Answers to PARTS OF SPEECH

n pro v adj adj n prep n v def 1. Samuel Johnson, who published his famous dictionary in 1755, defined a n prp det adj n lexicographer as “a harmless drudge.” Note that “as,” usually a subordinate conjunction here functions the same as the preposition “like” would.

det n adv pro v adj pro v det n prep n v adv n prep det 2. The town where I was born, which has a population of 3,000, offers very little in the n prep n prep n way of entertainment for teenagers. adv n prep n pro v adv v n pro v adj prep pro conj 3. As director of personnel, you must often make decisions that are painful to you and adj n your employees. Note: Here, “as” is also functioning in the same way as in item 1. det n adv prep n v det n pro v prep det 4. The hurricane bearing down on Florida frightened the residents who lived along the n coast. det n v prep n v v det n pro adv v 5. Any book printed before 1501 is called an incunabulum which literally means adj n “swaddling clothes.” det adj n prep adj n prep adj n adj n 6. Having been a police officer in downtown Nashville for thirty years, my neighbor v adj conj adj prep pro v prep det n grew restless and bored after he retired from the force.

det n v adj adj n adv det adj n prep n 7. This invitation thwarted his latest plan, to buy up a controlling number of stocks.

prep det n n prep adj n v 8. According to the U.S. Customs Service, smuggling birds from the Caribbean has v det adj n become a big business. prep det n prep adj adj n v v det n prep n 9. To search for the causes of lower SAT scores would be an exercise in conjecture. prep n pro adv v adv adj det adj n v v 10. Until yesterday, I never realized how awesome a redwood tree could be.

Answers for parts of sentence:
s s v do obp v 1. Samuel Johnson, who published his famous dictionary in 1755, defined a adj ph prep ph do oprp lexicographer as “a harmless drudge.” prp ph

s s v p.adj s v p.adj oprp v do 2. The town where I was born, which has a population of 3,000, offers very little in the adj cl adj cl prp ph oprp oprp oprp way of entertainment for teenagers. prp ph prp ph

oprp oprp s v v do s v padj 3. As director of personnel, you must often make decisions that are painful to prp ph prp ph adj cl prp oprp oprp you and your employees. ph

s part oprp v do s v 4. The hurricane bearing down on Florida frightened the residents who lived along the part ph prp ph adj cl prp oprp coast. ph s part oprp v v do s v 5. Any book printed before 1501 is called an incunabulum which literally means prp ph adj cl do “swaddling clothes.”

part oprp oprp s 6. Having been a police officer in downtown Nashville for thirty years, my neighbor part ph prp ph prp ph v padj padj s v oprp grew restless and bored after he retired from the force. adv cl s v do inf oprp 7. This invitation thwarted his latest plan, to buy up a controlling number of stocks. inf ph prp ph

part oprp ger oprp v 8. According to the U.S. Customs Service, smuggling birds from the Caribbean has prp ph ger ph = s prp ph v pn become a big business. inf oprp oprp v v pn oprp 9. To search for the causes of lower SAT scores would be an exercise in conjecture. inf ph = s prp ph prp ph oprp s v p. adj s v v 10. Until yesterday, I never realized how awesome a redwood tree could be. prp ph n cl = do Note: the noun clause uses an inversion of the usual subject-verb-object order. The way the clause would read in usual grammatical order would be: “how a redwood tree could be awesome.”

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