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Environmental Assessment Report

Initial Environmental Examination


Project Number: 37192
August 2009

PAK: Multitranche Financing Facility


Power Transmission Enhancement Investment
Program, Tranche 1

Subproject No. 21
132kV Rohri Substation to Gambat Substation
Transmission Line Subproject

Prepared by National Transmission and Despatch Company for the Asian Development
Bank (ADB).

The initial environmental examination is a document of the borrower. The views expressed herein do not
necessarily represent those of ADBs Board of Directors, Management, or staff, and may be preliminary
in nature.
CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS
(as of 30 May 2009)

Currency Unit Pakistan rupee/s (Pre/PRs)


PRe1.00 = $.0080
$1.00 = PRs79.80

ABBREVIATIONS

ADB Asian Development Bank


DDC Detailed Design Cell
DDS Detailed Design Stage
EIA environmental impact assessment
EMP environmental management plan
ESIC Environmental and Social Implementation Cell
IEE initial environmental examination
LARF land acquisition and resettlement framework
LARP land acquisition and resettlement plan
MFF Multitranche Financing Facility
NWC Nara Wetland Complex
PCB Polychlorinated biphenyls
PEPA Punjab Environmental Protection Agency
PEPAct Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 (as regulated and
amended)
ROW right of way
SIA Social Impact Assessment
TXL transmission line
WMP waste management plan

DEFINITIONS

Barren Land Land which has not been cultivated and was lying barren at
the time of field survey for this IEE
Cropped land Land which was under agricultural crops at the time of field
survey for this IEE.
Landowner Person(s) holding legal title to property on the electric
transmission line route from whom the Company is seeking,
or has obtained, a temporary or permanent easement, or any
person(s) legally authorized by a landowner to make
decisions regarding the mitigation or restoration of
agricultural impacts to such landowner(s) property.
Right-of-Way Includes the permanent and temporary easements that the
Company acquires for the purpose of constructing power
transmission facilities. For IEE of this Subproject Right of
Way was 100m on either side from the center line.
Tenant or Hari Persons cultivating the land on tenancy or share cropping
basis.
Topsoil The soil that has the highest content of organic matter, more
specifically defined as the "A" horizon.
Transmission Line Includes electric transmission and distribution lines,
substations, and their associated components.
Uncultivated Land The land which was not cropped at the time of field survey for
this IEE.
CONTENTS

Page
I. INTRODUCTION 1
A. Overview 1
B. Background 3
C. Scope of the IEE Study and Personnel 4
D. Policy and Statutory Requirements in Pakistan 5
E. Structure of Report 8
II. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT 8
A. Type of Project 8
B. Categorization of the Project 10
C. Need for the Project 11
D. Location and Scale of Project 11
E. Alternatives 12
F. Proposed Schedule for Implementation 13
III. DESCRIPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT 13
A. Project Area 13
B. Physical Resources 15
C. Ecological Resources 18
D. Economic Development 23
E. Social and Cultural Resources 25
IV. SCREENING POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION
MEASURES 27
A. Project Location 27
B. Environmental Impacts During Detailed Design and Pre-construction Phase 28
C. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures During Construction 34
D. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures During Operation 43
E. Institutional Requirements and Environmental Management Plan 45
V. PUBLIC CONSULTATON AND INFORMATION DISCLOSURE 48
A. Approach to Public Consultation 48
B. Public Consultation Process 49
C. Results of Public Consultation 49
VI. CONCLUSIONS 50
A. Findings and Recommendations 50

ATTACHMENTS
1. Pakistan EIA Process 52
2. Environmental Management Plan 53
3. Monitoring plan 62
4. Summary of public consultation 76
5. Preliminary Program for design, construction and commissioning 98
6. Trees affected by transmission line route 99
7. Trees and other infrastructures along RoW 102
8. Photographs 127
ANNEXURES
1. Drawings 131
2. Standards 139
I. INTRODUCTION

A. Overview

1. This document is the Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) for the construction of the
new 132 kilovolt (kV) double circuit Transmission Lines (from 220 kV Rohri substation to
existing 132 kV Gambat substation 63 kilometers (km) and in-out (interconnection of existing
132 kV Rohri to Gambat transmission line with Rohri New substation, 11.2 km) that forms
subproject No. 2 (RGTLs) under Tranche 1 of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Multitranche
Financing Facility (MFF) Power Transmission Enhancement Investment Program (the Program).
This IEE presents the results and conclusions of environmental assessment for the proposed
construction of Rohri to Gambat transmission line Subproject and is submitted by the
Government of the Pakistan (the Government), Ministry of Water and Power and National
Transmission and Dispatch Company (NTDC). The Rohri to Gambat transmission line
subproject (RGTL SP) is to be considered for early improvement under the Program and
requires environmental assessment under ADB operating procedures. An IEE has been carried
out to fulfill the requirements of ADB Guidelines (May 2003 1 2 ). This IEE study report is used to
complete the Summary SIEE , the sub project along with the D.G.Khan to Loarlai Transmission
Line sub project are being shifted from Tranche 3 of the MFF to Tranche 1 and as part of the
request to ADB for this reallocation of sub projects a SIEE (Dated May 2009) has been
prepared and submitted to ADB . 3

2. The Investment Program is proposed to be approved by ADB in 2009. The total cost of
the RGTL SP is estimated at US$ 10.88 million. ADB will fund the design, civil works and
procurement of equipment. The Project involves the construction of new 132 kV 74 km double
circuit transmission lines from the new 220 kV grid station (GSS) at Rohri to the existing 132 kV
Gambat substation and interconnection with an exiting line. The proposed transmission lines
are a part of the arrangement to disperse power from two independent power producers (IPP)
gas based power plants. Figure 1 presents the arrangement of dispersal of power from the
IPPs.

1
Initial project classification was carried out in 2008 and the Category is B. Most of the construction impacts will
take place with only local impacts and there are no potential significant environmental impacts associated with the
Tranche 1 subprojects construction. Initial environmental reconnaissance and Rapid Environmental Assessment
carried out by consultants under ADB guidelines in June 2008 indicated that all the Tranche 1 subproject will be
Category B.
2
ADB. 2003. Environmental Assessment Guidelines. Manila.
3
Category A projects that are deemed by ADB's chief compliance officer to be environmentally sensitive for the
purposes of (i) the 120 day rule, and (ii) the environmental management plan requirement could involve projects
that are near or in environmentally sensitive areas. At this stage no component of the Tranche 1 subprojects under
consideration is actually within a critical area and therefore the MFF tranche as a whole is Category B.
2

Figure 1: Dispersal Arrangement of the IPPs

3. The environmental assessment requirements of the Government for power transmission


projects are different to those of ADB. The environmental regulations of the Government
categorize development projects into two schedules according to their anticipated potential
environmental impact. The proponents of projects that have more adverse environmental
impacts (Schedule II) are required to submit an environmental impact assessment (EIA). The
Schedule 11 has gaps and it does not cover the entire range, policy is ambiguous and needs
clarification. The consultants have initiated a dialogue with Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) Islamabad for review of the policy. EPA Islamabad has agreed to open discussions with
provincial EPAs and other stakeholders to revise the schedules, so that study requirements are
not related to voltage or length of facilities being proposed to be added, but are related to
significance of impacts.
3

B. Background

4. The condition of the power transmission system in Pakistan is inadequate to meet


rapidly growing demand for electrical power. This situation limits national development and
economic growth. To enable the transmission system to deliver newly added generating
capacity the existing network has to be expanded. The overall contribution of power
infrastructure also requires institutional arrangements and capacity that support strategic
management of the sector, and planning and management of investments. Overall, the
proposed Program facility has been designed to address both investment and institutional
aspects in the electrical power sector. Impacts from the RohriGambat 132 kV Transmission
lines subproject are potentially significant, although not insurmountable, and compensation for
crops and trees will need to be paid for the land that will accommodate the transmission line
towers and the land within the right of way (RoW). The design for Rohri-Gambat 132 kV
Transmission Line Subproject and the 132 kV in-out (connecting) line is sufficiently complete
(June 2008) to permit IEE (Category B).

5. The Government has requested the ADB to provide finance for the Subproject to cover
the construction of 74 km of double circuit transmission lines, to help fulfill the overall objective
of the MFF to encourage economic growth and improve transmission efficiency. The improved
transmission efficiency will contribute to expansion of economic opportunities by improving
capacity and efficiency and security of supply in the Sindh Province of Pakistan. The new power
generating facilities' output, in fact, will be made available, through the proposed 500 kV
Shikarpur substation to the entire system and will have impact on load centers elsewhere than
Sindh. The line route is presented in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Line Route

6. The line route has been selected, by NTDC, with the purpose of minimizing impacts
upon population and assets. The route chosen is the shortest that can avoid existing villages
and farmhouses.
4

7. At the time of writing (June 2008) this Report, the transmission line route for Rohri-
Gambat Transmission Line (TXL) has been chosen and the preliminary detailed designs for the
TXL are completed and the overall requirements for the expansion have been clearly identified.
This IEE has been conducted based on those assumptions as of 2008-07-03.

C. Scope of the IEE Study and Personnel

8. The line route is presented, in Figure 4, the line connects new Rohri substation with
existing Gumbat substation the layout of the New Rohri substation is presented in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Location of Proposed 220 kV Rohri substation

9. The Study Area includes the TXL corridor within the ROW (30m either side of TXL) and
all the areas either side of the TXL including all irrigation facilities, water supply, habitable
structures, schools, health facilities, hospitals, religious places, sites of heritage or
archaeological importance and critical areas and other infrastructures like railway lines, roads.
Critical areas, 4 if any, within about 100m of the transmission line alignment are also to be
included in the study. The scope of work envisages construction of the bases of foundation
pads and towers to support the TXL and installation and commissioning of the TXL. Installation
works are expected to take place within 30m of the TXL.

10. The field studies were undertaken by a core study team with experience of
environmental assessment for power projects in Pakistan. Mrs. Syeda Bushra Waheed
conducted preliminary scoping, survey and assessment activities and coordinated the field
sampling and analysis. Mrs. Wali was also responsible to supervise collation of information and
co-ordinate the various public consultation activities. The environmental team also benefited
from technical support and other important information on the impacts of the proposed power

4
Critical areas as published by the PEPA on the website put in specific reference.
5

works provided in feasibility summaries prepared for NTDC, 5 and by expert consultants of BPI
dealing with engineering, power transmission, socio-economic, re-settlement and institutional
aspects.

11. The study process began with scoping and field reconnaissance during which a Rapid
Environmental Assessment (footnote 5) was carried out to establish the potential impacts and
categorization of enhancement activities. The environmental impacts and concerns requiring
further study in the environmental assessment were then identified. The methodology of the IEE
study was then elaborated in order to address all interests. Subsequently both primary and
secondary baseline environmental data was collected from the enhancement works and the
intensity and likely location of impacts were identified with relation the sensitive receivers; based
on the work expected to be carried out. The significance of impacts from the power transmission
expansion work was then assessed and, for those impacts requiring mitigation, measures were
proposed to reduce impacts to within acceptable limits.

12. Public consultation was carried out in May 2008 in line with ADB guidelines (footnote 2).
Under ADB requirements the environmental assessment process must also include meaningful
public consultation during the completion of the draft IEE. In this IEE the Public consultation
process included verbal disclosure of the subproject works as a vehicle for discussion.
Interviews were conducted with local families and communities along the GSS area and
transmission line alignment. Written records of the responses have been passed to the Project
Proponent, NTDC. The responses from correspondents have been included in Attachment 5
and summarized in Section 6 of this IEE.

D. Policy and Statutory Requirements in Pakistan

13. Direct legislation on environmental protection is contained in several statutes, namely


the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act (1997) the Forest Act (1927) the Sindh Wildlife Act.
In addition the Land Acquisition Act (1894) also provides powers in respect of land acquisition
for public purposes. There are also several other items of legislation7 and regulations which
have an indirect bearing on the project or general environmental measures. Where GOP has
not set a standard or guideline criterion the standards given in World Banks publication Pollution
Prevention and Abatement Handbook are used as criteria. World Band criterion is also used in
parallel to GoP criteria

1. Statutory Framework

14. The Constitution of Pakistan distributes legislative powers between the federal and the
provincial governments through two lists attached to the Constitution as Schedules. The
Federal List covers the subjects over which the federal government has exclusive legislative
power, while the Concurrent List contains subjects regarding which both the federal and
provincial governments can enact laws. Environmental pollution and ecology is included in the
concurrent list. Hence both the federal and the provincial governments can enact laws on this
subject. However, to date, only the federal government has enacted laws on environment, and
the provincial environmental institutions derive their power from the federal law. The Punjab
Environmental Protection Act 1996 is now redundant. The key environmental laws are
discussed below.

5
Feasibility Summary submitted to the Asian Development Bank by the National Transmission and Despatch
Company, Pakistan under Power Transmission Enhancement Project PPTA 4665-PAK. Subproject Number 2.2,
T3, Rohri-Gambat 132 kV Transmission Line.
6

2. Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997

15. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997 is the basic legislative tool
empowering the government to frame regulations for the protection of the environment. The act
is applicable to a wide range of issues and extends to air, water, soil, marine, and noise
pollution, as well as to the handling of hazardous wastes. The key features of the law that have
a direct bearing on the proposed project relate to the requirement for an IEE and EIA for
development projects. Section 12(1) requires that: No proponent of a project shall commence
construction or operation unless he has filed with the Federal Agency an initial environmental
examination [IEE] or, where the project is likely to cause an adverse environmental effect, an
environmental impact assessment [EIA], and has obtained from the Federal Agency approval in
respect thereof. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency has delegated the power of
review and approval of environmental assessments to the provincial environmental protection
agencies.

3. Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Review of IEE and EIA


Regulations, 2000

16. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997 (PEPAct) provides for two types of
environmental assessments: IEEs and EIAs. EIAs are carried out for projects that have a
potentially significant environmental impact, whereas IEEs are conducted for relatively smaller
projects with a relatively less significant impact. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency
Review of IEE and EIA Regulations, 2000 6 (the Regulations), prepared by the Pak-EPA under
the powers conferred upon it by the PEPAct, categorizes projects for IEE and EIA. Schedules I
and II, attached to the Regulations, list the projects that require IEE and EIA, respectively. .

17. The Regulations also provide the necessary details on the preparation, submission, and
review of IEEs and EIAs. The following is a brief step-wise description of the approval process:

(i) A project is categorized as requiring an IEE or EIA using the two schedules
attached to the Regulations.
(ii) An EIA or IEE is conducted as per the requirement and following the Pak-EPA
guidelines.
(iii) The EIA or IEE is submitted to the concerned EPAprovincial EPAs if the
project is located in the provinces or the Pak-EPA if it is located in Islamabad.
(iv) A fee, depending on the cost of the project and the type of the report, is
submitted along with the document.
(v) The submittal is also accompanied by an application in the format prescribed in
Schedule IV of the Regulations.
(vi) The EPA conducts a preliminary scrutiny and replies within 10 days of the
submittal of a report, a) confirming completeness, or b) asking for additional
information, if needed, or c) returning the report requiring additional studies, if
necessary.
(vii) The EPA is required to make every effort to complete the IEE and EIA review
process within 45 and 90 days, respectively, of the issue of confirmation of
completeness.
(viii) When the EPAs accord their approval subject to certain conditions:

6
The Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Review of Initial Environmental Examination and Environmental
Impact Assessment Regulations, 2000
7

a. Before commencing construction of the project, the proponent is required


to submit an undertaking accepting the conditions.
b. Before commencing operation of the project, the proponent is required to
obtain from the EPA a written confirmation of compliance with the
approval conditions and requirements of the IEE.
(ix) An environmental management plan (EMP) is to be submitted with a request for
obtaining confirmation of compliance.
(x) The EPAs are required to issue confirmation of compliance within 15 days of the
receipt of request and complete documentation.
(xi) The EIA approval is valid for three years from the date of accord.
(xii) A monitoring report is to be submitted to the EPA after completion of
construction, followed by annual monitoring reports during operation.

18. Transmission lines and grid substations above 11kV are included under energy projects
in Schedule II, under which rules EIA is required by Government for all projects involving
transmission lines of 11 kV and above and for grid substations. IEE is required for transmission
lines less than 11 kV and large distribution projects (Schedule I). A review of the need for
EIA/IEE submission is therefore required by the relevant environmental protection authority in
this case the Punjab Environmental Protection Agency. As the proposed project will be located
in Sindh, it falls under the jurisdiction of the Sindh EPA.

19. There are no formal provisions for the environmental assessment of expanding existing
transmission lines and grid substations but Punjab EPA (PEPA) have requested disclosure of
the scope and extent of each subproject in order that the Director General of PEPA can
determine if additional land is required and the need for statutory environmental assessment.1

4. National Environmental Quality Standards

20. The National Environmental Quality Standards were first promulgated in 1993 and have
been amended in 1995 and 2000. The following standards are specified therein:

(i) Maximum allowable concentration of pollutants (32 parameters) in municipal and


liquid industrial effluents discharged to inland waters, sewage treatment facilities,
and the sea (three separate sets of numbers)
(ii) Maximum allowable concentration of pollutants (16 parameters) in gaseous
emissions from industrial sources.
(iii) For power plant operating on oil or coal:
(iv) Maximum allowable emission of sulfur dioxide from the power plant
(v) Maximum allowable increment (concentration) sulfur dioxide in ambient air due to
operation of the plant
(vi) Maximum allowable concentration of nitrogen oxides in ambient air when the
plant is operating
(vii) Maximum allowable emission of nitrogen oxide for steam generators as a
function of heat input
(viii) Maximum allowable concentration of pollutants (2 parameters) in gaseous
emissions from vehicle exhaust and noise emission from vehicles.

5. Other Relevant Laws

21. There are a number of other federal and provincial laws that are important in the context
of environmental management. The important laws are listed below.
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(i) The Sindh Wildlife Protection Ordinance, 1974 empowers the government to
declare certain areas reserved for the protection of wildlife and control activities
within in these areas. It also provides protection to endangered species of wildlife.
As no activities are planned in these areas, no provision of this law is applicable to
the proposed project.
(ii) The Forestry Act, 1927 empowers the government to declare certain areas
reserved forest. As no reserved forest exists in the vicinity of the proposed project,
the provisions of this law are not applicable to the proposed project.
(iii) The Antiquities Act of 1975 ensures the protection of Pakistans cultural
resources. The Act defines antiquities as ancient products of human activity,
historical sites, or sites of anthropological or cultural interest, national monuments,
etc. The Act is designed to protect these antiquities from destruction, theft,
negligence, unlawful excavation, trade, and export. The law prohibits new
construction in the proximity of a protected antiquity and empowers the Government
of Pakistan to prohibit excavation in any area that may contain articles of
archaeological significance. Under the Act, the project proponents are obligated to:
(a) Ensure that no activity is undertaken in the proximity of a protected
antiquity
(b) Report to the Department of Archaeology, Government of Pakistan, any
archaeological discovery made during the course of the project.
i. No protected or unprotected antiquity was identified in the
vicinity of the proposed project that may be affected by the
project.

E. Structure of Report

22. This report reviews information on existing environmental attributes of the Study Area.
Geological, hydrological and ecological features, air quality, noise, water quality, soils, social
and economic aspects and cultural resources are included. The report predicts the probable
impacts on the environment due to the proposed project enhancement and expansion. This IEE
also proposes various environmental management measures. Details of all background
environmental quality, environmental impact / pollutant generating activities, pollution sources,
pollution control equipment, predicted environmental quality and related aspects have been
provided in this report. References are presented as footnotes throughout the text. Following
this introduction the report follows ADB guidelines and includes:
(i) Description of the Project
(ii) Description of Environmental and Social Conditions
(iii) Assessment of Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures
(iv) Environmental Monitoring Plan
(v) Public Consultation
(vi) Recommendations and Conclusions

II. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

A. Type of Project
9

23. The new RohriGambat 132 kV Transmission Line Subproject (No. 2 of Tranche 3 now
shifted to Tranche 1) is part of the greater Rohri 220kV subproject (No. 7, Tranche 2), which has
been designed to disperse the electricity to be produced by two independent power producers
(IPPs) at Dharkai and Ghotki respectively. This subproject will be implemented under Tranche 3
of the Power Transmission Enhancement Investment Program of NTDC. It includes the
construction of a new 74.0 km long 132kV transmission lines passing through Sukkur and
Khairpur districts in the Sindh Province. The alignment of the new 132kV transmission line has
deliberately been designed mostly through unproductive government land to avoid mainly the
date-palm orchards along the National Highway (N-5). As a result, only about 9 km (12%) of its
length will traverse private farmlands, with crops and trees affected.

24. The two power plants are to be interconnected by means of a 220kV double circuit
transmission line to the new 220 kV Rohri substation. The Rohri substation is further connected
to the existing 220 kV Shikarpur substation by means of a double circuit 220kV transmission
line (Subproject No. 7, Tranche 2), and to the 132kV Gambat substation by means of a double
circuit 132 kV transmission line (included as Main Line in this Subproject). In addition, this
subproject involves the construction of two sidelines, namely the incoming and outgoing double
circuit 132kV transmission lines between the old RohriKhairpurGambat 132 kV transmission
line and the new Rohri 220/132kV substation. Main Line (Line A): Double circuit 132 kV
transmission line (62.9 km; 286 towers) from the New Rohri 220/132 kV Substation (to be
constructed) to the existing Gambat 132 substation, will be constructed partially in Sukkur
district (26,187m) and partially in Khairpur district (36,695m) (Sindh province). Side Lines (Line
B): Both the incoming (Line B.1) and outgoing (Line B.2) double circuit 132kV transmission lines
(11.1 km; 47 towers), connecting the existing RohriKhairpurGambat 132 kV transmission line
with the new Rohri 220/132 kV substation will be constructed in Sukkur district.

25. The subproject will have its offtake point in village Aror, Taluka Rohri of District Rohri,
Sindh. 132 kV TXL will pass through the Villages in Rohri and Khairpur Districts.
Interconnecting 132 kV line from existing Rohri to Khairpur transmission line passes through
Barri Patni, Nawab jo Goth, Ameer Banglo. The subproject will involve construction of 132 kV
double circuit 74 km lines. The transmission line will require total 286 towers. The nearest
settlement to TXL is Aror and there are many villages along the RoW of Transmission Line but
the line is about 50 m to 100 m away from the nearest house. Figure 4 presents the location of
the proposed 132kV double circuit Rohri-Gambat Transmission Line.

Figure 4: Transmission Line Route of Rohri Gambat line


10

B. Categorization of the Project

26. The construction works are generally expected to take place within approximately 30 m
of the RoW, depending on local requirements. At this stage the methods to construct the towers
are presumed to take the usual pattern of constructing supporting piles in situ and assembling
the prefabricated metal towers above.

27. The transmission lines will be constructed within a largely barren and unproductive area,
however, some agricultural cultivated area will be impacted .The potentially environmentally
significant impacts will be limited but will include damages to crops on cultivated land (The
Rohri-Gambat Subproject construction will traverse mostly the barren government owned lands
88%, and partly the privately owned irrigated farmlands 12%. Of the total 333 towers, 291
towers will be constructed on barren land, while only 42 towers will be constructed in privately
owned farmlands).The disturbance to these areas will be very localized as most of the
construction work will take place within the RoW of TXL. Further major disturbance outside the
RoW should not be significant if routine environmental management procedures and
engineering controls are implemented thoroughly. This IEE study has included field
reconnaissance in May 2008 of TXL route of the whole length of about 74 km the TXL stretch
with surveys taking place from May 2008.

28. Categorization is based on the most environmentally sensitive component and the
Subproject (TXL) is categorized as a Category B subproject under ADB requirements and this
IEE report is based on that assumption.

29. The aspects of the project with potential for significant environmental impacts need to be
assessed in detail and environmental assessment has therefore focused on significant impacts
from the construction aspects as well as consultation with the public all along the proposed
alignment of the transmission line. This report has also surveyed the transmission line corridor
11

and immediate hinterland that may be affected by knock on effects from impacts such as waste
disposal.

C. Need for the Project

30. The condition of the power transmission system in Pakistan is inadequate to meet
rapidly growing demand for electrical power. This situation limits national development and
economic growth. To cater to addition of power generation facilities, the existing power
transmission infrastructure has to be expanded. The overall contribution of power infrastructure
also requires institutional arrangements and capacity that support strategic management of the
sector, and planning and management of investments. Overall the proposed PTE-MFF facility
has been designed to address both investment and institutional aspects in the electrical power
sector.

31. The power dispersal arrangement for the two independent power producers' power
plants has been proposed as a result of load flow studies have been carried out for the peak
load conditions of August and September 2007 under normal system conditions. In general, the
studies show that with the commissioning of the subproject will ensure that the power for the
power plants will be available to the system. The system will operate within both load and
voltage limits.

32. The feasibility study for the subproject was prepared by consultants under TA Loan
2186-PAK has demonstrated the need for the proposed improvements based on electricity
demand and network studies and that significant benefits can accrue in the form of reduced
load on transformers and reduction in transmission line losses. Thus there is a clear and
immediate future need for this subproject.

D. Location and Scale of Project

33. The subproject involves the construction of a 132 kV double circuit transmission line
from New Rohri substation to existing 132 Gumbat substation, the line will have off take point at
Mauza Aror of Taluka Rohri (Figure 2).The subproject also includes the construction of a double
circuit line that connects the existing 132 kV Old Rohri substation to existing 132 Khairpur
transmission line. The transmission lines will consist of about 74 km of twin conductor 132kV
dual circuit transmission line. Substation (Rohri 220 kV) is not the part of this subproject

34. Depending upon the type of tower and subsoil condition, the tower footings have
variable dimensions. However a minimum of 150m2 working area is required for the excavation
of normal foundations and upwards of 250m2 for the larger angle towers. The depth of
excavation for the normal foundation varies from about 3 to 4 m. The excavation for tower
footing is carried out either manually or by mechanical excavator as per site requirements.

35. After fixing steel reinforcements concreting the piles the necessary excavation ditch is
refilled with excavated material and the site is brought to the original ground level. As such, only
four tower pedestals protrude above the ground level by about 0.15 m for normal foundations
and about 1.8 m for pile foundations.

36. Tower/Pole erection is carried out on the concreted pile pad locations with the help of
derrick poles or cranes. The required working area for this activity is about 500m2 for each
tower. The tower is erected in panels of 2m to 3m height. The panels are assembled on the
12

ground, lifted in parts with the help of derrick poles/crane and then joined together with nuts and
bolts, which are tightened at the specified torque.

37. There are roads, tracks and unpaved roads/dirt tracks and ponds in the vicinity of the
line route. The line alignment ensures that a minimum of the population and infrastructure is
affected. Accessibility will not be a problem. There are tracks and tracks available to the
contractor who should not have to develop any new access roads/tracks for transporting the
materials. This should results in very little if any damage to the vegetation or disruption of the
farmland in the vicinity of the TXL. The whole length of the proposed transmission line is
approachable through a number of major or minor metalled roads and village tracks. Almost all
the village tracks are linked to the metalled roads and are thus accessible to vehicles. The
contractor is unlikely to need to transport the materials manually. In any event care will be taken
that the disruption to the vegetation is kept to a minimum.

38. The environmental impacts are likely to be localized near the supporting tower/pole
construction at most places and impacts are reviewed in the environmental impact section of the
report. The impacts will need to be reviewed and amended if necessary if the locations change
and when the detailed designs are available.

E. Alternatives

39. The Tranche-1 subprojects will contribute to the improvement of the overall performance
of the power transmission sector, improving transmission efficiency, broadly widening access to
power to drive economic opportunities. The beneficiaries of the Project will be people,
companies, and government and non-government agencies in Pakistan that use power
transmission services. Power users will benefit in terms of secure power and improved power
safety and potentially increased productivity.

40. Do nothing scenario: Predictions have indicated that, without T1 power transmission
subproject, supply will not be as reliable as with the project in purely power transmission terms
based on the available information. The project is part of an overall strategic improvement to the
system. In absence of the subproject, the potential for interruptions to power supply will
increase and socio-economic development of the provinces could be affected in the short to
medium term. In an un-enhanced state the potential for interruptions to supply and increased
wear and tear on equipment (transformers etc) will be enhanced.

41. Alternative construction methods: The feasibility and constructability of the


transmission line towers is well established locally and the construction of TXL and installation
of equipment is well practiced in the international context (even if some types of equipment are
new Pakistan). The process basically includes the transportation of equipment to site and the
assembly of prefabricated units in-situ. Thus the impacts from construction per se are very
manageable from the environmental viewpoint.

42. Alternative geometry: Line design of 132 kV Rohri to Gambat transmission lines avoids
the local villages by selecting a route bypassing these villages. In case where it becomes
impossible to select alternative routes angle towers are utilized to obtain vertical and horizontal
clearance. It will cross rural areas and agricultural land, only about 10% land is productive.
Some further detailed surveys may be carried at construction stage to suit contractors'
requirements; however, the line design, line route and location of towers should not significantly
alter.
13

43. The extent of land acquisition is presently anticipated to be none as this is a


transmission line subproject and according to the Land Acquisition and Resettlement
Framework (LARF) and Land Acquisition and Resettlement Plan (LARP), land under the towers
is not to be paid if access to farmers to this land is not hindered after completion of construction
activities. The present assumption is that the transmission line will be completed as planned on
the defined alignment as described in Figure 2.

F. Proposed Schedule for Implementation

44. The Project Proponent (NTDC) plans to have the T1 completed by mid to late 2013. The
details for the implementation of the subprojects are in development. There will not be any land
acquisition or compensation process since no land is required. There will, however, be need for
compensation for damages to crop/trees, and orchards. The LARP provides estimates of these
damages .The project will be offered to bidders in about 3 months from approval from ADB.
Award of contract will take place about 3 to 6 months from receipt of bids. The construction
period is estimated to be about 18 months to 2 years. The preliminary schedule is presented in
Attachment 5.

III. DESCRIPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

A. Project Area

1. General Characteristics of Project Area

45. The Rohri Gambat 132 kV double circuit transmission line will traverse mostly
unproductive barren lands (88%) which is mostly plain (some hills in Aror village of Taluka
Rohri) and some partially agricultural lands (12%) avoiding all the compact housing area and
date palm orchards; only four scattered residentialcumfarm mudhouses and five (date palm,
banana and mango) orchards will be partially affected, as well as some seasonal agricultural
crops. The TXL is at a minimum distance of 0.22 km, and generally at 3 to 5 km, from the main
Highway. Figure 4 shows the TXL route location.

46. There are houses including residential and other social infrastructure and other
transmission lines that are located within 100m of the proposed transmission line. The Rohri to
Khairpur Road will pass through Nara Canal minors. Watercourses, ponds and roads
(Attachment-7) are in the vicinity of the line route. However by using angle towers and by
locating the TXL on mainly unproductive land the settlements are avoided and there are only
four locations where the line is immediately adjacent to residential or school property based on
the alignment provided by NTDC

47. Erection of each of the tower may require working room of up to 500m2 however there is
plenty of room available in barren unproductive and the agriculture fields for the towers needed
to support the line on the cultivated private land. Provisions have been made in the LARP to
compensate the cost of damages of crops and damage to trees. Access to the TXL will be from
the Rohri Khairpur Road and existing approach roads from Rohri Khairpur Road. There should
be no need to disturb any existing roads and watercourses, based on the current alignment
subject to reconfirmation after detailed designs are complete.
14

2. Affected Administrative Units

48. The alignment of the transmission lines were altered slightly at a number of places, by
providing angle towers (diversions) to avoid both housing areas and most fruit orchards. Double
circuit 132kV transmission line (62.9 km with 286 towers) from the New Rohi 220/132kV Sub-
Station (to be constructed) to the existing Gambat 132kV substation, will be constructed partially
in Sukkur district and partially in Khairpur district (Sindh province). Side Lines both the incoming
and outgoing double circuit 132kV transmission lines (11.118 km with 47 towers), connecting
the existing Rohri-Khairpur-Gambat 132kV transmission line with New Rohri 220/132kV Sub-
Station, will be constructed in Sukkur district. The villages affected are presented as follows:

Table 1: Villages affected

Length Length Total


No. of No. of Total
Sr. of of Length
District Village Towers Towers No. of
No. Line-A Line-B of Line
Line-A Line-B Towers
(m) (m) (m)
Sukkur Rahim Jo
1.
Goth
Sukkur Aror
2.
Village
26,187 11,118 37,305 118 47 165
Sukkur Barri
3.
Patni
Sukkur Ameer
4.
Banglo
5. Khairpur (Kot Diji)
Goth Miran
36,695 - 36,695 168 - 168
Khairpur Goth
6. Ghulam
Qasim
Khairpur Goth
Sardar
7. Khan
Wassan
Khairpur Goth
Nawab
8. Khan
Wassan
Khairpur Goth Gahi
9. Faqir
Sanjrani

10. Khairpur
Mithal Ujjan
Jo Goth
Khairpur Saddique
11. Ujjan Jo
Goth

12. Khairpur
Goth Kenro
Chakrani
Khairpur Goth
13. Bakhsh
Khan
Khairpur Goth Abdul
14. Ghafoor
Shabani
15

Length Length Total


No. of No. of Total
Sr. of of Length
District Village Towers Towers No. of
No. Line-A Line-B of Line
Line-A Line-B Towers
(m) (m) (m)
15. Khairpur Bhatti
Goth Sufan

Khairpur Goth Haji


16. Gul
Mohammad
A = Main Line, B = Side Line

49. For the purpose of this study the Rohri Gambat TXL Subproject has been assumed to
affect all the adjacent local authorities and interviews have been conducted with the public from
all along the TXL corridor. In addition to the main villages there are about few isolated houses
and hamlets scattered along the length of the proposed TXL.

B. Physical Resources

1. Topography, Geography, Geology, and Soils

50. The western half of the district Sukkur forms a vast alluvial plain, broken only at Sukkur
and Rohri by low limestone hills, which tend to preserve a permanent bank for the Indus at
those places. Large patches of salt land (Kalar) occur frequently, especially in the upper part of
the district. The desert portion of the Rohri sub-division, known as the Ragistan, possesses
extensive sand hills. There are no hills in the district except the low range on the northern
extremity, of which Sukkur and Rohri are built and which run-southward from that point to
Khairpur district boundary. They extend for some forty five kilometers into that district spreading
out to a width of twenty seven kilometers. Their highest elevation is about twenty four meters
above mean sea level. They are nummulitic limestone and belong to the same group as the
Khairpur range to which they resemble in their rugged and barren aspect. There are four
prominent hills, namely Adam Shah hill near Sukkur, Kalka hill at Aror, Laheri hill at Rohri
and Shadi Shaheed hill at Kandhra hill. The land gradually slopes from north-east to south-
west. The general elevation of land surface varies form about 50 to 100 m above sea level.

51. The Khairpur District may be divided into two parts the plain cultivated area in the west
comprising Khairpur, Gambat, Kot Diji, Mirwah and Faizganj taluka where irrigation and
influence of the Indus River and its canal extends. The south eastern half of the Khairpur district
is the second part which consists of hills of wind blown sand running in parallel rows from
northeast to southeast. This is known as Ragistan and is part of the great desert which
continues into Tharparker district. A range of hills which starts south of Rohri Taluka of Sukkur
district rising to a height of about 150 meters above the sea and 100 meters above the
surrounding plain continues in the same direction for about 45 kilometers further after passing
into the Khairpur district. The soils of the district are numerous, each with its different
characteristics. The desert portion of the district is very extensive and is covered with sand hills.
The western boundary of Khairpur and Gambat Taluka is formed by the river and is covered
with forests.

52. The soils of the district Sukkur, and Khairpur are of numerous varieties, each with
different characteristics. These are Latiari -a soil formed from the silt of the inundation; Tanak
the hard soil left by repeated inundation; Thariari a crooked soil, often seen near the river with
great cracks in it; Gesari -- dusty soil; Rabba -- hollow and Khariri -- an uneven soil; Pat--a good
soil and wariasi -- sandy soil; kalaar or saline soil, covered on the surface with an efflorescence
16

of carbonate of soda; and Thaith Kaller a very salty soil, Sailabi - the heavily saturated soil with
moisture which requires no water from seed time to harvest.

2. Climate and Hydrology

53. There is little variation of altitude above sea level in the land along the alignment. The
small change in altitude in both the districts means no variation between the climates of the
project area. The climate at Rohri, Khairpur is typical of that of the Sindh.

54. In these two Districts, the maximum temperature in summer reaches 44oC. In winter the
minimum is 4.5oC. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures in summer for this period
are 44 and 29 respectively and in winter 23oC and 9oC respectively. The summer season
starts from April and continues till October. May, June and July are the hottest months. The
winter season starts from November and continues till March, December, January and February
are the coldest months.

55. The rainy season starts in July and ends in September. Annual rainfall is 166.8
millimeter. More rains occur in July and August than any other months. Most of the winter rains
are received in the months of March and April.

3. Groundwater and Water Supply

56. Irrigation is largely dependent on the canals, but tube wells have also been sunk in the
areas where water is fit for irrigation. The chemical quality of groundwater in the district varies
area wise and depth wise. The sweet potable water is available along canals otherwise
groundwater is brackish. Irrigation supplies are perennial and tube wells have been installed to
make up the deficiencies. The strata near the TXL are water bearing and alluvial deposits,
giving groundwater potential throughout the subproject area and the water table is fairly near
the surface at 20 to 25 feet. The water table is not seasonal and dug wells do not generally run
dry. Groundwater sources exist in the area and there are tube wells within 500m of the
proposed TXL towers. The local population in most of the TXL is generally reliant on supply
from tube wells and pumps. Piped water supply is available in 38% and 16 % housing units of
Sukkur and Khairpur, respectively, while hand pumps are used in 40% and 68% inside the
houses in Sukkur, and Khairpur (Gambat). There should be no impact on these sources of
water during the construction. 2005 Pakistan Council of Research for Water resources
(PCRWR) data present drinking water data for Sukkur (Rohri) , which is : samples exceeding
World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines : turbidity 58% ; iron 75% ; sodium 25% and Total
Dissolved Salts (TDS) 64% .PCRWR 2001 and 2002 data indicates that : turbidity 40% samples
exceed WHO guidelines ; hardness 33% samples exceed WHO guidelines ; 17% samples in
Sukkur were found unfit for human consumption on E-Col count ..Tube well water analysis ,TDS
, of three locations near the transmission line were quoted as: Arror (About 10 km from the
Rohri sub station) 757 mg/L ; 1 km from Arror 630 mg/L ; Bhit Noor Shah 777 mg/L . National
Water Quality Monitoring Program present 2001-04 data of water quality at Sukkur (Rohri) as :
alkalinity 1.2 mg/L ; calcium 3.2 mg/L ; chloride 6 mg/L ; fluoride 0.1 mg/L ; nitrates 1.1 mg/L ;
sulphates 43 mg/Land E.Coli 0 /100mL .

4. Surface water

57. Rivers and Tributaries: Indus is the only river which passes through the north western
boundary of the Sukkur district and it traverse to the whole length of Khairpur district and its
direction of flow is from north to east to south-west. In width, it ranges from 450 to 1500 meters.
17

The average during the low season being 650 meters. During floods it is more than a kilometer
wide. Its depth varies from 1 to 8 meters; the water is of a dirty brown color. At Sukkur it passes
through the gorge between Sukkur and Rohri towns, the island of Bukkur bisecting the channel.
The westerly drift of the Indus continues and Indus flows more or less amid way stage through
the alluvial belt, shut in by the limestone of the Khairpur on the west and the sand hills of the
Ragistan on the east. The area over which its waters can spread or be distributed is about 16
million acres. There are no marshes or lakes / streams in the subproject area. Water quality of
Indus at Sukkur is quoted by PRCWR as : ph 7.1- 7.5 ; TDS 257-487 mg/L ; faecal coli form
150-400 /100mL ; chlorides 6-100 mg/L ; sulphates 4.2-10.5 mg/L .TDS at Sukkur barrage
(starting point of Nara Canal and the line) is quoted as : 180-200 mg/L based on 2007
measurements .

58. Irrigation: The Sukkur and Khairpur (Gambat Districts) depend mainly on canals. In
these districts main sources of irrigation are Janib Wah, Korai Wah, Mahesro Wah, Jari Wah,
L.M. Feeder, Lundhi Wah, Qazi Wah, Dingro Wah, Massu Wah, Mahro Wah, Mahi Wah, Dahar
Feeder, Sehar Wah, Kander Branch, Dahar Minor and Guddu Feeder which offtake from Sukkur
Barrage and irrigates Sukkur / Rohri. The other means of irrigation are a few wells and
tubewells. The katcha area within the river protective bunds is brought under cultivation during
Rabi season, which is termed as Sailabi cultivation. Similarly the Ragistan portion of the Rohri
Taluka is brought under cultivation when there is good rain. The entire area of Rohri Taluka
depends upon river spill inundation canals and tube wells and its small portions irrigated by
Nara canal for cultivation. The nearest irrigation channel is the Nara Canal which runs through
the project Ragistan portion of Nara is brought under cultivation when there are good rains. But
very little barani cultivation is possible in Khairpur District.

59. Cultivation must always depend mainly on canals and in this district also main sources of
irrigation are three canals known as East Feeder. West Feeder and Nara canal. The other
means of irrigation are a few wells and tube wells. The line crosses the Nara Canal between
tower nos. 14 and 15 .Attachment 7 presents all canal crossings and Annexure 1 presents the
canal crossing with reference to the line route. The Nara Canal crossing is presented as follow :
18

5. Air Quality

60. Air quality in the subproject area appears good based on observation during the study
period. Domestic sources of air pollution, such as emissions from wood and kerosene burning
stoves as well as small diesel standby generators in some households, are well dissipated.
There are no other industrial pollution sources are present in the vicinity.

61. The other major source of air pollution is dust arising from construction and other ground
or soil disturbance. Near the access roads, when vehicles pass, dust levels will increase. The
nearby road is paved but dust levels are elevated when vehicles pass intermittently over the
roads based on field observations and may be high enough to obscure vision significantly based
on observations in May 2007.

6. Noise, vibration

62. Noise from vehicles and other powered mechanical equipment is intermittent. There are
also the occasional calls to prayer from the PA systems at the local mosques but there are no
significant disturbances to the quiet rural setting. However the construction from the proposed
power expansion will use powered mechanical equipment. Subjective observations were made
of background noise and also of individual vehicle pass by events. Based on professional
experience background daytime noise levels are probably well below 55dB(A)L90.

C. Ecological Resources

1. Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquatic Biology

63. There are no areas of wildlife significance near the Subproject area. At present in these
two districts jackals (canis aureus) are fairly common whereas hyenas (Hyaena hyaenidac) and
wolves (Canis palfipes) are hardly seen. Foxes (Vulpes bengalensis) are seen in rapidly
contracting area of dry waste. Hog deer are seen along the bank of Indus and wild boar (Sus
cristatus), though much diminished are still found in small numbers. Hares (Lagomorpha lepus)
and deer are fairly common. Indus reach from Guddu to Taunsa Barrage is the main habitat of
Indus Dolphin. Among the birds the partridge (Francolinus pondocerainanes) is abundant. Both
grey and black partridges are very common in the forest plantation. Waterfowls are also found
penetrating the field of green wheat and kunj are also regular winter visitors. The other birds
found in the district are alexandrine large Indian parakeet (Psittacula eupatria), white-breasted
water-hen (Amauromis phoenicurus), sirkeer malkoha cuckoo (Taccua leschenaultia) and
Indian scoops owl (Otus bakkamoena), kites (Milvus migrans govinda), crows (Corvus
splenders) and Houbara bustard.

64. There are no reservoirs or other water bodies within the line right of way. However,
Indus River, Sukkur barrage and Nara Canal are the main water bodies / ponding areas which
are the closet water sources. These water bodies form a habitat for a large number of fish
species. The major commercial fish species according to Department of Fisheries, Sukkur /
Khairpur include Catla catla (Theila), Channa marulius (Saul), Cirrhinus mrigala (Mori) and
Cyprinus carpio (Gulfam), Nangra robusta, Cirrinus mrigala, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Labeo
rohita Labio calbasu, Amblypharyngodon mala, Aploccheilas panchux, Aspidoaria morar,
Barilius naseeri, Eutropiichtys vacha, The Rohri to Gambat section of the transmission line does
cross the Nara Canal and ponds ( these are ponds located close to the Gumbat substation, and
are within the line right of way . these ponds , however, are man made i.e. a result of illegal
19

aggregate mining and the rising ground water has converted these ditches in to a brackish
water ponds , these ponds are not protected and have ,little or no ecological value) and one
tower location will have part of the tower footing within the reach of one of the pond.

2. Terrestrial Habitats, Forests and Protected Species

a. Vegetation Cover and Trees

65. The subproject area, which is sub tropical and semi-arid, is dominated by rural suburbs
and with various productive fields of monocultures that now dominate the agro-ecosystems
present in the subproject area. Common floral species with rooted vegetation are also present
near most of the water bodies of the area.

66. The forests of Sindh generally follow the course of the river Indus. The greater number
of the subproject area and forests are strictly riparian. Some of the riparian blocks have lately
been converted into inland forests. Forest consists of four types of trees namely Acacia arabica
or babul (acacia arabica); Prosopis spicigera or kandi; Populus euphractica or bahan; and two
species of tamarisk, Tamarix gellica and T.dioica, called lai and jhao respectively and can be
divided into three bands according to their distance from the river. The first is the bahan tamarix
band, the second bearing babul, the third is characterized by kandi growing always in very open
order frequenting the highest and driest parts and occupying, on the whole the largest area of
the tree. Populus euphractica or bahan is grown in the immediate area of inundation. Tamarix
gellica and T.dioica exists chiefly in the new lands thrown up by the Indus in Khairpur district.

67. Common trees found in the subproject area are, Zizyphus jujube or ber,; Azadiracha
indica or nim, Albizzia labbak or Siras; Ficus bengalensis, Banyan or wad and F.religiosa, pipal;
Tamrindus indica, tamarind; Acacia farnesiana, Villayati babul; Cordial myxa, Lesuri and
C.rothii, liar; Parkinsonia aculeta, Vilayati kikar; Casuarinas equisetifolia, Popuines, bhendi,
Capparis aphylla, kirir; Salvadora persica; Khabar, the mustard-tree of spripture. Common
vegetation found in the subproject area includes Euphorbia nercifolia, tamarix gallica, acacia
nilotica, zizyphus numularia, prosopis specigena, ficus religiosa, eucalyptus canaldulensis,
Melica azadirchta indica, colotropis procera. Other minor produce from the forests are reeds
from sar and kanh grasses (Saccharum spontaneum and arundinaceum), T. Dioca, Salvadora
oleoides, Hyperanthera pterysperma.

b. Protected and Religious Trees

68. There is no protected forest near the Rohri Gambat 132 kV Subproject. During 1997-98
the total area under forest in Sukkur district was 51,000 hectares which yielded 55,000 cft of
timber and 27,000 cft. of firewood besides other minor products. However, RoW and TXL will
likely to affect some trees. There are also planted trees along canals and roads. The major
trees grown in the forest are Shisham (Dalbergia sissoo), Kikar (Acacia arabica) and
Eucalyptus. Other trees found in the forest limits including bushes are Zuzyphus jujube
Azadirachta indica, papal and albizzia lebbek and ficus bengalensis. Mehrano, Keti Pir Pagaro
and Ranipur shikargah are the important forests of Khairpur district. There are many trees along
the RoW but these are on private land. In general permission should be sought from Divisional
Forest Officer of Forest Department and the local tree owners for the felling of any trees. LARP
for the SLSP will make provision for compensation of local people for the loss of trees, if needed
after detailed study. The works must deal with trees that need to be lopped or removed for
safety reasons with the necessary permissions. Although the line route avoids : protected wet
20

lands and ; wildlife sanctuary , the line route is in the vicinity of these areas . Protected areas
are described in 3 below .

3. Protected Areas / National Sanctuaries

69. In Pakistan there are several areas of land devoted to the preservation of biodiversity
through the dedication of national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. Three wetlands and reservoirs
namely the Indus River, Sukkur Barrage and Nara Canal Wetland Complex (NWC) exist in the
subproject area. These water bodies provide excellent feeding, breeding and resting habitats to
numerous migratory as well as sedentary birds. The water reservoirs are located on one of the
major bird migration routes of the world, the Indus Flyway. The NWC is a Ramsar site (located
in either side of the Nara Canal) which is ecologically very important for containing
representative, rare or unique wetland types and / or for conserving biological diversity. Situated
in tehsil Nara district Khairpur Nara and associated wetlands form a complex of wetlands in the
Nara desert region which extends from Ghotki, Sukkur, Khairpur to Sanghar district. The NWC
is a complex of about 200 small, medium and large wetlands. Some are seasonal, most are
permanent. These wetlands are freshwater to brackish to saline, stretching from the town of
Juneji in the North to the Jamrao Head in the south. These wetlands lie on either side of Nara
canal which is the largest canal of Sindh having a cultivable area of 108 Mha. It originates from
Sukkur Barrage along with Khairpur Feeder and the Rohri Canal. Woodland, riparian forest,
scrub and desert shrubs occur on both sides of Nara Canal. These wetlands along with the
aquatic vegetation, reed beds and woodlands are the habitat for a variety of mammals, birds,
reptiles, amphibians and fishes. The NWC boundary (inclusive of the wildlife sanctuary) is
presented below
21
22

70. The Nara Wetland complex (Wildlife Sanctuary ) is a complex of three major habitats-
-desert, wetland and forestland. It lies 330 kilometers northeast of Karachi and represents
an example of a natural inland wetland ecosystem comprising 29 lakes. These lakes include
Akro, Chaachh, Loon Khan and Jansar, Mirco, Allah Dino, Mureed Waro, Masset Waro,
Batnion, Sanahry 1, Sanahry 2, Taker, Karang, Bandan Wari, Wasso Wash, Baron Waron,
Kinro, Murhne, Khararo, Kandy Waro, Chugri, Chhamb, Bolahi, Hadero, Baro, Khurand Wah,
Khan Wari, Manak Waro, Wallan, Akan Wari and Shore Jee lakes . Wildlife Sanctuary is an
aggregate of lakes, which have come into existence as a result of seepage from irrigation
channel Nara. The Nara Canal is the second largest canal of Sindh, and has a great history
attached to it. The Indus from time immemorial overtops its Left Bank in low places,
between Reti and Rohri. During the inundation period, the floodwater would eventually find
its way to the Natural Drainage in eastern Sindh . The NWC is located on both sides of the
Nara Canal, the transmission line crosses the Nara Canal much before the NWC boundary
starts (see para 59 above),the line route are presented in Annexure 1 and also in Figure 5
below.

Figure 5: Nara Canal Wildlife Complex and Transmission Line Route

71. The area (presented in Figure 5 above and in Annexure 1 is more than 5 km away from
the line route) is of ecological value as far as the biodiversity is concerned. There is a very
characteristic ecosystem having a chain of wetlands in a desert habitat. The Nara Canal and a
belt of land along the canal totaling area of 108,960 ha starting from Sorah to Jamrao Head is a
game reserve. It was established in 1972. The ecosystem of the game reserve is a mixture of
desert and wetlands. The game reserve was established for the protection of hog deer, grey
and black partridges and the crocodiles in the canal and the dhands. There is also the Nara
Desert Wildlife Sanctuary in the area. Its area is 223,590 ha which was created mainly for the
23

protection of Chinkara, grey partridges and houbara bustard .Para 69 presents the proposed
boundary of the complete Nara Complex including : wet lands and ; wild life sanctuary .

72. The protected area have twenty one species of mammals, 134 species of birds and 16
species of reptiles were recorded from the area. Hog deer, smoothcoated otter, marbled teal,
marsh crocodile are the keystone species/species associated with high wetland values (Ghalib
et al., 2004). The area supports 198 marsh crocodiles out of 480 reported in Sindh province
(Javed and Rehman 2003). Nara canal and the following 14 wetlands are important for
supporting marsh crocodile: Torti, Somen, Harni, Ganjo, Shenhlo, Dholaho, Chaho, Nagiopeer,
Simni, Samabi, Akhero, Badrami, Derhan and Chhoti dhand.

73. Certain wetlands are very important for supporting the following threatened or rare / less
common water birds: Ruddy shelduck, Tadorna ferruginea (Dangree, Talaho and Wichawaro
dhands), Shelduck, T. tadorna (Dangree and Nagiopeer dhands), Ferruginous duck, Aythya
nyroca (Dangree, Jagheer, Khakro and Kathor dhands), Greater flamingo, Phoenicopterus
roseus (Jagheer dhand), Spot bill duck, Marmaronetta angustirostris (Dholaho dhand), Black
ibis, pseudibis papillosa (Putkan, Ganjo and Maywaywari dhand), Garganey, Anas querquedela
(Samabi dhand), Indian darter, Anhinga melanogaster (Simni, Badrami and Derhan dhands),
Greylog goose, Anser anser (Jagheer dhand). There are protected areas near the
transmission line like Takkar Wildlife Sanctuary ( included within the map presented in Figure 5
above) and Nara Game Reserve. The line route avoids both areas, however, detailed
investigation is being carried out with the help of Sindh Wildlife Department and NOC will be
obtained from Wildlife Department, Sindh.

D. Economic Development

1. Agriculture, Industries & Tourism

74. Cropping Pattern: Major crops grown in the subproject area are wheat in the rabi season
(winter-spring), and cotton and rice in the kharif season (summer-autumn). This dominant
cropping pattern of wheat-cotton and rice rotation covers 99% of the farmland, while
maize/fodder and vegetables are grown on the remaining lands. Thus, the subprojects impact
assessment has been made on the basis of wheat, cotton and rice crop losses. The total
farmland area to be temporarily affected by this subproject, in terms of crop losses, is presented
in Table 3.4 below

Table 2: Area of Affected Crops* by Type of Line and Districts (Gambat 132kV TL)

Section of Rabi Season Kharif Season Perennial Fruit


New 132kV
Transmissio
n Line Wheat (m2) Cotton (m2) Rice (m2) Orchards**
A: Main Line
(sub-total) 228,033 182,865 39,828 8,700
A.1: Sukkur
District 9,660 2,490 7,170 -
A.2: Khairpiur
District 218,373 180,375 32,658 8,700
B: Side Lines
(sub-total) 14,880 14,820 28,950 -
B.1: In-coming
Line (Sukkur) 11,820 11,820 - -
24

Section of Rabi Season Kharif Season Perennial Fruit


New 132kV
Transmissio
n Line Wheat (m2) Cotton (m2) Rice (m2) Orchards**
B.2: Out-
Going Line
(Sukkur) 3,060 3,000 28,950 -
Total (m2): 242,913 197,685 68,778 8,700
Percentages: 90.23 73.43 25.55 3.23

75. Horticulture: The main fruits grown in the area are guavas, dates, orange, lemon,
grapefruit, sweet lime, sour lime, mosami, tangerine (kino), potato, peas, onion are grown. The
most important crops of Kharif are cotton, oilseed and sugarcane, whereas main crops during
Rabi are wheat and gram. Rice, maize, pulses, chilies, barley, millet (bajra), tobacco, etc. are
also grown in the district.

76. Minerals: The subproject area is not rich in minerals. However, two minerals salt and
salt-petre and two stone quarries and one Fuller earth quarry are found in Sukkur district. There
are no mines and mineral resources of any importance in the Khairpur district.

77. Industry: Among important industries in the subproject area cotton textiles, cement,
leather, tobacco and cigarettes, paint and varnish, pharmaceuticals, agricultural implements,
hand pumps, lock-making rice-husking, oil mills, biscuit factories and confectionery, lace and
zari manufacturing, thread ball spooling, trunk making brass-wares, cutlery and ceramics. There
are a large variety of other cottage industries located in various parts of the subproject area.
These include dyeing and printing works, boat making, fishing line, plastic works, durri making,
and fold embroidery. Khairpur district is famous for its cottage industry. Several hand looms
operate in the town of Khairpur and Gambat which produce various types of cloths viz grabis,
sossies and lungies. Gambat is also famous for the production of costly and impressive Khes.
There are 2 sugar mills, 4 date factories, 18 cotton and ginning mills, 18 hand looms and 9 ice
factories in Khairpur district.

78. Tourism: There are many places of interest those attract tourists and promote tourisms.
There is no archaeological place of significance in the subproject are and sites that exist are
away form the subproject area e.g. Aror (the ruins of the ancient Hindu town, lie about 8 km to
the southeast of Rohri), Rohri is situated on a rocky eminence of limestone on the western side
of a precipice 12 m high rising from the bank of the river, Jamia Masjid building constructed in
1583, Masjid Mir Yaqub Ali Shah, one graveyard dated 1018 to 1301 A.H. carved stones with
Arabic inscriptions from the Holy Quran are also found, Lansdowne Bridge, Ayub Bridge,
Minaret of Masum Shah. Kot D.G. Fort, Sachal Sarmast Library, Mausoleum of Hazrat Sachal
Sarmast are famous places in Khairpur district.

2. Transportation

79. The subproject area is linked with the rest of the country by rail and roads. TXL
subproject area is approachable through the RohriKhairpur and access road to Gambat
Khairpur with the rest of the country. The district headquarters are connected with metalled
roads to all its headquarters. All talukas and villages of subproject area are connected with the
district headquarters through metalled roads. The subproject area is also served by railway line
which runs along the main metalled of the districts. Rohri is a railway junction the Karachi-
25

Peshawar Main railway line passes through Rohri taluka. Rohri-Jacobabad road enters
Jacobabad district near Begari canal from where it goes to Balochistan.

80. The subproject area is also connected by air with Karachi and other towns through
Sukkur Airport. PIA operates regular flights from Sukkur to other parts of the country. A new
airport terminal has recently been built and Khairpur is connected by air through Sukkur Airport.

3. Energy Sources

81. The distribution lines for electrical power run to a main grid substation 132 kV Sukkur.
The existing 132 kV Sukkur-Rohri Grid Station and Gambat 132 kV Grid station owned by
HESCO, transmit power to the load centers.

82. Reserves of fossil fuels the main sources of energy in Pakistan others are derived from
hydropower. In the study area there is no source of hydropower and other energy sources are
progressively more common further away from the major towns. The biomass sourcing is
concentrated on home garden production of fuel wood, the extraction of wood from forests,
woodland, crop plantations and agricultural residues. The other significant energy sources in the
area are kerosene and LPG. There are numerous petrol stations and LPG dealers in the district.
E. Social and Cultural Resources

1. Population Communities and Employment

83. Total population of the districts Sukkur 908,373, (Rohri Taluka is 224,362), Khairpur
District 1,546,587 (Gambat Taluka 146,436 persons as enumerated in March 1998. The 1998
Census, the population showed that these districts are predominantly 97%, Muslims. The
important minority is Hindu constituting 3% in Sukkur and Khairpur, higher at 5% in urban areas
of KhairpurGambat as compared to 2% in the rural areas and all remaining minorities are
reported as quite negligible. Sindhi is mostly predominant language spoken by 75% of
population in Sukkur and 94% in Khairpur followed by Urdu and Punjabi sharing 14% and 7% in
Sukkur, 1% and 3% in Khairpur respectively. Other languages spoken in the districts are
Balochi, Siraiki and Pushto.

84. The economically active population of the Sukkur area is 22%. Among the employed
population, 57% is self-employed, 1% working as private employees, 35% working as
government employees and 6% as unpaid family helpers. While in Khairpur District among the
employed population 73% are self employed in urban areas, higher at 76% in rural areas as
compare to 62% in urban areas. It is worthmentioning that most of the self employed are
males. The next important percentage is employees (Government) at 14%, much higher in
urban areas at 26% as compared to 11% in rural areas. The percentage of unpaid family
helpers has been reported at 6 three times females at 21% as compared to 6 percent males.
Employees (private) have been reported as 6% in the district, higher at 8% in urban areas in
comparison to 4% in rural areas.

85. The main occupation of women in rural areas including subproject area of Sukkur, and
Khairpur (Gambat) is house-keeping which includes attending to the cattle, extracting butter and
Ghee from milk, weaving and sewing of family clothes. In addition they generally help their
menfolk on farms with the lighter duties like transplanting of seedlings, threshing and winnowing
of grains and some times they also help in harvesting. Majority of the women prefer
independent life as housewives. In city women are housewives or work as professionals
doctors, nurses, teaching.
26

2. Education and Literacy

86. The literacy ratio of the Sukkur was 50% and in Khairpur 36% in 1998. The male literacy
ratio is higher at 60% and 50% as compared to 31% & 20% for female in 1998 in Sukkur and
Khairpur districts respectively. There are sharp differences in the literacy ratios by sex and area.
The ratio in urban areas is higher at 49%, 51% as compared to only 25% and 31% in rural
areas of Sukkur, and Khairpur respectively. The male literacy in rural areas is more than three
times in Sukkur in Khairpur to female literacy ratio. The following table shows the number of
educational institutions in these Districts.

Table 3: Number of Colleges / Schools in Sukkur District

Institution Male Femal Total


e
COLLEGE
1. Post Graduate * - 2 2
2. Degree 2 - 2
3. College of Education (Professional) - - 1
4. Government College of Physical - - 1
Education
5. Commercial - 1
6. College of Elementary Education - - 1
7. Polytechnic Institute - - 1
8. Petromen College of Computer - - 1
9. Law College (Private) 1 - 1
SCHOOL -
1. Primary 855 154 1009
2. Middle 28 24 52
3. High 36 9 45
4. Higher Secondary 2 2 4

Breakup of Male / Female College not as in 1995-96.

Table 4: Number of Colleges / Schools In Khairpur District

Institution Number
Khairpur University 1
Vocational Colleges 4
Poly Technique 1
Degree/Intermediate 6
Schools Higher Secondary 11
High 86
Middle 132
Primary 1398
Mosque School 1085
Source: Deputy Commissioner Office, Khairpur.
27

3. Health Facilities

87. Sukkur district has one District Headquarters Hospital, 1 Government Anwar Piracha
Hospital, 2 Taluka Headquarters Hospital, 3 Rural Health centers, 23 Basic Health Units, 5
Government Dispensaries, 1 Urban Health Center, 47 School Health Clinic, and 3 Maternity
Homes. While in Khairpur there is one Teaching and District Hospitals, 7 Taluka Hospitals, 11
Rural Health Centers, 60 Basic Health Units, 15 Dispensaries, 1 Veterinary Hospital and 10
mobile units are functioning day and night for providing the medical facility to the people of the
districts. There are several hospitals, dispensaries, health centers and clinics in Sukkur and
Khairpur.

4. Culture Heritage Community Structure

88. There are no official protected heritage sites of historic or religious or archeological
importance along the line except the ruins of the ancient Hindu town, lie about 8 km to the south
east of Rohri located in the subproject works areas. However, the alignment directly passes
over the twin tombs of two sisters which have historic and cultural importance. There is also an
old graveyard, and a mosque attributed to Muhammad Bin Qasim within 50 meters of the power
line corridor, both having historic and cultural importance. A No Objection Certificate (NOC) will
need to be obtained from the Provincial Archaeology Department for executing the works, and
for incorporating the necessary protection measures in the project design and construction
schedule. There is no major historic or archaeological feature of note but there are a few places
of worship e.g. a mosque and temple within about 500 m of the works.

89. The subproject area is inhabited by variety of tribes. The main Baloch tribes Rindh,
Chandio, Khoso and Lagharis and. non-Balochi tribes Samats, Sumras, Dahars, Mehars,
Bhuttos, Bhayas, Sayyad, Qureshis and Memons.are inhabited in Sukkur . Among Hindus the
Labana, Brahmans, Rajputs, Samati and Kolis, Bhils and Mahadev Kolis are residing. While
Khairpur (Gambat) District is inhabited by Baloch, Sheikh, Mamon, Soomro, Qureshi, Talpur,
Phulpata, Syed, Nareja, Channa, Tunio, Wassan, Ujan, Ghumro, Rajpur, MahaChar, Unnar and
Machh.

IV. SCREENING POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION


MEASURES

A. Project Location

1. Impact Assessment and Mitigation

90. This project will involve construction of 132 kV transmission lines. Most sensitive
receivers are set well back from the power lines; some are just outside the RoW within 10m of
the subproject in some areas.

91. The location and scale of the works are very important in predicting the environmental
impacts. This process of impact prediction is the core of the IEE process and it is critical that the
recommendations and mitigation measures are carried out according to with reference to the
conditions on the ground in the affected areas in the spirit of the environmental assessments
process. In this section the potential environmental impacts are reviewed. Where impacts are
significant enough to exceed accepted environmental standards, mitigation is proposed in order
to reduce residual impact to acceptable levels and achieve the expected outcomes of the
28

project being implemented (minimization of crop and asset damages; noise and dust mitigation;
redress of damages to infrastructure; management of transport and construction machinery to
minimize inconvenience to adjoining settlements; minimize invasion of privacy impacts).
Therefore, it is essential that a proper analysis is carried out during the project planning period.
In this regard, the impact prediction plays a vital role as these predictions are used for
developing mitigation measures and any alternative options, if appropriate. When the detailed
designs are completed the impacts and mitigation measures will need to be further reviewed to
take account of how the contracts are set up and in the light of any fine tuning of the subproject
proposals.

92. The potential environmental impacts in the design, construction and operational phases
are assessed below. Where impacts are significant enough to exceed accepted environmental
standards, mitigation is proposed in order to reduce residual impact to acceptable levels and
achieve the expected outcomes of the project. The criteria for assessment are the national
standards and criteria set by the GOP. Where GOP has not set a standard or guideline criterion
the standards given in World Banks publication Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook 7
are used as criteria. The EMP is presented in Appendix 2 as a matrix of mitigation measures to
prevent or minimize the impacts

93. The environmental management plan (Section 5 and EMP matrix Attachment 2) shall be
revised at project inception and through construction in order to feed back any significant
unpredicted impacts. It is based on the analysis of impacts, primarily to document key
environmental issues likely to arise from subproject project implementation, to prescribe
mitigation measures to be integrated in the project design, to design monitoring and evaluation
schedules to be implemented during subproject project construction and operation, and to
estimate costs required for implementing subproject mitigation measures. The EMP plan must
be reviewed at the subproject inception by the project management and approved before any
construction activity is initiated, to take account of any subsequent changes and fine tuning of
the proposals.

B. Environmental Impacts During Detailed Design and Pre-construction Phase

94. The line alignment of the Project and construction are critical in determining the
environmental impacts and route selection and the related impacts have been discussed in
Chapter 2. There are also a number of other matters that will require detailed designs that
consultant engineers will prepare and it is assumed that the detailed designs will avoid
construction impacts by good design and to minimize operational environmental pollution
impacts as far as practicable. In line with ADB policy on environmentally responsible
procurement, opportunities to provide environmental enhancements have been identified and
will also be included in the detailed designs. Routine matters such as avoiding unnecessary
removing of trees will also require attention in the detailed design and preconstruction stages.
Opportunities for enhancements during detailed design, construction and operation, which are
envisaged at this stage, have also been included in the EMP to be reviewed at the detailed
design stage (DDS).

7
Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook 1998, World Bank Group, Washington D.C.
29

1. Review of impact assessment, mitigation, and EMP

95. The EMP will be reviewed during the implementation phase at the detailed design stage
in line with best practice as required by ADB. A check will be made at the detailed design stage
that the alignment has been designed as planned to ensure the route is as described in the EIA
and the RRP for ADB with the same land acquisition. If there are changes in project scope or
alignment these will be disclosed to EPA and the EIA, LARP and EMP will be revised. The
revised EIA, LARP and EMP will be resubmitted to ADB, incorporating any recommendations
and requirements from EPA.

96. The EMP (section 5 and EMP matrix Appendix 2) has been compiled based on the EMP
principles promulgated by EPA, in a format familiar to ADB. The EMP is a working document
and will need to be reviewed in due course at inception and throughout construction in order to
feed back any significant unpredicted impacts. It is based on the analysis of impacts, primarily
to document key environmental issues likely to arise from project implementation, to prescribe
mitigation measures to be integrated in the contract documentation, project design, to design
monitoring and evaluation schedules to be implemented during project construction and
operation, and to estimate costs required for implementing mitigation measures. The EMP must
be reviewed in the inception phase by the project management when the detailed designs are
complete and the EMP will be approved by NTDC Environmental and Social Implementation
Cell (ESIC) before any construction activity is initiated, to take account of any changes and fine
tuning of the design proposals.

2. Social Impacts and Resettlement

97. The need for social preparation of the APs has been included in the social assessment.
The LARP has been completed to clarify the entitlements for resettlement and for compulsory
purchase of land and other matters for compensation. The social preparation will be completed
prior to commencement of construction. All acquisition of lands and monetary compensation will
be completed to minimize the uncertainty of people. All the payments/entitlements will be paid
according to the principles established in the entitlement matrix prepared as an integral part of
the LARP the details of which may be amended if there are changes in alignment.

3. Project disclosure

98. The preliminary design has been disclosed to the EPA and public consultations have
been conducted based on the preliminary alignment designs presented in Appendix 10. The
environmental clearances which will be required from EPA have also been identified (in
principle) subject to confirmation at the Detailed Design Phase (DDS).

99. It is common for the alignment of power transmission line projects to undergo some or
fine tuning during the detailed design phase.. The final alignment shall be disclosed to EPA at
the detailed design stage and the EMP must be reviewed.

4. Environmentally Responsible Procurement (ERP)

100. During the detailed design phase and in preparation for the construction phase, the
Detailed Design Cell (DDC) will prepare tender documents to make sure that future contractors
will be prepared and primed to cooperate with the implementing agency, project management,
supervising consultants and local population in the mitigation of environmental impacts.
30

101. The ADB guidelines on ERP8 recommend identification of opportunities to enhance


design and avoid environmental pollution by choosing non-polluting or enhancing methods. In
order to introduce this process as early as possible in the project the contractor will be required
to submit with their tender a Method Statement and schedule of environmental mitigation
measures in response to EMP. Contractual clauses will be included in the tender documents to
tie the implementation of environmental mitigation measures to a performance milestones. The
ESIC cell will check that contractors Method Statements submitted with tenders have made
sufficient provisions and include plans and sufficient resources to implement the mitigation
measures in the EMP that will be reviewed and updated as necessary at the detailed design
stage.

102. In order to comply with best international practice and ADB guidelines all the new
equipment will not contain Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) or other hazardous or persistent
polluting chemicals. Therefore in procurement documents it always shall be specified that
transformers, transformer oil and other equipment are to be free from PCB and other petroleum
fractions that may be injurious to environment or equipment. Although to date it has not been
possible to identify any PCB containing equipment in the sites so far investigated, it is required
that a plan will be made by NTDC to gradually phase out any isolated remaining items of
existing equipment with transformer oil, breaker oil or other equipment that may contain PCB
and this shall be done as soon as practicable.

103. The Detailed design Cell/Consultant (DDC) in cooperation with the ESIC cell will include
in the tender documents and draft contracts requirements that will also include but not
necessarily limited to the following:

(i) Minimize acquisition of agricultural land for temporary facilities (if needed) by
selecting preferred locations in detailed designs for construction yards and
asphalt plant on barren or marginal land and agree terms with local community.
(ii) Potential solution spaces will be identified in advance by the DDC and approved
by NTDC in consultation with the local community to ensure sufficient storage
and disposal space for cut surface materials and to avoid fly-tipping.
(iii) Include plans in detailed designs and programming that avoid community
severance and minimize disturbance of pedestrians and vehicular traffic during
construction. Detailed designs will also retain passageways along all footpaths,
tracks and access ways near the project during construction.
(iv) Designs will require hydrological and drainage impacts during construction to be
minimize by early phasing of replacement of culverts and other infrastructure.
These plans and designs will be included for in contracts.
(v) Extensions and improvements to drainage culverts that fall under embankments
of the project will be designed to account for increased runoff from rain due to
climate change and included in detailed designs.
(vi) Avoid disruption to and retain or re-provision current facilities for irrigation and
potable water supply before construction works commence; that provisions are
made to preserve the operation of current facilities for irrigation and potable
water supply in sufficient quantity in agreement with the local community.
(vii) Aim to provide some enhancements in line with ADB policy on environmentally
responsible procurement and avoid negative impacts due to unnecessary
removing of trees.
31

5. Planning Waste Disposal

104. Waste management plans (WMP) will be drawn up at the project planning stage of the
subproject to ensure that waste disposal measures will be undertaken to reuse and recycle all
materials wherever possible minimize the generation of waste. WMPs will be prepared for all
subproject packages as part of the environmental management plan to ensure that the waste
generated during the construction is disposed in an environment-friendly manner. With the
proper implementation of an appropriate waste disposal plan, there will be no residual risk due
to improper waste disposal. ADB Guidelines on Environmentally Responsible Procurement
2007 (ERP8) recommend reduction, reuse and recycling of waste.

6. Planning Hazardous Waste Disposal

105. The waste management plan (WMP) drawn up will also cover measures to be
undertaken to reuse and recycle all equipment and oil wherever possible and minimize the
generation of waste. WMPs shall ensure that any residual oily waste and other contaminated
waste generated in the construction and operational phase is disposed in line with provincial
EPA and local authority requirements. With the proper implementation of an appropriate waste
disposal plan, there will be no residual risk due to improper waste disposal.

106. The selected contractor will prepare a Waste Management Plan that will be dovetailed
including the management of oil and other waste materials; with disposal sites identified based
on the agreement with the local authorities for agreement by ESIC 1 month prior to the
commencement of construction work.

7. Avoiding adverse operational air quality and noise mitigation by design

107. The residential dwellings and other Sensitive Receivers near the Project are generally
set back sufficiently so that operational impacts will not be sufficient to affect the sensitive
receivers in the settlements. In order to preserve this acceptable situation NTDC must prevent
encroachment of settlements into the ROW. Construction impacts including dust and fumes
from erosion and earthworks will be controlled through the EMP. Operational air quality
monitoring will only be carried out for reassurance purposes at the substations.

108. The accepted World Bank criterion 9 of Leq55dB(A) or an increase in 3dB(A) at the
sensitive receiver for noise sensitive developments such as residences, schools, colleges and
hospitals is unlikely to be exceeded at any sensitive receivers in the villages during the
operational phase based on the alignment. Based on the public consultation there also seems
to be some local acceptance of the noise impacts that will come with the project. Therefore it is
recommended that before mitigation is designed at the detailed design stage the acceptability of
noise impacts on the residences and other sensitive receivers should be established with the
local stakeholders to ensure no unacceptable nuisances arise.

8
ADB. 2007. Environmentally Responsible Procurement - A Reference Guide for Better Practice. Manila.
9
World Bank. 1998. Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook. Washington D.C.
32

8. Managing hydrological impacts

109. The proposed Project will cross numerous rivers and rivulets. The tower footings and
support pads near the rivers will be designed to be safe during an occurrence of floods within
the expected design life of the structures. At the same time, the design of the river crossing
structures should be economical and within an acceptable risk limit.

110. Therefore to minimize and manage hydrologic flow at sites where flooding may occur,
appropriate structures will be included in the detailed designs in order to cater for worst case
flow and take account of increased rain from climate change during the life of the project. The
contractor will also base calculations on available industry standard estimates of such increased
flows that are available in the literature at the time (e.g. OECD 10). The designs will also provide
for redistributing sheet flows from surfaces to reduce erosion and other impacts. Designs will
also include adequate major and minor lead off drainage facilities to the nearest water courses,
as necessary. In order to minimize and manage hydrologic flow at bridges and culverts during
construction a Drainage Plan will also be prepared by the contractor to control construction
runoff and prepare to prevent flooding.

9. Planning for Erosion Control

111. The natural environment around the project is prone to erosion in some areas and the
construction works will aggravate this situation. Therefore the necessary engineering controls
for erosion protection measures need to be planned in advance. An Erosion Control and
Temporary Drainage Plan will be compiled in order to avoid any significant or catastrophic
erosion or landslide events. The Erosion Control and Temporary Drainage Plan will be agreed
with ESIC cell at least 1 month prior to the commencement of construction. This will allow time
for the contractor to make necessary provisions to install the soil erosion control and temporary
drainage measure in good time. The plan will include all the constructed works and peripheral
areas, particularly along access and haul tracks.

10. Planning Construction camps

112. Public consultation has also identified significant concerns about uncontrolled worker
camp operations and stockpiling of construction materials.

113. The sites selected for worker camps and back up areas for stockpiling materials and
equipment will be planned in advance in consultation with the local community and located to
avoid the most productive agriculture and will use waste/barren land and non-agricultural plots
as far as possible. Consultation will be undertaken with local authorities and land owners by the
detailed design engineers to agree use of such lands before detailed designs are finalized and
before construction contracts are signed and the arrangements will be reconfirmed by the
construction contractors and notified to NTDC before construction commences.

10
Agrawala S. et al. Development and Climate Change in Nepal Focus on Climate Change OECD, Working party
on Global Structural Policies - Environment Directorate / Development Co-operation Directorate 2003.
33

11. Temporary Traffic Management

114. There are also concerns about blocking existing roads and many other footpaths and
tracks near the route during construction. Therefore a provisional Temporary Pedestrian and
Traffic Management plan will be prepared by the contractor that can be updated by the
contractors and agreed with ESIC 1 month prior to start of works. Alternative footpaths and
access should discussed in advance with the local authorities in the districts and signposted
and be re provisioned before the start of construction.

12. Institutional strengthening and capacity building

115. The ESIC cell currently has few staff and there will be a need for more human resources
as discussed in the Chapter 5. A substantial amount of training will be undertaken in order to
ensure that the Cell officials are trained to understand how to apply the EMP. The training will
ensure they have the resources to apply the EMP and have the capacity to evaluate the
environmental requirements and contractors mitigation measures and also to facilitate capacity
building activities. This will work towards the development of a strengthening plan for the
environmental management undertaken by ESIC as the Project moves from the detailed design
to the construction and maintenance phases. There will be a net increase in staffing in the ESIC
cell for monitoring all stages of the Project from pre-construction to commissioning and for the
first year of the operation and maintenance. An international environmental specialist should
also be engaged to support the ESIC at least for the first 6 months from pre-construction until
the monitoring and auditing methodologies are established by the ESIC cell.

13. Preparing the Contractor(s) to Address Mitigation Measures

116. The contractor will be primed by including the EMP and environmental assessments in
the bidding and contract documentation. The contractor(s) will be informed that they will be
required to produce method statements and plans in advance as required in the EMP for,
Temporary Pedestrian and Traffic Management Plan, Drainage Plan, Erosion Control Plan,
Waste Management Plan and Noise and Dust Control Plan, and a schedule of costs for
implementation of mitigation measures.

117. It has been reported that it has been typical for contractors to put emphasis on the
financial compensation for nuisances. This may be acceptable for some social impacts where
evacuation is necessary or houses have been accidentally damaged, however it is not best
international practice to accept payment for environmental impacts. It has been noted by NTDC
that the approach of some contractors has been to pay money for nuisances rather than control
impacts at source. If say erosion impacts are not controlled properly there could be serious
environmental consequences such as landslides or runoff could cause fish kills in the rivers.
Therefore, the practice of paying financial compensation for impacts should not be allowed and
financial compensation will not be allowed as mitigation for environmental impacts or
environmental nuisance.

118. During the preparation for the construction phase the future contractors must be
prepared and primed to co-operate with the executing agency, project management, supervising
consultants and local population in the mitigation of impacts. Furthermore the contractor must
be primed by including IEE and the EMP in the contract documentation. The contracts must
require full implementation of the EMP and the contractor must be ready to engage capable and
trained environmental management staff to audit the effectiveness and review mitigation
34

measures as the project proceeds. The effective implementation of the EMP should be audited
as part of the loan conditions and the executing agency must be prepared for this. In this regard
the NTDC (the EA) will also prepare resources to fulfill the requirements of the law and
guidance prepared by EPA on the environmental aspects of projects and any updated
recommendations in the EMP as the mitigation measures are rolled out and updated as
necessary.

119. The requirements in the contract will include full implementation of all of the
environmental mitigation measures in the EMP. (Some of the social requirements in the EMP
will be carried out by the proponent NTDC vis a vis land acquisition and resettlement). The
agreement with the contractor will include preparing all the above documentation in advance in
the pre-construction phase with agreement from NTDC and the method statements and plans
will subsequently become part of the contract documentation. The contractor will also be
required to engage capable and trained staff or site agents to take responsibility for the
environmental management at the working level and to monitor and report on the effectiveness
and review mitigation measures as the project proceeds. The effective implementation of the
EMP will be audited as part of the loan conditions and the executing agency will be prepared for
this. In this regard, the NTDC (the Implementing Agency) will also prepare resources to fulfill the
requirements of the law and guide the contractors on the environmental aspects of construction.
Recommendations, guidelines and initiatives promulgated by NTDC and EPA will also be
incorporated in the revised EMP and updated as necessary.

C. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures During Construction

120. The source of the construction impacts will mainly be from removal of structures and
vegetation, construction of access, minor earthworks to construct the towers and bases
courses, re provisioning and repairing nearby pedestrian tracks.

1. Orientation for Contractor

121. Prior to the commencement of construction the contractor, all subcontractors and all his
workers will need to be trained on the requirements for environmental management. In order to
ensure that the contractor, subcontractors and workers understand and have the capacity to
implement the environmental requirements and mitigation measures there will be regular and
frequent training sessions and tool-box talks. Contractors tenders will be required to identify
separately the resources and funds to be applied to the training and mitigation measures and
contractors tenders shall identify named staff to supervise and responsible for mitigation
measures for all works including but not limited to earthworks, drainage re-provisioning, erosion
control, traffic management, materials management, noise and dust control, waste
management. Engineering controls will be designed by contractor as mitigation measures and
approved by the ESIC (supervising authority) prior to the commencement of the construction
works. No construction works will commence until all mitigation measures are in place and
approved by the supervising authority.

2. Advance planning of environmental mitigation measures

122. Removal of isolated trees: A significant proportion of the Project will run through
agricultural land. There are numerous isolated trees on farms and homesteads that will need to
be cut and will be compensated for under the provisions of the entitlement matrix in the LARP
(Appendix 6). Surveys made all along the alignment indicate trees are present very near the
35

project in many places but there should not be any need for further disturbance of trees in the
works once the ROW has been cleared.

123. By the time construction commences the contractor will have been primed by including
the revised EMP and environmental assessments in the bidding and contract documentation.
The contractor will be required to produce method statements and plans in advance of
commencement of construction as required in the EMP for:

(i) Drainage Management Plan


(ii) Temporary Pedestrian and Traffic Management Plan.
(iii) Erosion Control and Temporary Drainage Plan
(iv) Waste Management Plan,
(v) Noise and Dust Control Plan
(vi) Safety Plan
(vii) Material Management Plan

124. All the above plans will be submitted one month in advance of any construction activities
to ESIC cell to check and agree and verify requirements from EPA have been complied with. A
schedule of costs for environmental mitigation measures (including maintenance where
applicable) should be agreed with the contractor before the construction commences. The
implementation of mitigation measures shall be tied to payment milestones or a performance
bond for an amount agreed with the contractor and NTDC shall be deposited by the contractor.
The bond shall be forfeit in the event that environmental mitigation measures required in the
EMP are not fully implemented.

3. Hydrological, drainage and irrigation impacts

125. The Project will be designed not to interfere with the drainage on adjacent lands and
paths and to prevent soil erosion and retain the existing irrigation system in the operational
phase. However in the construction stages there is the potential for the works to have impact on
local water resources. There are numerous rivers, streams, irrigation and drainage channels
that cross or are affected by the project. The plans to avoid and retain such drainage and
irrigation works shall be included in the Drainage Management Plan and the contractors will
include plans for any necessary temporary drains to cater for worst case flow. The designs will
also provide for protection of the works that are in progress and for redistributing flash flows
from prepared surfaces during heavy rain to reduce erosion and other impacts. The
contractor(s) will be required to have a drainage engineer / erosion control officer to check
implementation of the temporary drainage mitigation on site and make modifications on a daily
basis as necessary.

126. To protect the drainage and irrigation system on surrounding land that may be affected
by construction activities and contractors will incorporate the following design features to
minimize alterations in the surface drainage near the project:

(i) Contractors will review the irrigation systems and irrigation structures potentially
affected by construction of the Project. If the irrigation cannot be maintained they
will provide and maintain alternative temporary irrigation structures for the
construction phase. At the completion of construction the contractor(s) will re
provision the irrigation structures disturbed by construction and agree with ESIC
36

cell if redesign is required or if new structures will be constructed or if the original


irrigation structures will be repaired.
(ii) Re provisioned irrigation channels will capable to supply all the fields previously
supplied with at least the volume of water supplied before the construction of the

4. Soil erosion and surface runoff

127. In the construction stages there is the potential for the works to have impact on local
water resources. The works are quite close to some major streams and rivers in some places
and there are several crossings of significant tributaries. There are potentially major impacts
from all the works near the rivers and streams. The drainage designs for the Project should be
cleared with the local drainage and irrigation authorities before works commence.

128. It is recommended that sedimentation facilities be set up at rivers where all working
stations are within 100m of streams and rivers, to trap and settle out runoff from the works.
Where wet works have to be pumped dry the waste water should first be passed through a
proprietary sedimentation tank (or similar) to remove suspended particles before discharge at a
location agreed with the ESIC cell. The contractor shall be required to have a dedicated
drainage engineer and erosion control officer. Where works cross streams and rivers the
preliminary designs for sedimentation facilities such as sediment traps, filter fabric fences, or
straw bale barriers should be included as a line item before those new areas are cleared and
opened up for construction works.

129. Professional experience suggests that it will be typical for contractors to claim that there
is insufficient space to set up erosion control and sedimentation facilities along the working
areas. Based upon observation it is not credible that there is no space and it is not acceptable
that there are no opportunities to use at least some form of sediment basins sediment traps. It is
recommended that preliminary designs for sedimentation facilities are included in the contracts
and subsequently in the Erosion Control and Temporary Drainage plans. Combinations of
alternative methods should be considered including but not necessarily limited to:

(i) schedule work so clearing and grading are done during the time of minimum
rainfall.
(ii) clear only areas essential for construction.
(iii) locate potential area pollutant sources away from steep slopes, water bodies,
and other critical areas.
(iv) route construction traffic to avoid existing works or newly planted vegetation.
(v) protect natural vegetation with fencing, tree armoring, and retaining walls or tree
wells.
(vi) stockpile topsoil and reapply to re-vegetate the site.
(vii) cover and stabilize topsoil stockpiles.
(viii) use wind erosion controls.
(ix) intercept runoff above disturbed slopes. Convey to permanent channel or storm
drain.
(x) on long or steep, disturbed, or man-made slopes, construct benches, terraces, or
ditches at regular intervals to intercept runoff.
(xi) use retaining walls.
(xii) use check dams.
(xiii) Install bioengineering in line with NTDC manuals and seed and fertilize.
(xiv) use seeding and mulch/mats.
(xv) use turfing.
37

(xvi) use wildflower cover.

130. Stockpiles should be covered before heavy rain to prevent wash out due to runoff.
Stockpiles should not be located within 20m of water courses and there should be an
intervening vegetated buffer to control any un-expected run-off. As a long-term benefit of the
project, the drainage infrastructure may be able to be modified as water harvesting structures to
collect water for irrigation and other uses and such options should be discussed and
investigated at the detailed design stage.

5. Water Quality Impacts

131. Water is a critical resource for the local community and resources will be protected
during construction. Where works are in progress, erosion control and sedimentation facilities
including sediment traps and straw bale barriers or combinations thereof will remain in place
and be maintained throughout the works to protect local water resources. Lubricants, fuels and
other hydrocarbons will be stored >100m away from water bodies. Solid wastes will be disposed
of properly (not dumped in streams). Construction material and spoil stockpiles will be covered
to reduce material loss and run-off and stockpiles will not be nearer than 100m to water bodies.
Borrow sites will not be close to sources of drinking water in case of runoff.

132. If complaints are received, the incidents and possible sources of water supply disruption
will be investigated by the contractor and the ESIC cell and where the complaint can be
substantiated; water samples will be taken and analyzed based on the baseline monitoring
results obtained in the preconstruction stage. Samples will be taken as soon after the complaint
as possible and analyses immediately and again two weeks after the complaint to determine if
water quality has been restored. The criteria will be based on the national standard.

6. Water Resources Impacts

133. It is assumed that ample water will be available and local water resources could be used
as sufficient yield is generally available. However the drainage system and water resources on
surrounding land will be affected by construction activities as follows: a) local water supplies will
need to be tapped to meet campsite and construction requirements, so bringing project based
water use into competition with local use; b) surface and subsurface water resources in the
selected sections could be contaminated by fuel and chemical spills, or by solid waste and
effluents generated by the kitchens and toilets at construction campsites; c) natural streams and
irrigation channels may become silted by borrow material (earth) in the runoff from the
construction area, workshops and equipment washing-yards.

134. Measures to mitigate the adverse impact on water resources and surface drainage
patterns have been incorporated into the other drainage mitigation measures. The contractors
will also carry out the following measures to mitigate the impact of tapping local community
water resources, where required:

135. Availability of water will be assessed to evaluate the impact on community resources.
Project water will be obtained without depleting local village supplies.

136. Camps will be located at least 100m away from the nearest local settlement to prevent
the contamination of community-owned water resources.
38

137. The contractors will be required to maintain close liaison with local communities to
ensure that any potential conflicts related to common resource utilization for project purposes
are resolved quickly.

138. Guidelines will be established to minimize the wastage of water during construction
operations and at campsites.

139. Availability of water will be assessed to evaluate the impact on community resources.
Project water will be obtained without depleting local village supplies.

140. Camps will be located at least 100m away from the nearest local settlement to prevent
the contamination of community-owned water resources.

141. The contractors will be required to maintain close liaison with local communities to
ensure that any potential conflicts related to common resource utilization for project purposes
are resolved quickly.

142. Guidelines will be established to minimize the wastage of water during construction
operations and at campsites.

143. The water ways and drainage streams en-route of the subproject project should not be
impeded by the works and the scale of the works does not warrant hydrological monitoring.
Refer to attachment 7 for likely impacts upon waterways and ponds (51 line spans cross water
courses or canals). The line crosses the waterways (canals and watercourses) at different
places. This crossing, however, is between two power pylons and in itself has no impact upon
the water way, even during construction the tower foundations are located away form the
waterway. Line stringing is by means of tension stringing equipment which has no impact on the
waterways.

144. During construction, machinery and transport will be used by the contractor, both have
potential of causing contamination to under ground and above ground water assets .There is
need to compile temporary drainage management plan one month before commencement of
works. Proper installation of temporary drainage and erosion control before works within 50m of
water bodies should be done. Proper construction of temporary drainage and erosion control
measures, maintenance and management including training of operators and other workers to
avoid pollution of water bodies by the considerate operation of construction machinery and
equipment. Storage of lubricants, fuels and other hydrocarbons in self-contained dedicated
enclosures should be >50m away from water bodies. Proper disposal of solid waste from
construction activities and labor camps. Cover the construction material and spoil stockpiles
with a suitable material to reduce material loss and sedimentation and avoid stockpiling near to
water bodies. Topsoil stripped material shall not be stored where natural drainage will be
disrupted. Borrow sites (if required) should not be close to sources of drinking water.

145. Wetland: There is a wetland in the vicinity of the line route; these are areas of great
ecological importance. There is need to protect these areas form possible fuel and oily spills
form construction machinery and transport used during the construction phase of the
subproject. The measures that need to be employed include: .Avoid disposal of wash water,
solid waste and discarded packing etc. on wetlands; Piling up of loose material should be done
in segregated areas to arrest washing out of soil. In addition, these materials should not be
tipped or stockpiled near wetlands. Leftovers from concrete works should not be dumped close
to wetlands. Avoid temporary structures or stockpiling within banks of river and on wetlands.
39

Special measures will be adopted to minimize impacts on the wild birds, such as avoiding
construction activities during the critical periods of breeding and feeding. Staff working on the
project should be given clear orders, not to shoot, snare or trap any bird. During the period of
migration of birds from Central Asia to the plains of Sind, which are normally the coldest months
of December and January and their return journey during February/March, the construction
activities, around the wetlands should be kept as efficient as possible to minimize impacts and
to encourage these migratory birds to settle at normal feeding grounds in wetlands. Contractor
will prevent the workers from hunting and fishing for water birds and fish resources, etc. Food
and fuel to be provided by contractor local villages. Erection of towers in the wetlands will be
avoided as far as possible. However, at places where realignment of the transmission is
unavoidable, towers with maximum span will be used to minimize the impacts.

7. Waste Management and Spoil Disposal

146. There may be some surplus rock and soil based materials. The waste management plan
(WMP) will be required to ensure waste from construction is managed properly and to reduce,
reuse and recycle waste wherever possible. Contractors will initially review the detailed design
consultants options for stockpiling and disposal locations for cut surface materials and
reconfirm or propose alternative disposal locations for agreement with NTDC and local
authorities. The contractor will prepare the WMP one month before the commencement of
construction with disposal sites identified for agreement by project supervision consultants
(CSC/ESIC/NTDC). The WMP will cover all aspects of construction waste disposal. It is
preferred that government land is used for dumping of material. If private land is to be used for
the purpose of dumping it shall commence only after written permission from the land owner is
checked by the ESIC in NTDC.

147. The mitigation measures in the waste management plan (WMP) will include but not
necessarily be limited to:

(i) Spoil will not be disposed of in rivers and streams or other natural drainage path.
(ii) Spoil will not be disposed of on fragile slopes, flood ways, wetland, farmland,
forest, religious or other culturally sensitive areas or areas where a livelihood is
derived.
(iii) Use surplus spoil for local repair works to fill eroded gullies and depression areas
and degraded land in consultation with local community.
(iv) Dispose of spoil will be to disused quarries and abandoned borrow pits.
(v) Disposed spoil will be spread in 15cm and compacted to optimum moisture
content , covered with topsoil, landscaped and provided with drainage and
vegetation to prevent erosion following NTDC/GESU guidelines 11 .

8. Noise

148. Powered mechanical equipment such as generators, excavators, piling rigs, stabilizers
and concrete-mixing plant can generate significant noise and vibration. Whereas various
modern machines are acoustically designed to generate low noise levels there is not much
evidence that acoustically insulated plant is available in Pakistan. The cumulative effects from
several machines can be significant and may cause significant nuisances.

11
Guide to Slope Protection Works. NTDC GOP 2007.
40

149. To minimize impacts the contractors should be required by the Cell to (i) maintain and
service all equipment to minimize noise levels, and (ii) locate equipment to minimize nuisances
and (iv) install acoustic insulation or use portable noise barriers where practicable to limit noise
at sensitive receivers. Insulation should be provided to minimize noise impacts such that the
measured noise at the edge of the works nearest residential areas will be less than 50dB(A)Leq
during nighttime (9 p.m. to 6 a.m.) and 75 dB(A) Leq at other times during the day.

150. There are a few schools near the project. The occasional commercial premises and
some residences are also set back from the likely working areas. Where schools are nearby,
the contractor shall discuss with the ESIC cell and the school principals the agreed time for
operating these machines and completely avoid machine use near schools during examination
times. Where noise is a major consideration (say outside temples) construction should be
avoided at sensitive times. As a fall back option to control noise, portable barriers can be
introduced creased using heavy thick ply-board or corrugated metal sheet. In addition to the
physical effect of mitigating dust and noise the installation of such measures should be
discussed with the local population and serve as a means for further public consultation during
implementation and assist in public relations.

9. Air Quality and Dust Control

a. Dust control

151. The location of the residences, places of worship, schools, hospitals and civic cultural
and other heritage sites has been reviewed above. Some of the residences in the settlements
are close enough to be disturbed by dust. Water is available in the study area although surplus
water may not always be available to suppress dust at many locations in the dry season.
Therefore as a general approach it is recommended that if works are within 15m of any
sensitive receivers, the contractor should install segregation between the works at the edge
and the sensitive receivers. The segregation should be easily erectable 2.5m high tarpaulin
sheet and designed to retain dust and provide a temporary visual barrier to the works. Where
dust is the major consideration the barrier can take the form of tarpaulins strung between two
poles mounted on a concrete base. These can be moved along the as the work proceeds.

152. Noise and dust were recognized by the local population as concerns but were
considered to be acceptable nuisances and that there were benefits from future improved travel
conditions. However in the dry season, when most of the construction will be carried out noise
and dust will be significant concerns for the general public in consultation. Therefore in line with
good practice mitigation measures are proposed to control all dusty materials at source. Also
works will not take place at night.

(i) If the working surfaces become dry and dusty, water will be sprinkled on the
and exposed surfaces when work is carried out within 50m of the side Sensitive
Receivers.
(ii) No work will be carried out during the night (2100hrs to 0700hrs).
(iii) If works give rise to complaints over dust, the contractor shall investigate the
cause and review and propose alternative mitigation measures before works
recommence.
(iv) All heavy equipment and machinery will be fitted in full compliance with the
national and local regulations.
41

(v) Fuel-efficient and well-maintained haulage trucks will be employed to minimize


exhaust emissions. Smoke belching vehicles and equipment will not be allowed
and will be removed from the project.
(vi) Vehicles transporting soil, sand and other construction materials will be covered
with tarpaulin sheets to avoid impact from dust. Speeds limits will be established
for vehicles within the works sites and on unpaved edge areas of the project .

b. Soil Contamination

153. Possible contamination of soil may occur from oils and chemicals at workshop areas,
and equipment washing-yards. The contamination may limit the future use of land for
agricultural purposes.

154. The following practices will be adopted to minimize the risk of soil contamination:

(i) The contractors will be required to instruct and train their workforce in the storage
and handling of materials and chemicals that can potentially cause soil
contamination.
(ii) If waste oils or other contaminants are accidentally spilled on open ground the
waste including the top 2cm of any contaminated soil shall be disposed of as
chemical waste to a disposal site acceptable to the NTDC and agreed with the
local authority / community. Debris generated by the dismantling of existing
structures will be recycled subject to the suitability of the material in line with the
MMP.

155. Solid waste generated during construction and at worker campsites will be properly
treated and safely disposed of only in demarcated waste disposal sites identified and agreed
with DOW and the local community.

156. Control measures for oily residues, lubricants and refueling are prescribed in the EMP.
The maintenance yards that will be created will have dedicated drainage which can capture run-
off. Oily residues and fuel should be captured at source and refueling and maintenance should
take place in dedicated areas away from surface water resources. With these measures in
place no significant impacts should be arise in construction.

10. Worker camps, maintenance yards and canteens operation

157. Uncontrolled worker camp operations can cause significant impacts. The sites for worker
camps will be planned in advance in consultation with the local community.

158. In consultation the public have expressed concerns about nuisances from construction
camps. The main issues of concern are uncontrolled defecation by construction workers,
unmanaged disposal of solid and liquid wastes into watercourses, natural drains and improper
disposal of storm water and black water in the village areas. The contractors will therefore adopt
good management practices to ensure that fuels and chemicals, raw sewage, wastewater
effluent, and construction debris/scarified material is disposed of under controlled conditions to
reduce the risk of contamination.

159. Prior to the close out of the Project construction in any area the worker camps will be
removed and restored to the original condition as far as is reasonably practicable to the
satisfaction of the and the local authority.
42

160. Before construction commences arrangements will be reconfirmed by the construction


contractors and notified to ESIC Cell / NTDC for approval as follows:

(i) Confirm location of work camps in consultation with ESIC and local authorities
with location subject to approval by the ESIC. If possible, camps shall not be
located near settlements or near drinking water supply intakes.
(ii) Cutting of trees shall be avoided and removal of vegetation shall be minimized.
(iii) Water and sanitary facilities shall be provided for workers and employees.
(iv) Construction camps will be established in areas with adequate natural drainage
channels in order to facilitate flow of the treated effluents.
(v) Portable lavatories or at least pit latrines will be installed and open defecation
shall be discouraged and prevented by keeping lavatory facilities clean at all
times.
(vi) Wastewater effluent from contractors workshops and equipment washing-yards
will be passed through gravel/sand beds to remove oil/grease contaminants
before discharging it into natural streams. Oil and grease residues shall be stored
in drums awaiting disposal in line with the agreed Waste Management Plan.
(vii) Predictable wastewater effluent discharges from construction works shall have
the necessary permits from EPA before the works commence.
(viii) Solid waste and sewage shall be managed according to the national and local
regulations. As a rule, solid waste must not be dumped, buried or burned at or
near the project site, but shall be disposed of to the nearest site approved by the
local authority.
(ix) The Contractor shall organize and maintain a waste separation, collection and
transport system.
(x) The Contractor shall document that all liquid and solid hazardous and non-
hazardous waste are separated, collected and disposed of according to the given
requirements and regulations.
(xi) At the conclusion of the project, all debris and waste shall be removed. All
temporary structures, including office buildings, shelters and toilets shall be
removed by the contractor and exposed areas shall be planted with suitable
vegetation, to the satisfaction of the and the local authority
(xii) The ESIC Cell shall inspect and report that the camp has been vacated and
restored to pre-project conditions as far as is reasonably practicable.

11. Safety of the Workforce

161. In order to maintain proper sanitation around construction sites, temporary toilets will
need to be provided. Construction worker camps will not be located in settlement areas or near
sensitive water resources.

162. The comfort and health of the workforce and surrounding local residents may be affected
to some extent from emissions of dust, noise and construction litter. The chances of serious
injury or accident during the construction activities are moderate and can be mitigated by safety
training and monitoring. Insufficient toilet provisions may give encouragement to defecation in
the open and may increase transfer of water or air borne diseases. Local labor will be used
wherever possible and where worker camps are needed they will include proper sanitation
facilities (at lease pit latrines and showering facilities).
43

163. Existing health services in the localities near the project such as health posts and clinics
have limited resources and may lack sufficient medicines and health personnel to accommodate
any additional patients from the construction workforce. Therefore in the construction stages the
contractor shall provide first aid facilities for the workers on the and at the worker camps with
at least one qualified first-aider.

12. Social Facilities and Health

164. Vectors such as mosquitoes will be encountered at any standing water which is allowed
to accumulate in the temporary drainage facilities; improper storm water management facilities
in the villages and settlements, improper disposal of wastewater generated from the local wells
along the side or water accumulating in borrow pits. Temporary and permanent drainage
facilities shall be designed to facilitate the rapid removal of surface water from all areas and
prevent the accumulation of surface water ponds.

165. Existing health services in the localities near the project such as health posts and clinics
have limited resources and may lack sufficient medicines and health personnel to accommodate
any additional patients from the construction workforce. Therefore in the construction stages the
contractor shall provide first aid facilities for the workers on the and at the worker camps with
at least one qualified first-aider or nurse present at all times. It is recommended that the
workforce be given access to a trained doctor at least once per week for routine checks and
medical examinations if necessary.

13. Enhancements or Changes in Scope

166. Opportunities for enhancements (or changes in scope) can be assessed prior to
construction and proposed enhancements will be discussed with the local population to identify
stewardship of any planting and also to serve as a vehicle for further public consultation at the
implementation stage and to assist in public relations.

167. Where rock based materials, gravels and sands are extracted it is a requirement to
rehabilitate the re-vegetation of these areas with indigenous species and this has been a
concern of local people in the public consultation. Following the completion of the landscaping
will take place and overall the appearance will be improved.

D. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures During Operation

168. The alignment seeks to provide a buffer distance from the corridor, keeping vehicles
away from sensitive receivers in the operational phase as far as possible. It is difficult with a
project of this magnitude to achieve an alignment that make sure all residences or commercial
premises or schools will far enough away from the project not to be affected in any way by
traffic emissions Therefore air quality will be monitored in the operational phase to provide
reassurance of the sustainability of the subproject. NTDC/the Government will also prevent
encroachment and enforce the exclusion zone and preserve the buffer distances to residences
within the substation.

169. No alignment could avoid crossing some rivers and streams and protection of water
resources must also be monitored in the operational phase to reassure the public that the
project does not make any long term impact on the water quality. Therefore chemical water
quality and the status of the river invertebrate communities will also be monitored in the
44

operational phase as an indicator of the sustainability of the rivers ecology and to provide
reassurance that the impacts were mitigated acceptably.

170. The alignment must also inevitably cross forests or plantations and the success of
compensatory planting must also be monitored in the operational phase to reassure relevant
authorities that the project impacts have been successfully mitigated and that the long term
impacts on forests or plantations are acceptable.

1. Air Quality

171. It is not likely that the sub project will give rise to any significant accumulations of air
emissions in the operational stage.

172. Air quality monitoring for of nitrogen dioxide and PM10 as a key indicator pollutants
should be carried out after the opening and at yearly intervals for 3 years prove the acceptability
of the project in air quality terms.

2. Success of compensatory planting

173. To ensure the success of enhancement planting and survival of the planted trees it is
recommended that an audit of the enhancements and other trees and shrubs under the Project
transmission line be undertaken by the NSIC after the initial cutting and planting has been
commenced to review conditions and maintain the planted trees

3. Encroachment and community awareness

174. The transmission line alignment will not displace any household. Resettlement and
compensation will be dealt with before construction starts. However experience suggests that
there will be additional encroachment. In addition some families may seek to resettle within the
ROW. During the design phase and subsequently in the course of construction and operation
awareness campaigning with the local public will be included in the project and the ESIC will try
to foster public stewardship of the Project to prevent the encroachment. Any areas where local
encroachment into the ROW or immediately adjacent to the ROW has taken place will be
identified and reported to the ESIC. Based on the proposed alignments these should not be
difficult tasks and this can be conducted as to minimize adverse impacts and maximize benefits.

175. The Social Impact Assessment (SIA) study and LARP have been completed in tandem
with this EIA for the whole of the project.

4. Effects of frequency

176. Transmission frequency used is 50 Hz , which is considered extremely low frequency,


impacts of this reduce rapidly with distance and there are no residential or other buildings that
are located at a distance that could be impacted by electric and magnetic fields, See IFC
guideline Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines- Electric Power Transmission and
Distribution, April, 30, 2007.
45

E. Institutional Requirements and Environmental Management Plan

177. The Environmental Management Plan is based on the type, extent and duration of the
identified environmental impacts. The EMP has been prepared by reference to and following the
best practices and the ADB Environmental Assessment Guidelines.

178. It is important that the recommendations and mitigation measures in the EMP matrix are
carried out thoroughly. NTDC tender/contract documents will include a clause (Annexure C of
the tender document) which requires the contractor to adhere to the all of the requirements of
the EMP and to protect and re provision infrastructure where necessary. In this way the
contractor is controlled and monitored to prevent creating damage to infrastructure. The
measures that are required, for the power transmission additions, to reduce residual impact to
acceptable levels and achieve the expected outcomes of the project are required in the
contract. The EMP matrix is presented as Appendix 2. The impact prediction (Section 4) is the
basis of the mitigation measures.

179. Prior to implementation and construction of the TL the EMP will be reviewed by the
NTDC ESIC after detailed designs are complete and amended as necessary. Such a review will
be based on reconfirmation and additional information on the assumptions made at the
feasibility stage on alignment, location scale and expected operating conditions of the project. If
there are any alterations of the alignment or additional transmission lines or extension of the
substation boundaries to be included, the designs may be amended and then the performance
and evaluation schedules to be implemented during project construction and operation will be
updated, and costs estimates can be revised. Large changes in scope will require preparation of
a supplementary environmental assessment and notification to ADB and approval of an updated
IEE.

180. The EMP will be reviewed by the ESIC and NTDC project management and approved by
PEPA before any contracts are signed and therefore well before any construction activity is
initiated. This is also an ADB requirement in order to take account of any sub-sequent changes
and fine tuning of the proposals. Before the works contract is worked out in detail and before
pre-qualification the full extent of the environmental requirements of the project (IEE/EIA) will be
included in the bidding documents, including the EMP. Past environmental performance of
contractors and awareness of environmentally responsible procurement will be used as
indicators for prequalification of contractors.

181. In order to facilitate the implementation of the EMP, during the preparation for the
construction phase the future contractors will be prepared to co-operate with ESIC and the local
population in the mitigation of impacts. Furthermore, the contractor will be primed through the
contract documentation and ready to implement all the mitigation measures and engage trained
environmental management staff to audit the effectiveness and review mitigation measures as
the project proceeds. The effective implementation of the EMP will be audited as part of the mid
term review of loan conditions and the executing agency will be prepared for this. Monthly
monitoring reports will be submitted to ADB every six months on the effectiveness of the EMP
implementation

182. The details of EMP are given in Appendix 2 in the form of a matrix. The impacts have
been classified into those relevant to the design/preparation stage, construction stage and
operation and maintenance stage. The matrix provides details of the mitigation measures
recommended for each of the identified impacts, approximate location of the mitigation sites,
time span of the implementation of mitigation measures, an analysis of the associated costs and
46

the responsibility of the institution. The responsible parties are specified for the purpose of the
implementation and the supervision of the EMP. The matrix is supplemented with a monitoring
plan (Appendix 3) for the performance indicators. An estimation of the associated costs for the
monitoring is given with the plan including physical mitigation costs as far as these can be
estimated at this stage. The EMP has been prepared following the best practices and the ADB
environmental assessment guidelines.

183. Prior to implementation of the Project NTDC will comply with several environmental
requirements, such as obtaining PEPA clearance (No Objection Certificate, compiling
acceptable EMP and Clearance Certificate) under PEP Act (Guidelines and Regulations 2000),
securing tree removal and replanting permits from the provincial departments of Forests and
Wildlife (Sindh) and other permissions required from other departments including but not
necessarily limited to Provincial Works and Services Department(s), National Highways
Authority and Irrigation Department(s). NTDC will also need to confirm that contractors and
their suppliers have complied with all statutory requirements and have appropriate and valid
licenses and permits for all powered mechanical equipment, permissions for use of local water
supplies in line with the all environmental requirements (e.g. and local authority conditions).

184. The EMP (Appendix 2) was prepared taking into account the limited capacity of the
NTDC to conduct environmental assessments of the subprojects and it is therefore required that
for this project NTDC engage an environmental specialist with at least 10 years experience in
environmental management five years site experience in environmental monitoring and auditing
to guide the subsequent formal assessment and submission process under the PEP Act and
monitor compliance with the EMP.

185. As of January 2007, NTDC has created environmental and social impact cell (ESIC)
under General Manager GSC (ESIC is now being placed under the General |Manager Projects)
. Attachment 3 presents the changed structure of NTDCs implementation formations). Currently
there are two environmental staff members (one Deputy Manager and one Assistant Manager).
At this stage staff members and the consultants are responsible for addressing environmental
concerns for the MFF potentially involving hundreds of kilometers of power transmission lines
and GS in later tranches. Most of the environmental work is delegated to consultants. Whereas
there is a limited level of awareness, NTDC staff needs more training and resources if they are
effectively provide quality control and supervision for the EMP implementation. Specific areas
for immediate attention are in EMP auditing, environmentally responsible procurement, air,
water and noise pollution management and ecological impact mitigation. It is recommended that
an environmental specialist consultant with 10 years experience covers this aspect full time for
at least the first six months of the MFF project and that on a call off basis with local support
those services are retained for the life of the MFF loan.

186. For this subproject and the whole MFF the environmental staff for the project
implementation team has been appointed prior to the outset of the implementation design
stage to ensure compliance with the statutory obligations under the PEP Act. It is also
mentioned that the NTDC process some in house capability such as and Environmental and
Social Cell and that as soon as possible potentially suitable staff are nominated to be trained
and man the cell at least on an inaugural basis. Due to the lack of in-house capability, at this
point, environmental specialist consultants the project implementation unit must address all
environmental aspects in the detailed design. It is recommended that the project management
unit (PMU) will have one technical manager (senior environmental specialist) to address all
environmental aspects in the detailed design and contracting stages. In addition, there will be
47

an environmental specialist(s) to cover the implementation of environmental mitigation


measures in the project packages. Both shall be members of the supervising consultants team.

187. The environmental specialists will:

(i) work in the PMU with NTDC to ensure all statutory environmental submissions
under PEP Act and other environmentally related legislation are thoroughly
implemented;
(ii) work in the PMU with NTDC to ensure all environmental requirements and
mitigation measures from the environmental assessment of subprojects are
included in the contract prequalification and bidding documents;
(iii) work with NTDC to execute any additional IEE and IEE requirements needed due
to fine tuning of the subprojects and that environmental performance targets are
included in the contracts prior to project commencement;
(iv) work in the PMU with NTDC to ensure all environmental requirements and
mitigation measures from the IEEs and IEEs and environmental performance
criteria are incorporated in the subproject contracts or variations and that the
EMP is effectively implemented;
(v) work with management consultant, supervising consultant and contractors to
manage and monitor the implementation of the project EMP.

188. Overall implementation of the EMP will become NTDCs responsibility. Other parties to
be involved in implementing the EMP are as follows:

189. Contractors: responsible for implementing all measures required mitigating


environmental impacts during construction;

190. Government agencies: such as provincial environmental agencies, and bureaus, at the
local level, will be responsible for monitoring the compliance with implementation of
environmental conditions related to statutory approvals of subprojects in their areas.

191. NTDC Board of Directors: responsible to ensure that sufficient timely resources are
allocated to process the environmental assessments and to monitor implementation of all
construction and operational mitigation measures required to mitigate environmental impacts.

192. Considering that other government agencies that need to be involved in implementing
the EMP, training workshops should be conducted at every six months or twice each year, for
the first 2 years (and annually thereafter) to share the monitoring report on the implementation
of the EMP, to share lessons learned in the implementation and to decide on remedial actions, if
unexpected environmental impacts occur.

193. The monitoring plan (Appendix3) was designed based on the project cycle. During the
preconstruction period, the monitoring activities will focus on (i) checking final alignment for
design of power transmission project; (ii) checking the contractors bidding documents,
particularly to ensure that all necessary environmental requirements and EMP have been
included; and (iii) checking that the contract documents references to environmental mitigation
measures requirements have been incorporated as part of contractors assignment and tied to
payment milestones, and making sure that any advance works (protection of specimen trees
and transplantation) are carried out in good time.
48

194. Where detailed design is required (e.g. for power transmission lines and avoidance of
other resources) the checking of designs must be carried out. During the construction period,
the monitoring activities will focus on ensuring that environmental mitigation measures are
implemented, and some performance indicators will be monitored to record the Projects
environmental performance and to guide any remedial action to address unexpected impacts.
Monitoring activities during project operation will focus on recording environmental performance,
monitoring encroachment, checking for leaks of SF6 at the GS substation and proposing
remedial actions to address unexpected impacts. The potential to use local community groups
contacts for monitoring should be explored as part of the activities in setting up the
Environmental and Social Cell which should have regular meetings with the local authorities and
NGOs as a matter of good practice and to discuss matters of mutual concern.

195. Although this is a large project for new power transmission lines, by generally keeping to
non-sensitive and non-critical areas the construction and operational impacts will be
manageable and no insurmountable impacts are predicted provided that the EMP is
implemented to its full extent and required in the contract documents. However experience
suggests that some contractors may not be familiar with this approach or may be reluctant to
carry out some measures. In order that the contractors are fully aware of the implications of the
EMP and to ensure compliance, it is recommended that the cost of environmental measures be
treated separately in the tender documentation and that payment milestones are linked to
environmental performance, vis a vis the carrying out of the EMP.

196. The effective implementation of the EMP will be audited as part of the loan conditions
and the executing agency must be prepared for this. In this regard the NTDC (the EA) must be
prepared to guide the design engineers and contractors on the environmental aspects.

V. PUBLIC CONSULTATON AND INFORMATION DISCLOSURE

A. Approach to Public Consultation

197. The public consultation process with various stakeholders has been approached so as
to involve public and other stakeholders from the earliest stages. Public consultation has taken
place during the planning and design and viewpoints of the stakeholders have been taken into
account and their concerns and suggestions for possible improvements have been included
where appropriate. Much of the Public consultation process to date has revolved around
concerns for the mitigation of construction impacts and the possible side effects from the
proximity of high voltage power lines.

198. There is also ongoing consultation for land acquisition and resettlement (LARP) and the
completion of the Resettlement Plan is documented separately. It is expected that this process
will continue through all stages of the subproject in order to accommodate stakeholders'
aspirations and to orient the stakeholders positively towards the project implementation and
where possible to harness cooperation over access issues in order to facilitate timely
completion.

199. The public consultation process has commenced in the initial feasibility stages (prior to
construction) in order to disclose the project information to the stakeholders and record
feedback regarding the proposed project and preferences. The stakeholders involved in the
process were the population likely to be impacted along the route of the proposed power lines;
the village leaders, school teachers, district administration.
49

B. Public Consultation Process

200. Prior to the implementation of the consultation, feedback, etc. has been carried out to
support this IEE and recorded. The focus of attention has been the population near the
proposed transmission line that may be affected by the subproject expansion. The level of
engagement varied from the stakeholder to stakeholder with some registering no major
comment but it is noted that none registered any outright opposition to subproject.

201. The disclosure of the enhancement project in advance and subsequent consultation with
stake holders has advantages in the environmental assessment and mitigation of impacts.
Public consultation can also provide a conduit for the improvement of the project implementation
to better serve the stakeholders.

202. The environmental assessment process under the Pakistan Environmental Protection
Act only requires the disclosure to the public after the statutory IEE/EIA has been accepted by
the relevant EPA to be in strict adherence to the rules. In this IEE the consultation process was
performed to satisfy the ADB requirements. The locations of consultation and people consulted
are listed in the full table of public consultation presented in Attachment 4.

C. Results of Public Consultation

203. The consultations identified some potential environmental and social impacts and
perceptions of the affected communities. The public consultation resulted in 208 responses in
May 2008 the field survey was carried out during the period 23 rd. April 2008 to 1 st. May 2008
(Attachment 4). The community supports the construction of the substation and transmission
lines. Residents along the RoW have the view that they should be paid fair and timely
compensation for their damaged crops and trees. The inhabitants near the TXL corridor and
RoW also expect more stable power supply in the region, with lesser complaints of load
shedding, with the provision of a higher voltage connection. Poor people requested for unskilled
and semi skilled jobs on priority basis with the contractors during implementation of the project.
Land acquisition and resettlement is not involved in this project (land under towers is not to be
paid if access to this land after construction of line is not hindered) as this is a transmission line
subproject. However, compensation will be paid to the loss of crops and trees to the concerned
parties / owners.

204. On the basis of the consultations so far, it appears that the project will have no
insurmountable environmental and social impacts but NTDC will have to make sure that
compensation and assistance amounts are assessed justly and that skilled and unskilled
employment should be preferentially given to the affected peoples as far as is reasonably
practicable.
50

VI. CONCLUSIONS

A. Findings and Recommendations

205. This study was carried out at the planning stage of the project. Primary and secondary
data were used to assess the environmental impacts. The potential environmental impacts were
assessed in a comprehensive manner. The report has provided a picture of all potential
environmental impacts associated with the Project, and recommended suitable mitigation
measures. This study recommends that some further follow up studies are undertaken during
project processing in order to meet the ADB requirements.

206. There are some further considerations for the planning stages such as obtaining
clearance for the project under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act (1997) but
environmental impacts from the power enhancements will mostly take place during the
construction stage. There are also some noise impacts and waste management issues for the
operational stage that must be addressed in the detailed design and through environmentally
responsible procurement. At the detailed design stage the number of and exact locations for
transmission tower placements may change subject to detailed surveys (by the contractor in
light of contractors requirements) but the impacts are likely to be broadly similar at most
locations and impacts have been reviewed in the environmental impact section of this IEE
report.

207. There are a number of key actions required in the detailed design phase. Prior to
construction the NTDC must receive clearance certification from the PEPA and NTDC must
complete an EMP that will be accepted by the PEPA and agreed by the contractor prior to
signing the contract. The information provided in this report can form the basis of any further
submission to PEPA as required in future.

208. The line alignment is restricted to the design of the line which has approval of NTDC; the
line route could be changed in the future which will require a revision of the IEE and the LARP.
However, crops and some trees will be compensated to the concerned parties. A social impact
assessment and resettlement action plan (LARP) has been completed in tandem with this IEE
for the whole subproject. The study (LARP) has:

(i) Examined and assess the overall social profile of the subproject area on the
basis of the primary and secondary data sources and preparation of a socio-
economic profile of the project districts.
(ii) Prepared a social analysis, taking into account socio-economic and poverty
status of the subproject area of influence.
(iii) Held consultations with relevant officials from the government and other relevant
officials, including consultation with affected communities to assess responses to
the project and ascertain the nature and scope of local participation in project
planning and implementation.
(iv) Identified, analyzed and, where appropriate, quantified the potential resettlement
impacts (minimal) of the proposed Project on the area and the population.

209. Baseline monitoring activities should be carried out during project detailed design stage
to establish the baseline of parameters for checking during the construction stage. The
monitoring schedule (Attachment 3) recommends monitoring on two occasions at two locations
along the Rohri subproject. The results should be integrated with the contract documentation to
51

establish performance action thresholds, pollution limits and contingency plans for the
contractors performance.
52 Attachment 1

PAKISTAN EIA PROCESS


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp


concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
DESIGN and - PRECONSTRUCTIN STAGE
1. Review of EMP Ensure EMP Ensure proposed live diversions are agreed and included in Completion of All project alignment Contractor ESIC
sufficient to contract. detailed design. Cell/ADB
control impacts Ensure final route to be built by contractor is as described in
and compliance RRP with same land acquisition.
with statutory OR
requirement of Review EIA and EMP & submit revised REA &
EPA environmental assessment in line with PCC/ADB
Guidelines. Resubmit.
2. Social Impacts To ensure that To be completed prior to commencement of Before the Targeted APs and families NTDC ADB
and Resettlement the adverse construction removal of according to the LAC.
impacts due to 1. Social preparation of the APs to be completed prior to houses and
the property commencement of construction. other structures The LAC and The Project Staff
acquisition and 2. Acquisition of lands completed to minimize the the APs to be will prepare an Inventory of
resettlement are uncertainty of people. given sufficient Losses (IOL).
mitigated 3. Completed implementation of LARP to provide time with
according to the compensation and assistance to the APs. compensation
LARP. 4. All the payments/entitlements are paid according to the money and
entitlement matrix, which was prepared according to the assistance to
LARP. resettle
5. All the impacts identified by the EIA were incorporated in satisfactorily.
to the LARP and relevant entitlements included into the
entitlement matrix.
3. Project disclosure Ensure 1. Design all changes to alignment disclosed to EPA. Completion of All project alignment. NTDC ESIC
compliance with 2. Ensure all changes to alignment are included in the detailed design. Cell/ADB
statutory revised EMP.
requirement of
EPA
4 Environmentally Ensure 1. Require in procurement specifications that transformers, Method ESIC Cellto check contractors ESIC Cell. NTDC / DB.
responsible environmentally transformer oil and other equipment are to be free from statement Method Statements include
procurement responsible PCB and other petroleum fractions that may be injurious during resources for mitigation

Attachment 2
procurement. to environment or equipment. contractor measures during negotiations.
2. Require new switchgear to be free from CFCs in selection, prior
Look for procurement specifications. SF6 gas insulated to contract
opportunities to equipment to be effectively leak free with nominal SF6 signing.
enhance design top up less than 1% per year.
3. Choose non-polluting or enhancing methods. Contractor No later than
Avoid
to submit Method Statement and schedule of pre-qualification

53
54
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp

Attachment 2
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
environmental environmental mitigation measures in response to EMP or tender
pollution. with tender. Include enhancements, techniques to negotiations.
reduce impacts.
4. Contractual clauses included to tie the implementation of
environmental mitigation measures to a performance
bond.
5. Waste disposal Ensure adequate 1. Create waste management policy and plan to identify 1.Prior to Locations approved by local ESIC Cell NTDC
disposal options sufficient locations for, storage and reuse of transformers detailed design waste disposal authorities. with the
for all waste and recycling of breaker oils and disposal of transformer oil, stage no later design
including residually contaminated soils and scrap metal cradle to than pre- consultant.
transformer oil, grave. qualification or
residually 2. Include in contracts for unit rates for re-measurement for tender
contaminated disposal. negotiations
soils, scrap metal. 3. After agreement with local authority, designate disposal 2. Include in
sites in the contract and cost unit disposal rates accordingly. contract.
6. Noise and air Plan and design 1. During All locations where SRs are ESIC Cell NTDC /
quality mitigation in to ensure noise . designing stage within 50m of alignment ADB
design. impacts are 1. If noise at sensitive receiver exceeds WB criterion [e.g. no later than
acceptable in Leq55db(A)] include design and installation of acoustic pre-qualification
operational insulation measures to control noise at SRs. or tender
phase. 2. Consider solid barrier to attenuate noise at schools and negotiations
hospitals to below accepted criterion.
3. Prepare Air Quality and Noise Control plan for
construction stage
8 Hydrological To minimize 1. Assess expected hydrologic flow in all areas where it is Before the Considered locations to be as Contractor NTDC / and
Impacts hydrological and sensitive, such as for irrigated lands taking into account commencement identified in the Detailed ESIC Cell.
drainage impacts changes due to climate change as predicted by accredited of construction Drainage Report.
during sources such as OECD. activities/during
constructions. 2. Ensure surface flows are controlled and facilitated detailed
through early re-provision of irrigation with appropriate designing
drainage structures in the road base including bridges and stage.
culverts.
3. Prepare Drainage Management Plan, to be completed
and approved by NTDC in the DDS at least one month prior
to construction.
9 Temporary 1. Prevent runoff 1. Identify locations for Erosion Control and Temporary 1. During first All stream and river crossings Contractor. NTDC / and
drainage and erosion and control Drainage along all of the line and around GSS. month after and all alignments where ESIC Cell.
control erosion.. 2. Include designs for EC and TD in contract (s) contract is slopes indicate erosion will be
2. Include 3. Agree detailed EC and TD plan with NTDC / ESIC Cell at signed but a problem based on
preliminary least one month prior to construction. before observation.
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
designs for construction.
Erosion Control in 2. Include in the
NTDC contract. NTDC contract.
10 Planning To plan to 1. Plan sites for worker camps and back up areas for During first Locations decided by NTDC / Contractor. NTDC / and
construction camps minimize the stockpiling materials and equipment in advance. month after ESIC Cellin consultation with ESIC Cell
and materials effect of the work 2. Consult local community and locate to use waste/barren contract is community and the Contractor.
management camps on the land and non-agricultural plots. signed but
surrounding 3. Agree use of land before construction commences before
environment and reconfirmed by the Contractor and agreed NTDC / ESIC construction
residents in the Cell at least one month prior to construction. 2. Include in the
area. NTDC contract.
11.Traffic Condition Plan to minimize Avoiding blocking existing roads and other access near the No later than Important locations to be ESIC Cell. NTDC.
disturbance of works route during construction. one month after identified n revised EMP.
traffic contract award. Plans made available to
Contractor with tenders.
12. Institutional Prepare ESIC 1. Develop strengthening plan for the environmental As soon as Throughout the project NTDC ADB.
strengthening and Cell for management by ESIC Cell as the Project rolls out. practicable no
capacity building implementation later than one
2. Increase staffing of NTDC Cell.
of EMP. month before
3. Train ESIC Cell officials to apply the EMP and to evaluate BOT contract
the environmental requirements and contractors mitigation award.
measures.
13 Prepare Full and effective 1. Prepare contractors to co-operate with the executing During pre- Throughout the project ESIC cell. NTDC / and
contractors for implementation of agency, project management, supervising consultants and construction no ADB.
implementation of environmental local population in the mitigation of impacts. Include the later than one
EMP mitigation approved EIA and the EMP in the contract documentation. month after
measures. BOT contract
2. Contracts must require full implementation of the EMP
award.
3. Contractor to engage capable and trained environmental
management staff to audit the effectiveness and review
mitigation measures as project proceeds.
4. The effective implementation of the EMP audited as part

Attachment 2
of the loan.
NTDC to prepare resources to fulfill the requirements of the
EMP and EPA guidance on the environmental aspects of
road projects
CONSTRUCTION
STAGE

55
56
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp

Attachment 2
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
1.Orientation for To ensure that 1. Conducting special briefing and / or on-site training for the Induction for all All staff members in all ESIC Cell and ESIC to
Contractor, and the Contractor, contractors and workers on the environmental requirement site agents and categories. monthly induction Contractor observe
Workers subcontractors of the project. record attendance and achievement. above before and six month refresher course and record and record
and workers 2. Conducting special briefing and training for Contractor on commencement as necessary until contractors details success
understand and the environmental requirement of the project. Record of work. comply / improve
have the capacity attendance and achievement.
to ensure that the 3. Agreement on critical areas to be considered and At early stages
environmental necessary mitigation measures, among all parties who are of construction
requirements for involved in project activities. for all
mitigation 4. Periodic progress review sessions to be conducted every construction
measures are six months employees as
implemented. far as
reasonably
practicable.
2. Plans to control Avoid impacts 1. Drainage management plan, Deliverable in All of NTDC alignment. Contractor ESIC
environmental and from unplanned final form to
2. Temporary pedestrian and traffic management plan,
associated impacts activities by NTDC one
penalizing 3. Erosion control and temporary drainage plan month before
contractors for not 4. Materials management plan, construction
committing to commences for
properly planning 5. Waste management plan; any given
works. 6. Noise and dust control plan, stretch.

7. Safety Plan
8. Agreed schedule of costs for environmental mitigation
measures (including maintenance where applicable).
{N.B. Forest Clearance and compensatory planting plan is
by NTDC}
3. Water quality To prevent 1. Proper construction of TD and EC measures , Prior to Relevant locations are Contractor ESIC l
adverse water maintenance and management including training of construction, construction within 50m of
quality impacts operators and other workers to avoid pollution of water 50m from water rivers.
due to negligence bodies by the considerate operation of construction bodies
and ensure machinery and equipment and reporting and feedback by Timing will
unavoidable ESIC cell depend on the
impacts are 2. Storage of lubricants, fuels and other hydrocarbons in construction
managed self-contained dedicated enclosures >50m away from water timetable.
effectively. bodies.
3. No stockpiles next ling to water bodies.
4. Proper disposal of solid waste from construction activities
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
& worker camps.
5. Borrow sites should not be close to sources of drinking
water.
4. Water Resources To minimize 1. In all areas Availability of water will be assessed to Prior to Relevant locations are all local Contractor NTDC
impacts on local evaluate the impact on community resources. construction, at water supply resources and and ESIC
water supply 2. Project water will be obtained brought in by tanker as all local water rivers. Cell
caused by necessary without depleting local village supplies. supply
construction 3. Camps will be located at least 100m away from the resources.
activities are nearest local settlement .
minimized. 4. The contractors will be required to maintain close liaison Timing will
with local communities to ensure that any potential conflicts depend on the
related to common resource utilization for project purposes construction
are resolved quickly. timetable.
5. Guidelines will be established to minimize the wastage of
water during construction operations and at campsites.
5. Spoil disposal and To minimize the 1. Implement Waste Management Plan. 1. Before Locations approved by ESIC Contractor. NTDC
construction waste environmental 2. Confirm conditions and safety of proposed disposal sites. construction Cell/ local authority. and ESIC
disposal impacts arising 3. Confirm amounts of surplus rock based materials that can commences A list of temporary dumping Cell
from generation of be reused in the project or by other interested parties for 2. Include in the sites to be prepared at the
spoil waste, reuse public projects. contract. bidding stage for agreement
where possible 4. Confirm sufficient locations in the contract for disposal of 3. UPDATE
and provide at least 4,000,000m3lspoil (or best updated estimate). Once a month
adequate 5. In contracts specify locations for disposal of all
disposal options construction waste and spoil at unit rates for re-
for unsuitable measurement.
soils. 6. used oil and lubricants shall be recovered and reused or
removed from the site in full compliance with the national
and local regulations.
7 Waste oil must not be burned. Oil and solid waste
disposal location to be agreed with NTDC and local
authority.
8 Open burning is contrary to good environmental practice
and will not be allowed.
6. Noise To minimize noise 1. Install, maintain and monitor all requisite mitigation as per Maximum 1. Strong follow up from ESIC Contractor. NTDC

Attachment 2
level increases contract all transformers and machinery shall be fitted with allowable noise Cellrequired to update and ESIC
and ground acoustic insulation levels are locations monthly Cell
vibrations during 2. Hammer-type pile driving operations shall be avoided 70dB(A)LEQ. 2. Potential noise impact
construction during nighttime. locations will be within 100m
operations. Well-maintained haulage trucks will be used with speed near all settlements and towns.
controls.

57
58
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp

Attachment 2
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
7. Air quality To minimize 1. Control all dusty materials at source. 1. Dust control 1. A list of locations to be Contractor. NTDC
effectively and 2. Stockpiled soil and sand shall be slightly wetted before planning will be prepared by the Contractor and ESIC
avoid complaints loading, particularly in windy conditions. a line item in 1month prior to Cell
due to the 3. Fuel-efficient and well-maintained haulage trucks shall be the approval of commencement of
airborne employed to minimize exhaust emissions. setting up dust construction.
particulate matter 4. Vehicles transporting soil, sand and other construction producing
released to the materials shall be covered. Limitations to speeds of such activities. 2. Most villages and hamlets
atmosphere. vehicles necessary. Transport through densely populated are sensitive locations
area should be avoided. 2.A schedule of (Appendix E)
5. Spray bare ground areas with water. spraying water
to be revised 3.All concrete plant and any
monthly rock crushing plant.
8. Soil Avoid soil Contractors to instruct and train workforce in the storage Instruct before Throughout all NTDC. Contractor NTDC
Contamination contamination and handling of materials and chemicals that can potentially works and ESIC
cause soil contamination. commence and Cell
Accidentally spills on open ground including the top 2cm of throughout all
any contaminated soil shall be disposed of as chemical construction
waste to a disposal site acceptable to the local authority / works.
community.
9. Work Camp To ensure that 1. Confirm location of work camps in consultation with UPDATE Once Location Map is prepared by Contractor NTDC
Location and the operation of NTDC and local authorities. Location subject to approval by a month the Contractor in tender/ bid and ESIC
Operation work camps does the NTDC. If possible, camps shall not be located near documentation. Cell
not adversely settlements or near drinking water supply intakes.
affect the 2. Water and sanitary facilities shall be provided for workers
surrounding and employees.
environment and 3. Solid waste and sewage shall be managed according to
residents in the the national and local regulations. As a rule, solid waste
area. must not be dumped, buried or burned at or near the project
site, but shall be disposed of to the nearest site approved by
the local authority.
4. Portable lavatories or at least pit latrines will be installed
and open defecation shall be discouraged and prevented by
keeping lavatory facilities clean at all times.
5. The Contractor shall document that all liquid and solid
hazardous and non-hazardous waste are separated,
collected and disposed of according to the given
requirements and regulations.
6. At the conclusion of the project, all debris and waste shall
be removed. All temporary structures, including shelters and
toilets shall be removed.
7. Exposed areas shall be planted with suitable vegetation.
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
8. The ESIC Cell shall inspect and report that the camp has
been vacated and restored to pre-project conditions as far
as is reasonably practicable.
10. Safety To ensure 1. Submit Safety Plan one month before commencement of During All areas of NTDC alignment.. Contractor NTDC
Precautions for physical safety of construction. construction and ESIC
Workers workers 2. Providing adequate warning signs. Cell
3. Providing every worker with skull guard or hard hat and
safety shoes.
4. Establish all relevant safety measures as required by law
and good engineering practices.
5. The Contractor shall instruct his workers in health and
safety matters, and require the workers to use the provided
safety equipment.
11. Social Impacts To engage local 1. Use local labour as far as possible for manual work. Claims of APs AA list of current construction Contractor NTDC
workforce and 2. Use local educated people for clerical and office work to be solved as areas and planned works to be and ESIC
community in the where possible. soon as updated by the Contractor Cell
NTDC Project. 3. Encourage monitoring of the project by local village possible monthly and displayed at local
To encourage groups. village offices.
local support for 4. Claims/complaints of the people on construction Necessary
the project. nuisance/damages close to ROW to be considered and evacuations to Special attention to locations
To ensure responded to promptly by the Contractor and monitored by be done as of irrigation systems, irrigated
minimum impacts NTDC. when terraces and lands damaged
to people living 5. Quarterly meetings with local VDC for liaison purposes to necessary due to flood or landslide.
close to the monitor complaints.
ROW. 6. Set up or maintain local communication lines via landline
or satellite phone.
12. Enhancements To make 1. Include planting of trees in addition to those removed Before close out All areas of the alignment. Contractor NTDC
environmental such as under lines in detailed design for visual interest and of construction and ESIC
enhancements amenity. in all areas Cell
and improve
appearance close
to the ROW.
OPERATIONAL STAGE
Environmental Objectives Mitigatory measures recommended Proposed timing Proposed Respons

Attachment 2
Concern locations ibility

59
60
Environmental Objectives Mitigation Measures recommended Timing to Locations to Resp. Resp

Attachment 2
concern implement implement MM imp mon
MM MM MM
1. Encroachment and To control 1. Maintain and monitor NTDC RoW boundary to prevent encroachment. During operation ESIC Cell NTDC
community encroachment. 2. Involve local community in line monitoring
awareness 3. Conduct awareness campaigning with the local public to foster public
stewardship of the area around the towers to prevent the encroachment.
4. Patrol and monitor the NTDC RoW & involve local groups or an NGO in the
protection of the new line.
5. Report any areas of encroachment into the ROW to the ESIC Cell.
2 Crops and Monitor impacts Track growth of large trees under the conductors. Operational phase all NTDC
vegetation from maintaining subprojects in and ESIC
tree clearance future Cell
under tranches
transmission lines
ADB = Asian Development Bank, AP = affected people, BOT = build-operate-transfer, DDS = detailed design stage, EIA = Environmental Impact Assessment,
EMP= environmental management action plan, EPA= Environmental Protection Agency, ESIC = Environmental and Social Implementation Cell, GSS = Grid
Substation, IOL = Inventory of Losses, LAC = Land Acquisition Collector, LARP = land acquisition and resettlement plan, MM = mitigating measure, NGO =
nongovernment organization, NTDC = National Transmission and Despatch Company, OECD = Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, PCB =
Polychlorinated Biphenyls, PEPAct = Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997 (as regulated and amended), REA = Rapid Environmental Assessment, ROW =
right of way, RRP = Report and Recommendation of the President, SF6 = sulfur hexafluoride, SR = sensitive receiver, TD = temporary drainage, VDC = Voluntary
District Committee, WB = World Bank.

Notes:
Based on EIA/IEE reports to be revised at DDS, RAP, SIA and other engineering considerations may change.
ADB checks that processes have been completed and signed off by NTDC before moving to construction stage.

Source: Project Preparatory Technical Assistance Consultants.


MONITORING PLAN FOR PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
DESIGN and - PRECONSTRUCTION STAGE
1. Review of Environmental During detailed design By completion of All project Contractor Initially NTDC Cell NTDC, ESIC ESIC cell staff
EMAP Management Action (later monthly by detailed design. alignment / later Contractor cell / ADB* cost
Plan (EMAP) is Contractor to cover any cost
reviewed unidentified impacts)
2. Social Inventory of losses, Completed prior to Before removal of APs according to NTDC Cell NTDC Cell staff NTDC /ADB* ESIC cell staff
Impacts and Property acquisition, commencement of houses and RP & LAFC. cost cost
Resettlement compensation and construction structures.
resettlement
completed to RP
requirements.
3. Project Design changes During detailed design Completion of All project Contractor Contractor cost NTDC & ESIC ESIC cell staff
disclosure notified by Contractor to cover detailed design. alignment. cell / ADB* cost
any access roads and
alignment changes,
additional VILLAGEs.
4. Contract follows Once, before Contract is Before Contract is Method Statements NTDC Project Contractor cost NTDC ESIC NTDC Cell staff
Environmental ADB Guidelines on signed. signed. include resources Cell. cell / ADB*. cost
ly ERP. Performance for mitigation
Responsible bond. Deposited measures.
Procurement.
(ERP) Contractual clauses
include
implementation of
environmental
mitigation measures
tied to a
performance bond.
5. Waste disposal Disposal options for Monthly or as required in 1.Prior to detailed Locations approved NTDC cell with ESIC cell ESIC cell NTDC
all waste transformer waste management plan design stage no by local waste the design
oil, residually to identify sufficient later than pre- disposal authorities. consultant.

Attachment 3
contaminated soils, locations for, storage qualification or
scrap metal agreed and reuse of tender
with NTDC and local transformers and negotiations

61
62
Attachment 3
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
authority.. recycling of breaker oils 2. Include in
and disposal of contract.
transformer oil,
residually contaminated
soils and scrap metal
cradle to grave.
2. Include in contracts
for unit rates for re-
measurement for
disposal.
3. After agreement with
local authority, designate
disposal sites in the
contract and cost unit
disposal rates
accordingly.
6. Noise and air Design changes During detailed design Completion of As defined in EIA NTDC Cell / Contractor cost NTDC / /ADB* NTDC Cell staff
quality included in EIA by Contractor. detailed design. (supplementary) & Contractor cost
mitigation in (supplementary) & EMAP.
design. EMAP approved by
MOEST.
7. Hydrological Temporary Drainage During detailed design One month before Considered Contractor Contractor cost NTDC / and NTDC Cell staff
Impacts Management plan. by Contractor and commencement of locations to be as NTDC Project cost
monthly to cover any construction identified in the Cell.
unidentified impacts Detailed Drainage
Report.
9. Temporary Erosion Control and During detailed design One month before All stream and river Contractor. Contractor cost NTDC / and NTDC Cell staff
drainage and Temporary Drainage updated by Contractor construction crossings and NTDC Project cost
erosion completed. monthly to cover any commences. where slopes Cell.
control unidentified impacts. indicate erosion will
be a problem.
10. Planning Use of land agreed During detailed design One month before Locations agreed Contractor Contractor cost NTDC / and NTDC Cell staff
construction with surrounding updated by Contractor construction NTDC cell in NTDC Cell NTDC Project cost
camps residents & monthly to cover any commences. consultation with facilitates. Cell.
VILLAGEs. unidentified impacts. community and the
Contractor.
13.Traffic Temporary During detailed design One month before Locations agreed Contractor Contractor cost NTDC / and NTDC Cell staff
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
Condition Pedestrian and updated by Contractor construction with NTDC cell in NTDC Project cost
Traffic Management monthly to cover any commences. consultation with Cell.
Plan agreed. unidentified impacts. community and the
Contractor.
15. Institutional 1. Strengthening plan 1. Once, 1. As soon as Throughout the NTDC Project NTDC Cell staff NTDC / and /ADB cost of
strengthening and agreed for NTDC cell. practicable project Cell. cost /ADB*. IES & support
2. Once for 1 month
capacity building
2. International 2, 3, 4. No later US$25,000
3. Ongoing
environment specialist than one month
(IES) 4. Ongoing before Contract
award.
3. Increase staffing of
NTDC Cell.
4. Train NTDC Cell
officials.
CONSTRUCTION
STAGE
1.Orientation for 1. Contractor agreed 1. Once 1. Before contract All BOT staff Contractor with Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
Contractor, and to provide training to 2. Ongoing is signed members in all IES assistance NTDC to cost
Workers professional staff 3. Ongoing 2. Before categories. monthly and record observe and
and workers. construction areas induction and six details. record success
2. Special briefing are opened up month refresher
and training for 3. Every six course
Contractor months
completed.
3. Periodic progress
review sessions.
2. Plans to control 1. Drainage Deliverable in final form One month before All of NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC Project NTDC Cell staff
environmental Management plan to NTDC cell one month construction alignment. Cell. cost
impacts 2. Temp. Pedestrian & before construction commences.
Traffic Management commences for any
plan, given stretch.
3. Erosion Control &
Temp. Drainage plan

Attachment 3
4. Materials
Management plan,
5. Waste Management

63
64
Attachment 3
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
plan;
6. Noise and Dust
Control plan,
7. Safety Plan
8. Agreed schedule of
costs for
environmental
mitigation.{N.B. Forest
Clearance and
Compensatory
Planting plan is
prepared by NTDC
cell}
5. Water quality Meaningful water Once (line item when During detailed Locations to be Independent Contractor cost NTDC / NTDC NTDC Cell staff
quality monitoring up opening up construction design by provided with the experienced Cell. cost
and downstream near water bodies). Contractor and detailed designs laboratory.
during construction update to cover including all bridges
within 100m of any unidentified during construction
rivers. Rapid impacts. within 100m of
reporting and rivers
feedback by NTDC.
6. Water 1. Availability of 1. Monthly Prior to All local water Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
Resources water acceptable to 2. Monthly submission of supply resources NTDC Cell cost
community. No progress reports. and rivers.
complaints.
2. Guidelines
established to
minimize the water
wastage during
construction
operations and at
worker camps.
8. Spoil disposal 1. Use of land Monthly (line item when Prior to All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
and construction agreed with opening up construction. alignment. NTDC Cell cost
waste disposal surrounding construction). Update monthly.
residents &
VILLAGEs.
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
2. Waste
Management Plan
implemented.
3 No open burning
10. Noise Noise mitigation Monthly (line item when Maximum All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC / NTDC NTDC Cell staff
measures opening up allowable noise alignment. should maintain Project Cell will cost
implemented in line construction). levels are the accepted monitor sample
with guidelines for 70dB(A)LEQ. standards activities.
noise reduction from
ISO/TR11688-
1:1995(E)
11. Air quality Noise and dust Monthly (line item when Prior to All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
control plan opening up construction. alignment. NTDC Cell cost
implemented. construction). Update monthly.
13..Soil Contractors Monthly (line item when Prior to All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
Contamination workforce to opening up construction. alignment. NTDC Cell cost
instructed and train construction). Update monthly.
handling of
chemicals
14. Work Camp 1. Use of land Monthly (line item when Prior to All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
Location and agreed with opening up construction. alignment. NTDC Cell cost
Operation surrounding construction). Update monthly.
residents & Villages.
2. Waste
Management Plan
implemented.
3 No open burning
19. Safety Safety Plan Once (update monthly One month before All NTDC Contractor. Contractor cost NTDC / NTDC Cell staff
Precautions for submitted as necessary) construction and alignment. (ESIC cell to cost
Workers update quarterly. actively
supervise and
enforce.
20. Social 1. Local labor is Monthly (line item when During All NTDC Contractor Contractor cost NTDC and NTDC Cell staff
Impacts used and workforce opening up construction. alignment. NTDC Cell cost

Attachment 3
2. Local educated construction). Update monthly.
people for office
work.

65
66
Attachment 3
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
3. Complaints on
construction
nuisance damages
close to ROW are
responded to
promptly by the
Contractor.
4. Quarterly
meetings with local
VILLAGE for liaison
purposes to monitor
complaints.
21. Contractor has Once (update monthly One month before All NTDC Contractor. Contractor cost NTDC / NTDC Cell staff
Enhancements included for some as necessary) construction and alignment. (NTDC Cell to cost
enhancements in update quarterly. actively
detailed designs supervise and
Including planting of enforce.
trees in addition to
bioengineering such
as in median
OPERATIONAL NTDC Cell staff
STAGE cost
1. Air Quality 1. Roadworthiness of 1. Roadworthiness of During operation. 5 locations on Contractor Contractor cost NTDC / and NTDC Cell staff
vehicles on NTDC. vehicles on NTDC Daily NTDC alignment ESIC Cell cost
2. Monitor NO2 and during operations nearest
PM10 as indicators. 2. Yearly intervals for 3 settlements.
years after opening for
reassurance.
2. crops and 1. Follow up on Tree 1) Quarterly 1) Throughout All NTDC Contractor ESIC Cell NTDC MOFSC and
vegetation Clearance and 2) Quarterly project alignment. NTDC Cell staff
Compensatory 3) Quarterly 2) Each of three cost.
Planting Plan. 4) Quarterly years after initial
2. Records on planting.
survival of planted 3) Continuous for
trees. three years after
3. The compensatory project completion
planting maintained 4) For four years
Environmental Performance Frequency to Timing to Locations to Responsible Cost of Resp PI Cost of
concern indicator (PI) monitor check PI implement PI to implement Implementation supervision Supervision
PI
4. Audited report by after initial
ESIC cell for on site clearance of the
and off-site forest.
compensatory
planting.
ADB = Asian Development Bank, AP = affected people, BOT = build-operate-transfer, EIA = Environmental Impact Assessment, EMAP= environmental
management action plan, ERP = Environmentally Responsible Procurement, ESIC = Environmental and Social Implementation Cell, IEC = International
environment specialist, LAFC = Land Acquisition Compensation Fixation Committee, MOEST = Ministry of Environment, Science and Technology, NTDC = National
Transmission and Despatch Company, ROW = right of way, RP = Resettlement Plan.

Notes:
Based on EIA/IEE reports to be revised at DDS, RAP, SIA and other engineering considerations may change.
ADB checks that processes have been completed and signed off by NTDC before moving to construction stage.

Source: Project Preparatory Technical Assistance Consultants.

Attachment 3
67
68 Attachment 3

MONITORING PLAN

1. NTDC have established the Environmental and Social Impacts Cell (ESIC) manned by
two professionals and support staff .The cell is attached with both the implementing Agency ,
the Chief Engineer EHV (General Manager Grid System Construction , NTDC ) and the
planning agency Project Director Technical Assistance (General Manager Planning , NTDC) .
The NTDC instructional arrangement with respect to social and environmental monitoring and
implementation is presented as follows:

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS

2. The implementation and monitoring of the social and environmental Program involves a
number of agencies including, NTDC as the implementing agencies, the Environmental
Protection Agencies of Sindh, Provincial Government Sindh.

National Transmission and Dispatch Company

3. NTDC as the prime executing agency (EA), bears the overall responsibility for the
preparation, implementation and financing of all tasks set out in this IEE/ LARP, as well as,
inter-agency coordination, and monitoring and evaluation activities required the LARP
preparation, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation. Institutionally, NTDC has three
functional divisions, namely the Planning, Projects and Grid Station Construction divisions.

4. The Planning Division is responsible for planning and preparation of subprojects and
keeping liaison with the Government of Pakistan and Asian Development Bank (ADB), as the
donor of this Project. This division is currently being assisted by the PPTA Consultants 12 ,
including a Environmental Expert for the preparation of the IEE and Resettlement Expert
responsible for LARP preparation), in preparing the identified subprojects in line with the ADB
Policies and obtaining approval from the donor ADB.

5. The Projects Division is responsible for the overall management and coordination of the
subprojects. Its major functions include, keeping regular liaison with ADB and relevant
departments of the federal and provincial governments, updating of IEE/LARP and its
monitoring and evaluation activities. In addition, the Project Management Unit takes care of the
overall coordination and liaison with the Government of Pakistan and ADB. It will be assisted by
the Project Management Consultants team, including a Resettlement Specialist, to be hired
shortly 13 . Secondly, the Environmental and Social Impact Cell is responsible for the updating of
and internal monitoring of IEEs/LARPs of approved Subprojects. It will be assisted by the
Resettlement Specialist in the external Monitoring and Evaluation Consultants team to be hired
shortly. 14

6. The Grid Station Construction Division is responsible for implementing the Subprojects,
including IEE/LARP preparation/updating and implementation. This large division is divided into
two geographical regions, each headed by a Chief Engineer. They are EHV I (Northern
Region, Lahore) and EHV II (Southern Region, Hyderabad). The Rohri to Gumbat 132kV

12
British Power International (BPI), a UK Based firm.
13
The hiring pf Project Management Consultants team is under process of selection (proposals are being
evaluated).
14
The hiring of Monitoring and Evaluation Consultants team is under process of selection (proposals are
being evaluated).
Attachment 3 69

Transmission Line Subproject falls under the jurisdiction of EHV II (Hyderabad), where a
Project Director as head of the Project Implementation Unit (PIU), along with an Executive
Engineer and Sub-Divisional Officers (Junior Engineers) will be managing the construction
works.

7. Besides, each regional EHV has an in-house Land Acquisition Collector (LAC), who
along with his field staff, an Assistant Land Acquisition Officer (Tehsildar) and Patwaris will take
care of the updating (if required) and implantation of the LARP. The NTDC LAC normally works
as an independent entity, but in case of local needs like price updating, grievance redress, etc.,
involves the respective District Government, especially the District Coordination Officer (DCO /
District LAC), Union Council Nazims, and other local leaders, and/or the Provincial Revenue
Boards, for addressing broader matters and resolving permanent Land Acquisition issues (not
applicable to this Subproject). In addition, the NTDC LAC will be provided technical assistance
by the Resettlement Specialist included in both the Project Management Consultants and the
external Monitoring and Evaluation Consultants teams. This intuitional arrangement is
presented as follow:

Figure A3.1: NTDC Organization for LARP Planning, Implementation and Monitoring
70 Attachment 3

Chief Executive, NTDC

General Manager, General Manager, Projects General Manager, Grid Station


Planning (GM Planning) (GM Projects) Construction (GM, GSC)

Project Chief Engineer,


Project Chief Engineer,
Director, EHV-II,
Preparation EHV-I, Lahore
Project Hyderabad
Consultants
Preparation
(PPTA/BPI)
(PD PPTA)

Project
Project Director
Manager, Project Project Director
Management Unit Management Project Project
(PMU) Consultants Implementation Implementation
Unit (PIU) Unit (PIU)

Environmental and Environmental and


Social Impacts Social Monitoring XEN & SDOs XEN & SDOs
Cell (ESIC) Consultants

Land Land
Acquisition Provincial Boards of Revenue Acquisition
Collector (For Land Acquisition) Collector
(LAC) (LAC)

District LACs,
Tehsildars/Patwaris
Assistant Land (For Land Acquisition) Assistant Land
Acquisition Acquisition
Officer (ALAO) Affected Officer (ALAO)
Households /
Tehsildar/Patwari Communities Tehsildar/Patwari

8. The amount and scope of work to be handled by the above referred cell far exceeds the
physical and professional ability and capabilities of the incumbents. To support this cell , to
carry out this task : monitoring consultants (MC) are being hired (these are also required as per
ADB loan covenants ) .The brief terms of Reference of the MC is as follows :

Environmental monitoring
Attachment 3 71

9. An environment evaluation expert(s) for a period of four (4) person-month (on as and
when required basis) who will undertake monitoring of IEEs and also other environmental issues
related to design, construction and commissioning of the subprojects according to the relevant
reports already prepared and approved by NTDC/ADB. The expected completion time of these
projects is one years.

(A) Design Phase

(I) Monitor final site selection process and final alignment selection process and its
environmental compliance with EMP.
(II) Review the implementation of the land acquisition plan and expropriation,
including considerations concerning vulnerable groups among land-owners,
farmers, and farm workers.
(III) Monitor contractors detailed project design to ensure relevant environmental
mitigation measures in EMP have been included.
(IV) Monitor the detailed environmental guidelines for construction works, including
procurement, management, works, closing operations etc in the light of IEE and
EMP.
(V) Review the management plan for mineral construction materials and waste
management.
(VI) Audit detailed designs of facilities and installations to ensure standard
environmental safeguards/ mitigation measures (as identified in EMP) have been
included.
(VII) Review landscape design plan, including compensatory planting.
(VIII) Monitor the performance of environmental training and briefings for the creation
of environmental awareness of project staff and NTDC.

(B) Construction phase

(I) Regular monitoring and reporting of contractors compliance with contractual


environmental mitigation measures in light of IEE and EMP.
(II) Monitoring of the implementation of the landscape design plan.

(C) Operation and Maintenance phase

(I) Monitoring of routine maintenance of facilities and transmission line in light of


mitigation measures specified in EMP.
(II) Monitoring of the implementation of the landscape design plan.

10. The MC will mainly assist the cell in the monitoring functions .NTDC is also in the
process of hiring Management consultants , who will assist the Project Management Unit (PMU)
of NTDC in amongst other things the implementation of the IEE/LARP ., including updating of
LARP s (price updating ) and updating of IEEs when ever major changes are made to approved
subprojects .the Terms of Reference (related to social and environmental aspects) of the
Implementation consultants are as follows :

(i) . Specifically, the PMC shall ensure that:


(a) All environmental assessment, framework, and plans for all the
subprojects should be conducted and implemented in accordance with
ADBs Environment Policy and Environmental Assessment Guidelines,
and Pakistan environmental assessment regulations and guidelines.
72 Attachment 3

(b) All land acquisition, and resettlement framework and plan are
implemented promptly and efficiently according to its terms in accordance
with the applicable Pakistan laws, and ADBs Policy on Involuntary
Resettlement.
(c) PMU will guarantee that all subprojects affecting ethnic minorities are
constructed and operated in accordance with the requirements of ADBs
Policy on Indigenous Peoples and applicable Pakistan rules and
regulations.
(d) PMU will follow the principles of the ADBs Policy on Gender and
Development and use appropriate Pakistan laws during each subproject
implementation.

The Activities at various stages of the project cycle are presented as follows:
Sr. Monitoring Parameter Monitoring Timing Responsibility
No. Locations
DESIGN PHASE
1. Audit project bidding documents - Prior to issue of biding NTDC through
to ensure IEE and EMP is documents project
included implementation unit.
2. Monitor that the selection - Prior to NTDC NTDC with the
process and final alignment approval of assistance of and
selection process and its contractors detail external
environmental compliance with alignment survey environmental
EMP consultants
3. Monitor contractors detail - Prior to NTDC NTDC with the
project design to ensure approval of assistance of project
relevant environmental contractors detail implementation unit
mitigation measures in EMP alignment survey
have been included
4. Monitor through implementation - Prior to NTDC NTDC with the
of detail environmental approval of assistance of and
guidelines for construction contractors detail external
works including procurement design environmental
management, works and consultants
closing operation
5. Review the mineral, - Prior to NTDC NTDC with the
construction materials and approval of assistance of and
waste management contractors detail external
design environmental
consultants
6. Audit detail design of facilities - Prior to NTDC NTDC with the
and installation to ensure approval of assistance of project
standard contractors detail implementation unit
design
Attachment 3 73

CONSTRUCTION PHASE
Sr. Monitoring Monitoring
Timing Responsibility
No. Parameter Locations
Observation of soil Construction sites, During routine
1 PMU
erosion campsites monitoring
At wells and surface
water bodies near
grid station and Before mobilization Contractor/PMU
construction
2 Water quality campsites
Selected local wells Monthly Contractor/PMU
Selected locations at
nearby surface water Monthly Contractor/PMU
bodies
Construction sites,
3 Water consumption Daily Contractor/PMU
campsite
Checks for any
damage to water During routine
4 Construction sites PMU
course, groundwater monitoring
wells
Construction sites,
Before mobilization Contractor/PMU
campsites
5 Ambient air quality
Construction sites, Once every two
Contractor/PMU
campsites months
Construction sites,
During routine
Checks for exhaust campsites Contractor/PMU
monitoring
emissions
6
Checks for dust Construction sites,
During routine
emissions campsites, project Contractor/PMU
monitoring
roads
Fortnightly or during
At nearby the construction
7 Noise Contractor/PMU
communities activities causing
noise.
At nearby Throughout the field
8 Public concerns PMU
communities activities.
74 Attachment 3

OPERATIONAL PHASE
Sr. Monitoring Monitoring
Timing Responsibility
No. Parameter Locations
Compensatory tree Selected sites for After construction
1 NTDC
planting plantation of trees phase
Land under the During routine
2 Crops and vegetation NTDC
transmission line maintenance
Population along During routine
3 Social safety Impacts NTDC
transmission line maintenance
Complete record of sampling and analysis should be maintained and documented.
PMU = Project Monitoring Unit , NTDC = National Transmission and Despatch Company

Summary of Estimated Costs for EMP

Implementation for Tranche 1

Staffing, audit
1 person for 2 years 1,200,0001 19,900
and monitoring
Monitoring
As detailed under EMP 5,000,0002 83,000
activities
Mitigation As prescribed under EMP and
8,000,0003 132,800
measures IEE
Transport 1 dedicated vehicle 2 years 1,000,0004 16,600
Contingency 3% contingency 456,000 7,600
Total 15,656,000 259,900
Cost for SP about 1/7th of total monitoring costs for Tranche 1.
1
@ Rs. 50,000/month .
2
Laboratory charges for : testing of construction materials ; water quality teats ; ambient air tests ; emissions
measurements ; and noise measurements .
3
Includes : Compensatory tree plantation under supervision of forest department ; and training on counterpart staff .
4
@ Rs. 25000 per month rental charges and Rs. 550.0 per day fuel and operating cost
SUMMARY OF PUBLIC CONSULTATION
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Man Group: Rahim Jo Goth
1. Akbar Khan Bahenga Landowner Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
2. Abdul Rasheed Khan Landowner Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
3. Karim Dad Labor Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Local skilled and Skilled and NTDC should employ Skilled
08 unskilled labor should be unskilled labor and unskilled labor from the
used wherever possible should be area
preferred from the
area
4. Miandad Ujjan Trucker Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Electricity should be Electricity should NTDC should consider
08 provided to the affected be provided to the electrification of
villages which are still villages / houses villages/houses, which are
without electricity which are not not electrified yet.
electrified
5. Asadullah Khan Shopkeeper Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- He supports the Construction work NTDC should complete all
08 construction of & TXL. should be work timely
He expects that they will completed in time
get more stable power
supply in the region with
the provision of high
voltage connection.
Woman Group: Rahim Jo Goth
6. Kanwal Ara House-Wife Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
7. Nasibah Khatoon House-Wife Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.

Attachment 4
8. Huma Akbar House Girl Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Local norms should be Line should not NTDC should avoid
08 honored pass over the distribution lines to pass over
houses the houses.
9. Hafeeza Rashid House Girl Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
10. Robina Akhtar House Girl Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over

75
76
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
over the houses the houses.
11. Anjuman Bibi House Girl Rahim Jo Goth 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
Man Group: Aror Village
12. Badar Din Bhatti Landowner Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
13. Mohammad Tariq Landowner Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhatti 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
14. Mohammad Ramzan Sharecropper Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhatti 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
15. Khair Din Labor Aror Village 24-4- Local skilled and Skilled and NTDC should employ Skilled
08 unskilled labor should be unskilled labor and unskilled labor from the
used wherever possible should be area
preferred from the
area
16. Ghulam Nabi Sirohi Landowner Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
17. Wahid Bux Sirohi Sharecropper Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
18. Ijaz Hussain Bhatti Sharecropper Aror Village 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Aror Village
19. Maryam Bibi House-Wife Aror Village 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
20. Noreen Ara House Girl Aror Village 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
21. Saima Ijaz House-Wife Aror Village 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
the local norms norms.
22. Shabnam House Girl Aror Village 24-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses the houses.
TXL would improve the
situation.
23. Rehana Student Aror Village 24-4- Electricity should be Electricity should NTDC should consider
08 provided to the affected be provided to the electrification of
villages which are still villages / houses villages/houses, which are
without electricity which are not not electrified yet.
electrified
24. Afshan House-Wife Aror Village 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
25. Shahida House Girl Aror Village 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Miran, Kot Diji
26. Mir Shamman Khan Landowner Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Tapar Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
27. Ghulam Sarwar Sharecropper Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
28. Ali Gauhar Sharecropper Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
29. Ghulam Burdi Sharecropper Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
30. Ghulam Murtaza Sharecropper Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay

Attachment 4
Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
31. Ali Haidar Landowner Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Dijji 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Miran, Kot Diji

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Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
32. Madiha Nasim House-Wife Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Dijji 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
33. Shamim House Girl Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Dijji 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
34. Ruqaia Bibi House-Wife Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Dijji 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
35. Zakiyyah Bibi House-Wife Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Dijji 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
36. Amir Begum House-Wife Goth Miran Kot 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Dijji 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Ghulam Qasim
37. Mushtaq Wassan Landowner Goth Ghulam 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Qasim 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
38. Habib ur Rahman Teacher Goth Ghulam 24-4- Load shedding is more in - -
Qasim 08 villages and affects all
spheres of life including
schools.
39. Mohammad Papang Landowner Goth Ghulam 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Gopang Qasim 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
40. Abdul Aziz Wassan Landowner Goth Ghulam 24-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Qasim 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
41. Shakir Ali Student Goth Ghulam 24-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Qasim 08 in the summer is a
nuisance; he hoped the
TXL would improve the
situation.
Woman Group: Goth Ghulam Qasim
42. Bushra House Girl Goth Ghulam 24-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Qasim 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL would improve the
situation.
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
43. Waheeda Begum House-Wife Goth Ghulam 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Qasim 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
44. Sadia Mushtaq Student Goth Ghulam 24-4- Extensive load shedding - -
Qasim 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and affect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL would improve the
situation.
45. Saima Bibi House Girl Goth Ghulam 24-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Qasim 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped that houses. the houses.
TXL would improve the
situation.
46. Kulsoom Bibi House-Wife Goth Ghulam 24-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Qasim 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
47. Bibi Halima House-Wife Goth Ghulam 24-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Qasim 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Sardar Khan Wassan
48. Mujahid Wassan Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
49. Ghulam Hussain Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Wassan Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
50. Asghar Ali Sharecropper Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
51. Sahib Dino Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and

Attachment 4
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
52. Niaz Wassan Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
53. Sahib Dino Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least

79
80
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
timely 15 days before civil works
54. Ali Dino Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
55. Pir Bux Sanjrani Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
56. Sameer Wassan Sharecropper Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
57. Hasan Ali Wassan Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
58. Niaz Hussain Wassan Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
59. Allah Ando Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
60. Ghulam Sahabbir Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
61. Rasheed Sanjrani Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
62. Alandho Khan Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
63. Bashir Khan Sanjrani Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
64. Nawaz Ali Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
timely 15 days before civil works
65. Mister Shah Nawaz Landowner Goth Sardar 25-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
66. Sajid Ali Sanjrani Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Load shedding in the - -
Khan Wassan 08 summer is a nuisance;
he hoped the TXL would
improve the situation.
Woman Group: Goth Sardar Khan Wassan
67. Saira Kulsoom House-Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped that houses. the houses.
TXL would improve the
situation.
68. Humaira Bashir Teacher Goth Sardar 25-4- Load shedding is more in - -
Khan Wassan 08 villages and affects all
spheres of life including
schools.
69. Ummi Kulsoom House-Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped that houses. the houses.
TXL would improve the
situation.
70. Nabiha Nawaz Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and affect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL would improve the
situation.
71. Aysha House Girl Goth Sardar 25-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
& TXL will improve the
situation.

Attachment 4
72. Sajida Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Load shedding in the - -
Khan Wassan 08 summer is a nuisance
and effect the studies;
she hoped the & TXL will
improve the situation.
73. Samina House Girl Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the

81
82
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
situation.
74. Shamim Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and effect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
75. Hava Dadi Mid Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
problem; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
76. Kainat Shabbir Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Load shedding in the - -
Khan Wassan 08 summer is a nuisance
and effect the studies;
she hoped the TXL will
improve the situation.
77. Batool House -Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Load shedding in the Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 summer is a problem; pass over the distribution lines to pass over
she hoped the TXL will houses. the houses.
improve the situation.
78. Afshan House GIrl Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
79. Benazir Wassan Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
problem and effect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
80. Hamida Begum House-Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Khan Wassan 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
81. Sher Bano House-Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
82. Kabir Bibi House-Wife Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
83. Shoba Student Goth Sardar 25-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and effect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
Man Group: Goth Nawab Khan Wassan
84. Sawab Khan Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
85. Miandad Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
86. Mohammad Uras Khan Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
87. Sajjan Khan Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
88. Azeem Khan Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
89. Murad Ali Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
90. Imdad Ali Sanjrani Landowner Goth Nawab 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan Wassan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
91. Wasim Akram Student Goth Nawab 26-4- Prolonged load shedding - -

Attachment 4
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance; he hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
92. Imran Arshad Student Goth Nawab 26-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance; he hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.

83
84
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Woman Group: Goth Nawab Khan Wassan
93. Asmat Ara House-Wife Goth Nawab 26-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
& TXL will improve the
situation.
94. Saima Akhtar Student Goth Nawab 26-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and effect the
studies; she hoped the &
TXL will improve the
situation.
95. Maryam Bibi Mid-Wife Goth Nawab 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Khan Wassan 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
96. Halima Sadia House-Wife Goth Nawab 26-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
97. Sheela Bibi House Girl Goth Nawab 26-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
& TXL will improve the
situation.
98. Parveen House-Wife Goth Nawab 26-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Khan Wassan 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Gahi Faqir Sanjrani
99. Abdul Ghafoor Wassan Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
100. Wadera Shabbir Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Wassan Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
101. Mohammad Bux Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
102. Nawazish Ali Samjrani Sharecropper Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
103. Ustad Nazil Wassan Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
104. Ali Nawaz Sanjrani Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
105. Bux Ali Wassan Landowner Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sanjrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Gahi Faqir Sanjrani
106. Shahida Batool House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Sanjrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
107. Amina Begum House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Sanjrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
108. Shamim Akhtar House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Sanjrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
109. Anisa Bibi House Girl Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Sanjrani 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
110. Zubaida Nasreen House Girl Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Sanjrani 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
111. Wahida Parveen House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Sanjrani 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.

Attachment 4
112. Shamim Begum House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Sanjrani 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
113. Parween Khtoon House-Wife Goth Gahi Faqir 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Sanjrani 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
Man Group: Mithal Ujan Jo Goth
114. Hamza Chakrani Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay

85
86
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
115. Mohabbat Channa Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
116. Hameed Ujjan Sharecropper Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
117. Ustad Punnabis Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
118. Ilahi Bux Shabani Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
119. Ijaz Hussain Wassan Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
120. Iqbal Chaudhry Landowner Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Mithal Ujan Jo Goth
121. Ameer Begum House-Wife Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Goth 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
122. Tasleem Akhtar House-Wife Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Goth 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
123. Karimon Dai Mid-Wife Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Goth 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
124. Naheeda Bibi House-Wife Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Goth 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
125. Meena Chaudhry House Girl Mithal Ujan Jo 26-4- Load shedding in the Line should not NTDC should avoid
Goth 08 summer is a problem; pass over the distribution lines to pass over
she hoped the TXL will houses. the houses.
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
improve the situation.
Man Group: Siddique Ujjan Jo Goth
126. Siddique Ujjan Landowner Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Jo Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
127. Amb Channa Landowner Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Jo Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
128. Mithu Khan Ujjan Sherecropper Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Jo Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
129. Arif Shabani Sherecropper Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Jo Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
130. Munawwar Hussain Landowner Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Wassan Jo Goth 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Siddique Ujjan Jo Goth
131. Shakira Bibi Student Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Jo Goth 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and effect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
132. Shakira Student Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Load shedding in the - -
Jo Goth 08 summer is a nuisance
and effect the studies;
she hoped the TXL will
improve the situation.
133. Naheda Nasreen House-Wife Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid

Attachment 4
Jo Goth 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
134. Mania Bibi Student Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Load shedding in the - -
Jo Goth 08 summer is a nuisance
and effect the studies;
she hoped the TXL will
improve the situation.
135. Malkani Labor Siddique Ujjan 27-4- Local skilled and Skilled and NTDC should employ Skilled

87
88
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Jo Goth 08 unskilled labor should be unskilled labor and unskilled labor from the
used wherever possible should be area
preferred from the
area
Man Group: Goth Kenro Chakrani
136. Mumtaz Shabani Landowner Goth Kenro 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Chakrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
137. Waris Wassan Landowner Goth Kenro 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Chakrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
138. Amin Khan Chakrani Landowner Goth Kenro 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Chakrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
139. Kanor Channa Landowner Goth Kenro 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Chakrani 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Kenro Chakrani
140. Shebba Shabani House-Wife Goth Kenro 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Chakrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
141. Batool Channa House-Wife Goth Kenro 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Chakrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
142. Zeenat Ara House Girl Goth Kenro 27-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Chakrani 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
143. Jannat Khatoon House-Wife Goth Kenro 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Chakrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
144. Zarina Amin House-Wife Goth Kenro 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Chakrani 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Bakhsh Khan
145. Bahram Khan Landowner Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
timely 15 days before civil works
146. Mohammad Mithal Landowner Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ujjan Khan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
147. Mohammad Shaukat Sharecropper Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ujjan Khan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
148. Master Ali Nawaz Landowner Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
149. Ali Mohammad Mahar Landowner Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Khan 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Bakhsh Khan
150. Hasina Bibi House-Wife Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Khan 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
151. Bilqees Akhtar House-Wife Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Khan 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
152. Farzana Jamal Teacher Goth Bakhsh 27-4- Load shedding is more in
Khan 08 villages and affects all
spheres of life including
schools.
Man Group: Goth Abdul Ghafoor Shabani
153. Allah Dad Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
154. Sukhan Khan Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and

Attachment 4
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
155. Tikku Khan Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
156. Makhan Khan Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and

89
90
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
157. Amb Khan Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
158. Tikki Khan Chhundoo Sharecropper Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
159. Pehlwan Shabani Landowner Goth Abdul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Ghafoor 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Shabani fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
160. Izhar Ali Shabani Student Goth Abdul 28-4- Prolonged load shedding - -
Ghafoor 08 in the summer is a
Shabani nuisance; he hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.
Woman Group: Goth Abdul Ghafoor Shabani
161. Resham House-Wife Goth Abdul 28-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Ghafoor 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
Shabani over the houses the houses.
162. Arbela Bibi House-Wife Goth Abdul 28-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Ghafoor 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
Shabani over the houses the houses.
163. Mai Sukkhan Old Women Goth Abdul 28-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Ghafoor 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
Shabani nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
164. Rukhsana House-Wife Goth Abdul 28-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Ghafoor 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
Shabani over the houses the houses.
Man Group: Goth Sufan Bhati
165. Ali Nawaz Bhatti Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
166. Mohammad Ilyas Bhatti Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
timely 15 days before civil works
167. Mukhtar Ali Bhatti Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
168. Mohammad Achar Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhatii Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
169. Hussain Bux Bhatti Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
170. Anar Ali Bhatti Landowner Goth Sufan 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhati 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Sufan Bhati
171. Malika Bibi House-Wife Goth Sufan 28-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Bhati 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
172. Munazza Bibi House Girl Goth Sufan 28-4- Extensive load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Bhati 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
173. Chand Bibi House-Wife Goth Sufan 28-4- Line should not pass Line should be NTDC should avoid
Bhati 08 over the houses avoided to pass distribution lines to pass over
over the houses the houses.
174. Sughran Arsheen Student Goth Sufan 28-4- Extensive load shedding - -
Bhati 08 in the summer is a
nuisance and effect the
studies; she hoped the
TXL will improve the
situation.

Attachment 4
Man Group: Goth Haji Gul Muhammad
175. Ali Bux Bhatti Sharecropper Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Muhammad 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
176. Sikandar Bhatti Landowner Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Muhammad 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least

91
92
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
timely 15 days before civil works
177. Imdad Hussain Bhatti Landowner Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Muhammad 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
178. Noor Mohammad Landowner Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Bhatti Muhammad 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Goth Haji Gul Muhammad
179. Ajeeba Begum House-Wife Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Muhammad 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
180. Noor Nisa House-Wife Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Muhammad 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
181. Fazilat Bibi House Girl Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
Muhammad 08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
& TXL will improve the
situation.
182. Arsha Begum House-Wife Goth Haji Gul 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
Muhammad 08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
Man Group: Barri Patni
183. Mohammad Hassan Landowner Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sharr 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
184. Mohammad Hayat Landowner Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
185. Muhammad Afsar Sharecropper Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
186. Khalkinna Dandan Sharecropper Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
187. Hussain Channa Landowner Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
188. Siddique Punjabi Sharecropper Barri Patni 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
189. Hussain Ahmad Teacher Barri Patni 28-4- Load shedding is more in - -
08 villages and affects all
spheres of life including
schools.
Woman Group: Barri Patni
190. Waziran Bibi House-Wife Barri Patni 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
191. Sat Bhari House-Wife Barri Patni 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
192. Maryam Bibi House-Wife Barri Patni 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
193. Maham Siddique House Girl Barri Patni 28-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
Man Group: Ameer Banglo
194. Abdul Ghani Burero Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
195. Mohammad Ramzan Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Sheikh 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
196. Ali Mohammad Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay

Attachment 4
Chaddar 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
197. Mohammad Ali Sharecropper Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
Chaddar 08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
198. Ghulam Qadir Chandio Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay

93
94
Sr. Participant Name Participant Address Date Issues Proposed Action Taken / Proposed

Attachment 4
No. Profession Raised/Concerns Measure
expressed/
Suggestions &
Requests
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
199. Sikandar Sheikh Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
200. Ghulam Nabi Sheikh Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
201. Abdul Hafeez Chandio Landowner Ameer Banglo 28-4- Crop and tree Compensation NTDC should pay
08 compensation should be should be paid compensation of crops and
fair and timely adequately and trees fairly and timely at least
timely 15 days before civil works
Woman Group: Ameer Banglo
202. Fatima Noor House-Wife Ameer Banglo 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
203. Mukhtara Bibi House-Wife Ameer Banglo 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
204. Kubra Begum House-Wife Ameer Banglo 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
205. Humera Begum House Girl Ameer Banglo 28-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
nuisance; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
206. Arifa Jabeen Student Ameer Banglo 28-4- Load shedding in the - -
08 summer is a nuisance
and effect the studies;
she hoped the TXL will
improve the situation.
207. Madhu Bhari House-Wife Ameer Banglo 28-4- Local norms should be Contractor/labor NTDC should bind the
08 honored should respect contractor to honor the local
the local norms norms.
208. Gul Pari House Girl Ameer Banglo 28-4- Prolonged load shedding Line should not NTDC should avoid
08 in the summer is a pass over the distribution lines to pass over
problem; she hoped the houses. the houses.
TXL will improve the
situation.
Preliminary Program for design, construction and commissioning

POWER TRANSMISSION ENHANCEMENT MULTITRANCHE FINANCING FACILITY


IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012


Task Name J F MAM J J A S O N D J F M AM J J A S ON D J F MA M J J A S ON D J F MAM J J A S O N D J F M AM J J A S ON D J F MA M J J A S ON D J F MA

Tranche 1
13 Extension Sub Projects
Contract Award
Delivery of Equipment

x
x

x
i
d
n
e
p
p
A
Construction and Erection
Testing and Commissioning
Other 6 Sub Projects
Contract Award
Delivery of Equipment
Construction and Erection
Testing and Commissioning

Tranche 2
Preparation of subprojects
Submission of Sub Projects for Approval (PFR)
ADB's PFR Processing
Contract Award
Delivery of Equipment
Construction and Erection
Testing and Commissioning

Tranche 3 (indicative)
Preparation of subprojects
Submission of Sub Projects for Approval (PFR)
ADB's PFR Processing
Contract Award
Delivery of Equipment
Construction and Erection
Testing and Commissioning

Tranche 4 (indicative)
Preparation of subprojects
Submission of Sub Projects for Approval (PFR)
ADB's PFR Processing
Contract Award

Attachment 5
Delivery of Equipment
Construction and Erection
Testing and Commissioning

95
96
TREES AFFECTED BY THE CONSTRUCTION OF GAMBAT 132KV TRANSMISSION LINE

Attachment 6
TL Reach Affected Fruit Trees Affected Wood Trees (No.) Total
(Tower Nos.) Compact Number of Fruit Trees Affected
Shisham Kikar Poplar /
Area Toot/Nee Trees
(Sisso) (Acasia) Eucalypts
From To (m2) Date Palm Mango Banana Total (F) m /Berry* Total (W) (No.)
Line A: Main Line - New Rohri to Gambat 132kV Transmission Line
Line A.1: Sukkur District
5 6 - - - - - - 1 - - 1 1
10 11 - - - - - - 1 - 1 2 2
12 13 - 2 - - 2 - - - - - 2
13 14 - 1 - - 1 1 - - 1 2 3
14 15 - 4 - - 4 - - - - - 4
sub-total (a1): - 7 - - 7 1 2 - 2 5 12
Line A.2: Khairpur District
217 218 - - - - - - - - - - -
218 219 - - - - - 1 1 - - 2 2
219 220 - - - - - - - - 1 1 1
220 221 - 1 - - 1 1 1 - - 2 3
221 222 - - - - - 3 - 2 - 5 5
222 223 - - - - - - 2 3 - 5 5
223 224 - 1 - - 1 2 - - 1 3 4
224 225 - - 2 - 2 1 - - 2 3 5
225 226 - - 1 - 1 2 - - - 2 3
226 227 - - - - - 1 - - 2 3 3
227 228 3,210 - - 201 201 2 - 2 1 5 206
228 229 1,230 - - 77 77 - - 3 - 3 80
232 233 - - - - - - - 1 1 2 2
233 234 - - - - - - - - - - -
234 235 - - - - - - - - - - -
252 253 - - - - - - - - - - -
253 254 - 4 - - 4 - 1 3 1 5 9
254 255 - 3 - - 3 2 1 - 1 4 7
255 256 - 1 - - 1 1 1 - - 2 3
256 257 - 2 - - 2 - - 2 - 2 4
TL Reach Affected Fruit Trees Affected Wood Trees (No.) Total
(Tower Nos.) Compact Number of Fruit Trees Affected
Shisham Kikar Poplar /
Area Toot/Nee Trees
(Sisso) (Acasia) Eucalypts
From To (m2) Date Palm Mango Banana Total (F) m /Berry* Total (W) (No.)
258 259 - - - - - - - - 1 1 1
259 260 - 1 - - 1 - 2 - - 2 3
264 265 - - - - - 1 1 - 2 4 4
265 266 - 2 - - 2 1 2 1 - 4 6
266 267 - 1 - - 1 - 1 2 - 3 4
267 268 - 3 - - 3 - - 1 - 1 4
268 269 - - - - - - - - - - -
269 270 - - - - - - - - 2 2 2
270 271 930 - 14 - 14 - - - - - 14
271 272 - - 1 - 1 - 2 - - 2 3
272 273 - 1 1 - 2 - 2 - - 2 4
273 274 - 1 - - 1 - - 1 1 2 3
274 275 - - - - - - 1 - - 1 1
275 276 - - - - - 1 - 2 - 3 3
276 277 - - - - - - - 1 1 2 2
277 278 - - - - - - 1 - 1 2 2
278 279 - - - - - - - - - - -
279 280 - - - - - - - - - - -
280 281 - - - - - - - - - - -
281 282 - - 1 - 1 - 1 - - 1 2
282 283 - - 1 - 1 - - - 1 1 2
283 284 - 1 - - 1 - - - - - 1
284 286 - - - - - - - - - - -
sub-total (a.2): 5,370 22 21 278 321 19 20 24 19 82 403

Attachment 6
Sub-Total (a): 5,370 29 21 278 328 20 22 24 21 87 415
Line B: Side Lines: In-and-Outgoing Lines from Existing Khairpur 132kV Transmission Line to New Rohri 220kV Grid Station
Line B.1: In-Coming 132kV TL from Existing Rohri - Khairpur - Gambat 132kV Transmission Lines to New Rohri 220kV Grid Station
B1.01 B1.02 - 2 - - 2 - - - - - 2
B1.02 B1.03 - - - - - 1 - - 1 2 2
B1.03 B1.04 - 5 - - 5 - 1 - - 1 6

97
98
Attachment 6
TL Reach Affected Fruit Trees Affected Wood Trees (No.) Total
(Tower Nos.) Compact Number of Fruit Trees Affected
Shisham Kikar Poplar /
Area Toot/Nee Trees
(Sisso) (Acasia) Eucalypts
From To (m2) Date Palm Mango Banana Total (F) m /Berry* Total (W) (No.)
sub-total (b.1): - 7 - - 7 1 1 - 1 3 10
Line B.2: In-Going 132kV TL from New Rohri 220kV Grid Station to Khairpur - Gambat 132kV TL
B2.09 B2.10 - - - - - - 1 - - 1 1
B2.10 B2.11 - - - - - 1 2 - - 3 3
B2.17 B2.18 - - - - - - - - - - -
B2.18 B2.19 - - - - - - - - - - -
B2.19 B2.20 - - - - - - - - 1 1 1
B2.20 B2.21 - - - - - - - - - - -
B2.21 B2.22 - 1 - - 1 - - - - - 1
B2.22 B2.23 - - - - - - - 1 - 1 1
sub-total (b.2): - 1 - - 1 1 3 1 1 6 7
Sub-Total (b): - 8 - - 8 2 4 1 2 9 17

TOTAL: 5,370 37 21 278 336 22 26 25 23 96 432


Percentage: - 8.56 4.86 64.35 77.78 5.09 6.02 5.79 5.32 22.22 100.00
* Toot = Mulberry; Neem = .: and, Berry = Zizaphus 78% 22%
TREES AND OTHER INFRASTRUCTURES ALONG ROW ROHRI

Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T1-T2
T2-T3 Xing
proposed
500kV Line
AM2
T3-T4 H.T. Top wire
14.0 + 11kV H.T.
98m
T4-T5 1 w/c
T5-T6 1 66 Kv Crossing +
11 KV HT
T6-T7 290.00 Water 11kV H.T.Line =
flow 8.08m
T7-T8
T8-T9
T9-T10 Track 1 Paved Road w/c -
to Patni
village
T10-T11 264.00 2
T11-T12 206.00
T12-T13 83.58 2
T13-T14 240.42 3
T14-T15 202.00 4 Track 1 + Rohri
Canal edge Khairpur
Road
T15-T16 197.72 Barre 2 Paved Boundary

Attachment 7
n roads wall
Land
T16-T17 146.28 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T17-T18 184.00 Barre Nullah
n

99
100
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T18-T19 214.00 Barre 11 KV + 66 KV
n crossing
Land
T19-T20 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T20-T21 225.02 Barre 132 KV portion
n will by
Land dismentalled
T21-T22 238.98 Barre Paved Road
n to Khairpur
Land
T22-T23 240.00 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T23-T24 212.00 Barre
n
Land
T24-T25 206.00 Barre
n
Land
T25-T26 240.00 Barre
n
Land
T26-T27 204.00 Barre
n
Land
T27-T28 222.00 Barre
n
Land
T28-T29 220.77 Barre
n
Land
T29-T30 251.23 Barre
n
Land
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T30-T31 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T31-T32 206.00 Barre
n
Land
T32-T33 202.00 2 1 Track
T33-T34 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T34-T35 234.00 Barre
n
Land
T35-T36 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T36-T37 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T37-T38 162.00 Barre
n
Land
T38-T39 158.00 Barre
n
Land
T39-T40 210.00 Barre
n
Land
T40-T41 220.00 Barre
n

Attachment 7
Land
T41-T42 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T42-T43 242.00 Barre
n

101
Land
102
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T43-T44 223.94 Barre
n
Land
T44-T45 252.00 Barre Water flow
n
Land
T45-T46 222.00 Barre
n
Land
T46-T47 242.00 Barre Water flow
n
Land
T47-T48 236.00 Barre
n
Land
T48-T49 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T49-T50 232.00 Barre
n
Land
T50-T51 246.00 Barre Paved Road
n
Land
T51-T52 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T52-T53 254.00 Barre Water
n flow
Land
T53-T54 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T54-T55 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T55-T56 236.00 Barre
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T56-T57 230.00 Barre
n
Land
T57-T58 234.00 Barre
n
Land
T58-T59 244.00 Barre
n
Land
T59-T60 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T60-T61 238.00 Barre
n
Land
T61-T62 240.00 Barre
n
Land
T62-T63 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T63-T64 236.00 Barre
n
Land
T64-T65 242.00 Barre
n
Land
T65-T66 236.00 Barre

Attachment 7
n
Land
T66-T67 238.00 Barre
n
Land
T67-T68 240.00 Barre

103
n
104
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T68-T69 238.00 Barre
n
Land
T69-T70 240.00 Barre Water flow
n
Land
T70-T71 238.00 Barre
n
Land
T71-T72 236.00 Barre Hill toe curve
n
Land
T72-T73 234.00 Barre Hill toe curve Paved Road
n
Land
T73-T74 240.00 Barre
n
Land
T74-T75 238.00 Barre
n
Land
T75-T76 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T76-T77 235.20 Barre Water
n flow,
Land hill toe
edge 2
T77-T78 240.00 Barre
n
Land
T78-T79 226.00 Barre
n
Land
T79-T80 228.00 Barre
n
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T80-T81 208.00 Barre Paved road
n with
Land shoulder
T81-T82 206.00 Barre 11 KV line H 7.72 Graveyard
n
Land
T82-T83 214.00 Barre Track 1 11 KV HT 920
n
Land
T83-T84 232.00 Barre
n
Land
T84-T85 212.00 Barre
n
Land
T85-T86 220.00 Barre Nullah
n
Land
T86-T87 218.00 Barre 11 KV HT 930
n
Land
T87-T88 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T88-T89 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T89-T90 218.00 Barre
n

Attachment 7
Land
T90-T91 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T91-T92 204.00 Barre
n

105
Land
106
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T92-T93 222.00 Barre
n
Land
T93-T94 228.00 Barre
n
Land
T94-T95 228.00 Barre Water
n flow
Land
T95-T96 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T96-T97 240.00 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T97-T98 232.00 Barre 66kV Line HT 11
n
Land
T98-T99 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T99-T100 248.00 Barre
n
Land
T100-T101 226.00 Barre
n
Land
T101-T102 235.75 Barre
n
Land
AM13 Barre
n
Land
T102-T103 252.25 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T103-T104 172.00 Barre 66 KV HT 931
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T104-T105 238.00 Barre House at
n 40 m
Land
T105-T106 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T106-T107 230.00 Barre
n
Land
T107-T108 220.00 Barre Graveyard
n
Land
T108-T109 108.00 Barre Graveyard
n
Land
T109-T110 236.00 Barre
n
Land
T110-T111 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T111-T112 222.00 Barre
n
Land
AM14 Barre
n
Land
T112-T113 198.00 Barre

Attachment 7
n
Land
T113-T114 228.00 Barre
n
Land
T114-T115 218.00 Barre

107
n
108
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T115-T116 212.00 Barre
n
Land
AM15 Barre
n
Land
T116-T117 242.00 Barre Paved Road
n to Khairpur
Land
T117-T118 228.00 Barre
n
Land
T118-T119 240.00 Barre
n
Land
T119-T120 228.00 Barre
n
Land
T120-T121 210.00 Barre
n
Land
AM16 Barre
n
Land
T121-T122 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T122-T123 212.00 Barre
n
Land
T123-T124 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T124-T125 222.00 Barre
n
Land
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T125-T126 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T126-T127 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T127-T128 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T128-T129 216.00 Barre
n
Land
AM17 Barre
n
Land
T129-T130 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T130-T131 248.01 Barre
n
Land
T131-T132 251.99 Barre
n
Land
T132-T133 222.00 Barre
n
Land
T133-T134 216.00 Barre
n
Land

Attachment 7
T134-T135 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T135-T136 210.00 Barre
n
Land
T136-T137 228.00

109
Barre
110
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T137-T138 220.00 Barre
n
Land
AM18 Barre
n
Land
T138-T139 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T139-T140 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T140-T141 200.00 Barre
n
Land
T141-T142 160.00 Barre Paved Road TP Line HT 420
n with
Land Shoulder
T142-T143 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T143-T144 218.00 Barre House at
n 30 m
Land
T144-T145 250.67 Barre
n
Land
T145-T146 273.33 Barre
n
Land
AM19 Barre
n
Land
T146-T147 200.00 Barre
n
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T147-T148 190.00 Barre
n
Land
T148-T149 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T149-T150 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T150-T151 174.00 Barre
n
Land
T151-T152 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T152-T153 222.00 Barre
n
Land
T153-T154 222.00 Barre
n
Land
AM20 Barre
n
Land
T154-T155 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T155-T156 212.00 Barre 1 Track
n

Attachment 7
Land
T156-T157 214.00 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T157-T158 218.00 Barre
n

111
Land
112
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T158-T159 226.00 Barre 1 Track
n
Land
T159-T160 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T160-T161 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T161-T162 174.00 Barre
n
Land
T162-T163 194.00 Barre
n
Land
T163-T164 210.00 Barre Water Flow
n
Land
T164-T165 200.00 Barre Hilltop
n
Land
T165-T166 208.00 Barre Hilltop
n
Land
T166-T167 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T167-T168 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T168-T169 212.00 Barre
n
Land
TM21 Barre
n
Land
T169-T170 224.00 Barre Water Flow
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T170-T171 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T171-T172 254.00 Barre Hill toe crave
n
Land
T172-T173 232.00 Barre Hill toe crave
n
Land
T173-T174 208.00 Barre
n
Land
T174-T175 212.00 Barre
n
Land
AM22 Barre
n
Land
T175-T176 152.00 Barre 11kV Line HT 1
n 9.20
Land
T176-T177 220.00 Barre 2 Track Water 11kV Line HT
n flows 9.20
Land hill toe
edged
2
T177-T178 204.00 Barre
n

Attachment 7
Land
T178-T179 206.00 Barre
n
Land
T179-T180 216.00 Barre Nullah
n
Land

113
114
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
AM23 Barre
n
Land
T180-T181 189.00 Barre Paved Road 11kV Line HT
n with 9.80
Land Shoulder
T181-T182 196.89 Barre 11 KV line H 7.72 Graveyard
n
Land
T182-T183 200.00 Barre Track 2 11 KV HT 920
n
Land
T183-T184 244.00 Barre
n
Land
T184-T185 232.00 Barre
n
Land
T185-T186 242.00 Barre Nullah
n
Land
AM24 Barre
n
Land
T186-T187 159.55 Barre 11 KV HT 930
n
Land
T187-T188 244.45 Barre
n
Land
T188-T189 214.00 Barre
n
Land
AM25 Barre
n
Land
T189-T190 218.00 Barre
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T190-T191 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T191-T192 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T192-T193 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T193 214.00 Barre
T194 n
Land
AM26 Barre
n
Land
T194-T195 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T195-T196 216.00 Barre
n
Land
T196-T197 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T197-T198 230.00 Barre
n
Land
T198-T199 196.00 Barre Paved Road L.T.Line House at

Attachment 7
n 14m +
Land House at
20m
T199-T200 238.00 Barre Paved road
n to Kot D.G.
Land
T200-T201 198.00

115
Barre
116
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
n
Land
T201-T202 210.00 Barre
n
Land
T202-T203 214.00 Barre
n
Land
T203-T204 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T204-T205 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T205-T206 202.00 Barre
n
Land
T206-T207 212.00 Barre
n
Land
T207-T208 218.00 Barre
n
Land
T208-T209 224.00 Barre
n
Land
T209-T210 208.00 Barre
n
Land
T210-T211 204.00 Barre
n
Land
T211-T212 219.98 Barre
n
Land
T212-T213 Barre
n
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
Land
T213-T214 244.00 Barre
n
Land
T214-T215 228.00 Barre
n
Land
T215-T216 220.00 Barre
n
Land
T216-T217 202.00 Barre
n
Land
T217-T218 268.00 Barre Paved road w/c
n
Land
T218-T219 196.00 2 2 Tracks w/c 1 Canal
crossing
T219-T220 240.00 1
T220-T221 238.00 3
T221-T222 202.00 5
T222-T223 202.00 5
T223-T224 248.00 4
T224-T225 224.00 5
T225-T226 244.00 3 1 Track 1 w/c
T226-T227 231.16 3
T227-T228 226.81 206
T228-T229 250.00 80
T229-T230 204.00 11kV Line Hut under
the line +

Attachment 7
boundary
wall
T230-T231 174.00 1 w/c
T231-T232 244.00 11kV Line
T232-T233 164.00 2 Paved road 1 w/c 11kV Line
with

117
118
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
shoulder
T233-T234 268.95 1 Track Paved road Canal
to Khairpur Crossing
T234-T235 241.05 1 w/c
T235-T236 214.00 1 w/c
T236-T237 216.00 1 w/c
T237-T238 222.00 11kV Line HT House
9.58m at 8m
T238-T239 218.00 Pond Lt Line Ltd 8.4m
T239-T240 212.00 Paved Road Pond
to Kot D.G. edge
T240-T241 216.00
T241-T242 238.00
T242-T243 134.00
T243-T244 170.00 Paved Road Pond L.T. Line 6.16m House at
Pass Edge 10m
T244-T245 234.00 Mosque18
m + HP 12M
T245-T246 234.00 1 w/c
T246-T247 232.00 1 Track
T247-T248 208.00 1 w/c
T248-T249 210.00 Pond edge
T249-T250 238.14 Paved road Pond edge
T250-T251 237.86 Canal
T251-T252 210.00 1 Track 1 w/c Pond 1 House 1 HP
under the
line
T252-T253 222.00
T253-T254 218.00 9 1 Track 1 w/c House at
42m
T254-T255 254.00 7 1 w/c
T255-T256 216.00 3 2 houses
10m & 36m
T256-T257 234.00 4
T257-T258 229.07 2 Track Canal
T258-T259 230.93 1
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T259-T260 194.00 3 Pond
Xing
T260-T261 218.00 1 w/c 11kV Line HT
9.60
T261-T262 208.00 11kV Line HT
9.60
T262-T263 216.00
T263-T264 210.00
T264-T265 208.00 4
T265-T266 237.08 6 1 w/c
T266-T267 248.92 4 2 Tracks Canal
T267-T268 176.00 4 11 kV HT 8.09M
T268-T269 242.00 8 11 kV HT 8.09M House at
16m
T269-T270 224.00 2
T270 250.00 14 1 Track Canal Xing
T271
T271 220.00 8 1 Track
T272
T272 240.00 7
T273
T273 230.00 67 Date Garden 1 w/c
T274
T274 244.00 5 1 Track
T275
T275 234.00 7 1 w/c Pond
T276
T276 190.85 22 Date Garden
T277 xing
T277 207.15 3 1 w/c

Attachment 7
T278
T278 220.00 2 w/c
T279
T279 220.00 1 Track
T280
T280 216.00 Pond 11kV HT

119
T281
120
Between

House / Hut
Watercours

Graveyard
Mosque /
the Distance Way /Track/ Pacca

Village /
e/ Pond

Nullah
Canal/
Minor/
Drain/

Attachment 7
Towers Trees Railway 132 kV/ LT/11 kV T/W

HP
(From Track
(m) Road
To)
T281 204.00 2
T282
T282 260.00 2
T283
T283 224.00 1
T284
T284 481.00
T285

132 kV Transmission Line Khairpur ROHRI Outgoing

Distance

Poultry Farm

Graveyard/
Way /

Shrine
Type of Pacca

Farm
Trees Katcha Watercourse Drain LT Village Mosque BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road
Road

B: Incoming Transmission Line (Grid Station to Existing Line)


Between JKD
AM1
B2.01-B2.02 2
AM2
B2.02-B2.03 6
AM3
B2.03-B2.04 11 kV Line
HT 9.08 +
66kV Line
7 1 w/c
HT Lower
Con 8.11 Tp
con 14.0
AM4
B2.04-B2.05
B5.05-B6.06 Pond
Edge
B2.06-B2.07 Pond
B2.07-B2.08
B2.08-B2.09 1 Track Paved 1 w/c
Distance

Poultry Farm

Graveyard/
Way /

Shrine
Type of Pacca

Farm
Trees Katcha Watercourse Drain LT Village Mosque BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road
Road

Road
AM5
B2.09B2.10 1
B2.10-B2.11 3
B2.11-B2.12
B2.12-B2.13
B2.13-B2.14 1 Track
AM5
B2.14-B2.15 300 1 Track
B2.15-B2.16 271.21
AM6
B2.16-B2.17 350 Nala
B2.17-B2.18 360
B2.18-B2.19 360 1
AM7
B2.19-B2.20 310 1
B2.20-B2.21 300
B2.21-B2.22 340 2
B2.22-B2.23 300 1

Attachment 7
121
122
132 kV Transmission Line Gumbat ROHRI Outgoing

Attachment 7
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Canal
Road
B: Outgoing Transmission Line (Grid Station to Existing Line)
Between JKD
AM1
B1.01-B1.02 276
AM2
B1.02-B1.03 234
AM3
B1.03-B1.04 270
AM4
B1.04-B1.05 220
B1.05-B1.06 228
B1.06-B1.07 286.53
B1.07-B1.08 276.47
B1.08-B1.09 240
AM5
B1.09B1.010 286
B1.010-B1.011 290
B1.011-B1.012 346 11kV Line
Ht 9.08m
B1.012-B1.013 278 Paved Watercourse
road on parallel to
line
B1.013-B1.014 2 Track Nara 11kV Line
Canal Ht 8.08m
12
canal
edge
AM5
B1.014-B1.015 232.12
B1.015-B1.016 256 Boundary
wall
AM6
B1.016-B1.017 284 1 Track
B1.017-B1.018 256
66kV Line
B1.018-B1.019 360 HT 14m +
11kV Line
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Canal
Road
HT 9.08m
AM7
B1.019-B1.020 310
B1.020-B1.021 Tee off
300
towers

132 kV Transmission Line Rohri Gambat Outgoing

Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B: Outgoing Transmission Line (Grid Station to Existing Line)
Between JKD
AM1
B1.01-B1.02
AM2
B1.02-B1.03
AM3
B1.03-B1.04 1 w/c 11kV
Line HT
9.08 +
66kV
Line HT
Lower
con 8.11
+ Topcon
14.0 m
AM4
B1.04-B1.05
B1.05-B1.06 Pond

Attachment 7
edge
B1.06-B1.07 Pond
B1.07-B1.08
B1.08-B1.09 1 Track Paved 1 w/c
road
AM5
B1.09B1.010

123
124
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W

Attachment 7
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B1.010-B1.011
B1.011-B1.012
B1.012-B1.013
B1.013-B1.014 1 Track
AM5
B1.014-B1.015 1 Track
B1.015-B1.016
AM6
B1.016-B1.017 Nullah
B1.017-B1.018
B1.018-B1.019
AM7
B1.019-B1.020
B1.020-B1.021
B2.23-B2.24 350
B2.24-B2.25 340
B2.25-B2.26 320
B2.26-B2.27 300
AM8
B2.27-B2.28 300
B2.28-B2.29 300
B2.29-B2.30 320
B2.30-B2.31 335
B2.31-B2.32 325
B2.32-B2.33 350
B2.33-B2.34 340
B2.34-B2.35 340
B2.35-B2.36 340
B2.36-B2.37 330
B2.37-B2.38 340
B2.38-B2.39 350
B2.39-B2.40 350
AM9
B2.40-B2.41 330
B2.41-B2.42 340
B2.42-B2.43 300
B2.43-B2.44 350
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B2.44-B2.45 350
B2.45-B2.46 350
B2.46-B2.47 350
AM10
B2.47-B2.48 330
B2.48-B2.49 350
B2.49-B2.50 340
B2.50-B2.51 330
B2.51-B2.52 340
B2.52-B2.53 320
B2.53-B2.54 330
B2.54-B2.55 320
B2.55-B2.56 330
B2.56-B2.57 330
B2.57-B2.58 320
B2.58-B2.59 300
B2.59-B2.60 350
B2.60-B2.61 350
B2.61-B2.62 340
AM11
B2.62-B2.63 330
B2.63-B2.64 350
B2.64-B2.65 320
B2.65-B2.66 350
B2.66-B2.67 330
B2.67-B2.68 320
B2.68-B2.69 320
B2.69-B2.70 300
B2.70-B2.71 320
B2.71-B2.72 330

Attachment 7
B2.72-B2.73 330
B2.73-B2.74 320
AM12
B2.74-B2.75 310
B2.75-B2.76 330
B2.76-B2.77 300
B2.77-B2.78 330

125
126
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W

Attachment 7
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B2.78-B2.79 350
B2.79-B2.80 350
B2.80-B2.81 350
B2.81-B2.82 350
B2.82-B2.83 350
B2.83-B2.84 350
B2.84-B2.85 350
B2.85-B2.86 350
B2.86-B2.87 320
B2.87-B2.88 350
B2.88-B2.89 350
B2.89-B2.90 350
B2.90-B2.91 345
B2.91-B2.92 350
B2.92-B2.93 350
B2.93-B2.94 350
B2.94-B2.95 350
B2.95-B2.96 350
B2.96-B2.97 320
B2.97-B2.98 350
B2.98-B2.99 350
B2.99-B2.100 350
B2.100-B2.101 350
B2.101-B2.102 350
B2.102-B2.103 350
AM13
B2.103-B2.104 320
B2.104-B2.105 320
B2.105-B2.106 340
B2.106-B2.107 340
B2.107-B2.108 300
B2.108-B2.109 350
B2.109-B2.110 350
B2.110-B2.111 350
B2.111-B2.112 350
AM14
B2.112-B2.113 350
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B2.113-B2.114 350
B2.114-B2.115 350
B2.115-B2.116 360
AM15
B2.116-B2.117 360
B2.117-B2.118 360
B2.118-B2.119 350
B2.119-B2.120 350
B2.120- 350
B2.121
AM16
B2.121-B2.122 340
B2.122-B2.123 300
B2.123-B2.124 350
B2.124-B2.125 300
B2.125-B2.126 300
B2.126-B2.127 295
B2.127-B2.128 320
B2.128-B2.129 330
B2.129-B2.130 365
B2.130-B2.131 350
B2.131-B2.132 360
B2.132-B2.133 360
B2.133-B2.134 360
B2.134-B2.135 360
B2.135-B2.136 360
B2.136-B2.137 300
B2.137-B2.138 350
AM18
B2.138-B2.139 300
B2.139-B2.140 320

Attachment 7
B2.140-B2.141 310
B2.141-B2.142 350
B2.142-B2.143 350
B2.143-B2.144 350
B2.144-B2.145 350
B2.145-B2.146 340

127
B2.146-B2.147 330
128
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W

Attachment 7
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B2.147-B2.148 315
B2.148-B2.149 300
B2.149-B2.150 340
B2.150-B2.151 350
B2.151-B2.152 330
B2.152-B2.153 350
B2.153-B2.154 300
AM20
B2.154-B2.155 300
B2.155-B2.156 350
B2.156-B2.157 350
B2.157-B2.158 300
B2.158-B2.159 300
B2.159-B2.160 300
B2.160-B2.161 330
B2.161-B2.162 330
B2.162-B2.163 335
B2.163-B2.164 350
B2.164-B2.165 350
B2.165-B2.166 350
B2.166-B2.167 350
B2.167-B2.168 350
B2.168-B2.169 350
AM21
B2.169- 295
B2.170
B2.170- 300
B2.171
B2.171- 325
B2.172
B2.172- 350
B2.173
B2.173- 300
B2.174
B2.174- 300
B2.175
AM22
B2.175-B2.176 350
B2.176-B2.177 350
Distance
Way /

Graveya
Poultry

Shrine
Type of Pacca Drain/ Mosque

Farm
Farm

rd /
Trees Katcha Watercourse LT Village BHU Pond T/W
Towers (m) Road Nullah
Road
B2.177-B2.178 350
B2.178-B2.179 350
B2.179-B2.180 350
AM23
B2.180-B2.181 260
B2.181-B2.182 300
B2.182-B2.183 300
B2.183-B2.184 315
B2.184-B2.185 350
B2.185-B2.186 350
B2.186-B2.187 300
B2.187-B2.188 345
B2.188-B2.189
AM25
B2.189- 245
B2.1290
B2.190- 330
B2.1291
B2.191- 350
B2.1292
B2.192- 350
B2.1293
B2.193- 240
B2.1294
AM26
B2.194 LOOSE POINT (ROHRI)

Attachment 7
129
130 Attachment 8

PHOTOGRAPHS

132 kV Gambat substation

132 kV Gambat substation


Attachment 8 131

Line Route

Line Route
132 Attachment 8

Line Route-Natural vegetation

Line Route-Sparse vegetation


Attachment 8 133

Line Route-Water logged area

Public Consultation
134 Annexure 1

Annexure 1
Drawings

A: Micro Location of Transmission line and Tukkar Wildlife Sanctuary


Annexure 1 135

B. Line Route
136 Annexure 1
Annexure 1 137
138 Annexure 1
Annexure 1 139
140 Annexure 2

Annexure 2
Standards
Annexure 2 141
142 Annexure 2

NTDC Standards for Transformer Noise

NTDC specifications for auto (Power) transformers (220 kV and 500 kV) require
that noise level be as per IEC 551 which simplistically interpreted results in a permissible
noise level of 80 db (this is subject to measurement conditions laid down in IEC 551).