388 19th Street  Oakland, California 94612

DOA Phone 510.238.1122  LMUDA Phone 510.452.4529  Fax 510.452.4530
info@downtownoakland.org  www.downtownoakland.org
info@lakemerritt-uptown.org  www.lakemerritt-uptown.org
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388 19th Street  Oakland, California 94612
DOA Phone 510.238.1122  LMUDA Phone 510.452.4529  Fax 510.452.4530
info@downtownoakland.org  www.downtownoakland.org
info@lakemerritt-uptown.org  www.lakemerritt-uptown.org
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4
DOA/LMUDA
YTD SOBO Budget Snapshot - April 2017

DOA YTD DOA YTD DOA YTD LMUDA YTD LMUDA YTD LMUDA YTD
SOBO Actual Budget Variance Actual Budget Variance Perm/Temp Variance Comments
Unfavorable TV due to an increase in
Clean and Safe $225,976.38 $225,718.36 -$258.02 $276,193.35 $275,877.64 -$315.71 training hours for the month of March.
Unfavorable TV due to unanticipated
Misc. $3,123.80 $3,000.00 -$123.80 $3,785.86 $3,333.36 -$452.50 expenses.
Favorable TV due to percentage of the
projected end of year bonus included in
Program Coordinator $8,192.42 $8,953.64 $761.22 $10,375.93 $10,943.36 $567.43 monthly allocation.
Favorable TV - strategic projects pending
PROW Maintenance $1,546.53 $8,833.36 $7,286.83 $1,085.27 $9,833.36 $8,748.09 implementation.

Watering $111.35 $1,666.64 $1,555.29 $136.10 $1,666.64 $1,530.54 Favorable TV due to weather.
Total SOBO $238,950.48 $248,172.00 $9,221.52 $291,576.51 $301,654.36 $10,077.85
5
DOA
2017 Current
Annual YTD Remaining
Projects Budget Actual Funds Notes
Hanging Plants (Maintenance) $1,500.00 $0.00 $1,500.00
Median Maintenance $5,000.00 $483.26 $4,516.74
Ground Planter Maintenance $4,500.00 $481.70 $4,018.30
Utility Box Wraps $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 Maintenance only
Big Splash $2,000.00 $0.00 $2,000.00
Latham Square Maintenance $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00
Cigarette Butt Program $1,000.00 $51.99 $948.01
CCTV System $2,000.00 $461.25 $1,538.75 1 year of Comcast service approx. $2000.00
Homeless Service Outreach $2,000.00 $0.00 $2,000.00
Misc. $3,500.00 $68.33 $3,431.67
Total $26,500.00 $1,546.53 $24,953.47
6
LMUDA
2017 Current
Annual YTD Remaining
Projects Budget Actual Funds Notes
Hanging Plants (Traditional) $1,500.00 $0.00 $1,500.00
Median Maintenance $5,000.00 $454.58 $4,545.42
Ground Planter Maintenance $6,500.00 $510.37 $5,989.63
Big Splash $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00
Utility Box Wraps (maintenance) $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00 Maintenance only
Franklin Square Beautification $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00
Cigarette Butt Program $1,000.00 $51.99 $948.01
CCTV System $2,500.00 $0.00 $2,500.00
Homeless Service Outreach $2,000.00 $0.00 $2,000.00
Misc. $3,500.00 $68.33 $3,431.67
Total $29,500.00 $1,085.27 $28,414.73
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The Lake Merritt Uptown and Downtown Oakland Associations are issuing a call for artist
proposals for a murals or street art installations within the boundaries of our districts here in
Downtown Oakland.

Project Details:
• The goal of any mural/street art project selected is to provide a piece of public art of interest to
residents and visitors to downtown Oakland.
• The project can come in various forms, shapes and sizes.
• The mural should include the metal gutters, air conditioning unit, door, pipes, vent, and meters.
• We are open to all forms and proposal, but typically expect the art to have a relevance to the
community of downtown Oakland and to be something unique to artistic fabric of the area.
• Special note: No buildings are selected at this time, we are expecting grant awardees to have
the ability to make contact with effected property owners and receive permission to execute their
project in the form of a contracted agreement.
• There is no application fee.

Proposal Deadline:
There is no deadline, and we want to hear from the community. If you have a project in mind and
you want to present it, please feel free to submit to us at anytime.

E-mail Proposals To:
Andrew@downtownoakland.org

Award Amounts:
We may give up to $5,000 per project. All costs associated with the project must be covered with
this funding. If additional funding is required to fully execute the project, please outline your
other funding sources. We typically will not release funding until commitments for all funding
have been secured to fully execute the project.

Initial Payment:
50% of the stipend will be paid within two weeks of a signed letter of agreement. 50% of the
stipend will be paid upon completion of the mural.

Downtown Oakland Association & Lake Merritt-Uptown Association ăĉĉŏāĊ0$ŏ0.!!0ŏŏđŏŏ'(* ČŏŏĊąćāĂ 
ŏþ!čŏĆāĀġĂăĉġāāĂĂŏŏđŏŏ ŏþ!čŏĆāĀġąĆĂġąĆĂĊŏŏđŏŏ4čŏĆāĀġąĆĂġąĆăĀ
%*"+Į +3*0+3*+'(* ċ+.#ŏŏđŏŏ%*"+Į('!)!..%00ġ1,0+3*ċ+.#ŏŏđŏŏ333ċ +3*0+3*+'(* ċ+.#ŏŏđŏŏ333ċ('!)!..%00ġ1,0+3*ċ+.#
9

Completion Date:
All submissions must have a completion date.

What to Send With Your Submission:
Please structure and label the proposal sections using the headings:
Part 1: The Written Proposal
Contact Information:
Full Name
Address
Telephone Number
E-mail address
Illustrations of Proposed Work
Proposals must contain between 1 and 5 sketches or digital illustrations of the proposed project.
Detailed Project Description (1 page maximum, 12 pt. font)
Please Include the Following Descriptions:
• A literal description of the project.
• A description of the concepts in the proposed project.
• How will this work contribute to resident’s, tourist’s and visitor’s experience of Downtown
Oakland?
• List the maintenance requirements the project will require, if any.
• An artist statement describing your experience and interest in the project.
Materials Budget:
Material reimbursement is available up to $500.00. The materials budget may be increased
depending on justification and approval of the Arts and Culture Board. Please submit a detailed
materials budget.
Part 2: Support Materials/Previous Work
• Proposals should be accompanied by 5 to 10 images of previous work. Files should be
submitted in a .pdf format and will be acknowledged upon receipt.
• Resume – Maximum 2 pages per artist.

Additional Requirements For Mural Projects:
Artist shall be responsible for preparation of the surface to ensure a minimal life span of 3 years.
This may include a primer and other preparation necessary for the optimum bond of the paint to
the wall. Two applications (two coats) of Anti-Graffiti/ultraviolet protective coating must be
applied on the surface and top of the finished art that will provide resistance to vandalism and the
weather. Please include the cost of the protective coating in your budget. Andrew Jones must
approve the mural prior to coating being applied.

Selection:
Members of the Lake Merritt Uptown and Downtown Oakland Associations staff and SOBO
Committee members will select all projects. The Lake Merritt Uptown and Downtown Oakland
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Associations reserve the right to deny any and all proposals submitted. These projects and the
awarding of funds is solely based on the availability of funding and the desire of the SOBO
committee to allocate funding to public art projects. Applying to funding in no way ensures
funding for your project.

Send electronic submissions Andrew Jones at Andrew@downtownoakland.org

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact Andrew Jones at
Andrew@downtownoakland.org
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Matt Litwin
359 Bellevue, Oakland CA
651 587 5351
Limpiodesigns@gmail.com

Concept, and how it relates to residents and tourists.

The concept behind this mural is to acknowledge and celebrate the wildlife that lives on Lake Merritt.
The main portion of this mural will be dedicated to a much larger than life painting of a great blue heron
and its environment here in Oakland, with a landscape of Lake Merritt in the background. The colors I
would use for the blue heron would be a range of cool colors; blues, purples, teals, greys, and white with
a black outline. The background will be easier to paint because the wall is already a green base, so the
cost of paint will be cut significantly. The underlining theme is to show how important Lake Merritt has
been to the wildlife in Oakland. It stands as a testimony to the support that Oakland has always placed
on sustaining and being aware of the environment. A less common known fact of the lake is that it is the
first wildlife refuge in the nation, which is something I would like to include in the mural.

The blue heron is not just a beautiful and strong bird that comes to the lake, but also holds a strong
presence in ideas of sustainability, grace and intellect throughout different cultures; which is great
because of the diversity in the city. Joe Kohn, the owner of Izzy’s, was also very interested in the idea of
the great blue heron because in fine dining there is a French saying that actually references the heron.
The quote translates to saying, that with greatly cooked plates should elegant, and crisp enough that a
long beaked bird could peck and eat it without any failure.

I believe this mural will make a great installation for tourists and locals alike because everyone will be
able to appreciate the mural for a fun, colorful examination of a large magnificent local bird. Tourists will
also be able to be introduced to the fact there are great blue herons here, and the rich history of Lake
Merritt, which can be hard to imagine when you first arrive to Oakland. As for locals, I think it is more to
celebrate their city, and the wildlife that lives in it. In the end the art piece will be a fun, and inviting
piece that will hopefully give people the time to remember that Oakland offers an amazing release from
the urban life, and that we should continue to be conscious about the environment for the next
generations to appreciate.

Artist Statement:
For the past four years I have been a traveling muralist and street artist committed to inspiring
communities through art. My work has taken me from Argentina to Australia, Thailand to UK and I
am currently here for the month of Feb and March. I am very interested in this project because I
have loved my time in Oakland so far, and my favorite place to be in outside and by Lake Merritt. I
feel this project is a great ode to my time here in the Bay Area, and I want to give back to this
neighborhood that I have been living in for the past two months. I also love to paint animals and the
idea to paint one across an entire building wall really excites me.

Budget

The cost of paints will roughly be $700-800. $500-600 for spray paint, $100 for house paints as , and
$100 for a top coat varnish. I am asking as well for an artist stipend of 3,000. I normally charge 125 an
hr, and I estimate the wall will take me 25 to 30 hrs to complete. The total budget would be 3500-3700.
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13

Date February 8, 2017
To: Mr. Greg Pasquali, Associate
CP VI Franklin, LLC
1000 Sansome Street, 1st Floor
San Francisco, California 94111
From: Phil Erickson, Community Design + Architecture
Rob Rees and Carrie Modi, Fehr & Peers
Mike O’Connell and Janine Watson, BKF Engineers
RE: 13th Street Final Concept Design Memorandum

Background
Community Design + Architecture, alongside Fehr & Peers and BKF Engineering, was
contracted by Carmel Partners and the Downtown Oakland BID to study existing
conditions and site constraints for the block of 13th Street in Downtown Oakland
between Broadway and Franklin Street; and develop a concept design for innovative,
tactical urbanism improvements that support pedestrian activity and complement
downtown businesses.

Tactical urbanism interventions are innovative tools that allow for flexible, inexpensive,
easily-implemented urban design improvements. In some cases, tactical urbanism
improvements may also serve as a pilot or testing ground for long-term, permanent
improvements. Common tactical urbanism design tools include colorful asphalt and
sidewalk paint, large planters, café seating and parklets, that make significant physical
and visual changes at a relatively low cost. These interventions often reclaim inefficient
right of way space to provide additional pedestrian plaza space – offering additional
pedestrian resources, complementing neighboring businesses, and improving safety for
those walking, biking or driving.

The following memorandum documents the site’s existing conditions, initial concept
design options, community input process and final design concept for 13th Street. The
design team has also provided a preliminary cost estimate for the tactical urbanism
installation and potential site furnishings.

Existing Conditions
The study block of 13th Street is in Downtown Oakland, between Broadway and Franklin
Streets. 13th Street is an east-bound, one-way corridor that begins at Broadway to the
west and terminates at Lake Merritt Boulevard to the east. The study block is located
across from the Downtown Oakland City Center, the 12th Street City Center BART
Station, and adjacent to several major AC Transit Bus stops, on Broadway, that serve 23
bus lines and the future AC Transit Bus Rapid Transit line.
14

Community Design + Architecture
RE: 13th Street Final Concept Design Memorandum
Date February 8, 2017
Page 2 of 10

Sidewalk and Street Conditions
The existing sidewalk is adequately wide for the level of pedestrian activity, typically around 12 to 14 feet,
though usable space is inconsistent along the block and the sidewalk quality is deteriorating. There is not
enough space for significant outdoor seating that would better serve existing and under construction
restaurants and cafes that exist along the block. The pavement along 13th Street is worn, uneven, and in
need of repair. This and a combination of maintenance practices has led to poor drainage along the
curbline with standing water being present at the northwest bulbout corner and other locations even in
the summer. Several underground utility improvements throughout the years have also caused
inconsistent pavement conditions along the roadway. The entrance of the block at Broadway has a large
bulbout on the northside of the street that shadows the diagonal parking on the northwest corner.
Additionally, there is an AC Transit bus stop at the bulbout along Broadway that serves five routes.

Adjacent Businesses
Several businesses are located along the study block. The ground floor of the north side of the corridor
includes:

- T-Mobile
- Camburger Restaurant
- A parking garage (currently beginning a planning process to be converted to office use with a
portion of the building remaining to be parking on the ground level)
- Mocking Bird Restaurant (expected to open in January, 2017)
- Wolfman Books
- Drastic Changes, Hair Salon
- Good Mother, Art Gallery
- The Wireless Store
- Golden Lotus Restaurant

The ground floor of the south side of the corridor includes:

- Burger King
- Radio Club and Bar
- Archer Bicycle Shop
- Modern Coffee
- Lobby entry for the Tribune Tower office building
- Tribune Tavern Restaurant and Bar

Traffic Patterns
Auto traffic is generally very low on 13th Street, based on observations. There are two off-street parking
facilities that take access mid-block but both have a small parking supply. One is a parking garage at 420
13th Street with approximately 200 spaces, and one is a small surface lot with approximately 17 spaces.
The 200-space garage has begun a planning process to convert to office use which would reduce the
amount of parking within the building and likely reduce the queuing that currently occurs, mainly in the
morning, as the garage is valet parked. Pedestrian volumes are very high at the intersection with
Broadway, and pedestrian volumes on 13th Street primarily serve the local retail and office uses directly
along the corridor.
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Community Design + Architecture
RE: 13th Street Final Concept Design Memorandum
Date February 8, 2017
Page 3 of 10

The roadway is one-way eastbound and has two-travel lanes. At the entrance from Broadway onto 13th
Street, there are two travel lanes. As diagonal parking transitions to paralleling parking on the north curb,
two additional travel lanes are added to create four-lane cross-section at the intersection with Franklin
Street. No dedicated bicycle facilities are provided, and this is not proposed segments of the City’s bicycle
network. No transit vehicles operate on this street.

Curbside Uses (Parking & Loading)
Parking and curb management along 13th Street varies. The north curb includes both diagonal paid
parking and parallel paid parking and a commercial loading zone near the 420 13th Street driveways. The
south curb of the block is predominately paid parallel parking with a designated commercial loading zone
near the Broadway intersection.

The entrance of the block at Broadway is traffic calmed with a large bulbout that frames the diagonal
parking on the northwest corner. At the entrance, the street contains two travel lanes. As traffic
continues down the block, the striping awkwardly transitions to a four-lane road with parallel parking.

Traffic along this block is dominated by commercial loading for adjacent businesses along 13th Street and
Broadway. These are primarily 20- to 30-foot long delivery trucks, with some larger trucks primarily
associated with Good Will. Throughout the typical business day, delivery trucks can be seen parked in the
commercial loading zones or stopped in the underutilized travel lanes, sometimes parked side-by-side
across multiple lanes.

Initial Concept Design Options
The design team developed a series of initial concept sketches with the following goals in mind: calm
traffic along 13th Street; complement adjacent businesses; maximize pedestrian space; allow for flexible
and creative programming along 13th Street; and accommodate fire and safety access. Ultimately the
determining factors around which the three initial concept studies varied included vehicular access and
business loading zone, parklet and plaza space placement, and fire access and staging. (See Attachment 1:
13th Street Concept Diagrams)

Vehicular Access and Business Loading
Each of the options used a similar strategy to
accommodate vehicle access along the street while also
accommodating short and long-term loading. The strategy
the design team developed provides a 20-foot wide travel-
way that includes a 16-foot drive isle and 2-foot short-
term loading buffers on either side. This strategy allows for
an emergency vehicle to pass a parked or loading vehicle;
20 feet is the desired minimum width defined by the Fire
Code.

Existing long-term parking and taxi waiting areas are
removed, in favor of the combination of parallel short-
term and long-term loading areas along the corridor. For
commercial or passenger loading by private vehicles, ride
hailing services, including taxis; each option provides 6-foot wide loading pockets placed in varying
locations along the block; when combined with the 2-foot wide loading buffer this results in an 8-foot
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Community Design + Architecture
RE: 13th Street Final Concept Design Memorandum
Date February 8, 2017
Page 4 of 10

standard parking/loading lane width. Vehicles are encouraged to pull tight to the edge of the travel-way,
but the two-foot loading buffer allows for additional space for delivery functions. The cross section in
each of the three options varies based on the placement of the plaza spaces. In practice, the narrowed
roadway with flexible but designated curbside loading spaces will accommodate the various loading
needs of 13th Street merchants and office buildings while also calming traffic and creating clearer
expectations for all roadway users. The reduction in parking is balanced by improvements for loading and
the provision of plaza space that complements the block’s businesses.

Fire Access
Fire and safety access are accommodated in each of the various cross section alternatives. In each
scenario, fire access is accommodated in two locations along the corridor where the long-term loading is
located. This strategy assumes the loading vehicles are out of the 20-foot combined travel way short-term
loading “edges”, and thank vehicles can vacate the 6-foot long-term loading area to provide fire trucks a
26-foot wide staging area. This results in two 20-foot by 120-foot staging areas located to provide ladder
truck access to the older and taller buildings along the block.

Plaza Space
After establishing the recommended travel-way width necessary to provide fire access and loading areas
along 13th Street, the design team explored how to complement corridor businesses with tactical
urbanism plaza spaces. The relationship of the plaza spaces assigned to various portions of the corridor
produced different traffic calming effects.

- Option 1 explored providing the maximum amount of plaza space along the north side of the
block. While this option provided ample linear plaza space, the resulting travel-way was more
direct and provided the least amount of traffic calming.
- Option 2 sought to evenly distribute the plaza space adjacent to each of the restaurant uses along
the corridor, producing a slight chicane-like treatment along the block. The resulting chicane
calms through-traffic as vehicles have limited visibility to the end of the block.
- Option 3 distributed the maximum plaza space at the northwest and southeast corners of the
block. The result of this distribution also maximized the offset of the travel-way and produced the
greatest amount of traffic calming.

Community Input
To inform the final design concept, representatives of Carmel Partners and Downtown Oakland BID staff
met with community stakeholders including businesses and building owners along 13th Street to solicit
feedback on the various concept design options. Their feedback was positive and encouraged the team to
distribute the plaza space evenly throughout the block so all businesses would benefit from the proposed
improvements. The result of this process was that the Option 2 concept design would move forward.

Final Concept Design
The Final Concept Design for 13th Street uses tactical urbanism tools including large planters at plaza and
pedestrian spaces to guard against calmed vehicular traffic. Colorful pavement paint is used throughout
the street except for in the travel-way portion of the street that will be used by people driving vehicles or
riding bicycles. The paint also delineates programming elements along 13th Street between Broadway and
Franklin Street in that distinct colors designate specific “zones” within the street, such as a plaza zone
versus parking or loading. An additional loading area, and refuse access to the current parking garage on
17

Community Design + Architecture
RE: 13th Street Final Concept Design Memorandum
Date February 8, 2017
Page 5 of 10

the north side of the street is provided with an area to the west of the parking garage access being
marked for loading and refuse pick up.

The concept significantly increases the available pedestrian gathering space in a series of plazas in the
northwest corner, northeast corner and southeast corner adjacent to neighboring restaurants. The total
resulting plaza space is nearly 5,000 square feet where businesses and the Downtown BID may provide
outdoor seating, park space, food trucks and other event space. The Downtown BID has provided colorful
metal tables and chairs in several other plazas and gathering spaces to complement neighboring
businesses. The tables and chairs are also easy to move during other larger programmed events.

A neck-down at Broadway, a mid-block chicane, painted bulbouts at Franklin, and a narrowed travel-way
all contribute to traffic calming along the block. Commercial and passenger loading are improved through
clear designation of curbside or other space. Street trees and planters delineate the pedestrian plaza
spaces from the travel-way while also beatifying the public realm and establishing 13th Street as a
comfortable and attractive destination.

(see Attachment 2: Final 13th Street Concept Design)

Cost Estimate
CD+A has provided an estimate of probable costs related to the suggested concept elements and
amenities identified in the Final Concept Design.
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Attachment 1: 13th Street Concept Diagrams

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Attachment 2: Final 13th Street Design Concept

19
Attachment 1: 13th Street Concept Diagrams
20
Attachment 2: Final 13th Street Design Concept

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Attachment 2: Final 13th Street Design Concept

ESTIMATE OF PROBABLE COSTS
13th Street Public Space Improvements
Downtown Oakland Association
February 8, 2017

Item 5
1 Line Item Qty Unit Unit Price Total Notes
# 0

SIDEWALK REPAIR
1 Sand Blast and Sealer 7,920 SF $ 3.50 $ 27,720
Subtotal $ 27,720
StreetBond System ON ROADWAY
Assumes simple pattern with stock and non-stock colors. Based
2 StreetBond 150 Coating 13,571 SF $ 3.05 $ 41,392
on contractor estimate, 4 coats of StreetBond
3 StreetBond Sealer 13,571 SF $ 0.10 $ 1,357
Subtotal $ 42,749
SLURRY SEAL AND STANDARD STRIPING
4 Slurry Seal 17,160 SF $ 2.00 $ 34,320
5 Signing and striping (thermoplastic) 1 LS $ 10,000.00 $ 10,000
Subtotal $ 44,320
SITE FURNISHINGS
6 Metal Table 12 EA $ 165.00 $ 1,980 3X3
7 Metal Chair 48 EA $ 70.00 $ 3,360 4 chairs per table
8 Concrete Circular Planter 27 EA $ 500.00 $ 13,500 34" diameter x 35" height
9 Temporary Stage 1 AL $ 20,000.00 $ 20,000
Includes stakes. Unit cost doubled as request to account for
10 36" Box Planter tree 9 EA $ 2,000.00 $ 18,000
potential replacement.
11 Planter tree box 9 EA $ 300.00 $ 1,530 5'x5' wood nursery tree box, Painted
12 Pea Gravel Soil Covering (Mulch) 4 CY $ 50.00 $ 200
13 Planting Soil 11 CY $ 80.00 $ 880
Unit cost doubled as request to account for potential
14 1 gallon accent plant 81 EA $ 28.00 $ 2,268
replacement.
Subtotal $ 61,718
TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS
Subtotal - Cost Improvements (rounded to $100s) $ 176,500
7% Traffic Control $ 12,355 Roughly 5 days to apply StreetBond coating and sealer
10% Mobilization $ 17,650
15% Contingency $ 26,475
TOTAL CONSTRUCTION $ 233,000
10% Design $ 23,300
Construction
5% $ 11,700
Eng/Admin
TOTAL HARD AND SOFT COSTS $ 268,000
Prepared by: Community Design + Architecture with BKF Engineers