award during the years away from home, and this has been a cherished honor for me. I am at the present time living the standards of the church and striving to teach my two children the same. I would be most grateful for the privilege to go back into the house of the Lord to do Temple work once again. I am requesting your kind consideration in this case, I would like to apply also at this time, for a Temple Annulment. I have all the documentation verifying these facts if they are requested. Our Civil divorce was final December 13, however, Harry has been married for sometime prior to that date, and is now living in New Mexico. I will always be grateful and thankful to you for your help and guidance that you have been to me during this hard time. Sincerely yours, Geraldine (Cherry) Nordberg

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THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
EAST ENSIGN WARD BISHOPRIC
ENSIGN STAKE

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

January 16, I960 President Arza Hinckley 618 12th Avenue Salt Late City, Utah Dear President Hinckley, Enclosed is an application of my daughter Geraldine Smith Nordberg, who is seeking an annulment from her former husband Dr. Harry Donald Nordberg, who was excommunicated from the church in June 1959, and who has violated all the sacred covenants and vows in the Temple he made. He ridiculed and mocked the temple ordinances and made light publicly of all the sacred things he promised. To my knowledge he has abused everything that is sacred and I feel strongly that he is not worthy of his children or his wife, and I endorse her request for a Temple Annulment. My daughter has striven to keep close to the Church and to teach and rear her children likewise. I’m confident she is worthy of the request she is making. I trust you will be able to render all assistance possible. May the inspiration of the Lord continue with you. Sincerely yours, Bishop N. A. Smith Ensign 3rd Ward NAS:cn Enclosure

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A Letter to Dr. H.D. Nordberg
September 2, 1958 Dr. H. D. Nordberg 3621 Morris Drive Ft. Smith. Arkansas Dear Don: It has become my duty over the last six years to council with the troubled and comfort the bereaved, and bless those that mourn, and lend the hand of fellowship to all those in distress. It is with the love I have for you and your family that I hope you will accept a little straight council from me and I trust you'll accept it in the spirit I give it, and, I hope you read this letter many times before you discard it. I feel it my right and my duty to warn you concerning your marriage and the great danger that lies ahead if it continues to be a tug of war and pulling apart and going to pieces. Don, your marriage concerns too many people for us to stand and see it break up without examining the values and looking at the facts and doing what we can to save it. We all, at home, have a great interest in your success and happiness. I will never forget that night you came to our store in Murray, to ask me for the hand of my daughter, and how you vowed that you loved her. I was proud that you were man enough to come forth and ask me for her, and I have been proud of you ever since with all your accomplishments, and to be associated with your fine parents and family, a real pleasure, I'm sure. But when my daughter came home last month grief stricken and broken hearted, so broken hearted that she was near a nervous breakdown, and still is, I thought it just couldn't be. Don, marriage is a momentous investment. In fact the greatest investment in our lives. The investment of ourselves and all that we are, and all of the future of our families and children is at stake. In marriage one cannot consider himself only, but must consider the total effect of all he does, the whole influence of all that he is on himself and all others involved. Marriage is not a matter of merely passing pleasure, but must be of enduring stability, built on character and consideration. There must be much understanding and much reasoning. There are some indispensable elements that should not be left out of the making of any marriage and some foremost among them are, trust, confidence, patience, faith and kindness, encouragement and common values and convictions, and an understanding heart, and of course, love. But love likely won't live long without these other indispensable elements. But, it will surely come if these elements are present. Duty isn't a word that is always quite comfortable or convenient, but the free and easy making of marriage and the free and easy undoing of it by divorce suggests for all concerned- the children, the community, the family and friends - for yourselves an eternal future and self respect and quiet conscience - that I feel I should say something about the simple doing of duty. There is a duty to the contract made. There is a duty to the covenants made. There is a duty to the obligations made. and as Richard Evans, one of our great Apostles says:

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"Happiness is not a thing of self, or self willed selfishness, or of mere pleasure, or personal convenience, or passing preference, but is a by-product of doing what we ought to do, and of being what we ought to be - and aside from all the other essentials, every marriage needs the simple, sincere doing of duty for stability, for respect, and for happiness at home." Marriage is a commitment of all that we are, and in your case solemnized in the Holy Temple of the Lord. Don, I know that deep down in your heart you have a testimony of the Gospel. To turn away from it, taking off your Holy Garments, is choosing the wrong path - it is letting satan step in and do his destructive work. I would warn you, in all earnestness to turn back and wear your garments again, honor your Priesthood, go to Church with your family and accept some kind of an assignment, even if it is small, it will gradually awaken the great factor that your soul needs at the present time, namely spirituality. You know how much time and effort and study it took to become a dentist. So it is with the plan of Life and Salvation. The church of Jesus Christ offers us the most perfect plan for success and happiness, throughout our lives. But it requires a lot of reading and study, and we must go to a great effort to learn and understand. If you and Cherry will just start to read and study and discuss the different subjects together you both shall gain a knowledge and strength that will build for true happiness and love and harmony in your home. It will let the Spirit of God enter in your home. It is said “A family that eats together, plays together and prays together, stays together," In a few days you will receive a book called, "Gospel Ideals" by President McKay, also "The Improvement Era". It is just full of rich inspirational teachings. It comes once a month. I'm sure both of you can find time to read its wonderful contents. It will give you a lot of courage to do what is right. We just must read and study. We cannot be saved in ignorance, and besides that, the devil will have no power to tempt you or break up your home* The Lord has said, "Behold I set before you this day a blessing and a curse, A blessing if you obey the commandments of the Lord your God, and a curse if ye will not obey the commandments of the Lord your God, but turn aside out of the way which I have commanded you this day." Deut.11 - 26. Don, you must "do all in your power (both of you) to prevent a divorce - a great tragedy which would bring untold heartache, grief, sorrow and regret and disgrace to so many. I sincerely urge you to go to a Marriage Counselor with Cherry or your Stake President, and accept of their council with an open mind. In times as such we must seek council from great men, men of great knowledge and wisdom* The Lord has made it very clean many times, the fate of one who would leave his wife for another, I would warn you of that fate, I'm sure you know what I mean. Blessed is the principal of repentance, the Lord always forgives upon evidence of sincere repentance, but not for just saying "I'm sorry", but to turn away from what you should not do. Ask God in all sincerity to forgive you - and don't be too proud to ask your wife to forgive you for all the deep sorrow and heartache and mental torture you have inflicted upon her. Don, we are fasting and praying for you and your sweet family and hope that somehow the Lord will help you to remove the barrier that seems to have come between you and your wife. I have written you as I would my own son, and I feel very deeply about this serious problem of yours and want to stand by you and council with you both. I have no hard feelings towards you, but pray to God that your eyes and heart may see and understand before it is too late. Sincerely yours, Nathaniel A. Smith

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The last letter I wrote Cherry before she passed away.
Sept. 23 1972 My Dearest Cherry; You are in my thoughts and prayers constantly. Your phone call last night lifted my spirit to the sky. You have always been very special to us in the family and have the distinction as the oldest child. You have always seemed to sense the responsibility of the oldest and have shown such a keen interest in the welfare of your brothers and sister, as well as your mother and me. Your love and devotion has rewarded us many times over for anything we have done for you. Your generosity and thoughtful little expressions of love is evident in the many little mementoes you have placed in our home, which reminds us of you where ever we look! We are proud of you and love you so much. Your love for your own lovely family of beautiful girls and the constant guidance and example of you and your dear husband, is a joy to behold. The Lord is pleased with your efforts and accomplishments. Although you have been away most of the last 25 years, you seemed close because you were in our thoughts more than ever. I suppose absence makes the heart grow fonder. Your trials and sorrows have been shared by us, as though they were a part of us, and you have come through them all. You will come through this one nobler and better than ever. It seems you have always been ahead of us. You seem to be able to accomplish the work of ten! I have always craved to be in your company and council with you. I could not ask for a better daughter. To see you stricken with this dread disease almost tears my heart out, but Im sure the Lord controls your destiny. You are in His Hands and have nothing to fear or regret. We have to accept his will. I’m so thankful your dear mother is able to be with you at this time, to strengthen you with her great love and concern for you. She is a good nurse, an excellent cook and knows how to combine that with the loving tender care you need to get you well. She is true, loyal and genuine through and through. I love her too, you are in good hands. I was so thrilled to get the promising news from you last night regarding the treatments you are getting. I feel you were guided to this place you have certainly done every thing possible within your power. If all goes well I plan to come down the first week in October. I plan to drive down through Bakersfield and avoid the freeways. Be assured you have our prayers for your recovery, Be of good courage and fear not. The Lord is mindful of you, and will not fail you. God Bless you, Your loving dad

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THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 24th Ward, Salt Lake State October 8,1944,Salt Lake City, Utah, Blessing Given by John C. Smith upon the head of Geraldine Smith, daughter of Nathaniel A. Smith. Born October 24, 1929, at Salt Lake City, Utah. Geraldine Smith: My Dear Niece: I place my hands upon your head and by virtue of the Holy Priesthood of our Father seal upon thee, thy Patriarchal Blessing. Our Father in Heaven is proud of the accomplishments of thy hands and he is conscious of the righteous intent of thy heart. You lived righteously in the presence of your brothers and sisters of the spirit world and you came to Earth clothed with a desire and a conscious urge to do everything necessary in this life for your exaltation in the life to come. You were privileged to be born under the choicest of circumstances, and out of the millions who inhabit and have inhabited this Earth it is your privilege to be born and reared under the Covenant and inspiration of the Priesthood of our Father. Not only do you have these blessings, but you ware born unto a family which have been instrumental in the lord thru the righteousness of their lives of greatly assisting in the restoration of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and of upholding and sustaining the purposes of God in the Earth. Many of this family have been valiant in the cause of truth and one of your cousins has accomplished more good in the Earth than any other being who ever lived on this Earth, save Christ himself, and he, the Prophet Joseph is a pure Ephriamite, and he is your kinsman. You also belong to this royal line. This is your heritage. These are your blessings in the Lord. Ponder them in your heart. Be conscious of your worth to the Church in the Earth. Realize always that you are here for a purpose and the blessings of your parentage will sustain you and will assist you in fulfilling your life's mission honorably before the Lord and your fellowmen. The church has need of your talent and of your integrity and she will call heavily upon you as a leader in the Auxiliaries of your Church, you will have the privilege of proving your worth and your faith in the testimony which you have of its truth. I rebuke the power of the destroyer and would recommend that you be very conscious of his power. Agree with him quickly and keep your thoughts on the divine purpose of your mission in the Earth. He is cunning and will deceive you, even pride and discouragement and jealousy and gossip are tools of his with which do weaken us that he might the better got hold of us and lead us down to destruction. Our Father has placed over to guard you and direct you an angel of light and you have felt that presence. You have felt the comfort of its arm in moments of sorrow. You have felt the lift of its hand in moments of joy. Counsel with it and let it lead you in the way of righteousness and when you seen to be on the wrong path, ask it to lead you again to the light and I promise you in the name of Jesus that the power of darkness shall never thwart your purpose in the Earth. You have a keen sense of discernment. You are quick to apprehend. You have the gift of friendliness and of wisdom in the understanding of the spirit and these talents and these gifts will sustain you as you consciously recognize and add to them, thru them the choicest blessings of the Earth will be yours. You will recognize the commandments. You will find Joy in keeping all of them. The good things of life will be your portion in the earth. You shall never want for the necessities, and by the spirit and the promise in prayer you shall know when you meet your companion for life and for the life hereafter. You shall be blessed with the strength of his love and with the strength of the love of your children.

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And though you may see much sin in the Earth, you shall be spared many of the sorrows common to man and the light of the Gospel will give you the joy which will lead you on triumphant in the Earth. And you and your posterity, thru integrity and faith will strengthen the Church in the Earth and bring blessings to many outside the Church. I seal you up unto a resurrection on the morning of the First Resurrection and promise you that there will be a place of distinction with your loved ones in the kingdom of our Father. Be fearless, and go to with your might, and those will be your blessings. I seal them upon your head in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, Amen. Approved by .(s) JOHN C. SMITH

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Special Priesthood Blessing for Geraldine
SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA JULY 30, 1972 Sister Geraldine Smith Sanders, at your request and through the Priesthood I bear, I give you this special Blessing. Dear sister, the word of the Lord unto you is that you be unafraid. His benediction is upon you. His peace is upon you. He is aware of the things that you are called upon to face. He is aware of the great value of your soul. He is aware of the problems that face those you love and associate with. I bless you at this time that this peace and this serenity will fall upon you as a mantle. I bless you that instead of being one who people will feel sorry for that you will be one who does great good. They will see you, they will realize that you have problems but they will be influenced so very much for good by the serenity and peace and confidence that you have, Now, Sister Sanders, it is not our prerogative to pronounce life or death but I bless you bless you that you will have useful years ahead of you. I bless you, or rather I say unto you that, your work is not yet finished here. Therefore, the things that you have to face, face with patience. This is something that came upon you not because of any evil that you have done or not because of any wrong you have done. It has come upon you because the Lord chose this means to temper your soul, and if you face it in the right way every reward and every blessing that God has will be yours as a result of this. Therefore, again I say unto you to be at peace with the world and be at peace with your maker. You see, dear sister, the lord has accepted the sacrifices that you have made. They have not gone unnoticed before Him and rather than any chastisement, this thing came to you in a form of a blessing even though you do not see or understand the full import of it at the present time. Now, Sister Sanders, you have been blessed by the Priesthood and this blessing is valid and this blessing is good. In the future do not be afraid to have this blessing pronounced upon you again, because just as sure as you live, the fullness of your life has not been reached. Much more than the medical powers that are in the world at the present time, the Priesthood will be the thing that will prolong your life and help you face this situation that you have and it will help you do the great good that you will yet be able to do. I say unto you do not feel that you must draw apart from your assignments. The lord will open a way so that you can fulfill these assignments and so that it will not be necessary for you to ask to be released from any of these responsibilities. The Lord will open the way so that when the time comes for this release it will come in a normal and a natural and a good way. You will know that what you have done has been pleasing and acceptable unto the Lord. I bless you that your joy with your family will be full, I bless you that, your children will rally around you end support you and help you. I bless you that your husband will he a power of strength unto you and on the other hand I bless you that you will be an influence and a force that will draw your family together closer than they have ever been before. Sister Sanders, the Lord is will pleased with you. Therefore go forth with faith in your heart, with courage in your heart, with a smile on your countenance and realize that you have work yet to do. I seal this blessing upon you through the Priesthood I bear and I do it in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.

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Her Last Great Adventure
by John Sanders
As was said of her cousin, Joseph Smith Jr., "He lived great and he died great in the eyes of God and his people." These words are applicable to Cherry Smith Sanders, one of God's true servants, here was a girl you had to know to believe. Her capabilities and talents were many. Though not without fault--she knew what these faults were--and strove earnestly all the days that I lived with her to overcome them. She had the vision of her work and callings and was always out in front with a less than slight impatience with those who would not or could not follow her lead. To some this may or may not have been a virtue. Her knack was in getting others so stimulated one way or another that they had to act. (I was known to rebel once or twice). Cherry's last Great Adventure really began two years ago this coming April. I remember well that Sunday eve. I was assigned to speak in Lompoc II Ward. Cherry having entered the hospital earlier that afternoon had one of the girls tape my talk so she could hear it, what a support she was to me, always her family first in her thoughts. Then the following day the awful telephone call from Dr. Elam-Malignancy--we will have to do a radical mastectomy. What a blow to all of us and especially dear Cherry. I tried to comfort her as she came out of the anesthesia. The pathologist's report was ominous. Lymph node involvement, the cancer had spread, but to what extent was unknown. There followed weeks of tests and scannings at Santa Barbara radiation center. It was decided not to do any radiation therapy. We were buoyed with hoped. Cherry, though in much pain from the recent surgery, accompanied me to the State Dental Convention at Anaheim Center. You cannot believe the bravery of this girl during these apprehensive months, she never once slackened from her home, church or civic responsibilities. She was Ward Relief Society President at this time. Brought the attendance up to all time highs. Looking back over her old calendars almost every day is outlined with civic, church or other duties. What a true champion she was-she gave life everything she had. These were trying months for all of us. The sickness of worry and fear were not apparent as Cherry was chorister each Sunday morning--she was the best. She delighted in helping the down and outer or the inactive. Many people became active in the church through her efforts. People knew she had cancer but could not feel sorry for her, because she radiated hope and courage and had the faith that all would be well. She nursed the sick and gave hope to the cancer victims. In May 1972, her pain became worse--and a recurrent lesion was removed from the chest wall, followed a few weeks later by a partial hysterectomy. This was the beginning of the end. June, saw Cherry at Conference in Salt Lake City for she had been called to be President of the YWMIA in Santa Maria Stake, another great challenge accepted and carried out with tremendous zeal. Her Gold & Green Ball was outstanding; she organized the Stake people for the Music Festival in Los Angeles Sport's Arena. We all watched in amazement and she never shirked or felt sorry for herself. I'm sure she knew or felt her time was ebbing away, and life became a most valuable commodity, not to be wasted in sleep or small things. Her condition worsened through July and August. She spent some time In S.L.C. with the naturepath treatment, but returned to Lompoc with her Mother, and then we--determined to seek Laetrile Treatment in Mexico, but that dear girl first wanted me to have a new office. She couldn't get me to move to new quarters so she spent a great deal of time directing the remodeling of my present office. Her ideas were great though I could not see some of them at the time—she could see the finished product and knew what was right. The new section is great and I'm so grateful to her for it. We left for Mexico on September 20, 1972, a beautiful Thursday morning. We stopped for lunch at San Juan Capistrano and Cherry did some shopping for the little girls, as always she was thinking first of 1960-1970 103

her family. We reached the Nieman's home in Chula Vista early in the afternoon--Uncle Gil and Aunt Virginia had offered to let us stay in their home during the time Cherry was being treated in Mexico. She was examined that afternoon and evening by Dr.Contreras and staff in the Hospital Del Mar, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. We heard many stories of hope from cancer victims who had or were receiving treatment there. I stayed with Cherry through the weekend making the trip to Hospital Del Mar three times with her and her dear Mother. We were hopeful but knew that only a miracle drug and help from God could save her now. Each day we had family prayer with Gil and Virginia and administered to Cherry. The faith and stamina of the girl was something to behold. When the time came for my flight to Santa Maria on Monday, Lydia and Virginia had not returned yet to drive me to the airport. Dear Cherry insisted on taking me, and sick as she was, never complained about doing it. Cherry seemed to hold her own, until the next Saturday she insisted upon doing the driving each day through Tijuana to the Hospital by the ocean (it was a beautiful spot). Saturday night, Gil called me about coming down, he said Lydia was under tremendous strain and I was needed. Cathy and I left early Sunday morning-arrived about 11 a.m. It was difficult to hold back the tears when I saw poor Cherry. She had lost so much weight and was very weak. I held her hand and wept as I thought or her years of service to me and the girls. .. She had given her all to living, and doing for us. Thoughts flooded through my mind. She won't be here for the marriage of any of her daughters. What will we do without her? At 12 noon a God send pulled up at the front door. Dear, wonderful Maida Spjut, Cherry's long time friend and counselor was here in her most critical hour of need. Words are not enough to express the love and appreciation we have for Maida, and the great service she rendered to all of us during the next week. She was constantly with Cherry during those few days she was hospitalized in Mexico. I returned on Wednesday, October 4, and relieved Maida at the hospital the next day. Maida's courage and spirit was a great sustaining power to all of us. She lived every minute at the hospital helpings others as well as Cherry. Cherry's doctors in Lompoc advised us to return her to Lompoc Hospital where they would continue the treatments. Grant Cannon, Cathy and Linda brought the Winnebago down on Saturday morning so we could make Cherry as comfortable as possible on the trip back to Lompoc. My dear cousin Bruce and Barbara Ballard came down to help us out of the hospital. Bruce talked with the doctors to make sure of her condition and then advised us no transfusion would be necessary. Maida, Linda, Cherry and myself made it to Lompoc Hospital by 9 p.m. Saturday evening. Cherry rallied somewhat for a few days. She was eating a little better and getting up sometimes to walk a little bit. Dr. Elam advised us to take her home for a day on a pass, we did this on October 21st, a Saturday. Soon after we got home Jasmine Lou and Winnie arrived from Los Angeles. They could not hold back the tears as her beautiful daughters sang "Where Love Is" to their dying Mother. (Uncle Lou is himself a victim of cancer and we are praying for his recovery). What a touching scene this was as Cherry said to Uncle Lou, "it's beat me." But still she would not give up the fight and we were all determined to see her through, counting still on a miracle to save her. The anguish and suffering of Cherry and all of us during the next two weeks is hard to describe. It was of course particularly hard on her dear Mother and Father. They were stalwart and helped us so very much. The children and myself owe them a great debt of gratitude. We prayed for our Cherry, around her bedside, and a particularly poignant and touching administration was given to her by Clayton Call our great friend and counselor. After that we went into the hall and wept for several minutes. "There will never be another Cherry," he said, "we all loved her." At Dr. Elam's urging, I reluctantly allowed them to return her to the hospital on November 1st. He called me at four a.m. the next morning. "Cherry has finished her battle," a courageous woman to the end.

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Volume 34

November 1972

No. 11

Seventh Member of the John Bushman Family Dies Within a Year
Cherry Smith Sanders, oldest daughter of Nathaniel A. and Lydia Smith of Salt Lake City, Utah(and granddaughter of Lois E.B. Smith) passed away at her home at 175 Oakmont, Lompoc, California 93436 on November 2, 1972. Funeral services were held in Lompoc 2nd ward on Saturday, November 4, with Bishop Dick Dixon officiating, besides her parents, she is survived by her husband, Dr. John P. Sanders, and six daughters, Cathy, Linda, Cynthia, Carolee, Stephanie and Allison all of Lompoc. Also she is survived by one sister, Lydia Marie (Mrs.James O.Mason), Gordon N. and Frederick Smith all of Salt Lake City. Cherry was born in Salt Lake City 24 October, 1929, She received her schooling in the city schools. She has resided in Lompoc since 1960. The following list of positions she held are strong evidence of her outstanding leadership ability and activity in the church and community: Santa Maria Stake Primary President, Stake YWMIA President, member of the Stake Music Committee, Lompoc 2nd Ward Relief Society President, Sunday School music director, President of the Lompoc Republican Club, President of the Alpha Club, Chairman of the Dental Wives Association, and coordinator for the Junior Alpha Club. All her family were present for the services. Other relatives there are mentioned in the Lois B. Smith Family News. The following is taken from a very much appreciated letter written to your editor by Cherry’s father, Cousin Nat Smith: "Your sweet letter just arrived in time as we are planning to return home in the morning. Lydia has been with our dear Cherry since June - and now we go home with a heavy heart. Cherry was such a sweetheart, so thoughtful of her family and friends, she could never do enough for us. To see her destroyed by this terrible cancer in such a short time almost tore our hearts out. the love and respect the people of Lompoc had for her was a sight to behold, everyone wanted to help with,food and service of all kinds. The last ten days she was so bad they felt she would be better off at home. Also, it would help the little girls to adjust to the situation a little better. All the neighbors took turns sitting with her all night and all day. She was a friend to everyone - church members and non-members alike. Little boys and girls would come to inquire how she was. An estimated 700 persons or over attended her funeral including civic leaders, the mayor, city councilman members, school leaders, several ministers and many non-members, the service was beautiful and touching. At the conclusion a non-member was heard to say, "There is such a peace and calm present here." The greatest tribute of all in my opinion was that the entire congregation followed her to her last resting place. They seemed to want to be with her to the end. The procession was more than three blocks long, and the largest crowd assembled at a graveside I have ever witnessed. It was all so overwhelming. Some one said, "She was no ordinary girl". We were proud of such a noble daughter."

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A Very Sacred Experience
A MANIFESTATION
December 7, 1973 - a memorable day. Our granddaughter, Cathy Dawn Nordberg, received her endowment in the Salt Lake Temple prior to her marriage to Tracy Eliason, After solemn prayer and supplication to the Lord in meditation in the creation room in the temple, while waiting, I was assured of the presence of our dear Cherry, now departed from us since November 4,1972. I felt her presence so strongly I supplicated the Lord that if it be His will that somehow her presence would be manifest to us. The session was delayed due to the large number of brides going through. Everyone was in, the doors closed, waiting with three empty seats in the ladies section across the aisle from me - still waiting - a worker asked if Lydia Smith was in the room. I responded that she was with the brides. - More waiting - Lydia, Cathy, and Maida Spjuit, a dear and close friend of Cherry's who felt impressed to be with Cathy on that special day, had not arrived. All was quiet. Finally, the door opened. I turned to look - first came Lydia, then Cathy, then Maida. She appeared to look like Cherry. I was a little stunned. They took the three reserved vacant seats across from me. After they were seated they all looked to see if they could see me. After they located me they all smiled and I saw Cherry in the face of Maida. They turned their faces to the front and I knew I had seen Cherry. She was happy and approving this event and that her dear true friend Maida was standing in her place with Cathy and her grandmother Lydia. The men preceded the sisters to the garden room. I did not see their faces again until the company moved out to the world room when again I saw Cherry in the face of Maida smiling as usual- - -again in the celestial room – near the center - directly across from where I was sitting but in two seats from the aisle they were seated with Maida nearest to me. I could not see them too well due to a sister in the outside seat, but after she was called up I had a full view of their profile, with Maida nearest to me. I could not remove my eyes because it was the profile of Cherry -- sure as sure. My whole being thrilled. I was one of the last to go through the veil - where I found Lydia, Maida, Cathy and Tracy in a huddle. Maida was telling them she was sure Cherry was there because she felt her presence so strongly that she was actually looking for her somewhere in the temple. Cathy said twice when she looked at Maida, she thought she saw her mother, and when I arrived not knowing what they had been saying, I announced I had a wonderful experience, that I had seen Cherry three times in Maida's face and I was sure Cherry wanted her there to stand in for her. Maida said "see Cathy, I told you she was here." We all wept with joy. by Grandfather Nathaniel A. Smith

From Maida Spuit, a dear and close friend of CherryIt's almost too sacred to write, but I must share with you the experience I had when going through the Salt Lake Temple with Cherry's Cathy when she received her endowments. There were only Cherry's parents, Cathy, Tracy, and I. I had dashed to get there, such a busy day, and I tried to explain the important things Cathy would need to remember as we went from room to room. Suddenly, in the garden room I began to actually look for Cherry because I felt her there. I hadn't even thought about her presence being with us- I was so busy with Christmas etc. and had dashed so fast to get there. In the next room it became such a strong influence I squeezed Cathy's hand and told her and Lydia that I kept feeling I might see Cherry, for I was certain she was there. I helped

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Cathy throughout the session as I knew Cherry would have done. After we went threw the veil- I found them all waiting. Cherry's father threw his arms-about me then said to Cathy-"I need to testify to you what has happened here tonight. Four times I saw Cherry -Maida had Cherry's face 4 different times and she looked at me and smiled. (I myself had not looked at him even once- I had turned to find him but never could, since it was a very large session.) He saw Cherry first in the garden room (when I first felt her presence.) Then Cathy said-"Aunt Maida, I looked at you twice when you smiled at me and you looked exactly like my mother, but I thought I was imagining it." Like I said- it is almost too sacred to write and I can't even think of it without shedding tears—only of joy, of course because.-now I know she still exists and that surely our church is of God. Cherry was there in the temple with her daughter. Another unexplainable fact. They always let only 1 go through with someone getting their first endowment- the matron told us that and suddenly a man in white stepped forward and said "I feel that these two should not "be separated(meaning Cathy and I) so they pinned a purple ticket on me to accompany her. I thanked them and told them I was representing her mother who had passed away last year. I know now I truly was representing Cherry- for I was Cherry there in the temple. What a testimony! So I had to share it with others who knew Cherry as I did. Much Love To You, Maida Dear Cathy and Tracy, We were so pleased to get your letter, it had the ring of busy and happy people. We are so happy for you and that you are involved in the church which is the greatest scarce we know to keep happy. It was good to talk with you on the phone. It seems there is always so much to say that you always forget something. I wanted to ask if you had received a copy of the letter Maida sent to John about our temple experience. At any rate, since John sent us a copy I’m enclosing one for you along with a copy of my version of what happened to me on that eventful day. I felt you should have these copies to keep as a record of a very sacred experience and a testimony of the divinity of the plan of life here and hereafter, and as to the nearness of your dear mother - not only to you but to all your sweet little sisters. It is also a reminder that she is a constant guardian angel to always be mindful of her nearness and influence. These are very sacred and personal events in your lives and should be revealed only to the most trusted friends that you are sure will treat as such, for it is an experience I will cherish as long as I live. You are very special to us and we think of you often. We received, a nice letter from Linda telling about her acceptance at BYU, then we can see her more often. We are also concerned about your little sisters, although they are in excellent hands, they need that extra love and assurance that can come from an older sister who they love and admire. We are very proud of you both and pray for you always. With all our love, Grandpa and Grandma Smith

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Chapter Eight

1970-1980
• • • • Sale of the homestead, equally divided Death of Brother Wickliffe, Mesa Death of daughter Cherry, Lompoc 75th Birthday, 75 present.

The homestead in Snowflake was indeed a family project and was participated in by all the children. Although the three younger children were to small to do much of the physical labor they were in on the struggle and lived it with the rest of us. The building of the home and improving the land was done by the older ones and I was just the right age to see the whole of the operation. After proving up on the homestead, Mother received a deed signed by the president of the U. S. and we all thought we were a part of it. The taxes were low and she rented the pasture out for enough to pay the taxes. In her later years mother worried about the responsibility and decided to transfer the property to Justin, the youngest son, for safe keeping and to avoid probate in the event of death. Justin collected the rents and paid the taxes and eventually maintained that the home stead belonged to him for his contribution to mother in her last days. The rest of the family had also contributed "equally and felt it should be divided equally, which was finally agreed to by Justin. As I was a licensed Broker, I was assigned to handle the sale of the property. All went well and after several trips to Snowflake we got an offer of $10,000.00 cash, which was acceptable to all except the in-laws. And there we run in to “the greatest static our family has ever experienced, and I became a hated man by them, but we finally over came the problems and each received their share in cash. They came to my home to get their check, and some have never been back. On Oct. 21, 1973 my brother Wickliffe passed away. He and his wife, Blanche were living in Mesa Arizona and working in the temple as ordinance workers. Wickliffe had a wonderful family and was highly respected for his honesty and diligence. The funeral was held in Mesa ward and a large crowd was there. All his living brothers and sisters were present, it was a means of getting together once again as a family, I was asked to write an article for the J B Roundup on his life and activities which I am attaching here with as an addendum to this page.(see attach.) This period of time was a sad time for my own family as our Dear daughter Cherry was stricken with the dread decease of cancer and for two years we hoped and prayed for her life. She was brave to the end. Her mother spent the last 5 months with her and her family helping out in the crisis, but it seemed she was called to the other side. She was ready, if anybody can be ready, and she had lived up to the full measure of her creation, left a wonderful family and was highly respected by the entire city. A more detailed account of her passing is included elsewhere in these memories. Her oldest daughter, Cathy, married after her death to a fine man named Tracy Eliason and now they have a lovely daughter. Our first great grandchild. They were married in the temple and are active in the church. Her second daughter, Linda Maria was also married to a fine young man by the name of Craig Allen. They were married in the temple and are active in the church. Both these young men have served a mission for the church. Linda now had a child which is our second great-grand-child (see addendum elsewhere).

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September 14,1975 was my 75th birthday. All my living brothers and sisters planned birthday party for me at the home of my sister Sadie. There were 75 present which was coincidental to my age. A big birthday cake with a big 75 on top was cut for all. Most of my brothers and sisters were present and all my children and most of my grand-children were present and a host of nieces and nephews as well. It was happy occasion and deeply appreciated. Toasts and short speeches were made, and some original jingles by the grand children were sung which were so choice. I am including them herewith. From Marie’s family Sung by Ralph, Samuel, Sara,& Benjman Mason to the tune of: My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean: My grandpa has fun with his grand kids, My grandpa tells stories and jokes, My grandpa is fun to go visit, His food and his fun are no hoax! Happy-day, Happy-day, Oh, have a special day grandpa; Happy-day, Happy-day, Oh have a special day. By Gordon and Joann’s Children. There is a kind man we love, and Grandpa its you, You are great in every way, we wish to be like you, You've taught us love for family, Honest true, we must be, Your great life we all revere, from your children here. Grandpa Nate— You are great. From Cherry’s children, sent in by Linda and Craig Allen and sung by Grandmother Lydia Grandpa, Grandpa, we’ve been thinking Bout how wonderful your are! To your wife, family and friends You are our shining star. Grandpa, Grandpa, we’ve been thinking, bout your 75 years,-lived Husband, father, bishop, real estate appraiser, Even a pony express mail driver! Grandpa, Grandpa, we’ve been thinking, Bout how proud we are of you. For bringing us a good name, joy and happiness Ohhhh, Nathaniel, We Love You! From Nathaniel A. Smith A lovers jingle written and sung by Grandpa to grandson and his bride James S.Mason and Jane Mason, to the tune of(Frankie and Jonnie) Jimmie and Janie are lovers, They met in a big hos-pit-al. It was love at first sight,

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They knew it was right, to make plans for tying the knot. Jimmie would earn his M D. Janie would earn her P H T. They will have great success, and in the end be blessed, with a beautiful fam-ily.

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November 23, 1973 Elder James S. Mason APDO 744 Cd.,Obregon, Mexico Dear Grandson Jimmie, We get the good reports of your missionary activities every week from your sweet mother. Your family are all so proud of you and so are your grandmother and me. It hardly seems possible you have been out nearly a year and by now you have adjusted to the different way of life as a Mexican missionary. As we have read some of your letters, we note the missionary spirit and your attitude to the work is beautiful. As you continue on, the thrills of the work will be more exciting. I congratulate you on your new assignment as an assistant zone leader. This will be an even greater and wider field of experience. I was not surprised, knowing you as I do and your family as I do. I even expected this call for you. Great things are in store for you and your love for those people will be stronger each day. As we hear of your experiences, it causes me to reflect on my missionary experiences way back in 1924 in the Southern States Mission. Things were different then, but the gospel was the same and the thrills from the spirit of the work were the same. Most of my time was working among the people in the backwoods country of Alabama, Georgia and West Florida. I thought they were 100 years behind the times, but their hearts were big and good. I learned what real hospitality was. Sometimes it wasn't much, but what they gave was genuine and true. I saw some missionaries complain about food and accommodations, but the Lord blessed me with an attitude I will always be grateful for-- that if these people can live with it, so can I. I had never tasted grits or black eyed peas or plain grease as gravy. They were actually nasty, but I learned to love them. I could even smack my lips on turnips greens. In looking through my old missionary bible, I recorded 12 baptisms in 2 years. Not much of a record now days. I also recorded blessing 21 babies. Some of the old time saints used to wait for the missionaries to come to bless and name their babies. One family with two little boys waited 2 years for us before their boys got a name. They called the oldest one sonny boy and the other sonny baby. They had no names picked out and wanted to name them after me - so one was named Nathaniel and the other Aikens. I couldn't think of better names. Which reminds me that James Stanton is a very great name and what better trade mark could you give some fine baby boy, if of course, there is a lack of appropriate names. Now you are 20 years old. What a great time to be alive. A great and exciting future is before you. We love you and your family very much and are well pleased with our oldest grandson and his example to all the other grand children. In July, our Cathy, your cousin, was 20. Now she is getting married in December to a very fine returned missionary. We think he is very choice and we are very happy for Cathy. Our prayers and blessings are with you. Be assured you are never alone. God bless you. We are adding a little to your bank account for your birthday - ($10).

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~~~~~~
During this period we had the sad experience of having three of our close relatives pass away in the year of 1975. March 16,1976 my beloved brother Homer B. passed away in the veterans hospital. Homer was a very special brother he always had a keen interest in all members of the family and managed to keep in touch with all of us he was a great visitor and remembered his boyhood days. He also had vivid memories of his mothers struggle in Snowflake. He was a loyal brother and honest in all his dealings with them. When he went on his mission some of us helped him out financially and after his return he paid us back every cent. He helped me out when we moved to the store on 2nd West and everything he did was thorough and neat. He served in the Army in World War II and saw action in the Battle of the Bulge in Germany. He always sent money home to his mother. He left a lovely wife, Predia a two fine sons John P. and Kenneth and a lovely home. He was a good provider and very thrifty. Sometimes he held down two jobs. We all miss him and hope for the best for his family. On May 7 my nephew-in-law, Parker Chipman, met with an accident while prospecting and was killed. leaving a wife, Cleo and 10 children. His wife was the daughter of my sister Sadie, a very sad day. On the 5th of May, my sisters husband, Harry G. Greaves, passed away. Although it was expected, due to his age, it was a sad occasion again for the family. Harry left a fine family and was loved by all. Our children Geraldine and her husband Dr. John P. Sanders, were well established in Lompoc, California with 6 lovely girls, and very active in the church. Dr. Sanders was in the High Council and Cherry was the Stake MIA PResident. Some comment on Cherry has been made else where in these memories about her passing and family life. But suffice it to say that this lovely family were living the teachings of the church and bringing up there family in an honorable way. Which is a credit to them. The oldest daughter Cathy was married to Tracy Eliason,a returned missionary and they have a lovely daughter, Jennifer now. They now live in Ontario,Calif. There second daughter, Linda Marie, is also married to a returned missionary, Craig Allen. They now have a lovely daughter named Cherry Jeannie Allen. They live in Provo, Utah while Craig is attending the B Y U. The other four daughters are living at home in Lompoc, California. We are very proud of this family for the way they have carried on and stayed together since their mother, Cherry passed away. Dr. John Sanders has since married a sweet girl from Glendale, Calif. and she has taken over so beautiful to hold things together. We all just love Maureen and the children all call her mom. We are very proud of her and thankful for what she is doing. She had two small boys at the time and they too have been accepted into the family. They are Greg and Scott. Our daughter Lydia Marie and her husband, Dr. James 0. Mason have a lovely family. 5 boys and two girls. They live at 681 18th Ave. Salt Lake City,Utah. Their children are: James S. Mason, Susan Mason, Bruce Todd Mason, Ralph Nathaniel Mason, Samuel Robert Mason, Sarah Mason, Benjamin Smith Mason. Daughter in law Jane Erdman Mason, Grand-daughter, Rebecca Marie Mason. This family are all very active in the church as well as having close family ties. Dr. Mason is the Commissioner of Health Service for the church as well as the assistant to the Aaronic priesthood committee of the church assigned to the deacons, and required to travel a great deal on church business. Marie is President of the ward primary as well as about all other ward activities. Their three oldest boys are Eagle Scouts and active in Priesthood Quorums. James S. has filled a two year mission to Mexico and is now married to a lovely girl. They now have a lovely daughter named Rebecca Marie. Susan is attending the University o f Utah, Bruce has graduated from East High and looking forward to a mission. Ralph, Samuel,Sarah and Benjamin are at home and very active in sports, school and church activities. The children are all taught to work and to be thrifty and know how

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to make their own spending money and to be resourceful. We are very proud of the Mason family and love to visit with them.We are thankful they live close enough that we can see them often. ~~~~~~

Dr. James O. MasonA man of Virtue, A man of Grace, A man of duty, In every place. this night we honor Tomorrow we part, But the blessings we’ve shared Remain in our heart. “When you work with love, you bind yourself to yourself, to one another, and to God.”.....Kahlil Gibran

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Our son Gordon Nathaniel and his lovely wife Joanne live at 6277 Maplewood Circle in Salt Lake City, Utah. They have 8 lovely children, 4 boys and 4 girls. David John, Annette, Jodee, Paul Nathaniel, Lori Ann, Andrew Gordon, Suzanne, and Timothy Frederick. They are all healthy children, excelling school and active in church. They are musically talented and are using their talents to their own development and the enjoyment of others. David has just been called to a mission for the church to Lansing Michigan. He is also an Eagle Scout, a very outstanding young man and a talented speaker. Annette and Jodee both play the piano and sing well together. Paul Nathaniel is an Eagle Scout and active in his priesthood quorum. Paul has been taught how to work and knows how to apply himself is a very busy boy around the home. Lori Ann talented and sweet. She knows how to do what has to be done in a busy household. Andrew Gordon, a thinker and good student. He excels in baseball, has been on the winning little league ball club and they have won many trophies. He is taught to be dependable Suzanne and Timothy are much at home and very active in the church and neighborhood activities. All these children are beautiful and well mannered. We are very proud of them. Gordon Nathaniel very active in the church, in the stake mission and one of the presidents of the seventies quorum. He is also a regional representative of the Bureau of National Affairs and has gained recognition as the outstanding rep. in the nation over the years. Joanne, a wonderful mother and church worker in everything that is asked of her. A very sweet and lovely person and loved by every one. We are very proud of this family and grateful for their love. Our son Frederick Aikens and his lovely wife Claudia and 4 children live at 1548 Michigan Ave. Salt Lake City, -Bradley Frederick, Anthony Edward, Heather Elizabeth, Natalie Ann and Adam Nathaniel. They are all healthy and intelligent children and very activein all activities in church and school. Claudia is the president of the Ward Primary which three of her children are members. She is also active in most all ward activities. She is a talented typist as well as good mother and homemaker. All my children are buying their own homes, and Fred is refurbishing this lovely old home. Both my sons, Fred and Gordon are graduates of the University of Utah and doing very well. Fred is in the automobile business with the Cline auto sales co. He is recognized as one their top salesmen and has won many company prizes for selling more cars, both as premiums and special trips. He has currently won a trip to the Hawaiian Islands and also a trip to Mexico with his wife, all expenses, It is is a great honor and we are very proud of him and his family. (see attached resume}

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RESUME

Personal: Frederick A. Smith 1282 Emerson Avenue Salt Lake City, Utah 84105 Telephone: 467-4094 Age 36 Married 3 children EDUCATION: Attended public school, Salt Lake City, Utah; Attended University of Utah 5 years, B. A. Degree. Graduated 1965 Major, Sociology, Minor Political Science Scholastic average 3.5 in major subject.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND WORK EXPERIENCE: Candidate/trainee; Retail management training program, Macy's California, San Francisco, Calif., 1965-1966. Assistant Manager; Hart Schaffner & Marx retail branch store, Arthur Frank Inc., Cottonwood Mall, 1967-1969. Salesmanager; Mount Olympus Waters Inc. General management of bottled water company with supervision of up to 13 employees. Computation of sales quotas and projections of 5 salesmen. Planning s coordination of route delivery sales and service. Marketing of small package distilled water involving sales at management level, and sales at retail level. Distribution at commercial, industrial, wholesale and retail levels, with advertising and promotion at retail and commercial levels. Purchasing and procurement of up to carload lots. Cost accounting to determine wholesale and retail price of products to be marketed. Personnel; Hire and train route delivery salesmen filling room and office personnel. Office and bookkeeping; Accounts receivable, collections involving telephone, letters, personal collection, small claims and full bankruptcy proceedings. 1969-1272 to present. MISCELLANEOUS: Member Sales and Marketing Executives of Utah, 1971-1972. Member Salt Lake Jaycees, 1968-1969. Served L.D.S. Mission to Swiss-Austrian Mission, 1956-1959. Fluent in German Language.

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Two Great People in my Life
All that I am or ever hope to be I owe to the guidance of two great people. My angel mother, Lois B. Smith, and my darling wife, Lydia H. Smith. My mother had the task of being both father and mother to me, due to a tragedy that happened to our family due to relative interference. (which is mentioned elsewhere in these memories). I was raised without the companionship of a father from the time I was twelve years old, and was subject of great discrimination from relatives- as a means of revenge to my mother. I was slighted and ignored by m y peers that should have given a helping hand. As a result, I grew up with a bitterness in my heart, instead of love for my relatives who openly predicted that our family would go to hell. But, they failed to reckon with the faith and determination of a little woman left with 10 children and was going to see that that did not happen. She knew the odds in that town and she also knew the lord was on her side. She would not give up on any of her boys. She counseled and guided me, went to the dances with me as my partner, and piloted my course even through high school and until received a call to be a missionary. Yes, my first 21 years were a great tribute to her in guiding me down the course that finally got me into the mission field. How she did it is a testimony to her faith and courage. Especially when I was out in road camps, logging camps and mining camps to make the means the family needed. I’m sure one of the great factors in it all was the fact that she paid my tithing on all the money I sent in and a guardian angel had a special watch over me and her great spirit prevailed over me. I’m ever grateful. Lydia Heiniger Smith was born in Switzerland, converted to the church and emigrated to America in 1920. She paid her own way and found work and was self supporting. She was proud and dignified, neat in appearance and very striking in her manner. She mastered the english language and her accent had the ring of an aristocrat. People were drawn to her as a perfectionist. She was not satisfied with any thing less. She was talented as a singer and loved music. She played the zither and yodeled the swiss folk songs to every ones delight. She lived with a sweet little swiss widow by the name of Marie Senn who became sort of a foster mother to her. They lived in the Covey apartments on East South Temple and just two houses east of where my mother lived, who became a good friend to Mrs. Senn. I was 24 years old when I met her at a birthday party in the Covey for one of my relatives. She played the zither and sang swiss songs to us and I thought I had never seen so much class in one person in my life! She was so different from any girl I had ever seen. I must have fell in love with her at first sight. I was waiting to go on my mission and thought I wouldn't have a chance with her. I finally got up courage to ask her for a date to a M I A dance. She almost swept me off my feet when she accepted, and we danced and danced all night together. I did not know any other girls and she did not know any other boys, so we just enjoyed ourselves, like nobody else was there. We fell head over heels in love. This was the beginning of her great influence upon my life, and a transition from mother to her influence seemed to take place. After 24 years, mother had partly completed her task, but she did not quit. Now between her and Lydia I was in good hands. Lydia and mother were the only ones from my family at the depot to bid me farewell. After a big hug and kiss from each, I climbed on the train. Lydia had promised me she would wait, but neither of us dreamed it would be nearly four years. Between these two great souls I received my strength and assurance that all would be well. Each week I received reassuring mail that kept my spirits up. I am indebted to them for some of the credit for completing a successful mission. I knew Lydia would wait, because now I knew her character. The thing I worried about was getting established to provide for her. The time finally came and on the 14th day of June 1928, we were sealed

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for time and eternity by Elder George F. Richards. During the next 48 years we would move 8 times, have 4 wonderful children cone to our home, and 25 grandchildren, have a degree of success in business that we scarcely dreamed of. The Lord has been good to us, and especially me for such a wonderful helpmate. She had lots of good common sense and was honest and straight forward, never deceiving, always told the truth. She was a perfectionist in everything she undertook to do. She was an expert cook and was the food chairman for the ward during the building time when so many ward dinners were given to raise funds. They have never had dinners the equal since (in fact I have been told they have forgotten how). Her great musical talent and beautiful voice was admired by all. She was a member of some of the outstanding singing groups in the city. As a music director she was superb, be it Primary children, Stake Relief Society music director or the chorister in the ward. She was a joy to behold in action. Our home was always spotless. The meals were always well prepared and at meal time everything was orderly. The children were always taught to be clean, honest, and truthful. Discipline was a must. Very rarely did she leave the children to the care of a babysitter for any length of time. Lydia was an excellent business woman. She managed the variety store to a successful operation. People came from far and near to see her store and trade with her. She understood the fundamentals of good business, and I’ll always be grateful for her counsel. We would be better off today if I had listened more to her! She respected my judgment and backed me up, in it as long as it proved to be good. We have worked together and never kept anything from each other. She has always been concerned about the children and their families. In time of sickness she has been on hand to help till the last of her strength was gone. When our dear cherry was stricken with cancer she stayed with her night and day for five months nursing and taking care of the family as well. She is always ready and willing to help any or them in time of need. Despite the fact that she was not well herself, due to her health, she has suffered a depressing condition that has been a very discouraging thing she has had to contend with but she still carries on. She is so versatile she can do anything, and together with all this she is a beautiful woman and we all love her dearly, and I am very proud of her. And so I strongly believe that an eternal power had a hand in bringing together a boy from Arizona and a Girl from Switzerland for a great purpose. By: Nathaniel Aikens Smith

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A tribute to my ancestors on my Mother’s side,
written for the J.B. Roundup 1976
Our heritage has become a strong Bushman tradition and culture It came partly as a result of two LDS missionaries bringing the gospel to Martin and Elisabeth Bushman In 1842. They were the only members of his father’s family to accept the gospel at that time. True to their conviction, they soon joined the body of the church in Nauvoo, with their four living children, and soon became recognized for their quality of character and dependability. June 7,1843, another son was born. He was named John. A very choice spirit indeed, with a very special mission. He was to become one of the stalwarts and mighty men of his day. Surely a special guarding angel was his constant companion in his 83 year span of life. During the days of his infancy in Nauvoo, when mob violence was threatening the lives of the saints and they were forced to flee, his life was spared. Again as they traveled westward with other families in the dreadful winter of 1846 when his 9 year old sister Elisabeth and his one year old sister Ester Ann died of chills and fever and were buried without a coffin. Although the infant son John was near deaths door, his life was again spared. Again he was protected as he was throughout his life from many close calls. After five destitute years in Iowa and other points along the way to the west with their special assignment to plant crops and make preparation for those pioneers that were to follow, they finally arrived in Utah. This Martin Bushman family settled in Lehi, Utah where they became prominent in the building of that community and in the affairs of the church After 25 years of pioneering in Utah and responding to every call, this infant son of Martin Bushman was now a man of destiny. John Bushman was a successful farmer, home builder and had established himself as a stalwart, dependable leader. It was 100 years ago a great mission call came to him. Not for two years, but for life. A call to go again into the wilderness 600 miles and assist in settling the eastern Arizona territory on the muddy little Colorado River Basin. To dispose of everything and go was a supreme test. But John Bushman did not hesitate and answered the call along with 200 other men There he proved himself to be a giant among men - a man of destiny Founding the settlement of Allen Camp (present site of Joseph City) and to live the united order was another test of his metal. When asked to assign all he had into the order against others with much less, was a mark of character. John Bushman was there when the first ditch was surveyed. John Bushman cut the first log for the dam while others were plowing. John Bushman sowed the first wheat that was planted by the mormons. In forming the united order, men of sterling quality and honest integrity were at a premium. John Bushman was one of them and was appointed to appraise the value of each mans property that was turned in and each received his due credit. To insure great harmony during those early days in a barren land with all the adverse conditions that confronted them, discouragement was the big enemy. The constant struggle with the elements and the loss of their irrigation systems through flooding was the supreme test that many could not take. John Bushman and the others that endured and stood the test were described as having "unflinching courage", and that is our heritage.

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A John Bushman Prayer for Us
A letter from John and Lois Bushman expressing thanks to their children and grand children on their 50th anniversary he said In part "Dear children and grandchildren, we are especially grateful for the harmony and good will that was manifest . and hope you all will cultivate all the good you have Inherited, and refrain from all the weaknesses you got from us; that you may never bring reproach on yourselves and us No greater honor can come to us all — This is the wish and prayer of your parents.” signed - John and Lois Bushman This is our heritage and our blessing

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Tribute of my Father
from Nov 1962 Kinsman by Sarah S Greaves, copied 1968
1871 JOHN WALTER SMITH was born June 10, 1871 at Parowan, Iron Co. Utah, in the old Smith home which is still standing in that town. He was the 8th child of his mother, Emma Seraphine West Smith and the 12th child of his father, Jesse N. Smith. At the time of Walter's birth his father had three wives, his mother being the first one. 1880 He was nine years old when he came with his parents to Arizona, April- 1880. They located in Snowflake, Arizona. He attended the grade school there three months each winter. He was a member of the first class in 1889- the Snowflake Stake Academy when it began in 1889. Silas, Walter and Samuel were the older brothers then, and were much together in the work at hand. They took care of their father’s farm and hauled wood from the cedar covered hills near the town for the stoves and fire-places of their father's three homes. They helped dig the wells in which good water was found as close as twenty feet deep.. These boys helped build a dam on the Silver Creek which furnished water for the farms and gardens of Snowflake. In the summer there were large wagon loads of hay which had to be gathered, hauled and stacked. Walter developed into a large strong handsome man, nearly six feet tall. He liked to act on the stage and took part in many of the dramas presented by the local town group. 1891The example and teachings of his parents gave him a strong faith in the Gospel. In 1891-92 he was 1st Counselor to Pres. Ezra Hatch of the Snowflake Stake YMMIA. He was Sunday School teacher of the adult class in Snowflake Ward 1894-96, maybe longer. 1892 Walter met Lois Evelyn Bushman when she came from St Joseph one winter (1891) to attend the Academy. They were married Nov 2,1892 in the Saint George Temple, Utah, to which they had traveled by team and wagon in company with Charles H. Ballard and Julia Smith, Walter's sister, who were also getting married. They began married life in one large room of Losie Rogers home in 1893Snowflake. Their first child, a girl, was named for Walter1s sister, "Sarah E. called Sadie, who had died some months before.” 1894 Moved on a 20 acre farm located between Snowflake & Taylor. While here during winter months Walter carried the U S Mail for his brother Joseph W Smith. While here on the ranch two sons were born 1895-97- Walter F and L Wickliffe. They bought two town lots in Snowflake and after living in a very small lumber house they built a fine brick home and by 1901 moved into it still unfinished. 1903 Walter was called to the California mission then transferred to the North Western States mission. They now had six children. While father was gone Uncle Jesse Bushman helped in the summer with the farm work and another year Rube Rogers helped by selling milk and eggs and farm produce and boarding the school teacher mother was able to support her husband on his mission. 1905By the time father came home, mother went to meet him in Portland, Oregon and saw the fair of the Lewis & Clark Exposition. After father returned from his mission he purchased another farm and sold their nice home to brother Samuel F Smith. They bought a city block south of town and built a cheaper home. Like many of the men in Snowflake he hauled from Holbrook to Ft .Apache, a distance of nearly 196 miles over the White Mountains. He had two or three span of horses and two wagons that used for this freighting work. He also sold hay and grain from his farm to the cavalry at the Fort.

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1910-12 Father and Uncle Silas got a US Mail contract to deliver mail from Holbrook to Ft Apache and all the towns in between. When this contract expired father obtained another contract alone, depending on the help of his three oldest sons, Walter 16, Wickliffe,14, and John 12. He also depended on hired help in the winter. After this mail contract expired father started the freighting work again. They now had a family of ten children. 8 boys and 2 girls. How proud he was of his sons. The smith name would surely increase. He liked to entertain us by reciting a reading about the “Smith”. 1916 Father took his teams to southern Arizona and worked on farms. Later son Wickliffe and wife and their small son moved to Ashurst, Arizona and father lived with them for awhile. Then he worked on a farm in Duncan, then moved to Verdin and rented a big farm there. While here he became acquainted with his nephew Henry l. Smith and family. 1926He was called from Verdin Ward to go on a short term mission to the Central States mission and while there had his son Nephi Pratt for a short time as a traveling companion, who also was there on a two-year mission. After this mission he worked on various farms. The depression was on and a bad year for farmers. That spring he sold his animals and came to Utah to visit his married children. While in Salt Lake City he spent much of his time at the home of his daughter Sadie (Sarah S Greaves). He did a lot of studying and writing. He commented on- the beautiful stories in the Bible, how they could be put into moving pictures for the benefit of the young people. He composed a pageant about the resurrection of the Savior, taking the story from both the New Testament and the book Mormon, showing scenes on both continents. Sadie was glad she could type the script for him and enjoyed listening to his discussions. He stayed the fall and winter of 1935-36 at Sadie's hone In the winter of 1936 his health began to fail. He became discouraged and one day said to me, "Well Sadie, there is one thing to I have been successful at and that is missionary work, teaching the gospel of Jesus Christ. I think if I had the chance I would love to spend the rest of my life in that work." He continued to get weaker and was taken to a hospital where they found he had cancer. He died 7 May 1936. The funeral was held on Sunday May 10th, which happened to be "Mother’s Day", however it was Father’s Day this day to his family. Father lived separately from mother the last 20 years of his life. They never got a Temple divorce and neither remarried.

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Up Date 1977 Nathaniel A. and Lydia H. clan. Marriages, Births, Missions.
ChildrenGrand-Children25 5 and another one expected any minute! 4- Cherry- Marie- Gordon- Fredrick

Great Grandchildren-

Marriages-4 and another one set for September Cherry’s oldest daughter Cathy to Tracy Jay Eliason 2 children: Jennifer and David Jay Ontario, California Cherry’s 2nd daughter, Linda to Craig M. Allen 1 children- Cherry Jeanne and .......any minute now #2 they now live in Tempe Az attending ASU Marie & Jim- oldest son James S. Mason to Jane Erdman 2-children- Rebecka and Jennifer new arrival they now live in Kerns Utah Susan Mason--Engaged to be married in September Gordon N & Joanne- Oldest daughter Annette to Russ K. Hill Married July 7,1977 Missionaries. David J. Smith 1976 Lansing Mission (Gordon & Joanne) Bruce T. Mason 4/15/77 Argentina Mission (Jim and Marie) Deceased--our oldest daughter Geraldine Sanders, 11/2/72. Our Cherry has gone on ahead, typical of her as she always seemed to be a little ahead of the rest of us. She left her mark, six beautiful daughters that will emulate her great character through her posterity eternally. Addendum -to-chapter--2

Tribute to my big brother-Walter F. Smith
"A strong in and a mother's blessing" is the way his mother characterized him. They named him Walter Fenwick. A red head born to John Walter and Lola B. Smith May 5, 1895. The second child and 1st son to be followed by 7 little brothers and another little sister. I say little because he was always big to us. Be was destined to be our leader and counselor. To stand in for our father and be the strong arm for his mother. He was the "Nephi" of the family and was to accomplish it all in 40 years. Even after his marriage, his personal interest in each one of us continued on, and with the help of a very understanding wife and his mother, the family organization was established for the purpose of

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promoting family unity and providing that every boy go on a mission for the Church. He being the president and mother the secretary & treasurer. From this nucleus 46 missionaries have served honorable missions to this date without any outside help. All 7 of the brothers served their mission, but the greatest missionary of them all was our big brother who stayed home that we might go. As I think of his personal sacrifice to see his brothers get on in the world and his constant urging for family unity for the support of mother, I can think of many instances when he put his family ahead of hie own personal interests, ie - It was under his leadership that we built a new home for mother. He was always ahead and leading in digging the basement, making the adobes for the home. I saw him stand in the mud pits all day filling the molds with mud for Phil & I to carry out to the drying area. Literally hundreds of them. ie - When the building boom was on in McNary City, he got a job as a plumbers helper. He soon advanced to a plumber and got me on to take the plumber's helper Job. We worked together. ie - When cash was scarce and jobs almost impossible to find, we rustled for work together ie logging camps, road construction or in the mines. If only one job was available, he insisted I take it. Said he could find another. When Walter, Phil & I went to the Ruth Mines in Nevada, there were only two jobs. He insisted we take them. He went on 4 miles to the Kimberly Mines sad got on but came over to see us every night. ie - After serving in the U.S. Navy in World War I, he was offered s job with the government to exterminate prairie dogs out near Sligman, Arizona. He said you can do this as good as I can - "You go”. If the man asks you “if you have been in the Navy tell him no, but you can ride a horse and know what a prairie dog looks like." His interest in all of us was most sincere and genuine and his counsel always good. During my tender years, he gave me fatherly advice and became a guiding light in my young life. Because of our close association we became pals. His untimely passing was a great shock to all of us and was a time of great grief and sorrow especially to his sweet little family. His great spirit remained close to guide his little widow and four lovely children to become established in life, this is a tribute to his greatness. He lived every day with a purpose. He died in the full bloom of life having accomplished his desire to be a distinguished county agent in Washington County. He left a noble posterity we are all proud of. Now after 39 years since his passing, his influence on my life is a sweet memory I shall always cherish. Truly a strong arm and a mother's blessing. Gratefully, One of his "little" brothers Nathaniel A. Smith

ADDENDUM

Tribute to my brother Wickliffe
Lois B. Smith Family Reported by N. A. Smith LORENZO WICKLIFFE SMITH passed from this life October 21,1970. His life span was 73 years, 8 months and 2 days. His life was guided and influenced by a willing prevailing spirit for good, and was devoted to love for his family, service to his church and follow men. He lived in peace and died in peace. His strength was his faith in the principles he embraced and the loving companionship of his beloved wife Blanch, who was always at his side. Together they raised a family of honorable men and women and a posterity that is a credit to them.

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He was industrious and resourceful and a good provider always with his family uppermost in his thoughts. together they owned and operated New Modern Dairy at Globe, Arizona for 36 years. He believed in thoroughness and dependability, and for those sterling qualities his services were in demand. The calling of a Bishop, High Councilman, teacher, missionary and many other assignments were indications of his qualities. His 24 year membership in the Rotary Service Club with a perfect attendance record speaks for his thoroughness and dependability. His mother described him as “one with broad shoulders”, he could carry responsibilities well. I describe him as a “humble nobleman.” To his lovely wife Blanch, five children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, we extend our love and blessing. The host of friends that paid tribute to him at the beautiful service was a testimonial to the high esteem they held for him and his family. We cherish his memory — his good works will follow after him. He held high the standards of his forebearers and brought honor to their name. Funeral services were held in the Mesa 5th ward, the service was beautiful and will long be remembered especially the very touching quartet by his 4 sons when they sang "Abide with me tis eve’n tide”. The beautiful talk by his nephew Darrall F. Smith was refreshing and consoling, and the lovely solo by his niece Vella Hose Smith seemed to climax our feelings as she sang "In My Fathers House are Mansions". Survivors include his Wife Blanche of Mesa; a daughter Myreel S. Lewis of Phoenix; four sons, Gerald W, of Salt Lake City, Kelvin R. of Mesa, Glenn S, of Thatcher, and Norman D. of Freemont, Calif . All his living brothers and sisters were present. (31 Grandchildren and 3 Great Grandchildren) Justin reports that they have a new grand daughter born Oct. 24, 1970. Her name will be Lynda Gaylene Smith, she is the daughter of Timothy and Cynthia Smith of Prove Ut. Justin arrived there from Wicks funeral the morning after the little lady arrived. Such is life, death and births go on an on. Sadie reports, their son Elden S, Greaves of Salem Oregon, now personal directer of the United FlavR-Pac Growers Co, has been elected president of the South Salem Kiwanis Club, and that he teaches seminary two nights a week, one at the Oregon State University, and one at the Corvillis College of Oregon. Congratulations Elden, we think your tops.

Our Sincerest Sympathies
Phillip Otto Smith 74, died of cancer 12-22-76. We extend our sincere sympathy to his widow, Lavern# to his three children, his six grandchildren, and five living brothers and sisters. A large group of relatives and friends attended the impressive and reassuring service which paid tribute to the life of this fine man. The sixth child of John Walter and Lois Bushman Smith, Born 8-31-1902. Attended school in Snowflake, St. George and Provo Graduated from B.Y.U. Retired school teacher, also retired Civil Service, Hill Air Force Base at Clearfield, Utah. Served many calls of leadership in the Church, including 2&1/2 years in Germany - a mission, Sunday School Superintendent, President of Elders Quorum and Seventies Quorum respectively. Ward Chorister and teacher. He was diligent in everything he undertook. A good provider, a. first class citizen. He and his family have lived in Clearfield for 24 years and have been members of the Clearfield 2nd Ward.

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A Tribute to my Brother Phill -1977
To characterize him with a word would be to say he was "RELIABLE". Anything he was assigned to do, be it hoeing weeds in the field, he could be relied to hoe his row to the end. Be it milking cows, he could be relied on to be there when the cows came home to be milked. When the stables had to be cleaned, he was there. When the pigs had to be fed, he was there. When wood had to be chopped, he knew how to handle the axe, and so I could go on and on. What a great blessing it was to me on that 31st day of August 1902 when that little boy was born to my mother destined to be my playmate and pal. Endowed with all these characteristics and qualities to rub off on me. I was two years old and naturally we grew up together. Played together, slept together, and were inseparable all through our young lives. He was christened PHILLIP OTTO SMITH — I am told he weighed 13 pounds at birth. The largest child mother had. He was so fat and like a "rollie-pollie" the family affectionately called him "BILLIE BOY". That name seemed to fit him and I still like to call Billie. He was the 6th child and 5th son in a young family. It was four years before his little brother Pratt came along. He became sort of a big brother to him. Of course in a small country town and new county it seemed all we did was chores. All his older brothers shared in that task. At times the older brothers were called on to go on the freight road, or on the mail route leaving Phil and his little brothers with the chores, but there was always a great supervisor that was behind it all that was a most diligent mother who would always pitch in on any of the chores and would often help with the milking. A near tragedy: I recall very vividly, Phil was about 3 1/2 years old. We often played in the barn yard and on the hay stacks. We would climb up and slide down. It was great fun. The chickens always ran loose in the barn yard and the old white rooster was always on guard to protect the flock. I had climbed up on a small stack and Phil was trying to get up when he slipped and fell or slid to the ground landing on his back. More scared than hurt, he began to scream. The old rooster seeing him with his mouth wide open pounced upon him and began to claw his face and peck his tongue and mouth with great vigor. I was horrified at the sight and slid down and chased him off. Phil was bleeding profusely from the mouth. As we started for the house we were both screaming when mother came to our rescue. When she assessed the situation she said, thank heaven he had his eyes closed or they may have been pecked out. A real scare. Phil had great scars on his tongue the rest of his life and when relating this experience, he would say, "It's true, I have the scars to prove it." Then he would stick out his tongue with a twinkle and wink of humor. There always existed a strong bond of brother loyalty between us. We were always compatible and shared each others feelings and welfare. After many years of constant companionship, we grew to understand each other and confided freely in each other which was a great blessing. In our early adolescent lives a tragedy came to our family. Due to relative interference and other problems, our parents became separated. Father moved to southern Arizona, leaving Mother with 10 children to face the criticism and abuse heaped upon her and the children. Phil and I were at the age to get the brunt of abuse and discrimination from the relatives. It seemed as an act of vengeance to our mother. This was the beginning of the bitterness that was beginning to be built up in our hearts, and this is sufficient to say the cause of our lack of interest in the great Smith family that has stayed with both of us, which of course we regret. I hope the day will come when the mist will be cleared away. This experience held our family closer together and determined to work together to accomplish our goals to have all the boys go on a mission. We rustled jobs together where ever we could find them. Often our brother Walter was with us. All we knew how to do was hard labor, like road construction, logging camps, railroad construction, farm

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work, working in the mines in Nevada and others. Through it all Phil never changed in character. He was always a respectable, law abiding citizen and a hard worker. He was also a great student and reader. He had strong opinions and he had reasons to support them. I learned to respect them as this was one of the strong characteristics of his personality and a mark of his greatness. Sometimes we fail to see the greatness in others because of a block of human blindness until It's too late, or almost. Sincerely, a brother, Nathaniel A. Smith

A Tribute to my brother Homer Bushman Smith
Born in a house that was still under construction, the roof not yet on, that little mother went through the ordeal of bearing a child under these trying circumstances. It was August 21, 1908. I was 8 years old and have vivid memories of the day. He was a beautiful little boy with lots of dark curly hair. He was given the name of Homer Bushman, in honor of mothers oldest brother who had stood by her in many trials throughout her life. This was her 8th child, and with this large family of small children we managed some how to survive by attaching a tent to the side of the soon to be new home as living quarters. I recall how the wind did blow and the tent sides would flap all night. Homer arrived in the family during a time of extreme hardship and that is all he knew for most of his young life and his great character was developed from that back ground. Subsequently, 2 more children came to the family, Justin and Winifred making 10 in all. Homer grew into a handsome young man and could be depended upon in any responsible assignment. He was always concerned about the welfare of the family and especially his mother. He was diligent and thrifty and believed in being economical in shopping for bargains. He believed in being honest and paying his share of everything that came along. He always had a great sense of fairness, I would like to refer to his insisting on reimbursing his brothers for all their contributions to him when he was serving on his mission. What a great character. He served his country in the army and saw action in Europe during World War II. It was while in England he met his sweetheart, Freda Foden. After the war he brought her to America and they were married and have two fine sons, John F. and Kenneth F. A fine family, we love them very much. Homer was a good provider and was always able to provide for the comforts of life. He will always be remembered for his family interest; and could always fill you in on any member we may need to know about. We will always cherish his memory and love him and his family, they are very special to us. Sincerely, one of the ten, Nathaniel A.

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Feb 5,1979 Dear Harold end Jennie, After you were here to get the files I had a few recollections about some important events that would not be in those files, and may not be in some of your other notes so I have jotted down a few of my recollections that can be verified from other sets of minutes. Feb.1953 the beginning of our administration we had a membership of upwards of 1300 and were housed in a building with another ward that had a membership of upwards of 1400. Our first great job was to build a new chapel that had long been in the process of getting started. Some funds had been accumulated for the building, but we inherited a sizable stake debt. We broke ground for the new building in March 1953. In Dec. 1953 we moved into the unfinished building and lived in it while we finished the work on it. In June,1955 the building was finished and paid for before its dedication. Two years later we paid off all stake indebtedness and the ward was divided. It was our policy not to make a given assessment to each member but instead we ask them to give all they could, plus donate labor. You have the amount of each raised also the hours of donated labor. All this was on top of the stake welfare assignment for cash and work. During this period of time the tithing was the highest in the history of the ward. During the period of time before and after the ward was divided a total of 8 years, upwards of 30 full-time missionaries were sent on missions, and many of our fine young responded to calls to Military duty, some saw combat action. During this period of time our Mens basketball won several stake championships and one year went all the way to the all church finals. Also a super boy scout troop under the great leadership of Mike Coles took the boys all the way back to Valley Forge Scout National Jamboree which they earned themselves along with other merits. During this period the ward sponsored two floats for tho days of 47 Parade. One by the Primary association and one by the MIA. Both of which were outstanding. During this period over 40 funerals were held for our dear departed ward members, and we had a n average of 40 widows, all of which received a special Christmas gift delivered in person by the Bishop and the Relief Society President. One year the Bishop’s wife- Lydia-made a swiss egg for each widow, which was long remembered. The relief society did great service at each funeral service, providing comfort and prepared many meals for the bereved. They were also a strong support to the ward bishopric. During this 8 years, the ward had used 8 custodians, the first was- James O. Mason- attending medical, and the last was our dear Blanchard Stol who was most loyal. We had a variety in between... some of which I would like to forget! Close coordination with all organizations was maintained by a monthly officers meeting. We called them the “Board of Directors Meetings”. Spirituality was manifest in all meetings which attributed greatly to the harmony and love for each other and the great tasks before us. These are a few of the recollections that came to me that I thought you might like to have. You can use your judgment what you use. I am grateful you two were given this assignment. No one is more qualified and best of all you were with me all the way with 100% support. I could not have done it without you, and I learned to love you as my own family. With great appreciation for you friendship I remain Nate & Lydia ----

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ELDER DAVID J. SMITH April 4, 1978 Salt Lake City My dear grandson David; You are one of twenty five very special grand children, and as grand parents We are especially proud of you as a missionary and especially now this great call has come to,you to be an assistant to the mission president. It confirms our opinion and pride in you as a missionary and as a representative of the Lord and your great family. Needless to say, we congratulate you and assure you the Lord will continue to bless and magnify you as a leader, as long as you continue to be humble before him, you will be stronger in the work. Some one has said “the Lord walks with a humble man." We were delighted to get your good letter but the news had proceeded it through your proud family announcing it to us on our recent trip with them to Arizona. This is a new and important phase of your mission that all missionaries don’t get. An opportunity to develop even more in leadership and supervision and another great challenge. I think of the challenge that came to Moroni when he was confronted with the task of finishing the work of his father, Mormon, in writing the history of the Nephite people. (see Ether 12; 22 to -30 ) and assuming the full responsibility of all those sacred records. He said "therefore the Lord hath commanded me even Jesus Christ." and I said unto him; Lord the Gentiles will mock at these things because of our weakness in writing, for Lord thou hast made us mighty in word by faith,but thou hast not made us mighty in writing! for thou hast made all this people that they could speak much, because of the Holy Ghost which thou hast given them; and thou hast made us that we could write but little because of the awkwardness of our hands. Behold thou hast not made us mighty in writing like the Brother of Jared, for thou madest him that the things which he wrote were mighty even as thou art, unto the over powering of man to read them." (Now David, please note the beautiful promise the Lord gave to Moroni, and to me,and to you,and to all that are called even as many as the Lord our God shall call,)"and when I had said this, the Lord spake unto me saying; Fools mock, but they shall mourn; and my grace is sufficient for the meek , that they shall take no advantage of your weakness, and if men come unto me I will show unto them their weakness, I give unto men weakness that they may be humble and that my grace is sufficient for all men that humble themselves before me. For if they humble themselves before me, and have faith in me, then I make things stronger unto them, and I Moroni, having heard these words was comforted, and said: O Lord thy righteous will be done, for I know that thou workest unto the children of men according to their faith. I love that beautiful experience of Moroni how even he felt his weakness, how typical that is for all of us when a great assignment comes to us, but as Moroni said -we to can be comforted, as we are made stronger. That promise has been fulfilled to you as you have become strong in your work and your testimony and in the strength you give to others, for this we love you and the Lord loves you. Fifty years ago come June 14,1978 will be our golden wedding anniversary, a celebration is planned for that special day, we are hoping all 47 can be here, of course we will put a rain check on for our future missionaries Elder Bruce T. Mason and Elder David J. Smith and have another celebration when you receive your honorable release. As we look back now fifty years ago was yesterday but now it is forever. GrandMother joins me in entending our love and blessings for your continued success and welfare. Very sincerely your grand parents.

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Jan. 22 1979 Elder Bruce T. Mason; My dear grandson ; You will soon be 21 which usually indicates you are of age, but in my book you have been of age ever since I first saw you. You have always acted your age and more and you have seemed to be mature beyond your age, that is one reason we are so proud of you. How you are a mature missionary we are thrilled with your accomplishments in the mission field, the great success you are having indicates the quality of your work. I was especially thrilled to listen to your tape report to the family, and Grma and I want to thank you for the beautiful card with such a sweet letter to us, now nearly 2 months since you sent it, we are so slow but we always think of you and pray for you. Your mission is winding down and it will seem to you to be to soon, but now you are better prepared for your next challenge, there is no substitute for a mission. Now your brother Ralph is getting the spirit you won’t know him he has developed so much he is a beautiful boy and he has such a sweet spirit just like you, he is such an example to his little brothers, He ask Benny if he was going on a mission when he got big like Bruce and he said "I have To " so you see the spirit is contagious. Dear bruce please know that we love you for what you are and we are very proud of you and your family, Happy birthday

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GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Reported by Marie S. Mason On June 14, 1978 Nathaniel Aikens and Lydia H. Smith celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with their family: children, grandchildren -and great grandchildren (48 living. 2 on church missions and 1 deceased). The celebration began with a lovely dinner at the Lion House in Salt Lake City. There was a lovely display of pictures of each family unit that had been formed since this union 50 years ago. The dinner was followed by a very special program. Tributes to these great parents were given by each of their children and they were followed by a variety of musical numbers by the grandchildren. These numbers were anything but ordinary and reminded us all of the very special young people we are all privileged to enjoy in our homes. After the tributes and special numbers another tribute was given by two granddaughters who are mothers or mothers-to-be themselves. They gave a heartwarming tribute displaying many of the things grandmother had made for them and many others. A surprise happening came when they had each granddaughter come forward to present a beautiful daisy with a pink ribbon tied on it to their grandmother. Each received warm hug and kiss and grandmother ended up with 3 lovely vases of flowers and wonderful warm feelings. The grandsons then made their tribute to grandpa. Two grandsons made the presentation in the form of an original verse which contained their original kind of humor and feelings of love. They presented grandpa with a gold pen with the names of all his grandsons engraved on it. Grandmother then responded with some beautiful comments expressing her pride Grandmother then responded with some beautiful comments expressing her pride and joy in such a wonderful family and then treated us to a beautiful vocal solo accompanied by one granddaughter on the piano and one on the violin. She sang "Loves Old Sweet Song".

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We believe in providential guidance in our lives, We believe a perfect union of souls in the preexistence state is a common acceptance and belief, The prophets declare the truth of it, The poets proclaim the glory of it, and the scriptures verify the facts of pre-existence of many noble and great ones. We believe that poets sometimes have the spirit of prophesy, as our dear friend (known to us as mother Ohran)did on our wedding day June 14,1928, " A young man and a sweet maiden by the creator designed, To meet, to love, their hearts entwined. A perfect union of souls, a love so true. The angels are watching and guarding you." --- this we believe also.---Again another poet declared. "Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting, The soul that raises with us our life star hath had else where a setting and cometh from a far, Not an entire forgetfulness, not an utter nakedness, but thru trailing clouds of glory do we come from God who is our home."

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THE DIVINE PLAN A sweet little girl came to a good christian home in far away Switzerland in 1899. One year later, a little boy came to a good christian home in far away Arizona in 1900. 24 years later through an act of providence they were brought together in Salt Lake City. There was a familiar spirit both recognized, a lasting love at first has endured now and forever. words from a song (a sobering thought) Sun rise, sun set, swiftly fly the years, we did not remember getting older, and all of a sudden its here.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE ACTIVITIES OF MY FAMILY FOR 1978-. To wind up the activities of 1977 all the members of the family,except Cherry’s family in Calif, and the two missionaries, David Smith and Bruce Mason, met together in the Ensign 6th ward house at the invitation of our son-in-law, who is bishop for a Christmas party. A pot luck dinner and then songs and stories followed, a real family home evening. In reporting to my bishop I was glad to report a full tithing as usual and that Lydia and I had done 100 temple endowments for the year between us(for the year 1977). 1978 was a memorable year. We celebrated our 50th wedding anniversary. The children gave us a royal party and dinner mixed with love and sweet sentiments from all the children as well as some lovely lasting gifts. By the close of 1978 our family consists of 49 members, - 26 grand children and 10 great grand children. 1978 has been a year of good health, except for my legs, which have been causing concern to me especially when I’m in a hurry to go some where. They have slowed me down some in my appraisal work, not with standing, I have made over $1500,00 in fees. We are happy and out of debt and do not need help to get along. This year Lydia and I reported 42 endowments. In reporting at tithing settlement a full tithing and pledged $300.00 to the new Jordon River Temple soon to be built. We feel we have been greatly blessed in our life. The final great event of the family was the Christmas Party held at our son Gordon’s ward with all the children and grand and great grand children present that was possible to be there another great home evening, with all the children taking part, we used the ward house out of courtesy of Gordon as he is a member of the bishopric,(very convient these Bishoprics.) SEPTEMBER 1979 The closing months of my 7th decade in life. (a brief summary of events and happenings) The past 10 years has been a time of semi retirement and a slowing down of my physical activities although my health has been good except for a short visit to the hospital for a hemorrhoid operation and later a bout with an inflamed sophagus which still gives me some annoyance, but generally my health is good except for my poor legs and of course my hearing loss which is a constant handicap. My

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dear Lydia has also been feeling the effects of age, due to her problem with her colon, which is a constant worry for her. This month she will be 80 and the children are planning a birthday celebration for that great mile stone in her life, and this month marks the beginning of my 80th year, and we pray for good health. We are enjoying life but at a slower pace, our only worries are the welfare of our children and grand children all of which we are justly proud of their success and well being, our two missionaries David and Bruce have returned from very successful missions and now our grand son, Ralph Mason, will be leaving this fall for his mission. A great event last month our grandson, David, was married to a sweet beautiful girl, Elizabeth White, in the Salt Lake temple, July 30 1979. We all enjoyed a day of celebration and excitement. David is attending the U of U, and has earned a scholarship there for the coming year. Bruce Mason is also going to the U. this fall after his mission. Also, I should like to mention our grandson-in-law, Craig Allen, married to Linda has earned a scholarship at ASU in Tempe Arizona, where he is getting his doctorate in another year, which makes us proud indeed. They have 3 lovely daughters. Cathy, another daughter of Cherry’s, married to Tracy Eliason, have 3 lovely children now and live in Ontario, Calif. They are building a new home near Riverside Calif. Tracy is now a roofing contractor and we are very proud of them. Jimmy and his wife Jane have 3 lovely daughters and he is attending the U. of U. has one more year to go for his degree in accounting. Susan Mason and husband Brent Fackeral are also attending the U. and will be thru in one more year in accounting, they have 1 child, a girl Our Gr daughter Annette Smith and husband Russ Hill are now located in their home in the western area of the Salt Lake valley. Russ is in the plumbing business and doing real well. They have 1 child, a boy, Spencer. All these gr childern and their success in life, all are active in the church which accounts to a degree for their success. We had Cherry’s girls with us for a while this summer and had a chance to get better acquainted with them. Cynthia is attending the B.Y.U, this year and Carolee will be there next year. We get to see the Sanders family at least once a year as they try to make a trip up here once a year. We are happy they are so well situated in Lompoc, Calif. Our children here in Salt Lake City are prosperous and active in the church. Gordon is in the bishopric and his family are all active. Gordon is the top sales man for the B.H.A. and doing well with that company. They are buying their own home. Fred is top salesman for Cline auto co and is making a record there by selling an average of 30 cars a month. He and his children are all active in the church. Their youngest son, Adam, was 1 year old Aug. 25, 1979.They have 5 children- 3 boys, 2 girls. They are buying their home. Marie and Jim Mason are involved in all church activities. Jim is the bishop of the Ensign 6th ward as well as being the chief health officer of the state of utah. Their youngest son, Benjamin, is 5 and started in kindergarden school this year. He says he sure likes school. The masons are also buying their own home. Although it has been 18 years since I was released as the bishop of the East Ensign and Ensign 3rd wards, I still get requests to come back, especially when some of my old ward members pass away and were sorta attached to me. Such a request was made of me this month 8/1/79 when my good friend Lyle B. Nicholes passed away. He was such a strength to me when we were assigned to build the new chapel. I appointed him to be the chairman of the building committee. He was a very talented man and so many contacts with influential people. The building progressed so rapidly we surprised everybody. It was a a very large funeral. I was requested to speak for ten minutes. I decided to write my speech so as not to run over time, but when I got up to speak I could not bring myself to use my prepared speech, instead, put it in my pocket and relied on the spirit for guidance. I was filled with the spirit and talked for over 20 minuets and they all said it was the high light of the meeting and no one noticed the time. I had many comps. and hugs from old timers who said it was like old times to hear me again. There was a

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wonderful spirit present for which I was ever grateful that I could do justice to that great man and his many contributions to that community. GRANDPA SMITH For a guy who's 79» you're really cool, You let us come and swim in your pool. But besides all that, we love you Grandpa "Nat", And we hope you**ll have many more HAPPY BIRTHDAYS in store. We love you Grandpa, we do. Love Brad, Tony, Heather, Natalie, Adam

GRANDMA SMITH For all the Chinese Checkers you let us play, For all the toast and cocoa you let us eat in a day, For all the things you let us do, Blocks, planes, and toy trucks too, For all these things we're proud, and we love you, WE DO.' By Tony Smith

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The Life of Lydia Heiniger Smith

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Preface to Lydia’s Story
I feel so blessed to have had such a wonderful grandmother. Lydia Heiniger Smith lived a life of love, service, sacrifice, hard work, excellence, humility, diligence, patience, long suffering, generosity, consideration, helpfulness, and thoughtfulness. She was a true pioneer! The words to the primary song “Be a Pioneer” remind me of grandma: You don’t have to push a handcart, leave your family dear, or walk a thousand miles or more to be a pioneer. You do have to have great courage. Faith to conquer fear. Work with might for a cause that’s right to be a pioneer. Grandma didn’t push a handcart or walk a thousand miles, but she did sail across the Atlantic ocean -how many miles? She did leave her dear Mother, Father and 3 sisters and her beautiful Switzerland at a young age to come to “ZION”. Arriving in America with her sister, they then rode the train from New York to Logan, Utah. As she and her sister were riding on the train she remembers “getting so dirty as they crossed the desert country! It was not so beautiful, Switzerland beautiful. We both looked out the window and just didn’t talk too much!” Grandma had great courage, to leave behind everything she knew and loved to come to America. She had great faith throughout her entire life. She worked hard and taught her family to love and serve the Lord. Lydia is a valiant pioneer who left us a great legacy-- and as her daughter Marie has stated...”We owe to our ancestors the kind of life we live on earth.” The following pages have been pieced together from her own life story, and from the various memories contained as appendices to her life story. Sincerely, Linda Marie Allen

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Chapter One

1900-1910
On September 8, 1899, Lydia Heiniger was born to Friedrick and Elisabeth Heiniger, in the town of Biel (the German way of expression), Berne (the French way of expression), in Switzerland. Biel, Berne, was a town consisting of both French and Germans. Because of the languages, there were both French and German schools. Elizabeth and Frederick Heiniger had married on January 16, 1892. Frederick had proposed marriage to Elizabeth three times but had been refused each time. While driving some goods in his wagon with his horse team thru the little town of Nidau by Biel (where Elizabeth lived), Frederick spotted Elizabeth fetching water by the fountain in the town square. He promptly stopped his horses, walked over to Elizabeth and asked her again to marry him. This time she accepted with the stipulation that he would go to Church (the Protestant Church) on Sundays. She was very religious.” Lydia was the sixth of eight children born to Elizabeth and Frederick, three of whom died before they were three years old. She was also one of four girls that had been born barley a year apart each (Freida in 1897, Elise in 1898, Lydia in 1899 and Emma in 1900). By the time she was born, she grew up in a family of all sisters, her oldest sister Bertha, was seven years older, Frieda was about 2 and a half years older, and Elise was only about 14 months older. Emma was born one year after Lydia, and then passed away when Lydia was only four years old. Rosa was nearly six years younger than Lydia. Lydia remembers her early years: . I was born September 8, 1899 in Madretch (now called Beil) Kt. Berne, Switzerland. My parents were Frederick and Elisabeth (Boegli Kaeser) Heiniger. They were good, uprighteous, hard working parents. Father was a very quiet man. Mother had a happy and lively disposition. Father worked for a large Moving Van Company and Mother, besides being a good Homemaker, went to work for other people to help make a living and save for their old age. Over the years Mother had given birth to eight children -7 girls and one boy. Their little boy, Frederick, died when 3 years of age, Elise lived only 1 day-(5 Nov 1895 to 6 Nov 1895), and Emma (Emmely) died when she was 3 years of age, which left them -5 daughters, namely: Bertha, Frieda, Elsie, Lydia and Rosa. Mother was a very God fearing person. When Father courted her she would not say “yes” until Father promised to go to Church with her on Sundays We girls had a very humble upbringing, but we loved each other and had good times together singing, playing and knitting our own

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stockings to wear during the cold winter month. On Sundays we used to go for walks through beautiful forests or along the shore of the lovely Bieler Lake with our parents..

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Chapter Two

1910-1920
Lydia had a great love for animals . Lydia was also an excellent student who loved to learn. She wrote: During my school years I always had good grades on report cards and at the age of 15, when I graduated from school, my teacher wanted me to go into higher education. When I told my Mother, she said: “Then you get the big head!” This is all it took to discourage me. I was a humble child, and did not realize the importance of education, which I have regretted the rest of my life. Alice Uhlman was a neighbor and friend. They used to play together after school. They "liked to play marbles and jump the rope". One day Alice said to Lydia and her sisters, "Why don't you come to Sunday School with me sometime?” Lydia said they would always think up some excuse. But one day, they felt they should accept her invitation. Alice's mother was a widow and the two of them always went to church together. This impressed Lydia's mother because when grandpa Heiniger proposed to her, she told him she would marry him if he would go to church with her. He promised he would, but then quickly forgot his promise after they were married. Lydia’s family attended the Presbyterian Church. She said "we would go, but they didn't really have anything for us." As Lydia recalled, It was about that time my sister Elsie and I discovered the Church through a girlfriend, by the name of Alice Uhlman. She kept asking us to come to her Sunday School. So we finally did and we loved it so well, we could hardly wait for the next Sunday to come. The Spirit told us it was the truth, so before to long we were baptized by two American Missionaries- an Elder Moser and Elder Alma Bangeter. My sister, Elsie and I went to the church faithfully. After a time I was teaching Junior Sunday School Class.
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Lydia’s Baptism
Elise and Lydia were both baptized in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Tuesday, 14 April 1914. Lydia was 14 years old. Bertha’s daughter Lydia recalled “Elsie and Lydia joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Days as young ladies in April 1914. Grandma and the youngest daughter Rose were baptized the same year. Frieda was baptized six years later. Bertha, the oldest daughter and my mother were baptized in 1920 by my father in 1921. My parents had married in 1913 and lived in Bern.” . According to Lydia, “A friend of my Mothers used to visit with her and explain the gospel to her, so in time she also was baptized. In time, my sister Frida (1920) and Rosa (1921) were baptized. Father never went to Church.” However, her father was
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Katie Fackrell, Biography report “My Great-Grandmother Lydia Heiniger Smith 1899-Present”

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also baptized in September 1930. Elise and Lydia’s baptism occurred only three months prior to , 28 July 1914, when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia which marked the advent of World War I. According to the Church News, missionaries were removed from the area during World War I. ~~~~~~~~

The Bieler Quartet
Lydia loved music from the beginning and had considerable talent. She spoke of how she and her sisters used to sing together when they would walk in the woods and could harmonize so beautifully. “I wanted very much to have lessons on the Zither, so my parents got me a Zither. I had some lessons and learned a few songs. I could play pretty well the songs that I learned." Lydia’s mother also had a good singing voice. She would say: “ When I can’t sing anymore, I’ll whistle.” Lydia reminisced: I had an exceptional voice and should have had early training. My sister Elsie and I became close friends with Anna Fink and Alice Uhlman. We all had good voices and we started a quartet. There was a lovely elderly sister, her name was Sister Ritter. She played the piano and we went to her home faithfully once a week and learned to sing some beautiful songs note by note. We harmonized beautifully and memorized all of them. We had a large repertoire of songs: folk songs, religious songs and yodel songs. We got to be quite noted as the Bieler quartet over the period of five years. The mission President, Angus Cannon paid our fair to have us come and sing in Conferences in Bern, Interlaken and other places. Those were such happy times, we just put our hearts and souls into it. The Lord had blessed me with a beautiful wide range voice, so I used to sing the bass part. Alice Uhlman had a high soprano voice, Anna Fink sang second part and my sister, Elsie, sang tenor. We chose songs for mixed voices and it sounded so beautiful. I was in second heaven when I could sing. ~~~~~~~~

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Chapter Three

1920-1930
Lydia’s older sister Frieda was baptized in 1920 and became the first Heiniger to immigrate from Sweden to Utah. Lydia soon followed her sister with her good friend Alice Uhlman who had introduced her to the church and who also sang in the Beiler Quartet with her. Lydia wrote: In 1920 we girls had a desire to come to Zion. My sister Frieda migrated to Logan 6 months ahead of me. I came with Alice Uhlman in September of 1921. We sailed on a French steamer called “Rochambeau”. We were 9 days on the ocean. We experienced 2 major storms and found out how powerful the high waves are. We did not get sea sick, we enjoyed the trip. We arrived safely in Logan where we found work in nice LDS homes, as we could not speak much English2.

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NOTE: I’m now 85 years old, I have loss of memory, can’t pinpoint dates and all I did.

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In that same period of time my sister Elsie had also come with Anna Fink and her parents, so the Bieler Quartet was reunited in Logan for a short time only. Alice Uhlman was very unhappy in Logan and decided to go to California. We never were together again. November 13, 1921, soon after she arrived in Logan, Lydia was given a patriarchal blessing by William Hyde. Her patriarchal blessing promised, "your Father will gather with the church, where he can go to the House of the Lord and have his wife and children sealed to him."

A blessing given by William Hyde,

Patriarch, upon the head of Lydia Heiniger, daughter of Fritz Heiniger and Elizabeth Boegli. Born Sept. 8, 1899, at Madrektch, Barus, Switzerland.
Sister Lydia Heiniger, by the authority of the Holy Priesthood conferred upon me, I place my hands upon your head and seal upon you a Patriarchal and a Father’s blessing. In years to come you will realize more fully, than you can now, that the hand of the Lord has guided your footsteps to the bosom of the Church. He has opened up your way and He will continue his blessings over you. I bless you with health of body and vigor of mind to perform the duties that will be required at your hands in life. You are a daughter of Sarah, through the loins of Ephraim and great are the promises made to the faithful born under that lineage. I seal upon you the gifts of faith, knowledge and wisdom to perform will your mission in life. Great will be your joy in assisting to redeem your kindred dead. And great will be your joy when you go into the House of the Lord and receive a nobel bosom companion to comfort, cheer and bless through time and the countless ages of eternity. I seal you up against the power of the destroyer and I seal you unto eternal life. When you correspond with your parents-go into your secret closet and ask your Heavenly Father to dictate the words you should use and your Father will gather with the church, where he can go to the House of the Lord and have his wife and children sealed to him. That he can have them and claim them through time and the ages of eternity. Shun every temptation that would lead you into by and forbidden paths. And you will have influence and power with your associates in life. There are two powers- and his servants we are whom we list to obey. So guard your footsteps and shun the power of the evil one. As you advance in life, peace and joy will fill your soul. And you will never want for the necessities of life. I seal these blessings upon you and in time to come you will receive every blessing that would be for your profit and good, through y our faithfulness. In the Name of Jesus Christ. Amen

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As a young pioneer to Zion, Lydia was able to find work, what would become a life long friend Mrs. Senn, and an her eternal companion. She recalls these early years in America: I lived in Logan one year, then came to Salt Lake City, where I worked in a nice home as Nursemaid. The people’s name was Mr. and Mrs. Carl Fisher. I also worked for 2 Elderly Ladies. During that time I met a Swiss couple, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Senn. They were Housekeepers of a large lovely apartment house called “The Covey Apartments (on South Temple and 1st East).” We became very close friends and after her husband had passed away, she wanted me to come and live with her. She loved me very much. At that time I used to sing and yodel, playing the concert Zither. Mr. Covey had to get a new Houseman, but he let Mrs. Senn stay on because she was so valuable to him as the Houselady. The new Housekeepers’ name was Mr. Bates, his wife’s name was Letti Palmer. She was a cousin to my husband. Her mother was a sister to Nate’s mother- Lois Bushman Smith. One day she told Marie Senn, she was planning a birthday party for her husband and wanted it to be a real surprise, if she could hold it in her apartment, and Mrs. Senn consented. My husband Nate and his mother came to the party. Nate was a striking young man with rosy cheeks, black hair and beautiful white teeth. I played the Zither for them and sang. We fell in love with each other at first sight. He started to date me. Within 2 months we were engaged. He then was called on a Mission to the Southern States and I promised I would wait for him. It must have been in 1924. In 1926, Lydia’s sister Rose and her parents made the move from Berne to Utah. This left Bertha, the oldest Heineger sister and her family the only ones left in Switzerland. Even at the young age of six, Bertha’s daughter, Lydia Lerch Trevithick, recalls: My aunts Elsie, Lydia and Frieda had the desire to immigrate to Utah and did so in 1920. One day a few years later my aunt Rose came home and announced to her parents that she too de cide d to immigrate to Utah. My grandfather simply said: well what about us; we will be all alone here, we better go too. He was not a member of the Church at that time. This statement surprised my grandma totally. She shook her head and said: you are crazy. At the age of 59 and 63 this was no easy decision. Grandpa though p e r s i s t e d and was not to be discouraged. When he brought the subject up again grandma said, if we should go and not like it then you would blame me. But grandpa replied, well we can go and find out and if we don't like it we can always come back. With this thought in mind grandma finally agreed and

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preparations to leave their home and Switzerland went ahead full steam. So the day of departure came. I remembered the day in early May 1926. As a 6 1/2 year old excited, little girl I saw my grandparents, my aunt Rose with her fiancée, Paul E. Fankhauser, board the train in Bern, Switzerland. Their destination- Salt Lake City, Utah. With white handkerchiefs we waved good bye as the train slowly pulled out of the station and the dearly loved faces disappe are d to become a memory engraved in my heart and mind for many years to come. Also the thought and desire to one day join them in Utah was born at this very moment. Grandma, Grandpa, Aunt Rose and Fiancée with other members of the Church arrived in New York on the ship "the Majestic" on May 11,1926. A f t e r be i ng cleared on Ellis Island, a trying, seemingly endless train ride thru many states and many desolate prairies and deserts they did arrive in Salt Lake City to be embraced by their daughters. For the first few years my grandparents lived with daughter Frieda, her husband Franz and their three girls. Franz b e ing a baker and having his own business needed grandpa's help. Also Frieda he lpe d to run the business, so grandma was busy with the girls and household. After a few years they bought their own little home, cared lovingly for a v e ge t a ble garden, some fruit trees, flowers and goats .

Memories of Grandma & Grandpa Heiniger in America
When Lucille Yoller Pehrson, was 13 years old (1939), the grandparents bought their own humble home. It was 1310 South West Temple close to Elsie and Herman Miller who lived about 2 blocks to the south of them, also, not far from the Yollers. Mother expressed regret that she didn't visit more than she did. She did not drive at that time. However, I have fond memories of going out to their home almost every Sunday afternoon and evening. Mother's sisters and their husbands and their families also came. The adults visited on the porch while we children had a wonderful time playing outdoor games. We built strong family ties with our cousins and have always enjoyed getting together, even to this day. One fond memory I have of those Sunday visits to Grandma and Grandpa Heiniger's home is that afterwards, Dad would take us to Bill's Hamberger Place and buy us all hamburgers. They were 5 cents apiece and we loved it. It just so happened that Grandpa Heiniger had a wonderful Swiss neighbor, a Brother Merz, who explained the gospel to him. He was baptized and they were able to get to the Temple and receive their ordinances. Aunt Bertha said, "Together with Mother, they did much Temple and Genealogy work". Grandpa Heiniger also hired a genealogist to research his ancestors. The two of them would then take the names to the temple. Much temple work has been done on that line as far back as the 1500's. They were very happy here. In fact they loved it and Aunt Bertha said they never had the desire to return.

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Now her parents, most of her sisters, and her missionary were gathering in Zion. Lydia recalls Nate’s homecoming: Nate served his 2 years and went back to Snowflake, Arizona, where he was born and raised, to report his homecoming talk. Some of his relatives advised him to stay home and go to Teachers College at Flagstaff, Arizona.- which he did for one year. Then he decided he could do something else and make a living. So, he came back to Salt Lake. It was during the heavy depression, he walked the streets to find work. He finally found work in a Creamery. Later he went to work for Nelson’s Creamery and became top Buttermaker, that was in 1928.(It was the leading Creamery in SLC). He was fortunate and found a job as an assistant to the butter maker at Nelson Rick's Creamery. The butter maker was kind of "honery", but after while, he quit and dad became the chief butter maker. He used to keep track of how much butter he could make in a day. He was greatly respected there. That was in 1928". Over the 3 years he was gone, I went to work for a Mr. and Mrs. Salsbury in Burlingame, California. They had a lovely home, they were well to do. I worked there for one year, came back to Salt Lake, lived with Mrs. Senn and worked in the Bakery and French Pastry shop on 27th South State. My brother-in-law, Franz Yoller was a French Pastry Chef, he went into business for himself and did well. this is who I worked for. He worked as a pastry chef at the Hotel Utah for 2 years and then went into business for himself and was doing well. I remember Franz as a happy, hardworking man. I remember he would scrub Frieda's kitchen floor and wash her hair". Nate and I then got married in the Salt Lake Temple June 14,1928. After our marriage, there was a small family gathering at Frieda's home to celebrate together. We found a lovely Brick home on 13th Avenue and “D” Street. It had front and dining room, nice size bedroom, kitchen, bath and sleeping porch. I had saved enough money ($800-$900) to buy a front room, dining room and bedroom set, (furniture was not as expensive then as it is now) and so we had a good start. We lived there for 1 year, then moved in to a home on 12th East, near South Temple Street, next to Brimley’s Grocery Store. Nate had taken on a new job as Manager of that Grocery Store. He worked up a good going business and in time he bought Mr. Brimley out and operated his own Business, paying rent to the property owner. Marie remembers: Mother said that Dad was approached by Mr. Brimley, owner of Brimley Brothers Grocery stores. They had asked if he would run one of their

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stores. (They owned 2 or 3 stores). He learned the butcher trade from one of the Brimley brothers. "He loved it". "It was his nature". One day Mr. Brimley came to him and said he was going to have to cut his wages. Dad was making only $15 a day! Mother said, "he boiled and said, here are the keys! I would rather quit than steal". She said, "that man really woke up! That's why they went broke because they had dishonest workers. A man could just live on those groceries and not pay for it". "He did not cut his wages". Mother said, even though his wages were $15 a day, the amazing thing was they were able to live on that income and "we did not suffer". Later on when Mr. Brimley wanted to sell the stock to him and let him have the business, some man (she couldn't remember his name) loaned him the down payment and worked with him for a while in the store. One day Dad had to go to the basement of the store. There was a coat hanging there. He accidentally brushed up against it and felt bulky things in the pockets. This man had been stealing groceries, so Dad fired him. He still owed him some of the money he put up for the stock, so Dad paid him so much a month until he was paid in full.

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Chapter Four

1930-1950
Their life together was blossoming and their family was growing. Lydia wrote: October 24th, 1929 our first baby girl was born at the Holy Cross Hospital. She weighed 6 pounds. Dr. Edmund was our Dr. We named her Geraldine, she was subsequently nicknamed Cherry. She was a Doll, our pride and joy. We were not too happy with the house we lived in next to the store (on 12th East), so we moved into a nice duplex. It had just been redecorated. I can’t remember the exact location. I think it was on 6th South-11th East, it must have been during the year of 1930. While we lived there our darling, Lydia Marie, was born on June 13, 1931. She was a most precious baby. During the year 1932, we moved to Douglas Street, into a house with 2 bedrooms, We needed a larger place. February 9,1933 our first baby boy was born, we named him, Gordon Nathaniel. He was a lovely, good natured baby. He was born at home, Then on March 5th,1936 we were blessed with another baby boy. He was born at the Holy Cross Hospital, he weighted 9 pounds. He had black hair, a lovely baby boy. (Frederick Aikens) I was kept very busy being a Homemaker and mother of 4 lovely children. I never got active in Church at that time on account of the language barrier. Marie recalls: In September 1936, Rulon Sanders was our next door neighbor on Douglas Street in Salt Lake City. He also sold Real Estate. He showed Dad the Wallace nd rd property on 2 West (now 3 West) and 2nd North. Mother and Dad both felt it was "such a good set up". They were able to buy it for $36,000.00 with a $2000.00 down payment. Grandpa Heiniger furnished the money for the down payment. Dad was always so grateful. It didn't take him long to pay him back. Now he would be working for himself. Something he had longed to do.

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The property had a nice big home that was well built. A nice front room, dining room, breakfast nook, kitchen and four bedrooms. There was a grocery store, beauty salon, and variety store. There were 3 apartments on top of these businesses and Dad had 4 garages built in the back for the apartment tenants and for our family. Mother said, "during the nine years we lived there, we had them always rented. The rent income helped pay for the property. My husband was a good businessman and soon had a wonderful business going. He had a man clerk take care of the grocery department and handle the checkout department. Lydia wrote: In September 1936, my dear Husband had a chance to buy the Wallace Business Property and nice Brick Home on Second West and 7th North. The business Building consisted of a small Grocery Store, a Beauty Shop and another Store which was vacant at that time, above the Stores were 3 small apartments. During the nine years we lived there we had them always rented. The rent income helped pay for the property. Soon had a wonderful business going. He had a man clerk take care of the grocery department and handle the checking out D e p a r t m e n t .

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husband managed the Butcher Shop. He so loved to butcher, he sold quality meats at good prices and worked up a tremendous business. He was of course the overall Manager and Buyer of that business. After one year had past, he decided to do something with the vacant Store, he decided that space was to valuable and yet he sort of was at a loss of what type of merchandise to put in it. I said to him;”who will you get to operate it for you: I certainly can’t do it! I have my 4 children and the home to look after.” He answered: “I’ll get a clerk, you will not have to do it.” He got the store started with a variety of items. He also got a Lady Clerk who had been highly recommended to him, but she proved to be dishonest, so he discharged her and I took over. It was a humble beginning. I became the Buyer and Manager of Smith’s Variety Store and built a thriving business. I used to go to ZCMI and Kirks Wholesale House and hand pick all kinds of items, that I knew would sell and in time- I had a tremendous variety of merchandise. Before to long I hired a Mrs. Wood as full-time clerk, and at Christmas time we were to busy that our dear Cherry and Marie also clerked. Marie remembers this time: Dad built a wonderful grocery business. It was called SMITH'S MARKET and was especially known for his meats. He hired a beautician to run the beauty shop, which was always busy, and the Variety Store exceeded all expectations. Mother had a gift and artistic talent in knowing how to display things. People in the area loved coming to her store and she always sold her stock. The store included a small post office that was an added convenience for customers. Her window displays were always attractive and brought people in. Mrs. Wood worked full time and was a pleasant woman, honest and reliable. Good help was a great blessing. School clothing for children was a popular item in late summer. I remember the dresses Mother would let me pick out as we prepared to return to school. I felt so lucky to have such nice dresses. Mother enjoyed her garden and yard. She was very clean and kept things beautiful inside and outside. Although Christmas time in the store was a busy time, she always provided great Christmases in the home. One of my most memorable Christmases happened there. During the 9 years that Dad and Mother had those stores, the country was also experiencing the depression years. (1936- 1945). Many people suffered because there were no jobs. Our family was always OK because people still had to eat. We were very blessed during those troublesome years. Dad was always a good provider for his family. One of my memories of Dad was his slipping away from the store to the house in the late afternoon where he could take a half hour nap. It was a great energy booster for

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him. Being on his feet for such long hours was very tiring. That was one of the benefits of having the house so close. Another memory of my dad was, he loved a good beef steak. Often he did not get home from the store till after we children had gone to bed. Occasionally he would bring a wonderful steak home and have mother cook it up for him. I loved a good piece meat as much as he did. The smell of that steak frying would wake me up and I would come down and share a steak with my Dad. He always got a kick out of that. It was a special one on one time that was special for both of us. Those years also encompassed WWII years. We had a German woman who lived in our home. We were so young, I never thought to ask mother how that came about. We called her Schwester. We were told that schwester meant sister in German. All I remember about her is that because of the war, she was unable to return to Germany, so she helped mother by cleaning, cooking and ironing. She was very good natured. I remember we children used to tease her by tying strings across the doorway to her room. When she came up to her room at night, the light was dim and she would be startled when she walked into the string. She was good about putting up with our antics. I remember she had gallbladder surgery while she was with us and she suffered quite a bit of pain during that time. Those surgeries then involved quite a bit more then than they do today. We kids had very little supervision with our parents being occupied with the business. We pretty much did what we wanted. I remember playing house and dress ups with my friends and my sister Cherry. We used to continue playing "house" from one day into the next. We loved our dolls. We also rode our bikes, enjoyed roller skates, went swimming at the Warm Springs. In the summer time, we would play Softball in a field behind the store with the kids in the neighborhood. We played almost every evening. Then when it got darker, we played kick the can, hide and seek and other games. I remember rushing home from school so I could lie on the floor in front of the big radio and listen to the Lone Ranger, The Shadow, and other popular radio programs of the day. Near this same period in her life, Lydia took vocal training at the McCune School of Music in Salt Lake City in 1941 – 1943 She belonged to the Philharmonic choir for three years and during which time they gave some outstanding concerts. She was chorister of the ward Primary in 1942 and in charge of the ladies chorus of 24th Ward in 1943.

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She was teacher of the Trail Builder class in Primary in 24th Ward 1942. They bough a new home on 10th Avenue in Salt Lake City and Lived in Ensign Ward. From 1945 – 51 she was chorister in East Ensign Ward Relief Society and Ensign Stake Relief Society chorister. She took vocal training under Elizabeth Hayes Simpson at West Minster College, and Richard P. Condie3.

3

Unflinching courage [database on-line]. Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.

Original data: Westover, Adele B.. Unflinching courage. unknown: unknown, 1960.

http://tinyurl.com/29tbaod

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Chapter Five

1960-1980
The last years of their lives, they lived in The Graystone Condominium located on 27th south near 13th east in Salt Lake City. There was a pool there and in the summer the kids and grandkids were invited to come and swim. She always had wonderful sandwiches for the grandchildren when they finished their swim. They were usually egg salad, tuna salad, ham, cheese and mustard, or something else equally as good. Since there were quite a few grandchildren, this must have taken up a huge part of her summers, yet she did it joyfully, enjoying her family all the while. Lydia kept an immaculate home and was a wonderful cook. She would alternate having her children’s families over on Sunday evening for cocoa and toast. There would be a tall stack of buttered toast and plenty of hot chocolate. She would put a dollop of whipped cream on top of the hot chocolate. After the blessing on the food, they would begin dunking their toast and having a wonderful feast. Lydia didn't go to church much. She said it was because she didn't know the language that well and she always felt inadequate. Actually, it was hard for her to be in social or church settings. Marie has said that she feels Lydia’s depression and anxiety played a large role in her not taking part in church more than she did. She occasionally attended sacrament meeting, and stake conference meetings. I remember her being the ward chorister for a time. She would often serve on food committees for ward dinners and she did serve as a temple ordinance worker in the Salt Lake Temple for a time. She knew the church was true and a finer woman never lived. She was always mindful of others and their needs. Lydia was artistic in many ways. First of all, she was blessed with a beautiful singing voice. She loved to sing and yodel. She played the Zither and would accompany herself singing and yodeling. She knitted from the time she was a child. She said she and her sisters used to knit the long stockings they would wear in the winter. She made so many beautiful things over the years: Afghans. Marie has 4 in her home. One is a beautiful cable knit stitch with embroidery done over the knitting. She was always thinking of others. She made sweaters, adorable booties for all her grandchildren and great grand children, a knitted coat and suit for herself, shawls, needlepoint items, and on and on. Every item meets a high standard of excellence. She was a perfectionist in so many ways. She took great pride in her home, her cooking, her family and everything she did.

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Chapter Six

1980-1990
Nathaniel died May 7, 1982, Lydia she was 83 the year he died. In 1983 The Mason family moved to Atlanta. This was very hard for her to accept. She was looking to Marie to care for her in her declining years. After one year in Atlanta, Marie thought it was clear that she needed to bring her to live with her family. It was just too much for her to be alone. Lydia lived with Marie’s family on Oak Crossing Drive in Decatur, Georgia, near the Center for Disease Control, where Jim worked, for 5 years. In 1989, Jim was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to serve as Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services and head up the Commissioned Corp of the United States Public Health Service. This meant a move to Washington, D. C. They lived at 12 North Drive, Bethesda, Maryland. It was a home on the campus of the National Institutes of Health. A wonderful home. Lydia was now 90 years old. The move was hard on her, but she took it in stride and was cheerful about it. They lived here for 4 years and then for the last year in Washington, they lived at 2 West Drive, Bethesda, Maryland, which was also on the NIH campus. In December of 1993, Jim retired and Lydia returned with the Mason’s to Farmington, Utah.

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Chapter Seven

1990-1995
Returning home to Utah, December of 1993 was a wonderful time of reunion for Lydia. She had not seen much of her family for 10 years. Gordon and Joanne came for a visit two or three times during those years and Fred and Claudia were able to come one summer for a week. She was always happy when she could see her family. Now her grandchildren had changed, but her love for them was even greater, and she was so happy to see them again.. In April of 1994, Marie’s husband, Jim Mason, received a call to the 2nd quorum of the Seventy and was called to serve in Africa. Marie didn't know how to tell her that she would be leaving. She was very dependent on Marie by this time. She would be 95 years of age, she was declining physically and emotionally and had become a challenge for Marie. Marie’s daughter Sue and her husband Brent stepped forward and offered to take Lydia. They would be able to pay them from mother's funds and this would enable them to buy a home with a room and bathroom for mother. Sue and Brent and their family were wonderful to mother. It was a challenge for them. By early July of 1995, mother was becoming more than Sue and Brent could handle. We had agreed that when we reached this point, we would put her in a nursing home. Lydia had "died a thousand deaths" worrying about this possibility. Of all things in life, a nursing home she did not want. In Africa Marie got on her knees and pleaded with the Lord. Almost immediately Marie received a phone call from Sue. "Mom, I think grandma is dying!" Marie went directly to the nursing home. She had been admitted that morning. Marie stood by her bed. She did not recognize her for about 20 minutes. When Lydia realized Marie was actually there, she threw her arms up around Marie’s neck and just held her. That evening all of the family was around her bed. She was alert and coherent. They had a wonderful visit with her and everyone expressed their love to her and she expressed her love to them. When she fell asleep for the night, Marie went home. She received a call about 6:30am the next morning. Her mother had died during the night. Marie recalls: I got dressed and immediately went over to the Nursing Home. The curtain was drawn around her bed. I went in and just stood by her for some time. It was a sweet time for me. I knew it was sweet for her as well. She was finally released from her earthly body and the sickness she had lived with for so long and endured so well. I was happy for her. To know she finally knew peace and rest. To know she was with her beloved husband again. The spirit was sweet. I just enjoyed being there with her even in death. I felt her spirit around me. I was grateful for the knowledge that the spirit goes on living and that

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she was now free from the burden of an aged body and all of its afflictions. I felt grateful that she was with loved ones where she could rest and rejoice. I know I will see her again. The last 11 years of her life were difficult years. She suffered from clinical depression and anxiety. She also had times that she felt pretty good and during those times she would read the Ensign Magazine, write letters, watch a little television and read her scriptures. She had a strong faith and testimony of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

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Lydia’s Slipper Instructions

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Reflections: On my mother, Lydia H. Smith By: Marie Smith Mason
December 2003 At our Thanksgiving family gathering this year, my granddaughter, Rebecca Mason Williams asked me about my mother; her great grandmother, Lydia H. Smith. She asked if I had written anything about her life. She would like to know her better. The following is in response to her request. It is my hope that I can do her justice. I told her she was a GOOD woman and that I miss her very much. The thing I miss most about her is her unconditional love. This was true of my dad as well. I always enjoyed visiting them and in those times when I was in need of "comfort", I would go see them. They were nearly always there. It was such a blessing to just be with them. They were always true and constant in every way. As I think back now of the many things my parents did for me, I realize it was their way of expressing their great love for me and my siblings. Mother kept an immaculate home and was a wonderful cook. Jim and I loved going there for dinner or for Christmas or family parties. They alternated having our family and the families of my siblings in on Sunday evening for cocoa and toast. There would be a tall stack of buttered toast and plenty of hot chocolate. She would put a dollup of whipped cream on top of the hot chocolate. After the blessing on the food, we would begin dunking our toast and having a wonderful feast. The last years of their lives, they lived in The Graystone Condominium located on 27th south near 13th east in Salt Lake City. There was a pool there and in the summer the kids and grandkids were invited to come and swim. Grandma Smith always had wonderful sandwiches for us when we finished our swim. They were usually egg salad, tuna salad, ham, cheese and mustard, or something else equally as good. Since their were quite a few of us, this must have taken up a huge part of her summers, yet she did it joyfully, enjoying her family all the while, and most of us just took it for granted. In the early years of our marriage when we were financially strapped and struggling as Jim pursued his medical internship, residency and doctoral programs in Baltimore and Boston and Atlanta; at Christmastime mother would always send a LARGE box filled with generous Christmas gifts, Christmas candy, traditional loaves of egg braids, her special fruit cake and homemade Christmas cookies. She truly was our Santa and how we enjoyed it. When my last child, Benjamin Smith Mason was born, I was 43 years of age. Just days prior to his birth, Jim wanted to get his backpacking trip in before the baby arrived, so he left with the kids planning to be back in time for the birth. Sara, who was eight years old at the time, stayed home with me. I was so happy to have her. She was great company and a wonderful comfort to me. The baby decided to make his arrival 3 weeks ahead of time and I had to call my parents at 4:00 am on the morning of July 18,1974. They got me to the hospital by 5:30 am and Ben was born somewhere around 3:30 pm in the afternoon. Jim arrived home with the kids about 6:00 pm, surprised to learn he had missed such an important event. He came to see us as soon as he could get cleaned up. Once more, Mother and Dad were there to pick up the slack. During the first two years of Ben's life, Mother came every Thursday to give me the day off. It was a day that I got my hair done, did my grocery shopping and any other errand that was waiting. What a marvelous, generous and selfless mother. Has a daughter ever been more blessed by the sweet love of her mother.

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Mother suffered with clinical depression most of her life. It was a cyclical thing. Times when she was really non-functional and then times when she was fine - even enthusiastic about life and also times in between. There wasn't much medical help for her in her day, but her love and devotion to her children and her husband did not slacken or waver. Because of her depression, she was not all that comfortable with social settings. She did not attend church much, except she did attend sacrament meetings and conference meetings. She had a strong testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel and always supported Dad in his priesthood callings. She was especially supportive of him during the 8 years he served as bishop of the Ensign 3rd Ward. Mother was totally honest and true in all she did. Her life was largely wrapped around her family and extended family. We were very close to our aunts and uncles on her side of the family and also our cousins. Mother was artistic in many ways. First of all, she was blessed with a beautiful singing voice. She loved to sing and yodel. She played the Zither and would accompany herself singing and yodeling. She knitted from the time she was a child. She said she and her sisters used to knit the long stockings they would wear in the winter. She made so many beautiful things over the years: Afghans. I have 4 in my home. One is a beautiful cable knit stitch with embroidery done over the knitting. One, I am holding for Ralph's bride. I have showed it to him, hoping it would serve as a motivator. She was always thinking of others. My siblings also were recipients of her great generosity. She made sweaters, adorable booties for all her grandchildren and great grand children, a knitted coat and suit for herself, shawls, needlepoint items, and on and on. Every item meets a high standard of excellence. She was a perfectionist in so many ways. She took great pride in her home, her cooking, her family and everything she did. I worried that when Dad died it would be very hard on her. Dad died May 7, 1982. Dad was born September 14, 1900 so it was always easy to remember his age. Mother was born one year earlier, September 8, 1999, so she was 83 the year he died. Surprisingly, She did very well, but in 1983 Jim received an offer to be the Director of CDC in Atlanta. That meant we would be moving and this was very hard for her to accept. She was looking to me to care for her in her declining years. This was harder for her than Dad's death. After one year in Atlanta, it became clear that I needed to bring her to live with us. It was just too much for her to be alone. We lived on Oak Crossing Drive in Decatur, Georgia, near the CDC for 5 years. In 1989, Jim was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to serve as Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services and head up the Commissioned Corp of the United States Public Health Service. This meant a move to Washington, D. C. We lived at 12 North Drive, Bethesda, Maryland. It was a home on the campus of the National Institutes of Health. A wonderful home. Mother was now 90 years old. The move was hard on her, but she took it in stride and was cheerful about it. We lived here for 4 years and then for our last year in Washington, we lived at 2 West Drive, Bethesda, Maryland, which was also on the NIH campus. That last year, President H. W. Bush lost the election to Bill Clinton and he would have his own appointees. Jim took a position as one of the Vice Presidents of the Armed Forces medical school (Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences/ USUHS). Returning home to Utah, December of 1993 was a wonderful time of reunion for mother. She had not seen much of her family for 10 years. Gordon and Joanne came for a visit two or three times during those years and Fred and Claudia were able to come one summer for a week. She was always happy when she could see her family. Now her grandchildren had changed, but her love for them was even greater, and she was so happy to see them again.. We bought a home in Farmington, Utah. In the 10 years we had been gone, our children, those who had been out of state, were now back and all of them were living in Davis County. We had been away for so long, we just wanted to be near them. We saw the outside of the home in August of 1993 when we were here just prior to Ben's mission to Perth, Australia. We did not have time to see the house inside, so we asked Sue and Sara if they would take a look at it and tell us what they thought. They loved the house, so we bought it sight unseen and we have not been disappointed.

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In April of 1994 Jim received his call to serve in the Second Quorum of Seventy and we were assigned to serve in Africa. We were thrilled and honored and excited, but how could I tell mother - how could I leave her. In September of 1994 she would be 95 years of age. She was declining physically and emotionally. She had become a challenge for me. Who would take care of her now? Sue and Brent stepped forward and offered to take her. We would be able to pay them from mother's funds and this would enable them to buy a home with a room and bathroom for mother. Sue and Brent and their family were wonderful to mother. It was a challenge for them. I will be eternally grateful for what they did. In early July of 1995, mother was becoming more than Sue and Brent could handle. We had agreed that when we reached this point, we would put her in a nursing home. Mother had "died a thousand deaths" worrying about this possibility. Of all things in life, a nursing home she did not want. In Africa I got on my knees and pleaded with the Lord to please take her home. I told Him we had done our very best and we just couldn't do it any more. Almost immediately I received a phone call from Sue. "Mom, I think grandma is dying!" I couldn't believe how quickly the Lord responded to my plea. Jim and I had just returned from a 10 day tour of conferences in West Africa. I told her as soon as I could do my laundry, I would be on the next plane. Sue and Sara met my plane. It was about 2:00 pm. We went directly to the nursing home. She had been admitted that morning. I stood by her bed. She did not recognize me for about 20 minutes. When she realized I was actually there, she threw her arms up around my neck and just held me. That evening all of the family was around her bed. She was alert and coherent. We had a wonderful visit with her and everyone expressed their love to her and she expressed her love to us. When she fell asleep for the night, I left to go home. I received a call about 6:30am the next morning. Mother had died during the night. I'm convinced she was just waiting for me to get there. They told me the funeral home had been called to come pick her up. Did I want to be there before they came. I told them yes. I would be right over. The nursing home was in Bountiful so it was not far away. I stood by her bed with the curtain drawn around us. The spirit was sweet. I just enjoyed being there with her - even in death. I felt her spirit around me. I was grateful for the knowledge that the spirit goes on living and that she was now free from the burden of an aged body and all of its afflictions. I felt grateful that she was with loved ones where she could rest and rejoice. I know I will see her again.

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MEMORIES OF MY YOUTH, MY MOTHER LYDIA HEINIGER SMITH, AND MY FATHER. NATHANIEL AIKENS SMITH
By Marie S. Mason February 8,2005 Mother was a beautiful woman. There was no guile in her. She kept a beautiful home. Prepared wonderful meals for her family and always supported dad in his work and his church work. When I was about 5 years old (1936), dad bought a parcel of real estate on then 2nd west (now 3rd west) between 6th and 7th north in Salt Lake City. There were several buildings included in the parcel: A nice home, a grocery store, a beauty shop and another store. On top of these buildings were 3 apartments and dad had 4 garages built in the back to accommodate our family and the tenants of the apartments. Dad was able to purchase this property for $36000.00. My mother's parents (my maternal grandparents) provided a $2000.00 down payment which dad was able to repay within a relatively short time. I marvel at their ability to do this. They lived in very modest circumstances themselves. He was always very grateful to them for this help. It gave him the help he needed to begin what became a very successful business. Dad built a wonderful business for his grocery store and was especially known for his meats. He operated the grocery store with the help of another man whose name I have forgotten. He hired a hair dresser to work in the beauty shop, which was always busy, and asked Mother to make a variety store out of the other space. Mother had a gift and artistic talent in knowing how to display things. She would go to ZCMFs wholesale store and buy things for babies, children and families. She knew what people needed and could use. People in the area loved coming to her store. She always sold her stock. She also had a small post office there, which was an added convenience that people liked. Her window displays were always very attractive. She built up a wonderful business. A neighbor by the name of Mrs. Wood worked in the Variety Store for a long time. She was a pleasant woman, honest and reliable. Good help was a great blessing. I remember the dresses she would let me pick out for school in the fall of each year. I felt so lucky to have such nice dresses. Mother enjoyed her garden and yard. She was very clean and kept things beautiful. Christmas time in the store was a busy time, yet she always provided great Christmases in the home. One of my most memorable Christmases happened there. I have recorded the experience under separate cover. During the 8 years that Dad and Mother had those stores, the country was also experiencing the depression years (1936-1943). Many people suffered because there were no jobs. Our family was OK because people had to eat. We were very blessed during those troublesome years. Dad was always a good provider for his family. One of my memories of Dad was his slipping away from the store to the house in the late afternoon where he would take a half hour nap. It was a great energy booster. That was one of the benefits of having the house so close. Another memory of my dad was, he loved a good beefsteak. Sometimes he did not get home from the store till after we children had gone to bed. Occasionally he would bring a wonderful steak home and have mother cook it up for him. The smell of that steak frying would wake me up and I would come downstairs and he would share his steak with me. It was a special one on one time for both of us. I have always shared his love of a good piece of beef. Those years also encompassed WWII years. We had a german woman who lived in our home. We were so young, I never thought to ask mother how that came about. We called her Schwester. We were told that schwester meant sister in german. All I remember about her is that because of the war, she was unable to return to Germany, so she helped mother by cleaning, cooking and ironing. She was good-natured. I remember

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we children used to tease her by tying strings across the doorway to her room. When she came up to her room at night, the light was dim and she would be startled when she walked into the string. We played other pranks as well, but she was always good about putting up with our antics. I remember that she had gallbladder surgery while she was with us and that she suffered quite a bit of pain during that time. We kids had very little supervision with our parents being occupied with the business. We pretty much did what we wanted. I remember playing house and dress ups with my friends and my sister Cherry. We used to continue playing "house" from one day into the next. Our play house was an old shed in the back yard and sometimes we used the back porch. We loved our dolls. In the summer time, we would play softball in a field behind the store with the kids in the neighborhood. We played almost every evening. Then when it got darker, we would play kick the can and other games. I remember rushing home from school so I could lay on the floor in front of the big radio and listen to the Lone Ranger, The Shadow, and other popular radio programs of the day. Mother didn't go to church much. She said it was because she didn't know the language that well and she always felt inadequate. Actually, it was hard for her to be in social or church settings. My personal feelings are that her depression and anxieties played a large role in her not taking part in church more than she did. She occasionally attended sacrament meeting, stake conference meetings. I remember her being the ward chorister for a time. She would often serve on food committees for ward dinners and she did serve as a temple ordinance worker in the Salt Lake Temple for a time. She knew the church was true and a finer woman never lived. She was always mindful of others and their needs. She was always giving and always generous. She lived with me for 10 of the last 11 years of her life. That last year she lived with my daughter Sue and her husband Brent Fackrell and their family of 5 children, (Katie, Tierra, Chelsea, Elise and Joe), when my husband Jim was called into the 2 Quorum of the Seventy and we were assigned to begin our service in Africa. It was a sacrifice for her to lose me at age 94, but she accepted it and so appreciated Sue and Brent for their sacrifice and willingness to take her into their home and provide for her in such a loving way.. Mother loved the scriptures and the Ensign magazine. She had a strong faith and a strong testimony of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

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GRANDMA and GRANDPA HEINIGER GO TO AMERICA
By Lydia Lerch Trevithick Salt Lake City, Utah July 15, 1997 Just a few hours ago my mother and I said good bye to our friends of the Branch of Bern, Switzerland, and boarded the train to Geneva. My brother with his wife Dory traveled with us to Geneva to say their good bye's before our boarding the TWA plane taking us to Paris-Ireland-across the Atlantic Ocean to New York and lastly to Salt Lake City, Utah. It was late November 1946. As we were settled in our seats and flying over the countrysides, my thoughts turned back many years to my childhood and to the upcoming reunion with my grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. My grandparents Elizabeth and Frederick Heiniger were married on January 16, 1892. Grandfather had proposed marriage to Grandmother three times but had been refused each time. While driving some goods in his wagon with his horse team thru the little town of Nidau by Biel (where Elizabeth 1ived),Frederick spotted Elizabeth fetching water by the fountain in the town square. He promptly stopped his horses, walked over to Elizabeth and asked her again to marry him. This time she ac ce pt e d with the stipulation that he would go to Church (the Protestant Church) on Sundays. She was very religious. During the following years eight children were born to them, three died in infancy. The five daughters that grew up were a joy to their parents. two of them, Elsie and Lydia joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Days as young ladies in April 1914. Grandma and the youngest daughter Rose were baptized the same year. Frieda was baptized six years later. Bertha, the oldest daughter and my mother were baptized in 1920 by my father in 1921. My parents had married in 1913 and lived in Bern. My aunts Elsie, Lydia and Frieda had the desire to emigrate to Utah and did so in 1920. One day a few years later my aunt Rose came home and announced to her parents that she too decide d to emigrate to Utah. My grandfather simply said: well what about us; we will be all alone here, we better go too. He was not a member of the Church at that time. This statement surprised my grandma totally. She shook her head and said: you are crazy. At the age of 59 and 63 this was no easy decision. Grandpa though p e r s is t e d and was not to be discouraged. When he brought the subject up again grandma said, if we should go and not like it then you would blame me. But grandpa replied, well we can go and find out and if we don't like it we can always come back. With this thought in mind grandma finally agreed and preparations to leave their home and Switzerland went ahead full steam. So the day of departure came. Reminiscing during our flight I remembered the day in early May 1926. As a 6 1/2 year old excited, little girl I saw my grandparents, my aunt Rose with her fiancee, Paul E. Fankhauser, board the train in Bern, Switzerland. Their destination- Salt Lake City, Utah. With white handkerchiefs we waved good bye as the train slowly pulled out of the station and the dearly loved faces disappe are d to become a memory engraved in my heart and mind for many years to come. Also the thought and desire to one day join them in Utah was born at this very moment. Grandma, Grandpa, Aunt Rose and Fiance with other members of the Church arrived in New York on the ship "the Majestic" on May 11,1926. A f t e r be ing cleared on Ellis Island, a trying, seemingly endless train ride thru many states and many desolate prairies and deserts they did arrive in Salt Lake City to be embraced by their daughters.

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For the first few years my grandparents lived with daughter Frieda, her husband Franz and their three girls. Franz be ing a baker and having his own business needed grandpa's help. Also Frieda h e lp e d to run the business, so grandma was busy with the girls and household. After a few years they bought their own little home, cared lovingly for a v e g e t a b le garden, some fruit trees, flowers and goats . Grandpa, after having been taught the gospel, joined the Church. Both grandma and grandpa did much temple work as well as genealogy. Their friendly manner endeared them to all their family, especially the grandchildren and friends. they were industrious, hardworking, honest, good people. Grandma wrote faithfully many letters that were always excitedly opened, wheein she continually expressed her feelings of being content to live in Utah and close to the temple. The only thing she missed was to be able to go to the many small and beautiful forests that surrounded towns and villages all over Switzerland. Also, she missed her daughter Bertha (my mother) and hoped that she with her family might someday emigrate too. Grandma NEVER wanted to go back !!!! Well, here now my mother and I were on our way to this reunion. Aft e r my dad passed away June 6, 1943 having been ill for many years, and World War II being over, we felt it the right de cisio n and the Lord o pe ne d the way. My brother with wife Dory and baby Yvonne em igrate d to Salt Lake City in 1949. Lydia Lerch Trevithick Salt Lake City, Utah July 15, 1997

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Memories of Nathaniel and Lydia Smith June 2010

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Memories of Nathaniel and Lydia July 2010
Cathy Eliason (Sanders)
Probably too many to list, but I clearly remember mornings in Grandma’s kitchen as she prepared breakfast, juicing her carrots and sipping grape juice from a tiny glass. She always was working. Her food preparation was of the highest quality and the presentation of her food was masterfully artistic. She loved her little bird, Dickey, and would often sing a tune with this pretty little yellow bird through the morning as she would tidy up her home. Her home was always spotless and yard beautiful. My thoughts often go to her talents and her devotion to her family. It was evident in every word she spoke, every deed she did. We loved their visits, they would come loaded with jars of canned fruits, jams and veggies and boxes full of fresh baked goodies. While at our home she would always have hot breads and yummy treats fresh out of the oven when we girls returned home from school. Grandpa was a gentle giant in my mind. Had the firmness and gruff of someone strict, but always had time to share a hug and a long conversation. He always wanted to know the details and could remember them no matter how long ago he had been told. His sweet laugh and tender words of encouragement were always with him, even after a long day at work or evenings spent at the ward house. One day (I was about 5 yrs old) I had been playing down the street with a neighbor friend. Grandma had been calling me for several minutes to come home and get ready for dinner, the sun was still out and we were having too much fun. She came at least twice to get me and twice I ignored her. Then as I saw her coming after me for the third time I quickly jumped out of the tree that I had been playing in, only to catch the inside flesh of my hand on a branch stub – it cut and pulled open my skin about 2-3 inches , I was bleeding everywhere and of course screaming hysterically. She ran in the house and back out with a small white towel, wrapped my hand tightly and tried to comfort me. A few minutes later, Grandpa walked through the door and took me from her. I think I must have fallen asleep in his arms. Because when I awoke, it was dark and the neighbor friend who was a Dr. was standing next to me about to give me a shot and fix my hand. Poor Grandpa had to hold me down and put up with more screaming….then the memory ends at that point. (I must have been in shock or just exhausted by then) Looking back, I have to wonder if Grandma was sad about the dinner she had worked on for most of the afternoon and was it ruined. I am sure I put them through much worse as I grew into a teenager, but I always knew they loved me no matter what. And I really knew they loved my mom, Cherry. They always showed the upmost concern for her, during the time we lived with them while mom was going through her difficult divorce. And again, when she was suffering for months and months with the complications and the treatments for cancer. As mom became more weak and unable to take care of her family, there on our door step was Grandma and Grandpa Smith.

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Ready and willing to do whatever was needed to sustain our family of 6 young girls and a home to manage. I don’t remember how long they stayed. I do remember they came several times and each time stayed as long as they could. Grandma and Grandpa were there for me as I was preparing to enter the Temple prior to my marriage to Tracy. They were my guardians and support in so many aspects of my life. A fun tidbit about Grandma, is that she supplied an enormous amount of her homemade famous fruitcake as a treat for my wedding reception. It was delicious and I remember many of the guests complimenting her on how yummy it was! As we had our children, they were all welcomed and adored by our sweet grandparents. They even tended my three oldest children (ages 4,2 & 6wks) for an entire day while Tracy and I went snow skiing, only to have me return in a leg cast. Grandpa was NOT happy that I had done this and gave me quite a talking to about doing something that could prevent me from fulfilling my motherly duties!!! Later he assisted Tracy in giving me a priesthood blessing to help ease the pain and discomfort. We always loved to visit them and were treated like ROYALTY each time we came, even into their older years. (truly amazing!)

Jennifer Turcsanski (Eliason)
Grandma Lydia got me hooked on Hot Chocolate and Toast. She also ALWAYS made me eat my crust that was usually left on my plate. I hated that! But now make my kids it the crust too! ;)

Linda Allen (Sanders)
I feel so blessed to have Grandma and Grandpa as my grandparents. They have always been such a wonderful example of charity and love. As a little girl, I remember how much I always looked forward to their coming to our home in California for a visit. Grandma would always bring her fabulous canned peaches or cherries or jam or even beets! We loved them all. I remember her beautiful full course dinners, lunches and breakfasts! The best memory of all is dunking white toast (buttered to the edge) into her delicious cocoa! ummmmm! I also have a vague memory of living at their home and sliding down her stairs on a pillow-it was fun, but I don’t think she liked us doing that. I loved how grandpa was always happy, and smiling! He always had a joke or witty remark! I do remember him telling me that he swallowed a watermelon seed and that is how he got his large stomach. :) Most important to me was how much grandma and grandpa sacrificed for our family. When mom was so sick, they were both there. When my sister, Cathy, got married they were both there. I never realized until now (because I am now a grandparent), the time and effort they put into each trip, just to support us and extend their love! They both came to my wedding- again traveling to California! I always knew they loved each one of us girls to the max!

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When I went to BYU, it was a very difficult time for me. I really missed my mother, and so again....Grandma and Grandpa were there for me. I would love to go to their home on the weekends and they would spoil me and treat me like a queen! When I was a new mother- again they were both there for me. Grandma and Grandpa even came to Craig’s Graduation and provided the delicious chicken salad!! Grandma taught me how to knit, crochet, and bake. I loved to call her and ask for her recipes and then she promptly write them down and mail them to me. She taught me also that the best thing to do in the morning is to drink a glass of orange juice because it “clears out the cobwebs!” I knew the Gospel was true, because they lived it. I knew they loved me because they showed it in every way! I knew they loved each other because of how they acted together. I knew they both loved the Lord because of their lives. I am forever grateful for this my heritage!

Cherry Driscoll (Allen)
I am so glad to have memories of Grandma Lydia and Grandpa. The more I think about their life the fonder I grow of them. I love the photos my mother has of them with us as children. I am glad they were able to be at my mother’s wedding, I can only imagine it wasn’t easy for them to be there - so it makes me love them for their tenderness to see them in those photos of that special day filling in for the grandmother I was never able to meet. I can’t wait to make the holiday egg bread a tradition in my family! I will always think of Grandma Lydia when I try to nurture a flower garden or test out some of her recipes, and Grandpa Nate when I consider writing loving advice to my children. I feel like my Great-grandparents Lydia and Nathaniel Smith are shining examples of goodly parents, and both a direct link to my pioneer heritage. I am so grateful that I have memories of them.

Cindy Sloan (Sanders)
So many wonderful memories are forever in my mind and heart of Grandma and Grandpa Smith. I remember seeing Grandpa Smith always treating Grandma like a queen. I remember Grandpa’s funny sense of humor. I remember wonderful summer vacations to Utah- the Smith Family reunions in Liberty Park. Spending time with Grandma and Grandpa in their beautiful Gray stone apartment. I remember swimming in the pool, with the Mason and Smith cousins. I remember delicious food at every meal that Grandma served so beautifully. I think our favorite had to be Grandma’s cocoa, and Egg Braid bread. I can remember in the later years of Grandpa Smiths’ driving, my little sisters and I fearing for our lives as we flew down the streets of the Avenues in the back of his beautiful blue car. I remember Grandma’s beautiful voice. I can remember always feeling so proud of my Grandparents, and the handsome couple they were. I am so grateful for their wonderful example of love, of faith, and righteous living. The two of them have greatly influenced me and our family.

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Carolee (Leelee) Sanders
I remember them as a sweet and tender couple. They were always together and treated each other with the upmost respect and love. They looked happily at each other, they were courteous and kind, and complimentary towards one another. Grandpa was so gentle with her, and she was so grateful for him -they were a wonderful example of what an eternal marriage should be. Whenever I came to Grandpa and Grandma Smith’s house as a child, I remember the delicious food, the wonderful smells, and the clean bedrooms waiting for all of us. I remember thinking that Grandma Smith had a “magic freezer” because she would always have some special treat in there ready for us to enjoy after dinner. I didn’t understand how she did this, but I truly loved seeing what she would pull out of this treasure box. Most often it would be a lucious bundt cake or delicious cookies. I have developed a great love for baking and think of her often when I am in my kitchen making something special for my family, and I try to make sure there is always a bundt cake in the freezer. It’s a good thing!! They were two beautiful people with lots of love to share with all of their family and I am grateful for them.

Stephanie (Stevie) Graham (Sanders)
I remember Grandma and Grandpa taking us to McDonalds in the big blue Buick. Grandpa had a problem keeping the speed limit and we drove very fast down Holiday Blvd. Cindy, Leelee, Allie and I were lined up in the back seat like four little ducks with no seat belts. I figure our Mother, Cherry, was protecting us from above, because she knew how much Grandpa liked his Cheeseburgers. Grandma could make any meal into a masterpiece (from egg salad sandwiches to spaghetti). My greatest sadness is, my husband and kids never had an opportunity to dine at her beautiful table. I love them truly…… Stevie

Alison (Allie) Trounce (Sanders)
I loved to visit Grandma and Grandpa at the Greystone apartment; I thought they lived in a beautiful perfect house! Grandma was the best cook ever and her coco and toast was my favorite. I always felt a lot of love from both of them, visiting them in the summer was always what I looked forward to. My memories of Grandma and Grandpa Smith… ….Grandma’s incredible food! Coco and toast, eggs,

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veggies, cookies, you name it that woman could cook! At night when they went to bed I would seek in the kitchen to snag a few cookies from the cookie jar for me and Stevie. I loved going to their house because I thought they lived in a palace, everything was so beautiful and clean. Grandma would always sing or yodel and call me O-llie! Grandpa would always get the blocks and cars out for me and Stevie to play with, we would play for hours on their living room floor. In their toy box they had a BLUE PINTO STATION WAGON – this became my favorite car to play with, I always dreamed of one day have a blue pinto station wagon of my own! Ha Ha! I loved Grandma and Grandpa Smith they were so kind and welcoming and I always wanted to visit them!

Marie Mason (Smith)
I truly was born of goodly parents- They were without guile and full of selfless service for their family and others. Dad was always pleasant to be around. We all loved his sense of humor and his one liners- I hope some of the 2nd generation can remember some of them. Mother was the “hostess with the most-ess”. She had such a standard of excellence in everything she did. Many of us were blessed by her generosity. One of my memories- is that she would take turns inviting our families over on sunday evening. She would serve a large stack of buttered toast with homemade hot chocolate and a “dollup” of whipped cream. We would dunk toast to our hearts content. Mother and Dad were always there and ready to help. My 7th child was born 3 weeks early. My husband was back packing with the older children- all but Sara who was 8 years old at the time were with him. I went into labor about 2 am on the day they were to return home. I had to call Mother and Dad who willingly picked me up about 4 am and delivered me to the hospital. Benjamin Smith Mason was born about 3:30 pm and the family returned home about 6 pm that day, July 18,1974. Jim missed the whole thing, but we were so glad for this new little boy.

James O Mason
They are good, kind, generous persons. They were excellent parents and always kind to a son-in-law. They did a great job of raising their children, specially my eternal sweetheart- who is such a good mother and companion. Nate was a wonderful bishop of our ward. Lydia’s love of beauty- music, home, garden, etc. brought joy to her and her family.

Susan Fackrel (Mason)
Where should I start? We often lived outside of Utah while we were growing up, so we would come to Utah for the summer and stay with Grandma and Grandpa. These are some of my earliest memories of my grandparents. I have a few memories of their lovely

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home on 10th Avenue. I remember once Grandma lost her prized pet canary. It had flown out of an open door or window, and she was worried that she would never see it again. But she had trained it to go back into it’s cage when she set it on the floor with the door propped open. So on this occasion, she took the bird cage out to the middle of her back lawn and set it down with the door open. Then she started to call her little canary. It swooped down out of a tree and flew right into it’s cage! We were all so amazed at her little obedient bird! This was a life lesson on how critical it is that we are obedientI’ve never forgotten it! We loved grandma’s delicious home-canned cherries! They were such a treat! they lived on Loren Heights Drive at the time. Grandma had such a beautiful, immaculate garden. Rose bushes, petunia, dahlias- it was perfect in every way! Whenever I get a whiff of petunias, it takes me back to evenings on the back porch, enjoying the nice breeze from Millcreek Canyon, and the subtle sweet smell of Grandma’s petunias! I’ll never forget Sunday dinners at Grandma and Grandpa’s. Or should I call them Sunday Feasts? Grandma was such an artful chef! The food was always so very tasty. And Grandpa always wanted just a smidgeon or just a sliver more of it! He’d say things like “My doctor told me to keep my eye on my weight. So I’ve got it right out in front of me!” OR after a hearty meal he’d say “Will someone push the table over so I can stand up?! He always kept us chuckling! How I miss his sense of humor! When I was in 7th or 8th grade I did a report on Switzerland. Grandma helped me so much! She had pictures and artifacts that she let me display. She helped me make a huge poster of a Swiss chalet up in the Alps wehre a man in lederhosen was blowing on an alpenhorn. She was so proud of her Swiss heritage! It made me proud to have some of her rich Swiss blood in my veins. She mad some Eggbread for me to serve to my classmates. AS I think back I am so impressed with her willingness to drop everything and help me with this project. I remember going on drives with Grandpa-sometimes it scared the socks off of me! When Linda an dI were students at BYU together, he’d drive down to Provo and pick us up so that we could spend the weekend at home and enjoy a delicious home-cooked meal. I don’t know if he ever checked his “blind spot” when he changed lanes- but miraculously he never got in any accidents! Grandma was always ready and willing to teach me how to knit or crochet. When I made a baby blessing dress for my firstborn, I wanted to crochet it. Grandma helped me figure out the pattern. When I had completed the dress, she sewed the cutest little slip for Katie to wear under it. She didn’t even have a pattern! Of course she knit some cute little perfect booties to go along with the blessing dress! We all loved Grandma’s booties! I have one of the pairs that she knit for Joseph in my curio cabinet. They are a treasure to me. When I taught the Merry Miss girls, they wanted to learn how to knit. Grandma was there to encourage them. They loved her enthusiasm and when they saw how much she loved knitting, it made them all the more interested in learning how themselves. How about cocoa and toast?! Nobody on this beautiful earth can make cocoa and toast taste like such a feast as Grandma could! I loved how she’d serve it out of her sterling silver teapot into beautiful china teacups! It was like having a tea party! After we all had our cups of steaming cocoa, she’d wander around the table dishing up “dollops” of whipping cream! She was always so intent on taking care of the

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needs of others, that I’m not sure whether she ever got to sit down and eat. She was always making sure that everyone had what they needed. She was a true lady. When she got older, she made sure that each of her granddaughters got one of her teacups. What a special memento mine is to me! Who could ever forget Grandpa Smith’s photo albums? Complete with his scrawling script written right on the pictures! How fun it was to sit in his den with him and look at photos together. He was a terrific historian! I could go on and on! What a blessing to have these two grandparents in our lives. We always knew that they loved us to pieces and would do anything for us! They have given us a rich legacy and a name and reputation to be proud of.

Ralph Mason
Grandpa Nate always seemed happy to see us. One of my favorite memories with Grandpa was when he took me with him to do an appraisal. We were in his tan Impala and were traveling south on Wasatch Blvd. We came up behind a small sports car, and as Grandpa was traveling at a higher rate of speed, he swung out to pass. The sports car driver sped up, making it more difficult for Grandpa to pass him, but we finally overtook him and continued on our way. The sports car continued behind us and whether due to Grandpa “baiting” him by slowing down (my vote), or just by choice, the sports car driver pulled out to pass us. Grandpa turned to me and said, “Watch this.” At that point, Grandpa dropped the hammer and increased speed to match the sports car beside us. We sped along Wasatch Blvd. side-by-side in an all-out smack down for dominance. After a few seconds of racing, I remember becoming moderately concerned about the car approaching us from the opposite direction. Grandpa and macho man were aware of the new development, but neither was going to relent (although I recall sensing an extra level of concern coming from the lane next to us). The ultimate game of Chicken continued until the last possible moment when Grandpa backed off and the sports car squeezed in ahead of us – just as the approaching car whipped by. I was so shaken I almost wet myself. Grandpa, on the other hand, was howling with laughter…totally enjoying the moment and obviously pleased with himself. What a hoot! My memories of Grandma revolve around her thoughtfulness: never forgetting my birthday as a child (always received a card from her), getting crocheted Christmas slippers from her (which I didn’t appreciate nearly as much as I should have – and which I would love to have now) and her wonderful cookies, egg braid and hot chocolate and toast. I also remember seeing her at our house on frequent occasions helping Mom by cleaning or planting petunias out in the garden. On a rare “bonus” occasion, Grandma Lydia would yodel for us (as a kid, I got a huge kick out of seeing my Grandma do that).

Sarah Wankier (Mason)
My memories of Grandpa are: Sitting in his old recliner with his "awesome" remote - can't you just hear it? "chachung-chachungchachung" as it changed the channels from where he sat - WOW! Also, "Kick the table over, I'm done.." and "Give me just a sliver of that..!" Helping set up old green cots in the living room when we had sleepovers with the cousins... His adding machine in the little office which I LOVED to play with... Also, he just radiated kindness and love and always had a little twinkle in his eye whenever grandma might be frustrated with us grandchildren or him...

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Memories of Grandma are: Delicious food - egg salad sandwiches after a day swimming, cocoa and toast - PILES of toast with good real butter, delicious meat and mashed potatoes, egg bread, liverwurst sandwiches for Grandpa, lemonade cookies, beautiful afghans and booties, needlepoint chairs and art work, dahlias in her garden, drying our ears with q-tips after swimming, always taking care of everyone and serving us, and of course yodeling!

Gordon Smith
Families are forever. Dad always had his little brownie camera with him. He called a “Kodak”. He would take pictures @ Reunions, Christmas time, Thanksgiving, Birthday parties, Anniversaries, Every Baptism, every Blessing, Ordination, graduation, at ballgames, funerals, weddings and showers. Dad loved his wife and his children unconditionally. He was always very kind and forgiving for any bad decisions we might make.. Dad was a great leader. He owned his own business. Smith Market and Variety Store. He also rented out a beauty shop and 3 apartments above the stores. He later founded Nate Real Estate and Appraisal Service. He served in many Church callings, the longest one was Bishop for 8 years of the East Ensign – later Ensign 3rd Ward.. After Dad’s funeral one of the widowed sisters came up to me and said, “Your Dad promised me he would speak at my funeral. Now what am I going to do?” Dad did speak at many funerals while he was Bishop. One evening after we had finished dinner Dad said he had to go to a meeting. I, being about 6 or 7 years old, wondered just what a meeting was. So I went out in the garage and hid on the floor of the back seat of our Pontiac. When we arrived at the Church, I stood up and said, “Can I go with you to your meeting?” Dad just laughed and took me back home. Now that I am 70 years older I have come to know only to well just what a meeting is. After Mom & Dad sold the business on 2nd West he went to work for New York Life Insurance. He would take me with him on his business calls in the evenings. He would take advantage of this time to teach me to drive. I was only 13 or 14 and had to sit on a cushion in order to be able to look through the steering wheel of that beautiful navy blue Chrysler sedan. It had the longest hood in the world. Dad had a lot of patience and taught me well. I became a very good driver. I was so good that when I took my drivers test at 16, “I FLUNKED it” in GRAND STYLE. The Officer said, “Well, Gordon, you drive very well, but I have to fail you because you rolled thru 2 stop signs and did not come to a full stop. You can come back in 2 weeks and retake the test. Good luck. I did. My driving skills served me well. In my 40 years sales career I averaged 3,000 to 4500 miles driving a month. In the fall of l947 and the spring of 1948 I and a friend took over a SL Tribune paper route. This was the largest route in the city. 350 papers were dropped off each morning @ 4:00am on the corner of 7th avenue and K st. The route covered 7th Ave to 11th Ave south to north and I St to M St west to east. The winter of ’47-’48 was the toughest winter on record for Salt Lake City. Every morning I had to go get my friend out of bed at 3:30 am. He would always ask, “Is it snowing?” If I said, “yes”. His next question was, “How deep is it?” I would say, “it’s up to your waist. Come on, lets go.” His reply….”oooooh…….I’m sick” My Dad was my hero every time this would happen. Back in those days the paper carriers had to collect from the customers and pay N.A.C. before the 10th of each month. I had a customer who would always put me off. After about 3 months of this, Dad went with me and explained in very plain English that until after NAC was paid I didn’t make any money

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and that his lousy $1.70 was my profit from 3 customers. Again my DAD was my HERO. That guy was never late on his payment from then on. Mom and Dad would always have a dish full of candy on the front room table. Any time some one would visit them, especially the grand children, Dad would offer them some candy. They would politely take 1 or 2 pieces, and then Dad would say, with a smile on his face, “You had better stuff a couple in your pocket for later”. Dad believed, lived and loved the Gospel. He honored his Father and Mother. I can remember taking groceries to Grandma Smith. Then Dad would always ask her if she had enough money. Then he made sure she did. Above all else, Dad was always honest in his business dealings. My dear Mother was a meticulous person. She kept an immaculate clean home. She was very artistic with her needle work. Baby booties, afghans, sweaters, doilies, And much much more. She was always working on something. She never sat idle. If she wasn’t doing needle work she was working in the garden or cooking up something delicious to eat. A favorite was “Coco & Toast with lots of pure whipping cream whenever the grand kids would come over. And then,.a dip in the swimming pool. It has been said, “Grandma Smith is the only person I know that can make a banquet out of a sandwich.” Mother loved her flower garden. On 10th Avenue we had a huge rock garden and she would spend hours weeding and tending her flowers. She also had an operatic soprano voice and would spend hours practicing and vocalizing. She also played the zither quite well. How blessed I have been to have Nate and Lydia Smith for my parents. And Fred, Cherry, and Marie for my siblings. What a wonderful heritage we have. With fondest feelings, Gordon N. Smith 6/2/10

Jodee Smith
1. Sitting around the table having home-made cocoa and toast. The toast was buttered to the edges and cut for dipping. The cocoa was put into tea cups which sat on saucers, and topped with whipped cream. 2. When I was very young, our family was invited to a special dinner at their home (the one before they had the condo). The table was set with pressed linens, and had the crystal chandelier candle holder/flower vase in the center of the table. It was perfect. It was so elegant. We were told to be on our best behavior for this lovely dinner. We placed the linen napkins in our laps and the salads were served. I remember taking a portion, and then biting down on a tasty cherry tomato. Audible gasps of horror were heard as a stream of seeds and tomato juice sprayed across the beautiful white tablecloth. I had “ruined” the

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3.

4. 5.

6. 7.

8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

beautiful dinner! Grandma could see my distress over such an err. She looked at me and smiled and said, “Try to cut it in half next time”. (This is a very vague memory) I remember at this same house, down in the basement grandpa had a contraption that was a “massage” table. It was a long narrow table with about a 9” square on it that would move back and forth. The person would lay on the table with the square centered underneath their back. The square was supposed to relieve the muscles in the back. Well, we little kids thought it was a great amusement ride. We would take turns sitting on the square as a sibling or cousin would turn on the switch. The person sitting on the square would lurch back and forth and laugh as they tried to stay on the square without falling off before the switch was turned off. It was a short-lived adventure as we were admonished that this was an expensive piece of equipment, and we were not to touch it anymore. Grandma and Grandpa came to as many family events as they could. I remember their presence at birthdays, weddings, programs and sporting events. Grandpa had one of the “new state of the art” remote controlled TVs. The remote was a two-button cube. One button turned on the TV, adjusted the sound to 5 levels, and then turned it off. The other button cycled through the channels. When you pushed down on the remote, it would sound like a little air brake – phssht. Grandpa had a little candy dish by his chair. Grandma would say “no goodies before dinner”. Then when she left the living room, Grandpa would slip us a candy and wink. I loved going swimming with the cousins! The little elastic anklets with what appeared to be a poker chip attached made us feel all “official” when entering the pool area! “Marco-Polo” and “Underwater tea parties” were the games of the day. Although Grandma told us she lost her singing voice, we were so happy when she would sing for us, and it was even more exciting when she yodeled. It didn’t sound lost to us! Grandma taught me what a knit and a pearl were. I’ll never forget the day Grandma gave me hand-knitted booties for my baby. There is nothing in the world that compares to those booties with their perfect pom-poms. When tied right, there’s nothing a baby can do to kick them off their feet. Grandma was always in a dress or a ‘house dress’. Grandpa always had a joke – “Eat every bean and ‘pea’ on your plate!” We loved looking at pictures in Grandpa’s slide illuminator. It was kept on the shelf in the little study next to the kitchen. Riding in the back of the huge turquoise Impala. I bet six of us kids could fit across the back seat! We could have been killed, because Grandpa really didn’t mind those stop signs. The orange sticks at Christmas- my very own box!

Lori Pantuso
I loved the constant jokes and smiles from grandpa, and I love the feeling that anything from grandma was special and perfection.

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Fred Smith
"To try and pick one thing or event out of their lives of over 80 years is not only difficult, but perhaps even misrepresentative of who they really were or what they actually did. What they actually did was provide a steady foundation of always being there. Their goodness and integrity were givens - we didn't know any other experience. In my growing up years, I remember Dad always being at the store. He started early (4:00 a.m.) going to the farmer's market to buy the produce for the store, then returning to take delivery of the sides of beef from Joe Doctorman and sons. He would then run the butcher shop, cutting the meat and running the store 'til closing. It would usually be 10:00 p.m. before he came home. I, of course, was asleep both in the morning when he left and at night when he would return. I knew I could always run into the store if I needed anything, whether it was a fresh slice of bologna from the meat counter or a slice of Wonder bread, or a handful of malt balls from the candy counter in Mom's variety store. I can truly say we never wanted for anything as we were growing up. I remember after Dad sold the store and later was selling real estate and doing property appraisals, he would sometimes take me with him. I'd wait in the car while he would do his thing and going into the homes of his clients. I remember he told me after one disappointing transaction, "If you're doing business with someone and they call you 'Brother', do not walk - run away!"

Claudia Smith
Grandma Smith was an excellent cook. Meals in her home were always a delicious treat. She was a perfectionist in her homemaking skills and her home was always spotless and beautiful. She loved beautiful things and her home reflected that love. She was also an excellent knitter. We have all bee recipients of her beautiful afghans, baby booties and slippers. She taught me how to knit the baby booties at one time. I remember that she knitted herself a gorgeous suit that looked beautiful on her. She made me a lovely white knitted stole that I still have, carefully wrapped and put away. Grandma was also an excellent gardener. She spent hours in her yard planting and tending to her flowers. Everything she touched was made beautiful because of her skills. We loved her Christmas cookies, which were a work of art, and her Egg Braid was unsurpassed. We were always very grateful for treats from her kitchen. Grandma Smith made a rhubarb pie that Fred just loved. I have never been fond of rhubarb pie, but I wouldn’t dare not have a piece of that pie when she was serving it. I would eat a few bites and surreptitiously pass it to Fred to finish for me. I just had to be careful that she didn’t notice my empty plate and give me a second helping. She loved her family and took very good care of them. In her eyes, her children could do no wrong. When she went to lie with Marie, we weren’t able to see her for several years. Then, when Marie and Jim were living in Washington, D.d., Fred and I finally were able to go visit them and grandma Smith, and

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we were grateful for the time we spent with her. Later on, Grandma lived with her granddaughter, Susan, and her family and Fred was able to visit with her more often. I remember Grandpa Smith as a kind, patient, loving and generous man. He always had a smile for us and seemed glad to see us. He was bishop of the East Ensign Ward when I was growing up and before I started dating Fred. He was bishop when the new ward building was built on Ninth Avenue and K Street. I remember all the ward dinners and fund raisers we had so we could build the ward. There would be pot luck dinners where you took the food, paid to eat it adn then cleaned up after. Everyone pitched in to build the church. A few years ago, it was torn down and we were sad to think of all the wonderful memories of that building It was where our wedding reception was held. Grandpa Smith cherished his wife and worked hard to provide all the things she loved. Grandma used to purchase her own gifts, have them beautifully wrapped and then “let “ him give them to her to open. He would say, “I can hardly wait to see what I got her.” He also loved to eat the delicious food she prepared. Our boys loved to hear him say, “Eat every bean and pea on your plate.” Unfortunately, our younger children were too young to remember him.

Brad Smith
Grandma’s baking is legendary from her delicious bundt cake to her rich egg bread to her fabulous Christmas cookies. I remember playing with blocks in the spare bedroom at the Greystone condo, and Grandma’s exclaiming with delight at whatever I built. I remember being told to finish my meals so that I could “be a champion.” I remember Grandpa’s love of horses and his series of blue Chevy Impalas.

Adam Smith
I was three years old when Grandpa died, but i do remember cocoa and toast from Grandma!

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