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Contributions of the Golden Age of Athens, Greece

To Western Civilization.

10Th Grade
World History

Troy Wayne Davis

SED 480

02/01/2017

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STAGE I GOALS
Unit Overview:

This fifteen lesson unit focuses on ancient Athens, Greece. Beginning


with a lesson that provides a brief overview of the history of pre-Athenian
Empire Greece, and the formation of the Greek city-state, or polis, and a
lesson covering impact of Homeric literature, the unit quickly focuses on the
main contributions of the Golden Age of the Athenian Empire to modern
society: democracy, philosophy, and theater. Athenian democracy will be
examined, as will the rise and falls of tyrants and oligarchs in a democratic
system. The democratic mindset of the Athenian citizen will naturally lead
into a study and analysis of the great philosophers and the School of
Athens. Democratic expression, and the questions of the great thinkers will
then inevitably lead into the Greek theater and the immortal works of the
great playwrights. In conclusion, we will witness the fall of the Athenian
Empire and the rise of Alexander the Great.
A wealth of information on this subject is available at the fingertips of
anyone with Internet access in this modern age. Therefore, as a progressive
teacher of history with a teaching philosophy that focuses on training
students to think historically and critically, this unit will go beyond the
memorization of names, dates, locations, and events taught in many
traditional history courses. Instead, the great majority of the lessons in this
unit will be inquiry based explorations of central themes that have greatly
impacted western civilization. As a class, we will observe the dangers of
unreliable sources, and train how to examine vetted sources through critical
thinking and the Socratic method. The class will then learn how to exercise
historical empathy and historical thinking to understand the importance and
impact of these vital institutions and practices that have shaped the world
for the last twenty-five hundred years.

Enduring Understanding:

The intertwined concepts of democracy, philosophy, and the theater


were unique concepts that evolved in the Athenian mindset and set the
future course of western civilization. As a class, the students will examine
these concepts to learn their impact then, and today, and how each of the
three worked together to create the central theme of Athenian life two and a
half millennia ago.

Essential Question:

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How did the essential Athenian mindset give birth to the concepts of
democracy, philosophy, and theater that would impact western civilization
far beyond the end of the Athenian Empire? How were these three concepts
interwoven and dependent on each other to form a complete system of life
for the Athenians? What is the practical relationship between these three
concepts today?

Key Concepts:

Mycenae Early major Greek civilization, inhabited since early


antiquity.
Polis A city state in ancient Greece, especially as considered in its
ideal form for philosophical purposes.
Acropolis A citadel or fortified part of an ancient Greek city, typically
built on a hill; the ancient citadel at Athens, containing the Parthenon
and other notable buildings, mostly dating from the 5th century BCE.
Parthenon The Parthenon is a former temple, on the Athenian
Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people
of Athens considered their patron.
Pantheon All the gods and/or goddesses of a polytheistic people,
religion, or society.
Democracy A system of government by the whole population or all
the eligible members of a state, typically through elected
representatives.
Philosophy The study of the fundamental nature of knowledge,
reality, and existence. Philosopher: lover of wisdom (Greek).
Theatre of Dionysus A major theater in Athens, built at the foot of the
Athenian Acropolis. Dedicated to Dionysus, the god of plays and wine.
Tyrant (Greek) An absolute ruler unrestrained by law or person, or
one who has usurped legitimate sovereignty.
Oligarchy A form of power structure in which power actually rests
with a small number of people.
Archon Greek word meaning ruler, one of the nine chief
magistrates in ancient Athens.
Aeropagus A prominent rock outcropping located northwest of the
Acropolis in Athens, Greece. In classical times, it functioned as the
court for tying deliberate homicide.
Boule A council of 400 500 citizens appointed to run daily affairs of
the city; typically chosen by lot, and served for one year.
Citizen (Athens) An adult male Athenian who owned land and was not
a slave.
Ecclesia A political assembly of citizens of ancient Greek states;
especially the periodic meeting of the Athenian citizens for conducting
public business and for considering affairs proposed by the council.

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Demes A political division of Attica, the region of Greece surrounding
Athens. The ordinary non-elite citizens of the region were known as the
demos.
Athens One of the oldest named cities in the world, and the largest
and most powerful of the ancient Greek city-states, and the center of
the Athenian Empire.
Sparta - Also known as Lacedaemon, Sparta was a warrior society in
ancient Greece that reached the height of its power after defeating
rival city-state Athens in the Peloponnesian Wars.
Persian Wars A series of conflicts between the Achaemenid Empire of
Persia, and the city-states of Greece that started in 499 BCE, and
lasted until 449 BCE.
Peloponnesian Wars A series of ancient Greek wars fought by Athens
and its empire against the Peloponnesian League led by Sparta.
Macedonia (Or Macedon) An ancient kingdom on the northeast of the
Greek peninsula that gave rise to Philip II and his son, Alexander the
Great.
Hellenistic Meaning to identify with the Greeks, the Hellenistic
Greek world encompassed the territories of Alexander from his death in
323 BCE, until 31 BCE when the last of those territories were
conquered by Rome.

Additional people and events:

Lycurgus
Draco
Solon
Herodotus
Pericles
Thucydides
Peisistratos
Hippias
Cleisthenes
Ephialtes
The 400
The Thirty
Socrates
Plato
Aristotle
Pythagorus
The Stoics
Philip of Macedon

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Alexander the Great
Oracle of Delphi
Aeschylus
Euripides
Sophocles
Aristophenes

Standards:

Arizona Standards for Social Studies:


Strand 2: World History
Concept 2: Early Civilizations
P.O. 3: Analyze the enduring Greek and Roman
contributions and their impact on later civilization:
a.) development of concepts of government
and citizenship (e.g., democracy, republics,
codification of law, and development of
empire)

b.) scientific and cultural advancements (e.g.,


network of roads, aqueducts, art and
architecture, literature and theater,
mathematics, and philosophy)

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10


Students:
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of
primary and secondary sources, attending to such features
as the date and origin of the information. (9-10.RH.1)
2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or
secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how
key events or ideas develop over the course of the text. (9-
10.RH.2)
Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10
Students:
1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s)
from alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and
evidence.

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b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying
data and evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in
a manner that anticipates the audiences knowledge
level and concerns.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective
tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that
follows from or supports the argument presented. (9-
10.WHST.1)
2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration
of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or
technical processes.
a. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and
information to make important connections and
distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when
useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and
sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or other information and
examples appropriate to the audiences knowledge
of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective
tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that
follows from and supports the information or
explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications
or the significance of the topic).
(9-10.WHST.2)
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish,
and update individual or shared writing products, taking
advantage of technologys capacity to link to other
information and to display information flexibly and
dynamically. (9-10.WHST.6)

Objectives:

1. In order to understand the setting that gave birth to the Athenian


Empire, students will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Greek history
by creating a timeline of significant events and personages.

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2. Students will analyze Homeric literature through group discussion in
order to evaluate its influence on the developing Greek culture,
mindset, and political ideologies.
3. Students will demonstrate their understanding of Athenian democracy
by role-playing a trial before the Assembly in order to comprehend the
origins of the democratic system.
4. Students will compare and contrast the forms of tyranny/monarchy,
democracy, and oligarchy with a Venn diagram in order to recognize
their characteristics that are evident in todays political systems.
5. Students will rewrite Platos Apology in modern terms and vocabulary,
in order to judge by todays social standards if Socrates was guilty of
the accusations against him.
6. Students will examine Stoic philosophy and evaluate the strengths and
weaknesses of optimism, pessimism, and realism in order to apply the
Stoic perspective to todays issues for students.
7. In order to easier identify the great thinkers of ancient Athens,
students will demonstrate familiarity with the diverse philosophers and
thinkers of ancient Greece by identifying the figures in Raphaels The
School of Athens by interpreting the clues included in the famous
painting.
8. In order to comprehend how the theater was the voice of democracy,
students will evaluate their choice of a Greek tragedy and a Greek
comedy to interpret the democratic messages the playwright(s) were
attempting to communicate.
9. Students will evaluate the series of events which led to the fall of the
Athenian Empire and conclude with an interactive flow chart which
factors were most significant in its fall, in order to identify the pitfalls
that threaten our modern democratic system and society.
10. In order to appreciate the value of studying Greek antiquity,
students will judge if the contributions and concepts of ancient Athens
have made a lasting impact on western civilization and defend their
argument in a two-page written response.``
STAGE II ASSESSMENTS
Overview:

Authentic Assessments will be employed throughout this unit in the forms of


diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments. Authentic Assessments
will assure that the evaluation of this unit is in line with the declared course
objectives, Enduring Understanding, and Essential Questions.
Diagnostic and Formative Assessments will build on prior knowledge by
continually checking for the students understanding of content and
context while making the subject timely and pertinent by connecting
past to present, and relating content to real life scenarios. These
Assessments will evaluate the students comprehension of how the

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unique Athenian mindset gave birth to the concepts of democracy,
philosophy, and theater, and how those concepts grew upon and
worked together to become the foundation for the Athenian Empire.
Authentic Summative Assessments will not only thoroughly test the
students knowledge base on the facts of Ancient Greece and the
Golden Age of Athens, but will accurately evaluate the students ability
to associate abstract concepts with concrete terms. These
assessments will also test for the students ability to identify the
practical relationships between democracy, philosophy, and theater, as
well as the key figures and events that dramatically effected the
development of each.
Authentic Performance Assessments will evaluate the students grasp
of the Enduring Understanding central to this unit. The student will
demonstrate enduring understanding by illustrating how the Athenian
concepts of democracy, philosophy, and theater have shaped the
course of western civilization, and how those concepts are still
interwoven, interdependent, and essentially important today.

Diagnostic and Formative Assessments:

1. Class Activities: During class, integrated into the appropriate direct


instruction or inquiry based lesson plans, students will participate in
and complete in-class activities designed to authentically assess their
understanding of content knowledge and comprehension of key
concepts.
a. Timeline: A timeline of events and figures in Ancient Greece will
assess the students knowledge of historical facts and dates, and
contribute to objectives 1, 7, and 9.
b. Guided Notes: As primary source documents are examined and
analyzed, students will complete guided note graphic organizers
to assist with assimilation of knowledge and concepts.
Assessment by these organizers will indicate progress toward
objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9.
c. Role Play/Mock Trial: Students will role play and recreate a trial
for homicide in Ancient Athens to assess for understanding of the
Athenian judicial system, as well as role play the trial of Socrates
to demonstrate deeper understanding through historical
empathy. These activities will contribute to objectives 3, 4, 5, 7,
8, 9, and 10.
d. Venn Diagram: Utilizing a Venn Diagram to compare and
contrast, students will demonstrate understanding and
comprehension of institutions, systems, concepts, and
philosophies in accordance to objectives 2, 4, 6, 9, and 10.
e. Rewrite: Students will rewrite portions of primary sources into
their own words using modern language and terminology in order
to demonstrate higher level understanding and learning of

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important unit concepts. This assessment will contribute to
objectives 3, 5, 6, 8, and 10.
f. Comparison Charts: Students comprehension of advanced
concepts will be assessed through the use of comparison charts
to compare and contrast opposing or common elements. These
charts will contribute to objectives 4, 6, 7, 8, and 10.
g. Labeling: Students will be assessed on their familiarity with the
figures of Greek philosophy by labeling the figures in Raphaels
The School of Athens. This activity will contribute to objectives 1,
6, and 7.
h. Data Retrieval Chart: Students assimilation and retrieval of data
and concepts from primary sources will be assessed through the
usage of Data Retrieval Charts. This data retrieval will be used to
accomplish objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 9.
i. Interactive Flow Chart: Students will demonstrate knowledge of
historical sequences and comprehension of cause and effect in
historical events through the use of an Interactive Flow Chart.
This chart usage will contribute to objectives 1, 4, 9, and 10.
j. Short Essay: Students greater comprehension of key concepts
will be occasionally assessed by short essays in order to increase
their learning achievement in this unit. This critical thinking and
writing will contribute to objectives 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 10.
2. Exit Tickets: At the end of each daily lesson, the students will complete
a quick exit ticket as a diagnostic essay checking for understanding of
the days core objective. These tickets will vary in form, including:
question and answer, quick writes, real world application, to personal
relevance. For example, an exit ticket may pose the question: How
can applying the Stoic concept of knowing what is, or isnt, in your
control affect how current events impact you?
3. Discussions: Every lesson will include in depth discussion in groups,
pairs, or as a class. For direct instruction lessons, the discussions will
be initiated and directed by the teacher, while inquiry based lessons
will revolve around discussions initiated by the teacher, but with less
guidance. The purpose of these discussions is for students to work
together and help each other understand concepts by listening to
alternative points of view. These discussions will also be a quick tool for
assessment of students understanding of core concepts. Discussions
will be used to achieve every objective in this unit.

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Summative Unit Assessments:

Summative Assessments for this unit will consist of three short quizzes
during the unit, and a summative unit exam at the end of the unit. The short
quizzes will be fact-based multiple choice questions with clear answers for
the purpose of focusing students on the subject. A sample question for the
quizzes may be:
A form of power structure in which power actually rests with a small
number of people is:
a) democracy.
b) ecclesia.
c) oligarchy.
d) Aeropagus.
e) olgimocracy.

The end of unit summative exam will assess the students understanding and
mastery of all objectives and concepts presented in the unit, and will include
sections of multiple choice, short answer, and a short essay prompt.
I. Multiple Choice to assess definitions, key terms, places, events, and
figures that were discussed during the unit. These questions will touch
upon on all unit objectives. For example:
What ancient kingdom pre-dated the Greek city-states as we
know them?
a) Mycenae
Who was the hero of Homers Iliad?
a) Achilles
Who told the story of the Allegory of the Cave?
a) Socrates
What kingdom conquered Athens in the 4th century BCE?
a) Macedonia
II. Short answer to assess understanding of key concepts and institutions
presented in the unit. Again, these questions will touch upon all the
learning objectives of this unit, but at a higher learning level.
What role did Sophocles play in the life of Socrates?
a) Sophocles was a playwright who inaccurately
described Socrates.
What influence did Aristotle have on western religion?
a) The philosophy of Aristotle was heavily influential on
the religious teachings and writings of Judaism,
Christianity, and Islam.
After the Peloponnesian War, democracy was replaced by what,
ruled by who?
a) Democracy was replaced by oligarchy, ruled by the
Thirty Tyrants.

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III. Short essay prompt to assess the students enduring understanding of
the core concepts and answers to the essential questions of the unit.
Sample essay prompts are:
Describe the interdependency of the Athenian concepts of
democracy, philosophy, and theater.
Explain Socrates philosophy concerning the unexamined life.
How are the Greek concepts of democracy, philosophy, and
theater relevant in the world today?
Performance (Authentic) Assessments:

Mock Trial: This performance assessment will be introduced early in the


unit, along with the assignment of groups for this project. This will be an
ongoing project as students learn about the political and judicial structure of
the Athenian democracy, and will culminate in a mock trial in class. This trial
will be a re-enactment of a homicide trial in Ancient Athens, with the class
acting as the Assembly of 500, rendering an end product in the form of a
verdict on guilt, and a sentencing as appropriate. The students will have
access to primary sources detailing actual trials according to the historical
record upon which to build their mock trial case. This performance
assessment address unit objectives 1, 3, 4, 9, and 10. Group members will fill
the roles of accused, accuser, witness(es), and king archon.

GRASPS:
Goal: Demonstrate understanding of the judicial system of the Athenian
Democracy.
Role: Students will role play as the various figures of an Athenian trial for
homicide.
Audience: This trial be performed before the Athenian Assembly of 500.
Situation: A homicide trial in Athens.
Product: Verdict of guilty or not guilty; if guilty, an appropriate sentence.
Standards: Arizona Standards for Social Studies: Strand 2: World History;
Concept 2: Early Civilizations:
P.O. 3: Analyze the enduring Greek and Roman contributions and their impact
on later civilization:
a.) development of concepts of government and citizenship (e.g.,
democracy,
republics, codification of law, and development of empire)
Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10
Students:
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of
primary and secondary sources, attending to such features
as the date and origin of the information. (9-10.RH.1)
Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10 Students:
1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

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a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s)
from alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear relationships
among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and
evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying
data and evidence for each while pointing out the
strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and
counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in
a manner that anticipates the audiences knowledge
level and concerns.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration
of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or
technical processes.
a. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and
information to make important connections and
distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when
useful to aiding comprehension.

Written Essay: Students will write a minimum three-page essay evaluating


the lasting impact of Greek democracy, philosophy, and theater on western
civilization. Students will address how these concepts are in existence today,
as well as their interdependency now compared to 2500 years ago. Include
specific examples from primary and current sources and appropriate citation
for each. The essay will be double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Chicago format, and a
minimum of 3 pages. The structure of your essay should be:
a.) Introduction One or two paragraphs must include your thesis and a
connection of past to present.
b.) At least three body paragraphs each paragraph will support an
argument, along with textual evidence (including quotes).
c.)Closure One or two paragraphs briefly summarizing the essay,
restating the supporting arguments and providing a final conclusion.
How have the Athenian concepts of democracy, philosophy, and
theater impacted western civilization as we know it today?
Scoring Rubric

Points 0-2 2.5-3.5 4-4.5 5


awarded
Organization/Follo Poorly Somewhat Fairly well- Well-
wing directions organized organized organized and organized and
and did not and followed followed most all follows all
follow some directions directions
directions directions

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Use of examples Little use of Some use of Good use of Excellent use
and quotes specific specific specific of specific
examples examples examples and examples and
and and quotes quotes integration of
integration quotes
of quotes exceeded
expectations
Sentence Structure Ineffective/ Simple Some varied and Varied and
or incorrect and/or effective effective
sentence ineffective sentence sentence
structure sentence structure structure
structure
Grammar and Several Some Few mistakes in No mistakes
punctuation mistakes in mistakes in punctuation in
grammar punctuation and/or grammar punctuation
and/or and/or and/or
punctuatio grammar grammar
n
Overall Demonstrat Demonstrate Understands the Fully
comprehension of es little or s little objective understands
the essay prompt no understandin argument and the objective
understand g of the concepts, but argument and
(worth double the ing of the objective does not concepts,
points 10) objective argument or effectively effectively
argument concepts connect past to connecting
or concepts present past to
present

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Stage III Learning Activities
Unit Calendar:

Lesson Topic(s) Unit Brief Listing of Assessments


Objective(s) Activities

Lesson 1: The Unit Hook: A 1, 2 Introduction to Ancient Class Discussion,


Greek World quick look at Greece with Brian Begin Ancient
and Its History Homeric Greenes Crash Course. Greece Timeline,
mythology. Lecture: Homeric history Exit Ticket: Map
Learn about Video Segments. Analysis
the Geography Interaction and analysis
of Greece and of online maps for
the familiarization with
surrounding Greek geography and
Mediterranean. growth of civilization.
Learn the
stages of
Ancient
Greece
History.

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Lesson 2: The Compare and 1, 2 View short film segments Class Discussion,
Poleis: Athens contrast the on Sparta and Athens. Continue Time
and Sparta different forms Analyze Thucydides in an Line,
of government inquiry discussion with Exit Ticket:
for Sparta and Modified Cornell Notes as Modified Cornel
Athens. Know a literacy strategy. Notes
the parts of the Compare and contrast life
polis and and government in Sparta
major and Athens.
landmarks.
Lesson 3: Understand the 1, 9, 10 Lecture: Greek Class Discussion,
Greek importance Colonization and Continue Time
Colonization and effect of Government. Line,
and Empire territorial Chart the
expansion, and Analyze and chart Greek colonization for
the colonization and the effect Sparta and Athens
characteristics it would have on the for comparison.
of colonies for formation of government.
both Athens
and Sparta.
Lesson 4: Understand 1, 3, 9, 10 Read excerpts of Observations,
Athenian and Explore Aristotles Athenian Continue Time
Democracy the political Politics and Athenian Line,
and physical Constitution. Discuss Class Discussion,
constructs of concepts present today. Exit Ticket:
Athenian What is the role of a Compare an
Democracy, citizen in todays Athenian Citizen
and the role of Democracy? with an active
the Citizen. American citizen.
Lesson 5: Understand the 1, 3, 4, 9, 10 Diagram the institutions Class Discussion,
Athenian workings of of Democracy. Continue Time
Democracy institutions of Lecture: The failings of Line,
through the Athenian Democracy, and the Exit Ticket In a
Golden Age. Democracy, forming of Oligarchy and perfect world,
which is more
Oligarchy, and Tyranny. perfect?
Tyranny. Democracy,
Oligarchy, or
Tyranny?
Lesson 6: Understand 1, 4, 9, 10 Using Guided Notes, Continue Time
Athenian and explain the follow the course of the Line,
Golden Age of rise of the Greco-Persian Wars, the Exit Ticket: Cornell
Empire and Athenian rise of the Delian sheet from Guided
War Empire, the League, and the course of Notes.

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outcome of the the Peloponnesian War
Greco-Persian through excerpts from
Wars, and the Thucydides.
Peloponnesian
War.
Lesson 7: Learn about 2 Design a Table depicting Exit Ticket: Pick a
Greek Religion Ancient Greek the names and city in America.
Myth and characteristics of the Who would its
Legend and Greek Pantheon, patron Greek god or
how it shaped indicating primary goddess be? Why?
the Greek interests and connections
mindset, to other gods, goddesses,
leading to the cities, or individuals.
concepts of
philosophy and
democracy.
Lesson 8: Understand the 5, 7, 9, 10 Bell ringer introduction to Class Discussion,
Greek importance of the Apology. Essay assigned.
Philosophy: Socratic Lecture with Graphic Exit Ticket:
Socrates Part 1 inquiry and Organizer. Preliminary verdict
examination. Group Analysis for Socrates
Lesson 9: Analyze and 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, Engage: Who Am I? Exit Ticket Final
Greek synthesize 10 Watch Trial of Socrates verdict for Socrates
Philosophy: Platos Weigh mock arguments in Rewrite Apology
Socrates Part 2 Apology, groups.
accounting for Rewrite Apology
the trial of
Socrates.
Lesson 10: Analyze key 1, 4, 5, 7, 10 Allegory of the Cave, Continue Time Line
Greek aspects of the Lecture: Perfect Forms to Exit Ticket:
Philosophy: philosophies of Logical Existence Matching sheet for
Plato and Plato and Finding Aristotle in Plato and Aristotle
Aristotle Aristotle. Abrahamic faiths
Lesson 11: Explore and 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 10 Bell ringer: Mantra Continue Time
Greek Understand Brainstorm, Line,
Philosophy: key figures Watch Admiral Stockdale Exit Ticket: What
The Stoics and video. is an area of your
philosophies of Discussion on Cognitive life that you can
the Stoics. Behavior Therapy choose how to
respond to?
Lesson 12: Identify and 4, 8, 9, 10 Watch Video Segment Group Discussion,
Greek Theatre: Evaluate the Jigsaw activity on the Exit Ticket: is
The Comedies great Greek Comedians. comedic theatre

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Comedians. Discuss political impact. part of politics
today?

Lesson 13: Identify and 4, 8, 9, 10 Watch Video Segment. Group Discussion,


Greek Theatre: Evaluate the Jigsaw activity on the Exit Ticket: what
The Tragedies great Greek Tragedies. would the modern
Tragic Discuss political impact equivalent of the
Playwrights. Greek Tragedies be
in the political
arena?
Lesson 14: Recognize and 1, 2, 7, 10 Lecture: Greek Art and Continue Time
Greek understand the Architecture. Line,
Architecture significance of Compare sculptures from Identify Athenian
and Sculpture Greek art and different periods in Greek landmarks.
architecture, history. Exit ticket: In your
and the Analyze a building to school, what Greek
innovations recognize Greek innovations have
that have innovation. been used in
lasted through architecture?
history.
Lesson 15: The Understand the 1, 9, 10 Watch Video Segment, Continue Time
Rise of the course of In groups, analyze Line,
Macedonians events that led Thucydides segments Exit ticket: In your
to the fall of using guided notes. opinion, what was
Athens, and Think/pair/share the most important
the Greek factor in the fall of
poleis to Philip Athens and the
of Macedon. Greek archipelago
to Philip of
Macedon?
Lesson 16: The Understand 1, 9, 10 Watch first half of Continue Time
Empire of and follow the Alexander movie. Line, Exit Ticket:
Alexander career of Discussion on adaptation what aspects of
Alexander and of Greek culture: Greek culture did
his Empire. Hellenization. Alexander adopt?

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Lesson 17: The Understand the 1, 9, 10 Watch second half of Continue Time
Hellenistic impact and Alexander movie. Line,
Legacy legacy of Discussion on the fall of Exit ticket:
Alexanders Alexanders Hellenistic Compare and
Hellenistic Empire. How did Rome contrast strengths
empire. continue his legacy? and weaknesses of
Alexander the
Great.
Lesson 18: Solidify and 1 thru 10 Class will divide into Complete Time
Ancient Greece Enhance teams of three and Line: Exit ticket:
Unit Review understanding participate in a game of turn in your teams
and knowledge History Jeopardy. Teams Jeopardy score.
of the entire will earn extra credit
unit. according to team score.
Lesson 19: Students will 1 thru 10 Unit Exam Unit Exam
Ancient Greece be given
Unit Exam genuine
authentic
assessment, as
well as
personal
evaluation of
school

Catalog of Lessons:

Lesson 1: The Greek World and Its History


Objectives: 1, 2
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Introduction to Ancient Greece with Brian Greenes Crash Course.
Lecture: Homeric history and mythology
Video Segments on stages of ancient Greek history, including the Minoan and
Mycenaean civilizations.
Interaction and analysis of online maps for familiarization with Greek geography, The
Mediterranean, and growth of civilization.
Class Discussion, Begin Ancient Greece Timeline,
Exit Ticket: Map Analysis

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Assessments: Formative assessments during class discussions. The map analysis sheet will be
collected at the end of class as an exit ticket to check for student understanding.

Lesson 2: The Poleis: Athens and Sparta

50 Min. Direct Instruction Lesson Plan: Analyzing Sources using Modified Cornell Notes
Subject: 12th Grade Government/Economics

dary sources for: authors main points, purpose and perspective, facts vs. opinions, and/or different points of view on the same historical eve
and Roman contributions and their impact on later civilization: development of concepts of government and citizenship, scientific and cultu
a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex a

nce of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. (11-12.RI.3)

s and synthesize data using a modified Cornell notes literacy strategy in order to gain familiarity with the ancient Greek city-states of Sparta

heet analyzing a history article.

to complex):
y Greek city-states of Sparta and Athens
rian Thucydides and his contribution to history.
ted and general.

Materials/Technology Resources to be Used:


Laptops with electronic copy of selected history p
Cornell Notes worksheets
Pencil/Pen

earning, and make relevant to real life)


ww.history.com/topics/ancient-history/sparta), and then Athenians (http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/ancient-greece
Students Will:
ing sources and what strategies they use. Express the importance of Open the article at http://www.history.com/topics/anc
d data in sources. Instruct students to open the article at three paragraphs without using a strategy or organize
ncient-history/thucydides and analyze the first three paragraphs without Students will then answer questions about what they
the Spartan and Athenian societies.
then ask questions about what was read.

19
ation: Students can ask any questions necessary for clarification. Since the purpose of this section is to demonstrate difficulty in

Students Will:
izing and retaining data from sources without a strategy and/or guided Express their understanding of the Modified Cornell
ce. Teacher will introduce and the Modified Cornell Note system. understanding by reading the remainder of the Histor
teacher will then check for understanding that the students understand their Modified Cornell Notes appropriately.
l Notes. At this point, the teacher will instruct the students to read the Students will have 5 minutes to read.
ucydides, utilizing the Modified Cornell Note handout. After 5 minutes Students will then answer questions about what they
ns about what was read. Thucydides played in providing a historical account o
period.

ation:
room, giving explanation and assistance where needed, while maintaining an atmosphere of positive academic feedback.

Student Will:
nderstanding of the use of Modified Cornell Notes. Students will demonstrate understanding of the use o
element of targeted questions to the Notes to enable the readers to of targeted questions to the Notes to enable the reade
mation during their general research. during their general research.
udents to open the article at Students will then open the article at https://lucianofs
ki/doku.php?id=2011:thucydides-book-1-debate-at-sparta and analyze id=2011:thucydides-book-1-debate-at-sparta and ana
ornell Notes with targeted questions handout. Notes with targeted questions handout.
then ask questions about what was read. Students will have 5 minutes to read.
Students will then answer questions about what they

ation:
room, giving explanation and assistance where needed, while maintaining an atmosphere of positive academic feedback.

s:
ssions of the two central city-states of ancient Greek history and the impact of Thucydides as a historian.
g segments and the differences in literacy strategy for all three segments. Teacher will explain the high amount of reading inform
e taking and literacy strategies can provide throughout school, and can be carried into the workplace later.
s with targeted questions from the students.

Lesson 3: Greek Colonization and Empire


Objectives: 1, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
View History.com video segments on Athens and Sparta with guided notes worksheet.
Class discussion on democracy and militarism.
Lecture: Greek Expansion and Colonization.

20
Analyze and chart Greek colonization and the effect it would have on the formation of
government.
Assessments: Formative assessments will be chart and discuss the colonization for Sparta and
Athens for comparison. Continue Greek Time Line.

Lesson 4: Athenian Democracy


Objectives: 1, 3, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Read excerpts of Aristotles Athenian Politics and Athenian Constitution.
Explore the political and physical constructs of Athenian Democracy, and the role of the
Citizen.
Discuss concepts of Athenian democracy present today.
What is the role of a citizen in todays Democracy?
Assessments: Formative assessment of class discussion and inquiry. Continue Greek Time Line,
Exit Ticket: Compare an Athenian Citizen with an active American citizen.

Lesson 5: Athenian Democracy through the Golden Age.


Objectives: 1, 3, 4, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Lecture: The failings of Democracy, and the forming of Oligarchy and Tyranny.
Diagram the institutions of Athenian Democracy.
Compare the institutions and workings of Athenian Democracy, Oligarchy, and Tyranny.
Assessments: Formative assessment through class discussion, and Continue Greek Time Line.
Exit Ticket In a perfect world, which is more perfect? Democracy, Oligarchy, or Tyranny?

Lesson 6: Athenian Golden Age of Empire and War


Objectives: 1, 4, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Using Cornell Guided Notes, follow the course of the Greco-Persian Wars, the rise of the
Delian League, and the course of the Peloponnesian War through excerpts from
Thucydides.
Class Discussion.
View Power of Athens video and discuss.
Assessments: Demonstrate understanding of the Athenian Empire, the outcome Greco-Persian
Wars, and the Peloponnesian War by completing Cornell Notes and participating in classroom
discussion. Continue Greek Time Line.

Lesson 7: Greek Religion


Objectives: 2
Length: 50 minutes

21
Activities:
Lecture: Ancient Greek Myth and Legend and how it shaped the Greek mindset, leading
to the concepts of philosophy and democracy.
Discuss the effects of Greek Religion of Greek Academia.
Design a Table depicting the names and characteristics of the Greek Pantheon, indicating
primary interests and connections to other gods, goddesses, cities, or individuals.
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during class discussion. Completed Pantheon
tables. Exit Ticket: Pick a city in America. Who would its patron Greek god or goddess be?
Why?

Lesson 8: Greek Philosophy: Socrates Part 1

Socrates, As Seen Through Platos Apology


Author: Troy Wayne Davis
Content Area: Social Studies/World History
Grade Level: Grade 10
February 14, 2017
Lesson Length: 50-55 min
I. State Standards

Arizona Standards for Social Studies:


Strand 2: World History
Concept 2: Early Civilizations
P.O. 3: Analyze the enduring Greek and Roman contributions and
their impact on later civilization:
b.) scientific and cultural advancements (e.g., network of
roads, aqueducts, art and architecture, literature and theater,
mathematics, and philosophy)

22
Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10
3. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. (9-
10.RH.1)
4. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course
of the text. (9-10.RH.2)

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grade 9-10


6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technologys
capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly
and dynamically. (9-10.WHST.6)

II. Content Objectives


1.) In order to understand the philosophical foundation of Socrates teaching, students will analyze
Platos Apology and identify Socrates major claims and his method of discovery (Socratic
Method).
2.) Students will evaluate the steps of Socrates journey of intellectual discovery in order to
understand the concept of the examined life.
3.) Given the arguments in the text of Apology, students will analyze Socrates defense in order to
decide for themselves if an unexamined life is not worth living.

III. The Why


Students will learn the Socratic Method of examining ones life and environment, and realize
what Socrates meant when he said the unexamined life is not worth living.
Students will discover the value of learning from each others strengths and weaknesses after first
understanding their own limitations, in the manner of Socrates, who said: I am not wise.
Relevance:
This lesson will establish a foundation for understanding Greek philosophy, and introduce the
student to the Socratic Method of examination which can be used throughout life to examine
ones life, environment, and influences.

IV. Materials Needed


1.) Personal technology device opened at: http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/apology.html
2.) The Death of Socrates by Jacques-Louis David displayed on main projector from Wikipedia.
3.) Graphic organizer for evaluating arguments and defenses in Apology.
4.) Pens or pencils and student journals.

23
V. Key Vocabulary
Philosophy, Socratic Method, apologia, hemlock, ostrakon, impiety, pantheon, atheism, demigod,
rhetoric, sophistry, gadfly, Prytaneum.
VI. Bell work/Do Now/Warm Up/Reading
Students will immediately sit down and read the Summary handout printed from
http://sparknotes.com/philosophy/apology/summary.html as an introduction to Platos Apology.
Students will be instructed to write down any questions they may have from the introduction.
Reading time will be 10 minutes.
The instructor will explain the objectives and purpose of the lesson, and introduce the key
questions, including:
o Why was Socrates on trial? Is there a difference between what he is accused of and why
he says he is on trial?
o Why did the powerful men of Athens hate Socrates?
o Does Socrates say he is wise? Why, why not?
o How did Socrates learn?
o What does Socrates say makes life worth living?
o Was Socrates guilty of what he was accused of?
o Did Socrates have to die?
o In what ways can we apply what we learned from Socrates today?
According to Socrates, how can we make our lives better?

VII. Anticipatory Set/Grabber


As students go to http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/apology.html , the instructor will draw upon prior
knowledge by questioning the class in general on political structures of Athens (such as the
courts, juries, and democracy), as well as the early philosophers (such as the Pythagoreans and
Sophists). The instructor will then have assigned students search for, and read out, the definitions
to the Key Vocabulary terms.
Students will then be given the graphic organizer for this lesson, with instructions to write down
accusations by Socrates accusers on the left side of the top chart, and reasons Socrates said he
was on trial on the right. Students will also be instructed to answer the questions below the chart.
VIII. Instruction
The students will have 30 minutes to read Platos Apology, making appropriate annotations on the
graphic organizer provided by the instructor.
Students will then be grouped into working groups of 3 or 4. Groups will then identify three
examples from the text of how Socrates would use dialectic questioning for examination (i.e. the
Socratic Method), and record these examples in their writing journal. (10 minutes)
Groups will then consider the accusations/reasons for Socrates trial as recorded on their graphic
organizers and determine if he was guilty, innocent, or justified for each charge. These verdicts
will then be written on the board by a representative of each group. (10 minutes)
The instructor will then introduce the class to the written assignment following this lesson,
including all expectations and a rubric for assessment. Students will be instructed to begin
brainstorming for their essays thesis.

24
IX. Differentiation
Students of different aptitude for writing will be assessed on differentiated scales, based on the
amount of effort given to reach their maximum ability.
For students that are less advanced in language arts, special needs, ELs, etc. they will be assisted
with the readings, writing format, and content completion for the writing assignment. The
instructor will continually assess the progress of all students through the next week until the
assignment is turned in for grading. This assessment will be through group discussion and one on
one accountability for the assignment. Students will be encouraged to work together, creatively,
in order to offer the best product possible on this assignment.

X. Assessment
Assessment for this lesson will be continuous on several levels. Pre-assessment will begin with
the feedback and discussion from the bell work/opener, and continue to the information entered
on the graphic organizer for the reading. Authentic assessment will then be continued with the
group work and discussions, and completed for the day with the short exit ticket in the closure.
Final summative assessment for this lesson will be completed with the grading of the written
assignment.
XI. Closure
With about 5 minutes left in class, the instructor will stop student discussion and work on thesis
statements to assign a ticket out the door. This brief ticket out the door will be a short
paragraph in the student writing journal stating the students personal verdict (guilty, not guilty,
or justified) on at least two of the accusations against Socrates. Students will continue their work
on the Greek Time Line throughout the unit.
XIII. Independent practice/Homework
Essay Prompt
Explain in detail how Socrates demonstrated examining life, and how that examination would
anger some, and would lead to his death. Include three different examples of questioning and
examination and quotes for each. The essay will be double-spaced, 12 pt. font, Chicago format,
and a minimum of 3 pages. The structure of your essay should be:
d.) Intro paragraph must include your thesis and a brief historical context for the speech.
e.) Three body paragraphs each paragraph will represent a different rhetorical examination, along
with textual evidence (including quotes), and the result of each encounter.
f.) Closing paragraph- briefly summarizes the essay, restates the three examples of examination, and
the overall purpose for Socrates telling of these examples at this trial. What enduring
understanding was Socrates attempting to impart to his fellow Athenian citizens, and ultimately,
to us?

*Rough Draft due next Monday*


Scoring Rubric

25
Points awarded 0-2 2.5-3.5 4-4.5 5
Organization/Following Poorly Somewhat Fairly well- Well-organized
directions organized and organized and organized and and follows all
did not follow followed some followed most all directions
directions directions directions
Use of examples and Little use of Some use of Good use of specific Excellent use of
quotes specific specific examples and quotes specific examples
examples and examples and and integration of
integration of quotes quotes exceeded
quotes expectations

Sentence Structure Ineffective/or Simple and/or Some varied and Varied and
incorrect ineffective effective sentence effective sentence
sentence sentence structure structure
structure structure
Grammar and Several Some mistakes in Few mistakes in No mistakes in
punctuation mistakes in punctuation punctuation and/or punctuation
grammar and/or grammar grammar and/or grammar
and/or
punctuation
Overall comprehension Demonstrates Demonstrates Understands the Fully
of the essay prompt little or no little author's use of the understands the
understanding understanding of elements of author's use of
(worth double the points of the author's the author's use persuasive persuasive
10) use of of persuasive techniques, but not techniques to
persuasive techniques to as well as the best achieve his
techniques to achieve his essays purpose
achieve his purpose
purpose

XIV. Reflection
The instructor will reflect often on the Socratic principles and method while examining other
Greek teachers and philosophies over the next two weeks as a basic foundation for examination
and understanding. The best and most lasting reflection of the lesson will be accomplished with
the creation of the final drafts for the students essays.
Lesson 9: Greek Philosophy: Socrates Part 2

Teacher: Mr. Troy Davis Subject: 10th Grade World History Date: 03/13/17
The prosecution, the defense, and the sentencing of Socrates as recorded by Plato in Apology.
Know
Summarize and rewrite Apology in modern language.
Show

Level of Thinking Evaluation, synthetization

Why did Socrates choose to die? What legacy or lesson did he feel he had already established to allow
Essential Question
himself this choice?

26
SWBATo demonstrate a full understanding of the charges against Socrates, his defense, and his sentencing
as recorded by Plato in Apology by summarizing and rewriting Apology in modern language in order to
Lesson Objective
evaluate the words of Socrates for present day application.

1. Do Now (Who Am I)
2. Discussion of Arguments in Apology
Agenda 3. Guided Examination of Apology
4. Independent Practice (Assignment of Rewrite of Apology)
5. Exit Ticket (Mantra from Apology)
ENGAGE: How will I focus, prepare and engage students for the lessons objective? Differentiation
Do Now: Learning
Play a game of Who Am I? with the class. Style
o Students, in turn, will ask Yes/No questions till my Identity as a historical
figure has been deduced. Learning
o I am Socrates. Modalities:
Once the game is won, I will explain the objective and Extended Practice for the Visual
lesson. Auditory
EXPLORE: In what ways will my learners attempt to explain or do what I have outlined? How Tactile
will I monitor and coach their performance? Kinestheti
Class will watch The Trial of Socrates reenactment at https://www.youtube.com/watch? c
v=8ErCKuY4eyE
EXPLAIN: How will I convey the knowledge and/or skills of the lesson? What will my students be Multiple
doing to process this information? Intelligences:
Linguistic
In study groups, based on their at-home reading assignment, two students will express the Logical/M
accusations against Socrates, while the other two students will respond with Socrates athematic
rebuttal or defense. al
Groups will finish this section by discussing whether the accusation or the defense was Spatial
strongest for the points discussed. Musical
3Lesson Cycle

EXTEND: In what ways will my different learners attempt the objective on their own? How will I Bodily-
gauge mastery? Kinestheti
Based on the at-home readying, viewing of the reenactment, and the in-class discussion of c
arguments from Platos Apology, students will summarize and rewrite Apology in modern Interperso
language. At least two pages of the final product must be rewritten, and at least one page nal
summarized. Intraperso
Final product must be clear, balanced, and logically defended. nal
EVALUATE: How will I have students summarize what theyve learned? How will I reinforce the
objectives importance and its link to past and future learning? Will they have homework?
Specific
Practical application for evaluation: Accommodati
Teacher will tell the story of Admiral James Stockdale, and his use of mantras from Greek ons and
Modifications
philosophy to survive as a P.O.W.
:
Based on their familiarity of Apology, students will write a short phrase, or mantra, from
Copy of
Apology and the practical application to their life today.
the notes
Students will submit these answers as their exit ticket from the class. Visual
aids
Graphic
organizer
Other:

27
CLOSING: closing remarks, summary of what learned, announcements, reminders. HW: Summarize and
o Teacher will introduce the class to the Stoic mantra about things you cannot Rewrite Platos
change versus the things you can change. Apology in modern
o Continue Greek Time Line. language.

Lesson 10: Greek Philosophy: Plato and Aristotle


Objectives: 1, 4, 5, 7, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Analyze key aspects of the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.
View video interpretation of the Allegory of the Cave.
Lecture: Perfect Forms to Logical Existence.
Class discussion: Finding Aristotle in Abrahamic Faiths.
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during class discussion. Continue Greek
Time Line. Exit Ticket: Matching principles sheet for Aristotle and Plato.

Lesson 11: Greek Philosophy: The Stoics

50 Minute Inquiry Lesson Plan: Stoicism and the Stockdale Paradox


Teacher: Mr. Troy Davis Subject: 10th Grade World History Date: 03/13/17
Students will know and understand the core philosophy of the Stoic school of philosophy of Ancient
Greece, and understand the concept of utilizing Cognitive Behavior Therapy in applying Stoic philosophy in
Know
personal life. Students will know and understand the use of philosophical mantras as assistance in life
events.
Students will write a list of philosophical mantras to assist in controlling how they react to five of lifes
Show uncontrollable situations.

Level of Thinking Evaluation, synthetization, application, creation

If there are things in life that are beyond my control, what things are in my control, and how can I control
Essential Question
them?

SWBATo demonstrate a full understanding of the core philosophy of the Stoic school of philosophy by
Lesson Objective discovering that most things in life are out of our control in order to create a list of philosophical mantras to
assist with the things that are in our control.

6. Do Now (Mantra Brainstorm)


7. Watch video testimony by Admiral Stockdale.
Agenda 8. Guided Examination of Apology
9. Independent Practice (Assignment of Rewrite of Apology)
10. Exit Ticket (Mantra from Apology)
ENGAGE: How will I focus, prepare and engage students for the lessons objective? Differentiation

28
Do Now: Learning Style
Mantra Brainstorm.
o Students will group by threes. Learning
o Students will have 3 minutes to write down as many philosophical quotes, Modalities:
mantras, maxims, sayings, or one liners they can think of. Visual
o Students have 2 minutes to share with their groups what their mantras are, Auditory
and what they think they mean. Tactile
Each student will briefly share one mantra they wrote down in group with the class. Kinesthetic
Teacher will share and explain the Stoic Philosophy through the mantras of
Epictetus: Multiple
o Man is effected, not by events, but by the view he takes of them. Intelligences:
o Happiness and freedom begin with a clear understanding of one principle: Linguistic
Some things are within your control, and some things are not. Logical/Mat
o Make the best use of what is in your power, and take the rest as it happens. hematical
EXPLORE: In what ways will my learners attempt to explain or do what I have outlined? How Spatial
will I monitor and coach their performance? Musical
Bodily-
Class will watch The Admiral James Stockdale videos from youtube.com Kinesthetic
Class will watch the short Epictetus/Aurelius slideshow of Stoic mantras. Interpersona
In study groups, students will discuss their reactions and thoughts about the videos in l
relation to the Epictetus/Aurelius slideshow. Intrapersona
l
3Lesson Cycle

EXPLAIN: How will I convey the knowledge and/or skills of the lesson? What will my students
be doing to process this information?
Guided discussion: Specific
Accommodation
o What personalities handle struggle better? Do you feel someone is better than
s and
you?
Modifications:
Short story telling: Teacher will tell of the Stockdale Paradox. Copy of the
o Discuss the optimists, the pessimists, the realists. notes
EXTEND: In what ways will my different learners attempt the objective on their own? How will Visual aids
I gauge mastery? Graphic
Guided discussion: organizer
o What area of your life is, or has been your Hanoi Hilton? Other:
o What parts of that event were/are out of your control?
o What can you control? What can you choose?

EVALUATE: How will I have students summarize what theyve learned? How will I reinforce
the objectives importance and its link to past and future learning? Will they have homework?
Practical application for evaluation:
Students will choose five difficult areas or events in life, and for each, answer the
following:
o What is OUT of my control?
o What IS in my control?
o What mantras can help me change my view of these events; help me take
control?
CLOSING: closing remarks, summary of what learned, announcements, reminders.

29
Teacher and students will briefly discuss the philosophies explored over the last few HW: For five life events
lessons and reflect on some mantras learned. or situations, answer:
Students will quote a mantra as their exit ticket from the class, What is out of my
Continue Greek Time Line control? What is in my
control? How can I
change my view and
take control?

Lesson 12: Greek Theatre: The Comedies


Objectives: 4, 8, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Watch video segment on the Great Greek Comedy Playwrights.
Group Jigsaw activity on the Comedians.
Group Discussion: political impact and importance.
o Was the Greek Theater a necessary institution for a successful democracy?
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during group discussion. Exit Ticket: In what
way is the concept of Greek Comedy still alive in politics today? Name examples and how they
perform the same role or task as the Greek Playwrights. Continue Greek Time Line.

Lesson 13: Greek Theatre: The Tragedies


Objectives: 4, 8, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Watch video segment on the Great Greek Tragedy Playwrights.
Group Jigsaw activity on the Tragic Playwrights.
Group Discussion: political impact and importance.
o Was Greek Tragedy a necessary institution for a successful democracy?
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during group discussion. Exit Ticket: In what
way is the concept of Greek Tragedy still alive in political society today? Name examples and
how they perform the same role or task as the Greek Playwrights. Continue Greek Time Line.

Lesson 14: Greek Architecture and Sculpture


Objectives: 1, 2, 7, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Lecture: Greek Art and Architecture.
o Significance of Greek innovations that have lasted through history.
In groups, conduct the following exercises:
o Compare and contrast the sculptures from different periods in Greek history.
o Analyze a building to recognize Greek innovation.
o Identify Athenian landmarks.

30
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during group exercises. Exit ticket: In your
school, church, or other public building, what Greek innovations have been used in architecture?
Continue Greek Time Line.

Lesson 15: The Rise of the Macedonians


Objectives: 1, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Watch video segment: Twilight of Athens.
In groups, use guided notes to analyze excerpts from Thucydides and Herodotus.
o Think/pair/share what factors weakened the Greeks, preparing them to be
conquered.
Watch video segment: Rise of the Macedonians
o In groups, analyze the military advantages of the Macedonian arms and armor.
o In groups, discuss the Macedonian battle tactics.
Are some of these tactics still in use today?
In groups, analyze Thucydides segments using guided notes.
Think/pair/share Continue Time Line,
Exit ticket: In your opinion, what was the most important factor in the fall of Athens and the
Greek archipelago to Philip of Macedon?
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during group work and discussion. Continue
Greek Time Line. Exit Ticket: In your opinion, what was the most important factor in the fall of
Athens and the Greek archipelago to Philip of Macedon?

Lesson 16: The Empire of Alexander

50 Minute Inquiry Lesson Plan: Was Alexander, the Great?


Teacher: Mr. Troy Davis Subject: 10th Grade World History Date: 03/13/17
Know the impact of Alexander of Macedonias conquests on Greek, Egyptian, and Persian cultures and the
Know use of Hellenistic Culture.
Students will show their understanding in written summary by answering the essential questions and
Show identifying great leaders, past and/or present.

Level of Thinking Evaluation, analyzing, synthetization.

Essential Question What does it mean to be great? Was Alexander III of Macedonia truly great?

SWBATo demonstrate a full understanding of Alexander of Macedonias impact on the world he conquered,
and the subsequent Hellenization of the Mediterranean culture while analyzing primary source documents to
Lesson Objective
determine the answer to the questions: What does it mean to be great; and Was Alexander great?

31
11. Do Now (Great Leaders)
12. Primary sources
Agenda 13. Answer the research questions.
14. Independent Practice (Debate viewpoints)
15. Evaluation through written historical summary.
ENGAGE: How will I focus, prepare and engage students for the lessons objective? Differentiation
Do Now: Learning Style
Students will examine the Great Leaders handout.
o Students will then define what great means to them and identify the Learning
characteristics of the great leaders. Modalities:
o Students will identify world leaders today, if any, that they consider to be Visual
great. Auditory
Teacher will Introduce the Essential Questions of the lesson. Tactile
EXPLORE: In what ways will my learners attempt to explain or do what I have outlined? How Kinesthetic
will I monitor and coach their performance?
Teacher will read the opening narrative to challenge discussion and offer the focus Multiple
question: Based on his actions and his character, does Alexander III of Macedonia Intelligences:
deserve the title of the Great? Linguistic
o Students will answer this question through investigation and discussion, while Logical/Mat
maintaining disciplined heuristics to think like a historian and employing hematical
historic empathy in their judgments. Spatial
Class will read the four primary sources: Musical
o Anonymous Author, Iternerarium Alexandri Bodily-
o Arrian, The Anabasis of Alexander Kinesthetic
o Diodorus, A History of the World Interpersona
l
3Lesson Cycle

o Plutarch, Excerpts from writings, CE 90


EXPLAIN: How will I convey the knowledge and/or skills of the lesson? What will my students Intrapersona
be doing to process this information? l

Teaming up with a study partner, and using the four primary sources above, the students
will answer the following: Specific
o How do I know this is reliable information? Accommodation
o When was this document written? Who wrote it? What as its purpose? s and
o What is the authors point of view about Alexander III? Modifications:
o How can this document help me answer the focus question? Copy of the
Students will write their answers in the Pairs Document Analysis graphic organizer. notes
EXTEND: In what ways will my different learners attempt the objective on their own? How will Visual aids
I gauge mastery? Graphic
As historians discuss and debate the sources with peers, in groups of four. organizer
o While discussing, cite evidence for your viewpoints. Other:
o Answers and opinions will vary, so write down your group responses in your
Group Document Analysis graphic organizer.
EVALUATE: How will I have students summarize what theyve learned? How will I reinforce
the objectives importance and its link to past and future learning? Will they have homework?
Finally, as historians, compilate a written summary of your research findings that
answers the focus questions and that is supported with details from the primary sources
you have read.
Focus question: Based on his actions and his character, does Alexander III of Macedonia
deserve the title of the Great?
Your written summary should be an essay, at least 2 pages long, double spaced.
CLOSING: closing remarks, summary of what learned, announcements, reminders.

32
Teacher and students will discuss the days lessons and things learned about one of the HW: Present a written
largest characters in western history. 2-page summary essay
Exit ticket: Name one characteristic or action of Alexander, or his followers, that supporting your answer
surprised you. to the question: Based
on his actions and his
character, does
Alexander III of
Macedonia deserve the
title of the Great?

Lesson 17: The Hellenistic Legacy


Objectives: 1, 9, 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Students will watch chose selections of Alexander movie in order to understand the
events around the time of Alexanders death, and the resulting shattering of his empire.
Class discussion on the fall of Alexanders Hellenistic Empire.
o Could the fall of the Empire have been prevented?
No primogeniture.
o With the effects of Hellenism lasting past Alexander and laying the foundation for
the Roman Empire, did his Empire really fall, or was it taken up by unexpected
others?
o How did Rome continue Alexanders legacy?
o What was the lasting impact of Alexanders Empire in the Middle East, Southwest
Asia, and Northwest Africa?
Assessments: Formative assessments will be taken during group discussions. Exit ticket:
Compare and contrast strengths and weaknesses of Alexander the Great.

Lesson 18: Ancient Greece Unit Review


Objectives: 1 through 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
Class will divide into teams of three and participate in a game of History Jeopardy in
order to solidify and enhance understanding and knowledge of the entire unit.
Teams will earn extra credit according to team score. Complete Time Line: Exit
ticket: turn in your teams Jeopardy score.
Assessments: Complete Greek Time Line. Exit ticket: Turn in your teams Jeopardy Score.

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Lesson 19: Ancient Greece Unit Exam
Objectives: 1 through 10
Length: 50 minutes
Activities:
The unit exam is an authentic assessment that will span the duration of the class period.
Students will be allowed to refer to one 3x5 index card during the exam with any amount of
information on it. However, it must remain a flat, non-modified, 3 inch by 5 inch, two-
dimensional index card that can be read by the student without any type of assisting lens.
Students can ask any question of the teacher; the teacher will reply at his own discretion.
Assessments: The unit exam is a summative assessment that will test students understanding on
all the objectives and topics covered during the unit. This authentic assessment will consist of
multiple choice and short answer questions, as well as a short essay prompt to fully assess the
students deeper grasp of concepts.

Attachments
Lesson 2:

Cornell Notes
Lecture, reading/chapter/novel/article
during class, power point, movies (if need Name: ___________________________________
to collect info.)
Class: _________________ Period: ________
Topic:____________________
_________________________ Date: _____________________

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Essential Question:

Questions/Main Ideas: Notes:

Summary:

35
Cornell Notes
Lecture, reading/chapter/novel/article
during class, power point, movies (if need Name: ___________________________________
to collect info.)
Class: _________________ Period: ________
Topic:____________________
_________________________ Date: _____________________

Essential Question:

Questions/Main Ideas: Notes:

The Corinthians claimed that


the Spartans place value in not
being what?

What are we told that the


Athenians always are?

For Thucydides, one must


have what to succeed in
wartime?

Summary:

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Lesson 8:
Pre-Reading for Apology

Plato's The Apology is an account of the speech Socrates makes at the


trial in which he is charged with not recognizing the gods recognized by the
state, inventing new deities, and corrupting the youth of Athens. Socrates'
speech, however, is by no means an "apology" in our modern understanding
of the word. The name of the dialogue derives from the Greek "apologia,"
which translates as a defense, or a speech made in defense. Thus, in The
Apology, Socrates attempts to defend himself and his conduct--certainly not
to apologize for it.
For the most part, Socrates speaks in a very plain, conversational
manner. He explains that he has no experience with the law courts and that
he will instead speak in the manner to which he is accustomed: with honesty
and directness. He explains that his behavior stems from a prophecy by the
oracle at Delphi which claimed that he was the wisest of all men.
Recognizing his ignorance in most worldly affairs, Socrates concluded that he
must be wiser than other men only in that he knows that he knows nothing.
In order to spread this peculiar wisdom, Socrates explains that he considered
it his duty to question supposed "wise" men and to expose their false
wisdom as ignorance. These activities earned him much admiration amongst
the youth of Athens, but much hatred and anger from the people he
embarrassed. He cites their contempt as the reason for his being put on trial.

37
Socrates then proceeds to interrogate Meletus, the man primarily responsible
for bringing Socrates before the jury. This is the only instance in The Apology
of the elenchus, or cross-examination, which is so central to most Platonic
dialogues. His conversation with Meletus, however, is a poor example of this
method, as it seems more directed toward embarrassing Meletus than
toward arriving at the truth.
In a famous passage, Socrates likens himself to a gadfly stinging the
lazy horse which is the Athenian state. Without him, Socrates claims, the
state is liable to drift into a deep sleep, but through his influence--irritating as
it may be to some--it can be wakened into productive and virtuous action.
Socrates is found guilty by a narrow margin and is asked to propose a
penalty. Socrates jokingly suggests that if he were to get what he deserves,
he should be honored with a great meal for being of such service to the
state. On a more serious note, he rejects prison and exile, offering perhaps
instead to pay a fine. When the jury rejects his suggestion and sentences
him to death, Socrates stoically accepts the verdict with the observation that
no one but the gods know what happens after death and so it would be
foolish to fear what one does not know. He also warns the jurymen who voted
against him that in silencing their critic rather than listening to him, they
have harmed themselves much more than they have harmed him.

Examination of Platos Apology


Accusations against Socrates Reasons Socrates gave Guilty
for trial ?

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Key terms notes: -
________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________

Who did Socrates set out to find? Why?


_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________.
What was Socrates final realization?
_______________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________.
What did Socrates say guided him?
_________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________.
What did Socrates say would make life not worth living?
_______________________________.
Did Socrates have to die?
________________________________________________________.
How can I apply what I have learned from Socrates?
___________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________.

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Lesson 17:
Great Leaders of History
Cyrus the Great Constantine the Great
King of Persia Roman Emperor
550-529 BCE 306 377 CE

Gregory the Great Canute the Great


Catholic Pope King of England/Denmark/Norway
1016 1035 CE 540 604 CE

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Some Great Leaders in History Page 2 of 2
Akbar the Great Peter the Great
Muslim Ruler of North India Russian Czar
1556 1605 CE 1682 - 1725 CE

Catherine the Great


Russian Empress
1762 - 1796

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Images of Alexander III

Gold Coins struck at Babylon A Statue

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On Horseback, Florence Archaeological Museum Bust found at
Thasos

The
Alexander Sarcophagus, Istanbul As Pharoah Luxor
Archaeological Museum Temple of Amenhotup III

ANONYMOUS AUTHOR of the 4th century A.D. Excerpts from Itinerarium


Alexandri Translated by Iolo Davies, 1998 Alexanders campaigns
Alexander boasted that he had won his victories for himself alone, and
became the more cruel to his friends as his success increased Alexander
went straight on to found the Macedonian empire, by his kingly skills,
bringing the whole Peloponnese under his rule. Accordingly Alexander first
settled the affairs of the whole kingdom of the Persians, giving it his own
laws and appointing its administrators [Alexander] founded for himself a
city (not unequal in size to the other cities names after him), Alexandria. He
did this as a practical precaution in case he ever had to campaign in that
region again. [Some} continued to intrigue against Alexander, however,
calling him the oppressor of the world Alexanders behaviour and
extravagant life-style were causing intense disgust among large numbers
of his men They took offense at his luxuries at table, his expensive attire,

43
his vanity in assuming the royal Persian head-dressThis cast a shadow over
all the former glorious achievements of his spirit .the fault in him grew
worse: he now wanted himself worshipped as a god and would have none of
being saluted in the manner of mortals.

ARRIAN Soldier, governor, and philosopher Excerpts from The Anabasis of


Alexander, A.D. 171 [Alexander] was very [famous] for rousing the
courage of his soldiers, filling them with hopes of success and dispelling their
fear in the midst of danger by his own freedom from fear For I myself
believe that there was at that time no race of mankind, no city, no individual
[to whom] the name of Alexander had not reached. And so not I can suppose
that a man quite beyond all other men was born without some divine
influence. He was very heroic in courage, He was very clever in
recognising what was necessary to be done, when others were still in a state
of uncertainty; In ruling an army, he was exceedingly skillful; and very
renowned for rousing the courage of his soldiers, filling them with hopes of
success, and dispelling their fear in the midst of danger by his own freedom
from fear. He was likewise very [dedicated to] keeping the agreements and
settlements which he made. His adoption of the Persian [way] of dressing
also seems to me to have been a political device in regard to the foreigners,
that the king might not appear altogether alien to them. what a height of
human success he attained, becoming without any dispute king of both
continents, and reaching every place by his fame.

DIODORUS Greek historian, 1st century BCE Excerpts from his writings
World History, Translated by M.M. Austen The Destruction of Persepolis As
for Persepolis, the capital of the Persian kingdom, Alexander described it to
the Macedonians as their worst enemy among the cities of Asia, and he gave
it over to the soldiers to plunder, with the exception of the royal palace. It
was the wealthiest city under the sun and the private houses had been filled
for a long time with riches of every kind. The Macedonians rushed into it,
killing all the men and plundering the houses, which were numerous and full
of furniture and precious objects of every kind. Here much silver was carried
off and no little gold, and many expensive dresses, embroidered with purple
or with gold, fell as prizes to the victors. But the great royal palace, famed
throughout the inhabited world, had been condemned to total destruction.
The Macedonians spent the whole day in pillage but still could not satisfy
their inexhaustible greed. [...] As for the women, they dragged them away
forcibly with their jewels, treating as slaves the whole group of captives. As
Persepolis had surpassed all other cities in prosperity, so she now exceeded
them in misfortune. Alexander went up to the citadel and took possession of
the treasures stored there. They were full of gold and silver, with the
accumulation of revenue from Cyrus, the first king of the Persians, down to
that time Alexander wanted to take part of the money with him, for the
expenses of war and to deposit the rest at Susa under close guard. From
Babylon, Mesopotamia and Susa, he sent for a crowd of mules, as well as

44
3,000 pack camels, and with these he had all the treasure conveyed to the
chosen places. He was very hostile to the local people and did not trust
them, and wished to destroy Persepolis utterly

PLUTARCH Historian, Ancient Greece Excerpt from writings, A.D. 90,


Translated by John Dryden For when any of his friends were sick, he would
often prescribe them their course of diet, and medicines proper to their
disease He was naturally a great lover of all kinds of learning and reading;
While Philip [Alexanders father] went on his expedition against the
Byzantines, he left Alexander, then sixteen years old, [in charge] in
Macedonia, not to sit idol, [he] reduced the rebellious , drove out the
barbarous inhabitants, and plant[ed] a colony of several nations , [He]
called the place after his own name, Alexandropolis. When he came to
Thebes, the city was sacked and razed. Alexanders hope being that so
severe an example might terrify the rest of Greece into obedience, thirty
thousand, were publicly sold for slaves; and it is computed that upwards of
six thousand were put to the sword. Alexander, by founding more than
seventy cities among the barbarian tribes, suppressed their savage and
uncivilized customs Those whom Alexander conquered were more
fortunate than those who escaped [He desired to give] all the races in the
world one rule and one form of government, making all mankind a single
people. And that the Grecians might participate in the honour of his victory
he sent a portion of the spoils home to them particularly to the Athenians ,
and [with] all the rest he ordered this [message] to be sent: Alexander the
son of Philip, and the Grecians, won these from the barbarians who inhabit
Asia. All the plate and purple garments, and other things of the same kind
that he took from the Persians, except a very small quantity, which he
reserved for himself, he sent as a present to his mother. For when his
affairs called upon him, he would not be detained, either by wine, or sleep,
spectacles, or any other diversion whatsoever and Alexander, who was
now proclaimed King of Asia, returned and rewarded his friends and
followers with great sums of money, and places, and governments of
provinces. Eager to gain honour with the Grecians, he wrote to them that he
would have all [cruel governments] abolished, that they might live free
according to their own laws He sent also part of the spoils into Italy, to
honour the zeal and courage of their citizen[s]. Meantime, on the smallest
occasions that called for a show of kindness to his friends, there was every
indication on his part of tenderness and respect. Developed by Betsy
Johnson, MSDE, 10-02

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References and Sources

http://mdk12.msde.maryland.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/alexander.h
tml Developed by Betsy Johnson, MSDE, 10-02

http://www.pbs.org/empires/thegreeks/educational/index_html.html

http://greece.mrdonn.org/lessonplans.html

http://www.brighthubeducation.com/high-school-english-lessons/64007-modern-
words-derived-from-ancient-greek/

http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/apology/summary.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-mkVSasZIM

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/thucydides

https://lucianofsamosata.info/wiki/doku.php?id=2011:thucydides-book-1-debate-
at-sparta
http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/ancient-greece-democracy

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/classical-greece

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/sparta

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/peloponnesian-war

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/peloponnesian-war/videos/spartans-
implements-of-death

http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/thucydides

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpgLAuZdutM

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