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TEFL140 ANYWHERE !

A Graduate’s Guide to Teaching English as a Foreign Language…
With the job market still struggling to recover from the recession and graduates finding greater employment challenges than at any time in recent history, TEFL offers you the chance to earn a decent wage, cut your living costs, improve your employability… and have an amazing time living and working overseas. With the British Council estimating that more than one billion people are learning English worldwide, the opportunities for graduates are virtually limitless*.
*British Council Learning. August 2009. www.britishcouncil.org/learning-faq-the-english-language.htm

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Contents
1 2
Opportunities
TEFL Opportunities for Graduates Graduate Opportunities Worldwide Worldwide TEFL Requirements 5 7 8

Training
TEFL Training for Graduates Which TEFL Course is Right for You? Online TEFL Courses Classroom TEFL Courses Combined TEFL Courses Trinity and CELTA Courses Grammar Quiz Specialist TEFL Training 11 13 14 14 15 15 16 18

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Finding Work
How to Find a TEFL Job Creating a Good TEFL CV Creating a Good TEFL Cover Letter Finding Work Yourself Finding Work With Recruitment Agencies Types of Teaching Institutions Arriving Overseas How Will TEFL Help Your Career? 21 22 24 26 28 29 31 34

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Destinations
Where Can TEFL Take You? North Asia South East Asia Western Europe and the Med Central and Eastern Europe Central and South America The Middle East Africa The Indian Subcontinent TEFL Glossary A Few Last Words Some Space for Your Notes 37 38 43 47 54 57 61 65 67 70 72 73
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Opportunities

1 Opportunities

TEFL Opportunities for Graduates Graduate Opportunities Worldwide Worldwide TEFL Requirements

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TEFL Opportunities for Graduates
As a recent graduate, finding a job teaching English as a foreign language overseas is relatively easy. In some cases you really only need the ability to speak English fluently to find work.
In fact, people have been teaching English abroad for decades with nothing more than wanderlust and their knowledge of the English language. However, over the last few years the market has become far more competitive and school requirements have increased to the point where the vast majority of the more reputable schools now require teachers with an accredited TEFL certificate. So we’ve created this guide to tell you exactly what you need to know about the TEFL industry, the courses available and the types of opportunities there are for graduates worldwide. It’s an up-to-date view of the world of TEFL based on our experiences of teaching abroad and training other people to do the same. It should serve as the perfect guide for the start of your TEFL adventure.

Enjoy!
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1 Opportunities

Siobhan’s Story
Siobhan Torrens took an i-to-i TEFL course after graduating. Her course took her all the way from Southampton to China… I arrived here in China in October 2009, so I’ve been here almost a couple of months now. This trip started way back in May. I was nearing the end of my dissertation which was about how to teach programming when I decided that I needed a break from computing. I love travelling so I looked at jobs where I could go abroad. I remembered thinking about teaching but I didn’t want to teach in a school in England or spend a year training to find out that I didn’t like it. The solution was simple - I decided to teach English as a foreign language.

sToRiEs aT REad moRE TEFL oaRd.com www.TEFL-chaLkb

Siobhan Torrens

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Graduate Opportunities Worldwide
English is the international language of business, politics, science and communications. The British Council estimates there are over a billion people learning English worldwide.*
About three quarters of these people live in non-English-speaking countries where TEFL courses are accepted and qualified TEFL teachers are in huge demand. In other words, every country needs English teachers - there are even foreign TEFL teachers in North Korea!

EuRopE 200,000,000+ LEaRnERs

asia 300,000,000+ LEaRnERs

souTh amERica 150,000,000+ LEaRnERs

middLE EasT 50,000,000+ LEaRnERs

There are hundreds of websites dedicated to TEFL jobs. It’s estimated that there are over 20,000 new TEFL jobs listed each month and one of the best known sites – eslcafe.com – can have over 2,000 listings at any given time. As a graduate you’re in a great position to find work overseas and you’ll find it easy to get working visas for some of the most lucrative TEFL markets in the world, such as the Middle East, Japan and South Korea. However, in some places the demand for TEFL teachers is so huge that many schools will employ teachers with no teaching qualifications or degree. This does depend on the country, the school and the individual employer – you may need to be qualified or degree educated to get a working visa in some countries. Also, the question of whether you want to teach without some training needs serious consideration (see page 11) as does whether you’d want to work for a school that has such low standards that they’d employ a teacher with no experience and no training.
*British Council Learning. August 2009. www.britishcouncil.org/learning-faq-the-english-language.htm

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Worldwide TEFL Job Requirements
The list below gives you a rough idea of the regional requirements for TEFL teachers looking for work abroad.
Region North Asia South East Asia Western Europe & the Mediterranean Central & Eastern Europe Central & South America Middle East Indian Subcontinent Africa English speaking countries General Requirements Degree required and TEFL certificate preferred TEFL certificate required Degree and TEFL certificate required TEFL certificate preferred TEFL certificate preferred Degree required Degree and TEFL certificate required TEFL certificate preferred Degree & CELTA/Trinity CertTESOL required

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Rozel’s Story…
Rozel Le Cornu is an i-to-i Teach in China intern. She headed East after graduating and had an amazing time… Sometimes bubbles of joy and excitement just cannot be contained and I begin to smile, or jump up and down, or laugh – or all three simultaneously! I get moments like this often here, like just now, walking back from the school canteen. I hear the cry of ‘Rozel!’ followed by a small Chinese girl running towards me, arms outstretched for a hug. Then after talking to her, I continue walking to have one of my grade 3 boys literally hurtle towards me, hug me, take my hand and then spin around with the biggest smile on his cheeky face! Wow, I’m going to miss this place when I head home!

sToRiEs aT REad moRE TEFL oaRd.com www.TEFL-chaLkb

Rozel Le Cornu

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Training

TEFL Training for Graduates Which TEFL Course is Right for You? Online TEFL Courses Classroom TEFL Courses Combined TEFL Courses Trinity and CELTA Courses Grammar Quiz Specialist TEFL Training

11 13 14 14 15 15 16 18

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TEFL Training for Graduates
One of the main questions people ask about Teaching English as a Foreign Language is ‘Do I really need a TEFL qualification if I’ve already got a degree?’ And the simple answer is no!
But a word of warning: although a TEFL qualification isn’t absolutely necessary for finding teaching work abroad, having a reputable TEFL course does make finding work loads easier. And there’s a lot more to TEFL training than just improving your employability and bumping up the wages you can demand. Even a short 20 hour TEFL course will increase your confidence and give you some guidance on how to manage a classroom, prepare activities and teach a lesson. Obviously longer TEFL courses will give you a deeper understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching English as a foreign language and give your students the level of education they deserve. In conclusion then, even though it is possible to get teaching work without a TEFL qualification, if you have one it’ll be easier to find work, you’ll be able to do a better job and you’ll be less likely to get caught out by your own students when teaching them the intricacies of the present perfect tense!

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2 Training

Niha’s Story
I graduated in 2009 but found it hard getting a job, which led me to i-to-i. I then decided to do a TEFL course to gain further teaching experience and to explore new opportunities and challenges that I might not get a chance to do normally. I’m currently signed up for the China Internship and I know that it will bring me new prospects, new friends and help me to learn more about myself and other cultures. It’s very exciting to know that a TEFL course can take you anywhere in the world, a chance that you might not get in other careers.
Niha Chaudry

sToRiEs aT REad moRE TEFL oaRd.com www.TEFL-chaLkb

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Which TEFL Course is Right For You?
Choosing the right course for you can be a tricky business. There are loads of different course providers offering loads of different types of courses. TEFL courses. TESOL courses. Online courses. Weekend courses. Combined courses. CELTA courses. Trinity courses. And with prices starting from £160 and going all the way up to around £1,000, it’s important you choose a course that suits your budget and the type of teaching you want to do. So to help you find the course that’s best for you, we’ve created this quick and easy guide…

TEFL Tip
As a rule of thumb, the more hours of study you do, the better your prospects of finding work overseas! 2 Training
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Online TEFL Courses
Online TEFL courses range from cheap and cheerful 40 hour courses all the way up to in-depth 120 hour courses that are accepted by schools worldwide.
They cover all the key theoretical aspects of TEFL and offer loads of online learning resources, so they’re ideal if you already have practical teaching skills. If you prefer to study alone and at your own pace, or if you can’t make it along to a classroom TEFL course, they’re a perfect choice.

✔ Pros
l l l l Study whenever suits you Inexpensive Study from anywhere on the planet In-depth theoretical study

✗ Cons
l l l No face-to-face contact with tutors and other TEFL students No teaching practice There are some dubious online course providers so choose carefully

Classroom TEFL Courses
Short, classroom-based TEFL courses are ideal if you’re looking for a quick taste of TEFL or just need a basic certificate to improve your teaching CV.
They’re ideal for people who prefer to learn by listening and practicing in a classroom. With some providers, you can upgrade this basic TEFL course to a more in-depth course by adding online course modules to your classroom TEFL course. So if you catch the TEFL bug, you can improve your qualification quickly and easily.

✔ Pros
l l l 2 Training l The best classroom courses are respected worldwide Meet TEFL tutors and other TEFL students Can be a fun way to learn Can include peer teaching experience

✗ Cons
l l l l There’s no official worldwide accreditation body, so check the company thoroughly Course content can be superficial No teaching practice with real students Little attention to language and grammar analysis

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Combined TEFL Courses
Courses that combine online and classroom TEFL training are a great way to get a really comprehensive TEFL certificate that will make it easy to find work overseas.
They combine the theoretical aspects of online study with the practical lesson planning and teaching practice aspects of a classroom based course. Combined TEFL courses range from entry-level 40 hour courses all the way through to really comprehensive 140 hour courses with specialist training and loads of extras.

✔ Pros
l l l l l In-depth language and grammar study Practical face to face learning Up to 140 hours of study Meet TEFL tutors and other TEFL students The best ones are respected worldwide

✗ Cons
l l No teaching practice with real students There’s no official accreditation body, so check the company thoroughly

Trinity and CELTA Courses
Cambridge Certificate (CELTA) or the Trinity Certificate in TESOL provide an intensive introduction to teaching English with a full-time four week course.
If you have four weeks spare and the money to pay for the course, these courses can be a good option, especially if you are thinking of TEFL as a long term post-graduate career, want to teach in an English speaking country or are interested in moving up the career ladder into management or Director of Studies positions. However, if you’re thinking of heading overseas to teach for a limited amount of time, as a post university travel experience or CV building exercise, a Trinity or CELTA course may not be necessary.

✔ Pros
l l l l l High prestige Graduates can use it to teach in English speaking countries Independently audited and accepted worldwide Practical teaching content Teach real students and get feedback

✗ Cons
l l l l l Very intensive Very expensive Can be stressful Inflexible delivery model You’ll need to take a month off to study 2 Training
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You’re Obviously Pretty Smart, But How Good is Your Grammar?
So you’ve gone to university and you’re obviously pretty smart. But how much do you know about English grammar? Take this quick test, and then check the answers on the next page to see how smart you really are!
Instructions: Match the word in bold to its grammatical name by choosing a, b or c. Simple eh? Yeah right!

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I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) subject b) object c) possessive noun I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) adverb b) verb c) adjective I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) preposition b) article c) adjective I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) quantifier b) adjective c) article I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) adjective b) verb c) article

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I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) adjective b) article c) noun I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) present perfect b) present simple c) past simple I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) superlative b) comparative c) relative clause I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) passive b) conditional c) relative clause

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10 I live in a big house now. It’s the best house that I have ever lived in. a) past simple b) present perfect c) past perfect

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So How Good is Your Grammar?
The Answers
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 a) subject b) verb a) preposition c) article a) adjective c) noun b) present simple b) comparative c) relative clause b) present perfect

How Did You Do?
Less than 5 out of 10 Don’t worry, there’s more to teaching than knowing what a relative clause is, but you should think about taking a short grammar course before you start teaching overseas. You wouldn’t want your primary students knowing more about English grammar than you, would you? 5 to 9 out of 10 Good effort. You’re pretty good at grammar, but you might want to consider taking a short grammar course on top of your TEFL course to get you fully up to speed.

10 out of 10 You’re a grammar genius. The world of TEFL is missing out every day you’re not teaching. Get yourself a TEFL qualification, book your plane ticket and get yourself a teaching job as soon as possible.

2 Training
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Specialist TEFL Training
A good way to make your CV shine and improve your employability is to take a short specialist teaching certificate on top of your TEFL course. There are short courses available in everything from Teaching Business English to Teaching Young Learners.
They’re a great choice if you’re hoping to specialise in a specific area of English teaching, such as the profitable business English market. Take a look at the ‘Where can TEFL take you?’ section for more information about which countries are crying out for people with specific types of specialist training. There are loads of different specialist TEFL certificates out there including…

Grammar Awareness
Didn’t get a great score on the Grammar Quiz? This is the course for you!

Teaching Business English
A great introduction to the lucrative business teaching market.

Teaching Large Classes
Especially useful in Asia and the Far East.

Teaching Young Learners
If you want to teach kindergarten or primary kids, this is a great choice.

Teaching One-to-One
Useful if you want to make loads of money as a private TEFL tutor!

Teaching with Limited Resources
Especially useful if you plan to teach in South Asia, Latin America or Africa. 2 Training
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Leigh’s Story
After graduating with a Bachelor of Science and spending a year as a laboratory technician, something that I had hated from day one, I decided there has to be something more. I heard about i-to-i TEFL courses by chance through a travel agent while I was looking at options for a gap year. I realised this could be a way of fulfilling my dream of travelling to Eastern Europe as well as being a viable career option! With nothing to lose and everything to gain, I threw myself at it and found that it was a lot of fun and gave me the confidence and tools to get out there and do it. I start my new TEFL job in the Ukraine in 3 weeks!
Leigh Turnbull

sToRiEs aT REad moRE TEFL oaRd.com www.TEFL-chaLkb

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Finding Work

How to Find a TEFL Job Creating a Good TEFL CV Creating a Good TEFL Cover Letter Finding Work Yourself Finding Work With Recruitment Agencies Types of Teaching Institutions Arriving Overseas How Will TEFL Help Your Career?

21 22 24 26 28 29 31 34

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How to Find a TEFL Job
There are loads of different ways of finding work overseas. You can find yourself a teaching job from home, job hunt while you’re in-country, or even sign up to a TEFL recruitment agency and let them to do the leg-work for you. There are pros and cons to each. Search from Home
Sorting out a job from home allows you to get visas, travel arrangements and all the important stuff back home sorted safely in the knowledge that you have a job lined up at the other end. See page 26 for more information

In-country Job Searching
Looking for work in-country allows you to check out the area, inspect the school and meet other teachers before you sign up to a contract. However, taking time to travel isn’t always possible and it can get pretty expensive. See page 26 for more information

Using TEFL Job Agencies
This is probably the easiest way to get a job overseas, as long as you take the time to choose an agency that is trustworthy and reputable. See page 28 for more information

Many employers choose their staff a few months before they’re needed, so most schools advertise between April and July for jobs starting in September. So if you want to land yourself a job overseas these are usually the best times to start looking.

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TEFL Tip

Creating an Impressive TEFL CV
There’s no such thing as a CV that works for all TEFL jobs. You’ll need to create a basic template and then tailor it for each application, so the CV meets each employer’s selection criteria and works with your cover letter. Take a look at these hints and tips for more in-depth information.
Make sure everything on your CV is relevant. Remove anything that doesn’t shout ‘I can do this teaching job really well’. Keep it succinct and punchy. • • • • Use the same font as your cover letter. It creates a good impression – you’ve made the effort to present a professional package. Start with your most recent qualifications and experience. Key skills should be nouns. For current responsibilities use verb+ing. For previous jobs use the past tense. Make sure you’re consistent with word forms and punctuation. Use full stops after all or none of the items in a bulleted list – not just some of them. This level of care and consistency is especially important for an English teacher. If your CV is sloppy, the employer will think your attitude and your work in the class will be sloppy too!

Key resources
For TEFL CV tips: www.tefl.net/esl-jobs/resume-tips.htm For suggestions regarding tricky issues such a lack of experience: http://susanireland.com/resumework.htm

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A Great Example of a TEFL CV…
RESUME
Janet Baldwin 412 Iseya-cho, Kamigo-ku Kyoto 602-0873 Telephone: 075-212-6342 Email: janet_baldwin999@gmail.com

KEY SKILLS
• • Qualified and experienced TEFL teacher Coordinator of sports and activity programs

QUALIFICATIONS
2009 2008 TEFL Certificate i-to-i Melbourne Bachelor of Arts (Major: History) Monash University Melbourne

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Jan-Jul 2009 • • • Mar-Oct 2008 • • • Jul-Nov 2007 • TEFL Teacher, Universal English College, Kyoto Teaching Conversational English at all levels Teaching Business English to executives Organising out-of-class language activities Activities Officer, Student Activities Committee, Monash University Planned and managed sports clubs and events Designed promotional materials and checked for errors Completed records in a timely and accurate manner Freelance Tutor Tutored high school students in English and History

INTERESTS
Japanese language & culture; sport & outdoor activities

REFEREES
Professor Jane Scott History Department Monash University jane.scott@monash.edu.au (+613) 9275 2978 Mr Tim Michaels Tutor i-to-i TEFL Certificate tim_michaels_1978@hotmail.com (+613) 9352 3998

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Creating a Unique TEFL Cover Letter
Ready for the harsh truth? Most employers look at a cover letter for less than 10 seconds! After that they’ve already decided whether you’re a ‘maybe’ or a ‘definite no’! First impressions are very powerful and the following hints and tips should help you get past those all important first 10 seconds. Hints and Tips for a TEFL Cover Letter
• • • • • • • • Make sure that the cover letter includes the selection criteria in the job advert. These should be obvious, if they’re not it may be worth emailing them to see what kind of training and experience they’re after. Use ‘Dear’ followed by the person’s name, and finish with ‘Yours sincerely’. Keep your letter short and to the point. Keep the language simple and clear (you will be judged on the clarity and precision of your writing). Be courteous and direct – there’s no need to beg. ‘This is an application for…’ is much better than ‘I would really like to apply for…’. In business letter styles, do not punctuate dates, ‘Dear…’ or ‘Yours Sincerely’. Leave a line space between paragraphs and do not indent the first line. The text should be left justified. Use a clean business like font, such as Arial or Verdana. Most importantly, check every word of your application at least three times. Then get a friend to check it too. English teachers really shouldn’t be making errors in application letters, it just looks sloppy!

Key resources
Useful advice for letters and CVs www.eltworld.net/blog/2009/04/6-simple-reasons-why-your-tefl-resume-sucks 3 Finding Work For more ideas and the difference between post and email etc… http://jobsearch.about.com/od/jobapplications/job_applications.htm

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A Good Example of a TEFL Cover Letter
Ms Sawako Wakita Principal, Foundation English Kindergarten 3-2-6 Ogimachi, Kita-ku Shinagawa Osaka

20 July 2009

Dear Ms Wakita This is an application for the position of English Teacher, as advertised on www.eslcafe.com. I am a qualified and experienced English teacher. I have an i-to-i TEFL Certificate, and have been working for six months as a TEFL teacher at the Universal English College, Kyoto. In addition, I have designed and organised sports and activity programs. While at university I worked for the Student Activities Committee, coordinating a number of sports clubs for students. I would be very grateful for the opportunity to discuss my application further. Please find my resume attached. Yours sincerely

J.Baldwin

Janet Baldwin

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Finding Work Yourself
If you want to find work without using a recruitment organisation you’ve got two choices: search from home or look for a job when you’re in the country. Finding Work Abroad from Home
Having a job sorted before you leave home obviously has lots of plus points. It cuts out much of the anxiety of leaving home without a definite job lined up. It allows you to get your working visa. It gives you a little time to get lesson plans and materials together. And it means you can get your accommodation fixed up so you’ll have somewhere to lay your head when you get off the plane. There’s a list of resources on the next page which should make finding a job from home a lot easier.

Finding Work at Your Destination
Although it can be a little stressful, many people prefer to do their job-hunting once they arrive in their chosen destination. This allows you to meet the employer, check out the school’s facilities, check out the TEFL opportunities in the area and get insider information from other teachers who are working out there. Most employers recruit staff a few months before the courses start and advertise locally between April and July for jobs starting in September. So you’ll need to do a reconnaissance trip around this time or just take your chances when you land.

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Daniel’s Story…
I took my TEFL course after graduating; I was stuck in a dull, well-paid job, dreaming of doing something more exciting with my life. My sister was teaching in South Korea, and a couple of months after receiving my certificate I went to visit her. I enjoyed visiting Seoul and seeing the lifestyle that my sister lived so much that I flew home to quit my job and a month later flew back to find a teaching position. I had several interviews with schools and accepted a job on New Year’s Eve!

testimonial

Daniel Deacon

Useful Resources
Newspapers and publications
Tuesday: TEFL Classifieds in the Guardian Education section Thursday: Jobs pages in The Independent Friday: The Times Educational Supplement


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Recommended job sites
www.eslcafe.com www.tefl.com www.eslgazette.com www.jobs.tes.co.uk

Information about jobs overseas
www.transitionsabroad.com

A quick word about job adverts
Pretty much all TEFL job ads state that TEFL training and experience is required. But that doesn’t always mean that it is, so don’t feel too disillusioned if you lack TEFL experience. A well written CV and cover letter plus an internationally recognised TEFL qualification can often soften their selection criteria.

Finding Work with Recruitment Agencies
There are loads organisations that can help you find English teaching work overseas. They range from international educational foundations, voluntary organisations and charities to international language school chains and agencies that act as recruiters for independent language schools.
Finding work through a recruitment organisation can make finding work with a reputable employer a lot easier and a lot less stressful. However, it’s worth checking around to make sure that the recruitment organisation has a good reputation. And because many of the larger organisations often require a top level TEFL qualification and some teaching experience, they can be tricky to get registered with.

Useful Resources
Check any of the recommended job sites on the previous page, most of the top recruitment agencies advertise on them.

Reputable Recruitment Organisations
www.onlinetefl.com/tefl-jobs-abroad www.footprintsrecruiting.com www.reachtoteachrecruiting.com

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Paul’s Story…

Tokyo, Japa n

After graduating all I had was a degree with no idea what to do next. By doing the 120hr TEFL course it not only meant I was now able to teach English with the newly learnt skill and know how but also see the world. I have been able to use my TEFL qualification and my degree to get a job in Japan. My adventure has only just begun, who knows what will happen now that the world is truly my oyster.

Paul Dixon

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Types of Teaching Institutions
As a graduate, there are lots of different types of institutions and language schools where you may be able find work. The following pages should give you a better understanding of the kinds of places you could find work and the type of work you could be doing. Language Schools, Academies and Institutes
Language schools, academies and institutes are generally for-profit businesses. They can be small or large with branches located in one city or several around the world. They are probably the most widespread of institutions and the easiest places to find work. Most will require teachers to hold a TEFL/TESOL certificate but might not require a degree. Such institutions do not always offer the best salaries but they are excellent places to start: you’ll learn a great deal by teaching a wide variety of student age groups and by working alongside more experienced teachers from around the world.

Summer Programmes
Summer programmes may be affiliated with a language school, academy or even a public or private institution. Others are businesses that run only during the summer months and offer programmes both in the students’ home country and/or abroad. These programmes are usually set up to offer English classes in the morning and sports or social activities in the afternoon. Teachers are usually required to organise and take part in these afternoon activities. These schools can also be residential.

International Schools
International schools are usually private institutions with a mixed population of both expatriate and local children. Since these schools are usually accredited with different national and international educational organisations or government offices, they may have stricter hiring policies. In most cases, they will require a PGCE, QTS or State Board Teacher Certification for a full-time position. However, they may offer contracts for part-time work or extracurricular English classes and in countries where there is a shortage of English teachers a TEFL certificate will often be sufficient for a full-time teaching position.

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Universities
Work at a university is usually better paid but harder to come by. It is often offered on a short-term or course-by-course basis. Part of the reason for this is that most universities require higher degrees of their university lecturers. And even these higher degrees usually need to be officially translated and evaluated by a governing body before a longer term contract can be offered.

Service Schools
Service schools are for children of people in the military services (often primary and junior age). As these schools usually follow the official curriculum of whatever country they serve, teacher certification is usually required.

Expatriate Schools
Expatriate schools are schools run in a similar way to schools in the UK or the US. Like international schools, they are usually accredited with national or international educational organisations and tend to have stricter hiring policies.

Working for Businesses
Multinational companies such as British Petroleum and large banks like HSBC employ teachers and language trainers, often on a freelance basis. Knowledge of and background in the company’s area of expertise are often prerequisites for the job.

Private Teaching
3 Finding Work Working for yourself can be very lucrative (as it’s often cash-in-hand) though it can be unreliable. Work is found through word-of-mouth, local advertisements and recommendations. It is usually easy to find work as a private teacher if you are in a place that lacks native English speakers and the demand for English is high.

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Arriving Overseas
Once all the training, job hunting and organising is done and dusted, it’s time to get packed, organise your going away party, jump on the plane and head overseas. These hints and tips should come in handy. What To Take With You
The general rule when packing to teach abroad is to pack what you think you need, then get rid of half of it and the chances are you’ll still be taking too much! The majority of things you need can generally be bought when you arrive in country, so try to avoid over packing. Do some research on the area you will be living in and make sure you only take clothes that are suitable for the climate for the time of year you’ll be there. A good blog to check out for travelling light is www.onebag.com. Another tip is to make sure you think about what is acceptable teaching attire. For instance, teachers in China are given a lot of respect, so make sure you cover up and stick with neat, tidy outfits and you won’t go too far wrong! A handy tip for teaching abroad is to be prepared! Take a notebook full of classroom activities and games and the age groups or levels you think they are suitable for (a reputable TEFL provider should be able to provide with a few of these). Flashcards, photographs and coloured pencils are also a few things that you might find useful, and are still small enough to stash in your suitcase! One thing you might want to consider taking is a laptop, which is not only a great way for keeping in touch with friends and family from back home, but really useful for creating lesson plans and activities while you’re in country.

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Visas

Asia in particular provides so many opportunities to teach abroad and certain countries such as China and South Korea are really developing now. I think they’ll be crucial in terms of the world economy later on, so it’s exciting to think that we can get involved in that. I’d really recommend this career path to graduates, as it’s so easy for us now to get up and go! What really appeals to me with TEFL is that you’re able to live somewhere and actually meet local people and experience something a lot deeper than a tourist’s perception of a place.

testimonial

Kelly English

Culture Shock

Immersing yourself in a new culture and surrounding yourself with the unfamiliar can be unbelievably rewarding, but if you’re not prepared it can also give you a nasty case of culture shock! Knowing what to expect when you arrive can be the best way to protect yourself. So make sure you research your country well before leaving home, whether it be learning some of the lingo to help you get by or researching your local neighbourhood. Once you’re out there, make an effort to explore the area and make new friends, you never know, you might find someone else who feels the same way! If you’re feeling homesick, try to take it one day at a time, things can only get better! Remember to stay in touch with people from home, take advantage of sites like Chalkboard – the network for TEFLers abroad (www.tefl-chalkboard.com), and Facebook (www. facebook.com) to keep in touch with friends and family. And if you’re feeling down, just remind yourself that everyone’s just a phone call away. Check out the following article for some more top tips: http://www.tefl-chalkboard.com/travel-guides/181-How-to-Cope-With-Culture-Shock-While-Teaching-EnglishAbroad

Where to start? There are more types of visas in the world than there are people living in China! Well, maybe not quite that many, but the visa application process can be pretty complicated if you don’t know where to begin. But don’t panic, your new employer should be able to guide you through the application process. Watch out! Any TEFL employer that recommends you work on a tourist visa is probably not a credible employer, as this is illegal. There are thousands of TEFL websites out there, so make sure to check on the internet for more information regarding visas and employers – the last thing you want is to be banned from your dream destination due to working illegally!

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Money
While there are some initial costs that need to be taken into consideration when planning your move, the cost of living in most TEFL destinations will be a lot lower than at home. However, you’ll need to think about the following costs. Unless accommodation is provided by your school, you’ll usually have to put a deposit down, so make sure you have enough money to pay around two months’ rent upfront. Don’t forget, you’ll probably need enough money to get you by until your first pay day. If you work out what you might need to pay for before your first pay check arrives, you should have no problems.

Meeting New People
Making new friends in a new country can be daunting, but putting in a little effort can make the world of difference! Get yourself out there and visit local attractions, attend local events or join a group such as a language class or a gym, all of which are great places to meet new people. One way to make new friends is to tell your adult students that you don’t know much about the local cuisine or what places you can visit in the area, then stand back and watch the invites roll in! If you want to make friends with the locals, make an effort to visit local shops, restaurants and bars. The more you go to one place regularly, the more chance the locals will start to chat to you. Try not to spend all of your time in tourist traps, make the effort to try the local food and socialise in local bars… but don’t beat yourself up if you can’t resist the lure of a Big Mac once in a while!

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How Will TEFL Help You When You Get Back Home?
Teaching English as a Foreign Language after graduation can improve your job prospects and give you loads of transferable skills that are in demand in the domestic jobs market. So, even if you’re not thinking of teaching as a longterm career, spending time teaching overseas can be really beneficial to your future employability. Improve Your Communication Skills
When you teach overseas you’ll spend much of your time teaching in front of a class or preparing lessons. This will improve your communication skills and your confidence in presenting to a group, both of which are really useful in all forms of business. And because you’ll probably be teaching in a non-English speaking country, you’ll also learn to communicate effectively with people who don’t speak your language - a really useful skill if you’re planning on a career in multinational business.

A Challenge Like No Other
From the second you step off your outbound flight until the moment you say a tearful goodbye to your students, you’ll be challenged almost constantly (don’t worry it’s not as scary as it sounds). You’ll need to learn how to function in a foreign country, how to navigate your way around a new city, how to build new working relationships and ultimately, how to survive outside of your comfort zone. If you write your CV properly, future employers can’t help but be impressed.

International Networking
While you’re overseas you’ll cross paths with people from all walks of life: from foreign tourists and backpackers to local businessmen, university professors and government officials. If you make the effort to stay in touch, there’s every possibility that something may come of it. Life throws up all sorts of opportunities, it’s just a question of recognising them and using them to your advantage. 3 Finding Work
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Open New Doors and Broaden Your Horizons
Many people head off to teach for six months or a year and never come back: they find new opportunities and follow a new path in life. i-to-i TEFLer, Robert Clarke, set off to Indonesia in 2009 for a one year teaching experience. That one year has now turned into a whole new life abroad! He fell in love with another TEFLer and has since then gotten engaged and now lives in Dongguan, China with his fiancé teaching English in a public school! Don’t believe it? You can check out his story here: http://www.teflchalkboard.com/robertclarke. You never know where TEFL may take you until you make that all important first step, you could leave after three months or end up living on a remote tropical island having the time of your life!

How Will TEFL Help Back Home
Imagine it for a second. You arrive in a small city in South East China for the first time. Everything is foreign. You don’t know a soul for a thousand miles. You don’t know a word of the language. You’re not even sure what to order in the local restaurant. Now jump forward a few weeks. That foreign city is now home. You hang out with all the other TEFL teachers at your school. You pick up the evening newspaper for the old guy who lives next door. You can order a meal and have a short conversation in the local language. And you’re on first name terms with the family who owns the local restaurant. That is what teaching overseas gives you: independence, resilience and the belief that no matter how big the challenge, you’ll do alright!

Improve Your CV and Impress Employers
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A quick question! If you were an employer, whose CV would impress you more? A university graduate with a 12 months’ unrelated experience in a junior role in the UK or a graduate who’s a fully qualified English teacher with proven presentation and communication skills and 12 months’ experience of living and working overseas? For most employers it’s a pretty obvious choice.

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Destinations

Where Can TEFL Take You? North Asia South East Asia Western Europe and the Med Central and Eastern Europe Central and South America The Middle East Africa The Indian Subcontinent

37 38 43 47 54 57 61 65 67

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Where Can TEFL Take You?
With a degree and a reputable TEFL course behind you, there are a virtually limitless number of teaching jobs available around the world. Some of the most lucrative TEFL destinations, such as the Middle East and Japan, require a degree, and even those that don’t actually require one, look more favourably on graduates.
The following pages will give you a pretty thorough introduction to the most important information about teaching in all the key regions and each country within those regions. We haven’t talked about salaries and teaching conditions as they’re likely to change over time. However, it is worth doing your research online before you make a decision on where you want to teach.

Asia

ica fr A
S. America
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North Asia

China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan

Why Choose North Asia? Possibility of saving money in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong Good teaching packages in China (airfare, accommodation, travel bonus)

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What Jobs Are There?

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Private schools & universities Enormous demand in China and South Korea Not so much in Japan (after recession and the collapse of Nova, the largest private English teaching company in Japan)

What of Year? Times Jobs Are There?

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Private schools: year-round Universities: Japan/South Korea/Taiwan – before start of semester in Aug/Feb, China/HK – before start of semester in Sep/Feb

Challenges l l l 4 Destinations l l Conservatism Sexism Stories of badly managed schools Stories of bad agents Political sensitivities

Solutions l l l l l Don’t fight it - first impressions are crucial (e.g. dress, respectful manner) Status as teacher and foreigner helps Do research (e.g. teacher forums) No need for an agent, go to schools directly Avoid them

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China
Types of Work l l l l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l

’Ni hao!’

Huge demand Government schools and ‘normal’ (teacher training universities) Private language schools (for adults, students and children) Chain private schools (English First, Shane, Wall Street etc) Lots of opportunities for TEFL certified graduates Foreign campuses

Employment visa (Z Visa). Need visa notification from an authorised Chinese employer Degree preferable Such demand that schools may not require a degree – stress your experience as an alternative. Many expats find work on a tourist visa and the school arranges the employment visa while you remain in the country.

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Insider Information l l

Hong Kong
Types of Work l l l

’Lay ho!’

Strong demand for teachers willing to sign one-year contracts Most demand at private schools with children Part-time teaching on top of a full-time job especially lucrative

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Degree Working visa Working holiday visa available for 18-30 year olds from Australia Anything to sell your expertise is useful – TEFL/TESOL certificate, experience with children. 4 Destinations
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Insider Information l

Japan

’Konnichi wa!’

Types of Work l Demand for English teachers exists but less because of the recession, and competition for work after the collapse of Nova l Numerous private schools and chains (e.g. GEOS & ECC) l Conversation classes l Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school) l Japan Exchange and Teaching Programme (JET) when you work as an assistant in a junior or senior high school (must have degree and be under 40) Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l l Work visa sponsored by employer Degree Enter Japan on a 90-day tourist visa and look for work. Once you’ve agreed your contract, your employer will arrange your work visa. We do not advise that you work until your visa is finalised, but many teachers choose to, and schools may call it ‘training’. You then need to apply to an embassy outside Japan (e.g. Seoul). You can enter Japan on a ‘cultural visa’ for study, which allows you to work up to 20 hours per week.

Insider Information l l

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South Korea
Types l l l l l

’Annyong hashimnikka!’

of Work Huge demand for a English teachers Most work opportunities are teaching young children and adolescents Private hagwons (language schools) in cities Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school) English in South Korea Program (EPIK), similar to JET, which places native speakers in schools & education offices

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Need E-1 Visa (for large schools) or E-2 Visa (as conversation instructor) sponsored by employer Evidence of fluency in English (if you’re not from an English-speaking country) Degree Most teachers recommend job hunting on the ground to find better schools and conditions.

Insider Information l

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Taiwan
Types of Work l l l l

’Ni Hao!’

Huge demand for teachers willing to sign one-year contracts Most work is with children in private language schools and cram schools. Seem willing to sponsor teachers Government schools often advertise Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Working & residency permit, only obtainable with a one-year contract Bachelor’s degree with TEFL/TESOL certificate Passports only from English-speaking countries You can enter on a 60-day Visitor Visa, and then apply with a signed contract.

Insider Information l

Key resources
China www.eslcafe.com/jobs/china www.tefljobs.cn Hong Kong www.hkjobs.com Japan www.eltnews.com www.jobsinjapan.com

South Korea www.eslcafe.com/jobs/korea www.hiteacher.com www.worknplay.co.kr Taiwan www.eslisland.com www.englishintaiwan.com

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4 Destinations

Honor’s Story
When I first decided to teach in China, I wasn’t thinking about how it would boost my future career. The idea of experiencing life in a different culture and meeting lots of new people was enough to sell a few months in the People’s Republic to me. But in between the teaching and exploring, something rather unexpected happened: I managed to massively boost my confidence, public speaking and communication skills, not to mention just grow up a bit. And although I realised teaching wasn’t the long-term career for me (I’m way to impatient!), the skills I gained have stayed with me, and my time in China never fails to impress employers. They like that I’ve worked (and survived) in another country, as well as the fact that it’s made me a more rounded and independent individual. I reckon it was certainly the deciding factor with my current employer. Honor Baldry

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South East Asia
Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam
Why Choose South East Asia? l Low cost of living l Relaxed lifestyle l Many countries allow foreigners to stay up to 90 days without a visa l Students respect teachers and see the value of education, so class management is rarely a problem l Travel opportunities

What Jobs Are There?

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Many jobs in private schools (but lower pay than North Asia) Jobs available teaching all ages of students

NB It’s very difficult to find work in The Philippines and the Indian Subcontinent (as most students learn English at school). Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei source teachers from Britain through official channels

Times of Year?

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Year-round, especially school holidays, when many secondary and university students take extra English classes (Thailand midMar to mid-May)

Challenges l l Schools may insist on a British or American accent First impressions are very important – bad for teachers to lose face

Solutions l l Sell your different accent as ‘international’ Dress smartly with a professional resume and references

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Indonesia
Types of Work l l l Medium demand

’Selamat siang!’

English First chain schools Otherwise largely ‘back-street’ private schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l l l No degree required Tourist visa is 90 days max For longer work and stay (VITAS) permit you need sponsorship Passports only from English-speaking countries TEFL course very useful Authorities are very strict about visa regulations. However, schools like English First generally arrange VITAS for you.

Insider Information l l

Thailand

’Sawatdi krap! Sawatdi ka!’

Types of Work l Strong demand, especially in cities other than Bangkok e.g. Hat Yai, Chiang Mai and Songkhla l Chain schools l Small private schools l Many opportunities with universities, teachers’ colleges and private business colleges l Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g while working at a school) l Most schools source teachers locally rather than arranging jobs in advance Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses: Official Requirements l l l Degree and TEFL certificate Teacher’s license, working permit, and one year working visa For work at a university/college, you need a bachelor’s degree in Education + Thai cultural awareness course OR any bachelor’s degree + Thai education exam Many EFL teachers in Thailand teach on a tourist visa but this is illegal and there is threat of a crackdown. Universities and larger language schools might apply for a work permit for teachers willing to sign one-year contracts.visa while you remain in the country.

Insider Information l l

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Vietnam
Types l l l l l

’Chao ong! Chao ba!’

of Work Strong demand Universities Chain schools e.g. ILA Many small private schools, often specialising in business English, TOEFL etc Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school). Lucrative with children of expats from Japan, South Korea etc

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Degree in any field Sponsorship from employer for work visa Tourist visas can be changed easily to work visas in-country.

Insider Information l

Key resources
Indonesia www.eslbase.com/jobs/indonesia Thailand www.esl-teachers.net www.ajarn.com Vietnam www.eslbase.com/jobs/vietnam

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4 Destinations

Gareth’s Story
“I have no regrets about deciding to teach in Thailand at all, it’s the best thing I ever did!!” It’s 7pm on a Sunday evening in Bangkok. I’ve had quite possibly the easiest week of my entire working life, I’m about to pour myself a nice whiskey and coke and I’m going to sit on my balcony trying my best to write something interesting that will hopefully stir up some interest in you about this amazing place. My name is Gareth, I’m twenty-four years old and I’m a kindergarten teacher in Bangkok. Why did I decide to leave England to teach English in a far-flung corner of the planet? Imagine the scene: recently graduated from Lancaster University; I’ve studied hard my whole life; I did well in school, college and university and now I find myself sat in my second 9-5 telesales job in the space of four months selling insurance, possibly the dullest thing a person can buy. That was not where I envisaged myself when I graduated. I had two options: I could stay in the telesales job whilst looking for some dream job to come along in rainy Bolton (during an imminent recession); or I could get out there and make the most of the fact that I was still young, I had no major commitments keeping me where I was (kids, mortgage, wife etc) and there was a whole world out there that needed to be seen…

GaRETh's bLoG REad ThE REsT oF kboaRd.com aT www.TEFL-chaL

Gareth Openshaw

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Western & Mediterranean Europe
France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey

Why Choose Western & Mediterranean Europe? High salaries (esp. Northern Europe) Cosmopolitan lifestyle

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What Jobs Are There?

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Many chain schools (e.g. Berlitz, Wall Street, International House) Summer schools (but this is now hard to get a hold of) Universities Freelance work (esp. for companies/private tutoring), often via an agency – useful to have contacts and to know the language

Times of Year?

l l l

Private schools/freelancing: year-round, but peak in most countries Sep/Oct Summer schools in Mediterranean: Jul-Aug University: depends on country’s academic year

Challenges l Very difficult for non-EU passport holders as workplaces are reluctant to sponsor them (employer must prove no EU national is suitable) Employers (esp. in Mediterranean) may offer cashin-hand with no work permit Strict requirements regarding qualifications & experience High cost of living (and housing rarely supplied)

Solutions l l l l Working holiday visas for 18-30 year-olds (from Australia, NZ, Canada) Student visas often allow part-time work Build relationships with potential employers when visiting for other purposes (e.g. during a holiday) Be very cautious of employers offering you cash-inhand – you may be exploited, and if you are caught it’s big trouble Worth considering other options if you haven’t got any qualifications or experience Teachers often combine one main job with freelancing

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France
Types of Work l l l

’Bonjour Madame! Bonjour Monsieur!’

Private language schools University language centres Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Degree EU nationals preferred Business qualifications and/or experience is useful

Insider Information l

Germany
Types l l l l l l

’Guten Tag!’

of Work Private language schools Agencies delivering corporate work University language centres Language assistants in government schools Adult education courses Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Degree Specific requirements for different states EU nationals preferred It’s easier to find work than it looks.

Insider Information l

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Greece
Types of Work l l

’Geia sou!’

Frontisteria (secondary cram schools) Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l l Degree EU nationals or teachers from Greek background preferred Certificate of Proficiency in English Application for work permit must be in applicant’s country of residence (can be a slow process) Most teachers say it is better to look for work on the ground in Greece and then leave the country to apply officially.

Insider Information l

Italy

’Buon Giorno!’

Types of Work l l Private language schools Chain schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Degree EU nationals preferred Work permits for non-EU nationals now almost impossible Many teachers work illegally but this is very risky. 4 Destinations
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Insider Information l

Portugal
Types of Work l l

’Ola!’

Frontisteria (secondary cram schools) Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l Degree Because of demand, a degree may not be necessary. When you find a teaching job you can apply for permits locally. Insider Information l

Types of Work l l l Boom for teaching adults has passed Private language schools (but most unwilling to arrange official permits and will pay you cash) Growing area: pre-school and children

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l No degree required EU nationals preferred Application for work permit must be in applicant’s country of residence (can be a slow process) Many teachers work illegally but this is very risky.

Insider Information l

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Spain

’ Buenos d’as!’

Switzerland
Types of Work l l l Private language schools

’Guten Tag! Bonjour! Buon giorno!’

University language centres Private tutoring (especially after making contact, e.g. while working at a school)

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l l Degree CELTA/TEFL + teaching experience EU nationals preferred The law is strictly enforced.

Insider Information l

Turkey
Types of Work l l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l l Degree Work permit

’Merhaba!’

Strong demand (especially for evening and weekend work teaching adults) Many private language schools Chain schools Colleges/universities (require MA)

Insider Information l l Schools rarely help with work permits. Many teachers are on 3-month tourist visas, which is illegal. 4 Destinations
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Key resources
France www.tefljobsinfrance.com Germany www.tesall.com/germany.html Greece www.tefl.edu.gr/faq.htm#a9 Italy jobstefl.com/esljobsitaly.asp

Portugal http://www.lisbon-guide.info/facts_visitor/ working Spain www.eslbase.com/jobs/spain Switzerland http://www.jobsabroad.com/Switzerland.cfm Turkey turkeyjoblink.com

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A Spanish TEFL Interview: Emma Ryan
Why did you decide to start teaching English? After nearly 20 years as a civil servant, I realised that I was entirely unfulfilled and was looking for a challenge. I’d always enjoyed training and teaching, and I love languages. It seemed like the obvious combination of my passions. Did you do a TEFL course before you started teaching? I took the weekend TEFL initially, with the intention of doing the full one, once I had the time though, as yet, I haven’t actually done so! What I learned on my weekend course has been invaluable, though. How are you finding the experience of teaching in Spain? I honestly don’t have a bad thing to say about it. Madrid is a fantastic city, easy to live in, friendly, reasonably cheap and teaching here has been great fun. What would be your advice for someone thinking of teaching in Spain? Do it! Come here with no pre-conceived ideas, and throw yourself into it wholeheartedly. You won’t be disappointed. Getting in with a school or an academy is probably the best way to do it, though private students have their advantages too, so don’t discount anything. You will find the Spanish to be welcoming, friendly and enthusiastic and, with English fast becoming the “must-have” ability for their jobs, you’ll find that being a native speaker makes you very, very popular!

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Central & Eastern Europe
Czech Republic, Hungary, Russia
Why Choose Central & Eastern Europe? Low cost of living Good lifestyle with cafes, nice food, beer and wine

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What Jobs Are There?

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Many private language schools Strong demand for teachers outside the big centres (i.e. Prague and Budapest) and especially in the former USSR Business/technical English with corporate clients (through a school or as a freelancer)

Times of Year?

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Year-round, but especially winter when tourist teachers return home

Challenges l l l In much of the region, standard of living is low, so you’ll receive low salaries Locals have high expectations of teachers and are wary of foreign hooligans Competition – lots of British and American teachers, especially in Prague

Solutions l l l Supplement school salary with freelancing Be professional (in appearance and approach to teaching) Specialise (e.g. in English for Business or IT/ network with other teachers)

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Czech Republic
Types of Work l l l l l Private language schools Chain schools Freelancing with companies

’Dobry den!’

Lots of opportunities in provinces, but stiff competition in Prague Lots of stories of badly managed schools – do some research

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Any bachelor’s degree (but TEFL helps) Work permit Where demand is strong (e.g. small cities), a degree may not be necessary and schools will arrange paperwork.

Insider Information l

Hungary
Types of Work l l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l l

’Jo napot k’vanok!’

There’s demand but language schools rarely provide full-time work – many teachers need to work at several schools Private language schools Chain schools Freelancing with companies

Most schools say TEFL/TESOL certificate + year’s teaching experience Work permit Smaller schools find it difficult to get teachers. Degrees may not be necessary and schools will arrange paperwork 4 Destinations
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Insider Information l

Russia
Types of Work l l l l

’Zdravstvuitye!’

Private language schools Chain schools Freelancing with companies Strong demand for business English. Private schools send teachers to client’s workplace

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits:

Official Requirements l l Most schools say degree + CELTA Work permit Demand for teachers is so strong that many schools will hire native speakers without qualifications. Good references are as important as qualifications.

Insider Information l l

Living expenses:

Key resources
Czech Republic www.eslbase.com/jobs/czech-republic Hungary http://www.esljobs.com/teach-english/hungary Russia www.englishfirst.com/trt/esl-jobs-in-russia.html

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Central & South America
Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico
Why Choose Central & South America? Low cost of living Slower pace of work Colour & excitement

l l l

What Jobs Are There?

l l l

Many private schools Universities & colleges (better conditions but may be strict with qualifications) Companies may employ English teachers (for Business/ Technical English) directly

Times of Year?

l l

Private schools: year-round, but especially autumn Universities: school year generally starts at the end of March

Challenges l l Low pay, rarely with accommodation Security

Solutions l l Latin America is for lifestyle, not making money Act sensibly

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NB once you start working at a school, it’s often possible to negotiate a higher salary

Brazil
Types of Work l l l

’Ola!’

Private language schools Chain schools Government schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Bachelor’s degree Degree There are a lot of Brazilian students studying in English-speaking countries. Ask them for recommendations and contacts.

Insider Information l

Types of Work l l l Private language schools, especially in Santiago Chain schools Government schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Bachelor’s degree Need signed contract for work visa Most teachers start teaching on a 3-month tourist visa (which is illegal but widespread) while they look for a longer-term contract which will get them a yearlong work visa.

Insider Information l

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Chile

’ Buenos d’as!’

Types of Work l l l Private language schools Chain schools Government schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Only bachelor’s degree required if you undergo an interview in person If apply from offshore, you need a bachelor’s degree and TEFL/TESOL certificate Making contact in person is effective.

Insider Information l

Types of Work l l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l l l TEFL/TESOL certificate No degree required Need a sponsor for work visa Some private language schools will take teachers with the certificate only, while others require nothing more than native-level fluency. Schools often prefer to interview teachers in person. Many positions are never posted online. Strong demand because of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) Private language schools Chain schools Government schools

Insider Information l l 4 Destinations
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Mexico

’ Buenos d’as!’

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Costa Rica

’ Buenos d’as!’

Key resources
Brazil www.eslbase.com/jobs/brazil Chile www.teachingchile.com

Costa Rica www.escapeartist.com/efam/64/Teaching_ English_In_Costa_Rica.html Mexico www.teachenglishinmexico.com

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The Middle East
Jordan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, UAE
Why Choose The Middle East? Can be highly lucrative. May be tax free. Often accommodation is supplied and free schooling for children Sponsoring schools arrange all paperwork Longer contracts 2-3 years (but only 1 year in Saudi) l l l

What Jobs Are There?

l l

Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Jordan have the highest demand Most jobs through colleges & universities

Times of Year?

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Sep/Oct is the start of the academic year in most countries

Challenges l l Laws are strictly enforced (e.g. no pork or alcohol is allowed in Saudi) Strict social ‘rules’, especially in Saudi Arabia & Kuwait – e.g. no public display of affection between a man and a woman, no discussion of family members in class, no reference to decadent behaviours in class Sexism Anti-Semitism

Solutions l l l These laws are no joke! You have to accept them before accepting a job Again, you have to accept this if you want to live there Many jobs ask for a male or a female teacher, depending on the gender of students – both men and women will receive respect in a teaching context Israeli passports and teachers with ‘Jewish’ sounding names may be refused a visa

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Jordan
Types of Work l l

’Marhaba!’

Colleges & universities Private schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Generally a degree is required Must be sponsored The law is strictly enforced.

Insider Information l

Kuwait
Types of Work l l

’Salaam!’

Colleges & universities Some foreign institutes

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Generally a degree is required Must be sponsored The law is strictly enforced.

Insider Information l

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Saudi Arabia
Types of Work l l l Colleges & universities Some foreign institutes

’As-salam alaykum!’

The demand for native-English speaking males is strong. Colleges offer high tax-free salaries, free transportation and accommodation, along with other perks You will have to organise a job before going there because there are no tourist visas for Saudi Arabia

l

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Degree Must be sponsored The law is strictly enforced.

Insider Information l

UAE

’ Aahlan wa sahlan!’

Types of Work l l l Colleges & universities Some foreign institutes Private schools

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l l Degree Must be sponsored The law is strictly enforced. 4 Destinations
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Insider Information l

Key resources
Jordan www.esljobs.com/teach-english/jordan/ Kuwait www.esljunction.com/TEFL/TEFL_Jobs_Kuwait. html

Saudi Arabia www.jobsabroad.com/SaudiArabia.cfm UAE www.eslbase.com/jobs/uae/

4 Destinations
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Africa
Egypt, Sudan
Why Choose Africa? l l l l Volunteering is very fulfilling work – teachers report Africa is ‘life-changing’ You are directly helping people in difficult circumstances Sense of adventure Because of lack of resources, Africa will quickly develop a teacher’s skills & creativity

What Jobs Are There?

l l

Demand for volunteer teachers is very high Some international schools are present, but the requirements for qualifications & experience is very strict

Times of Year?

l

Year-round

Challenges l l l Very few well-paid teaching positions in Africa Difficult living conditions Hard to get work permits in many countries (employer needs to show no local can do the job and there are many high-level English speakers in Africa) Lack of teaching resources Security (crime and terrorism)

Solutions l l l l Do not consider Africa for making money This will be a meaningful experience – just have realistic expectations Volunteering is a much easier option 4 Destinations
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l l

Learn about possible classroom activities with limited resources – check out any training courses that specialise in this Act sensibly

l

Egypt
Types of Work l l l

’ Aahlan wa sahlan!’

Private schools Volunteers for various international organisations Foreign institutions like the American University in Cairo and the International Language Institute Heliopolis

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses:

Official Requirements l Work permit & work visa (school arranges) before arriving Making contact in person is effective. Insider Information l

Sudan
Types of Work l

’Salaam aleikum!’

High demand for volunteers through various international organisations that work directly with Sudanese institutions

Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: 4 Destinations Living expenses:

Official Requirements l Work permit plus letter of recommendation Ensure you are emotionally prepared if you’re volunteering – as much of the population is below the poverty line. Insider Information l

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The Indian Subcontinent
India, Nepal
Why Choose The Indian Subcontinent? l l l Culturally exciting Cities like Mumbai are booming You can directly help people in difficult circumstances

What Jobs Are There?

l l

Volunteering Niche jobs such as accent modification

Times of Year?

l

Year-round

Challenges l Paid jobs are scarce. There are many local English teachers – English is a national language in India – and many foreign teachers looking for work Low salaries Poverty & crowded conditions

Solutions l l l Have a point of difference – e.g. Business English experience Low cost of living Be emotionally prepared 4 Destinations
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l l

India
l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l l Degree Work permit for paid work

’Namaste!’

Types of Work Strong demand for volunteers Business English Interesting work such as accent training for call centres

Insider Information l l Most teachers are volunteers and have entered on a tourist visa. Not many paid positions are advertised on the internet. You generally need to be on the ground and look for opportunities. To get a work permit you need a letter from your employer.

Nepal
Types of Work l l l Conditions Monthly salary: Hourly rate: Other benefits: Living expenses: Official Requirements l Work permit for paid work Insider Information l l

’Namaste!’

Strong demand for volunteers Short-term work at private schools Interesting work such as teaching at monasteries

Most teachers are volunteering and have entered on a tourist visa. Established schools may help you get a work permit.

4 Destinations

Key resources
India www.esljobs.com/teach-english/india Nepal http://www.tefl365.com/country/nepal

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Jodie’s Story
I’m Jodie, I graduated from Birmingham Uni in July ‘09. Whilst recovering from hip surgery and looking for jobs I stumbled across TEFL. Never in a million years did I imagine myself teaching in Thailand, but I’m going, in May for 5 months. I’m super scared because I know nothing about teaching, but im also really really excited about going – this is my chance to do something different and meet loads of new people and I cannot wait to meet fellow TEFLers and travellers. I’m hoping to save enough to do a bit of travel afterwards as well, this is the reason for the one way ticket! I am 21, live in Kidderminster and I absolutely must have something to keep me occupied all of the time as im very easily bored. I work full time as an administrator but I fill any free time with aerobics, gym, swim, reading and music, but I am especially fond of a good old night out with friends, partial to a drop of vino and love meeting new and exciting people. Get in touch fellow TEFLers/ travellers - would love to hear about your experiences!

sToRiEs aT REad moRE TEFL oaRd.com www.TEFL-chaLkb

Jodie Taylor

4 Destinations
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TEFL Glossary
Communicative Classroom A classroom where students often interact and speak with other students EAP English for Academic Purposes; teaching students planning to study at university ESP English for Specific Purposes; teaching students in a specialised field, e.g. engineering or health General English English with no specialised focus Ice-breaker A student-to-student speaking activity at the start of a class; also called a warmer Learner’s Dictionary A dictionary specially designed for learners Methodology An approach to teaching (e.g. the communicative methodology believes students should speak to each other in class) Reference Grammar A book for looking up grammar rules Teaching Practice A lesson a trainee teaches on a teacher training course Test Preparation A course for students who are going to take an important test Young Learners Teaching English to children Language Analysis Examining the structure and meaning of language Macro Skills The four primary language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking Native-Speaker Someone who learnt a language from early childhood Non-Native Speaker Someone who learnt a language after early childhood CELTA The Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults, run by Cambridge University TEFL Certificate The entry level of qualification for the TEFL industry

TEFL Glossary
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Chain School A school with a number of branches in different cities or countries Diploma A higher level of qualification than a certificate; only required for positions of responsibility in a school EFL English as a Foreign Language; generally used to mean English for work or study ESL English as a Second Language; generally used to mean migrant English ESOL English as a Second or Other Language (used mainly in the UK); any English teaching to non-native speakers Split Shift A work schedule with a long break in the middle (e.g. 2 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the evening) TEFL Teaching English as a Foreign Language (used mainly in the UK); generally used to mean English for work or study TESOL Teaching English as a Second or Other Language (used mainly in the US, Australia and New Zealand); any English teaching to non-native speakers Trinity CertTESOL A certificate in TESOL run by Trinity College, London

TEFL Glossary
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Are You Ready to Get Started?
You’ve got all the information you need to get started as a TEFL teacher. All that’s left is to make the decision and get out there, so here’s a quick recap of the main reasons why you should ditch the 9 to 5 for a while, get TEFL qualified and see the world as an English teacher.

Five Reasons to Get out There
1 2 3 4 5 There are more TEFL jobs than there are TEFL teachers You can get fully qualified quickly and affordably You’ll see the world and have a real adventure You’ll improve your CV There will still be plenty of time to spend nine hours a day sat in an office… if you ever decide to come back from teaching abroad!

A Few Last Words
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Space for Your Notes

Space for Your Notes
73

Space for Your Notes

Space for Your Notes
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Join Chalkboard & Chat to Other Graduates TEFLing Abroad!
Join i-to-i’s Chalkboard – the world’s first social network dedicated to TEFL and you – and you can chat directly to other TEFLers all around the world! You’ll be able to:
• • • • • Chat to other TEFLers about teaching abroad Get tips & expert advice on all things TEFL & travel Check out blogs, pictures and videos from TEFL trips abroad Get free teaching resources Find out how teaching abroad can help enhance your CV and career potential

www.tefl-chalkboard.com

2 Training
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