BOMA Standards Updates

Monday, April 5th , 2010

presented by Abel Design Group

Jeffrey Abel, Assoc., AIA, LEED® AP Principal Filo Castore, AIA, LEED® AP Associate Principal Director of Architecture and Sustainability Ana Davoodi Project Designer

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BOMA STANDARDS 2010
Standard Methods of measurement and calculating rentable area

Abel Design Group has researched the BOMA Standard Methods of Measurement and Calculating Rentable Area (2010) in order to assist clients/brokers with up to date information.

BOMA STANDARDS 2010
Standard Methods of measurement and calculating rentable area

•Purpose
Clear communication Unambiguous measurement of rentable area

•Method A Revisions
(Legacy Method) Floor R/U ratio to building service areas R/U ratios Rentable areas

•Method B Revisions
(Single Load Factor Method) Not permitted in the 1996 version Identical load factor for all floor levels More stable rentable area of a building

•Enclosure Requirements
New regional practices Provides consistent boundaries for measuring interior gross area

Method A (Legacy Method)
•Methodology of 2010 is generally similar to that of ANSI/BOMA Z65.1-1996, with new terminology. •Application of the floor R/U ratio to building service areas has been discontinued.
•Known as “building common area” in predecessor standard • This results in a slightly different R/U ratio and rentable areas

Rentable Area:
•The product of the occupant + allocated area of an occupant or floor level times the R/O ratio of the building. The may also by calculated as the product of the occupant area of an occupant or floor level times the load factor A for the floor level.

R/U Ratio:
•A ratio, the numerator of which is the preliminary floor area of a floor, and the denominator of which is the usable area of that floor, that distributes floor service areas to the occupants on a floor on a proportional basis.

Method B (Single Load Factor Method)
•This method was not permitted in the 1996 version •Applied to the occupant area of each floor to determine the rentable area •Identical load factor for all floor levels of a building •May office more stable rentable area of a building over time •Base Building Circulation (BBC) :
•The minimum path on a multi-occupant floor necessary for access to and egress from: •Occupant areas •Access stairs, escalators and elevators •Rest rooms, janitor’s closets and water closets •Required area of refuge •Life safety equipment (such as fire house cabinets and fire house cabinets and fire extinguishers) •Building service and amenity areas (such as building lobbies, building conference rooms, sky lobbies, and the like)

Method B (continued)
•Occupant Storage:
Space that is usable by occupants only for storage or because of its location and/or because the levels of finish, lighting, power and HVAC are unsuitable for use as office space, and is accounted for separately from the other rentable areas of the building.

•Usually located on floors that do not contain occupant area
•Basements •Mechanical levels •Enclosed parking levels

•Deducted from interior gross area in determining preliminary floor area

Enclosure requirements
•New regional practices, particularly for tropical climates •Enclosure limit:
a limit up to which an occupant has the right to build an exterior enclosure at a public pedestrian thoroughfare.

•Intended to provide a consistent boundary for measuring interior gross area when the exterior enclosure of a building is subject to modification by an occupant. •Exterior enclosure:
the wall, roof or soffit that constitutes the envelope necessary to enclose a building.

•If occupancy is by the people, an exterior enclosure must provide appropriate ability to control the interior environment.

WALL PRIORITY DIAGRAM
MAJOR VERTICAL PENETRATION BUILDING SERVICE AREAS FLOOR SERVICE AREAS BASE BUILDING CIRCULATION OCCUPANT AREA & AMENITY AREAS

MAJOR VERTICAL PENETRATION

BUILDING SERVICE AREAS

FLOOR SERVICE AREAS

BASE BUILDING CIRCULATION

OCCUPANT AREA & AMENITY AREAS

CL NS NS NS NS

FS CL NS NS NS

FS FS CL NS NS

FS FS FS CL NS

FS FS FS FS CL

FS: Far Side wall surface CL: Centerline of wall NS: Near Side of wall surface

BOMA International – Lease Guide with Green Lease Language

BOMA International – Lease Guide with Green Lease Language
•Why: To facilitate the transition of the real estate marketplace to a more energy and carbon efficient future both from business and environmental perspective. Building owners and managers have been demanding the tools to develop, operate and manage sustainable properties. Furthermore, tenants and tenant spaces are critical to ongoing management and continual improvement of a building. • Who: Green Lease Task Force: Steven A. Teitelbaum and Jones Day for BOMA with input from EPA Energy Star Program®, USGBC LEED Rating System™, and the GBI Green Globes System™. • When: First issued in 2005, with continued revisions. • What: BOMA’s new lease guide was developed to address commonly cited barriers to implementing green building practices. The guide serves as both a legal-language tool to help building owners and managers maintain a green building through operations and management practices, and also serves as an education tool for working with brokers and tenants to outline what is expected of tenants in a high-performance green building and the responsibilities of all parties involved in the ongoing efforts to keep it green and encourage continuous improvement.

The green lease guide covers: • prime lease agreements • guaranty of lease • form subleases In addition, the guide delineates: • energy efficient practices • recycling and waste management • maintenance and repairs • tenant improvements • contractor rules and regulations

http://shop.boma.org

Incentivizing BOTH Landlord and Tenant •Create dual-incentive language for improvements that aid the building in achieving environmental goals •Encourage and/or require sub-metering and set thresholds based on kW/sf/yr •Require Landlord and Tenant to participate in programs that facilitate ridesharing, car pooling, and the use of public transportation •Construction projects would need to follow protocol to protect a building’s indoor air quality.

http://shop.boma.org

Overcoming Barriers and Skepticisms

Split incentive resulting from a typical triple net lease, where landlord pays, and tenant benefits. Flexible guidelines, rating-system neutral. Avoid definition of “green”, “sustainable”, “high performance”. Facilitate ongoing management and operations for the features, policies, amenities or management practices of a specific building and its continual improvement.

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Basic Lease Information Lease Agreement

Section 2.1 Section 1.2 Section 4.2 Section 6.1 Section 6.3 Section 6.4 Section 9.1 Section 10.2 Section 10.4 Section 15.1 Exhibits

Lease Term Right to Relocate Annual Operating Charges Use Sustainable Building Operations Recycling and Waste Management Maintenance and Repairs Alterations Ownership and Removal at End of Lease Term Services and Utilities Contractor Rules and Regulations

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Lease Agreement

Section 1.2

Right to Relocate

Landlord’s relocation of Tenant shall be to a relocation Premises that meets or exceeds the green certification rating of the Premises and meets or exceeds the energy and carbon efficiency of the space, as determined by the U.S. EPA’s Energy Star® performance rating tool, Portfolio Manager.

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Lease Agreement

Section 6.1

Use

Tenant shall not use or operate the Premises in any manner that will cause the Building or any part thereof not to conform with Landlord’s sustainability practices or the certification of the Building issued pursuant to the [the U.S. EPA’s Energy Star® rating, the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes TM for Continual Improvement of Existing Buildings (Green GlobesTM-CIEB), the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system, or ______ standard].

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Lease Agreement

Section 9.1

Maintenance and Repairs

All maintenance and repairs made by Tenant must comply with Landlord’s sustainability practices, including any third-party rating system concerning the environmental compliance of the Building or the Premises, as the same may change from time to time.

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Lease Agreement

Section 10.4

Ownership and Removal at End of Lease Term

Tenant shall dispose of in an environmentally sustainable manner any equipment, furnishings, or materials no longer needed by Tenant and shall recycle or re-use in accordance with Landlord’s sustainability practices. Tenant is responsible for reporting this activity to Landlord in a format determined by Landlord.

Green Language across Multiple Sections

Lease Agreement

Section 15.1

Services and Utilities

Tenant shall be required to submit to Landlord electricity consumption data in a format deemed reasonably acceptable by Landlord.

Thank You

One Greenway Plaza – Suite 450 Houston, TX 77046 713.622.8899 v 713.622.5655 f info@abeldesigngroup.com www.abeldesigngroup.com

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