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Syracuse University

Marcellus Free Library Adult Summer Reading Program

Felicia DaVolio, Elizabeth Griffin, and Kelly Voorhees


IST 613: Library Planning, Marketing, and Assessment
Professor Jill Hurst-Wahl
28 April 2016
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 2

Table of Contents

Project Plan 3
Marketing Plan 22
Assessment Plan 41
References 68
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 3

Project Plan

Introduction
The Marcellus Free Library serves a unique population of patrons. This description of the
population is derived from the various ages that are present in the area; millennials, families, and
senior citizens make up relatively equal portions of the population. The Marcellus Free Library
already has a childrens summer reading program in place and would like to begin a similar
program to encourage a new population to read throughout the summer, the underserved
population of senior citizens. According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a senior citizen is an
elderly person; especially: one who has retired ("Senior Citizen."). In this project, senior
citizens will be considered all adults 65 years of age or older. The program will run from the
beginning of June to the end of August. This program will be administered in both the library and
the senior living facilities located near Marcellus Free Library. This 12-week program will
consist of five programs held throughout the summer. The program will also have the senior
citizens track their reading progress throughout the summer. They will hand in their reading list
at the library each week and will receive points for using different library services and reading a
variety of genre. They will also be able to win weekly prizes and be entered to win grand prizes
when they submit their reading list.
This will begin the process of developing more programs for adults, which will encourage the
senior citizen population to use the library to meet their social needs, as well as help encourage
them to increase their reading and improve their technology skills. Additionally, it is the
librarians hope that this program will encourage lifelong learning and strengthen memory
retention. The adult summer reading program seeks to inform and introduce patrons to library
services, encourage greater library usage, and bring underserved patrons into the library. It also
hopes to strengthen relationships between the library and the community and form lasting
partnerships with community businesses. The organizers of the Marcellus Adult Summer
Reading Program (MASRP) believe this program will help reach more community members,
inform those who are currently using the library about what programs and opportunities they
might be missing and show those who have not used library services what the library can
provide. The library wants to ensure they are supporting the information needs of various age
groups, with a focus on helping to improve senior citizens access to the library.
Relationship to Library Strategic Planning
The Marcellus Free Librarys mission statement is to make accessible to the community its
facilities and its print and non-print materials for recreation, information, and education, while
actively promoting appreciation of books and learning. It continues on to discuss the importance
of encouraging the interests of young people. In this regard, the MASRP fits nicely within the
mission of the Marcellus Free Library as it encourages patrons to use library resources for a
variety of different reasons. The program aims to be both recreational, educational, and
informative. Additionally, the MASRP promotes a love of literature and lifelong learning, which
also supports the overall mission of the Marcellus Free Library.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 4

As the Marcellus Free Library does not currently have a strategic plan, it cannot presently be
explained how the Adult Summer Reading Program would fit into it. A strategic plan is in
development and upon completion, this will be revisited.
User Needs Assessment
Key Internal Stakeholders
Marcellus Free Library Board of Trustees
o This Board of Trustees has to be aware of the program before it happens. They want the program
to succeed because the more patrons involved in the library, the more likely they will be able to
get future funding.
Marcellus Free Library Director
o The director has to be aware of the program before it happens. S/He will want the program to
succeed to encourage more patron use of the library and the increased use of various services.
S/He will also want the relationship between the library and the local businesses to flourish, so
there is more of a chance of donations in the future.
Marcellus Free Library Librarians and Staff
o This group is in charge of planning, creating and initiating the Adult Summer Reading Program.
They will be organizing the events, prizes, and any other materials needed for the program to
exist. The MASRP will emphasize all aspects of the library in order to encourage senior citizens
to increase their use of the library. The success of the program will affect their future
responsibilities.

Key External Stakeholders


Senior Citizen Users
o The participants of the Adult Summer Reading Program will be able to see all that the library has
to offer. See the Importance/Impact on User section below for more detail.
Senior Citizen Non-Users
o This group will be able to witness the impact the program has on their friends. It may encourage
these library non-users to become users. It may also encourage these library non-users to
participate in the MASRP next year.
Senior Citizen Facilities
o This group will be impacted by the MASRP because the senior citizens who are living in these
facilities would have more activities to do, thus be happier. This will also be a great opportunity
for these facilities to partner with the library on this program. If the two decide to team up, the
senior citizen facilities can use this as a marketing tool to get new clients.
Senior Citizen Caretakers
o This group will benefit from the program because the senior citizens in their care will have more
activities to do and possibly make more friends. This will be beneficial to the caretakers because
this will look good to the senior citizens family and possibly for the caretakers business.
Family members of Senior Citizens
o This group will benefit from the program because they will get to see their family members
participating in community events and socializing more. The family members of the participating
senior citizens, as well as non-user senior citizens, will want the MASRP to continue and
succeed.
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Local Businesses
o This group will benefit from the program because their businesses will provide services to the
local senior citizen community. Local businesses will also serve as an additional marketing point
so that the library will reach a wider audience.

Service Users
Anyone in the community over the age of 65 years can be a service user. The senior citizen
library community is one that the library is attempting to reach and involve in a variety of
programs. The Marcellus Free Library is surrounded by two senior citizen living facilities. Most
of these residents do participate in the library, but the library feels they are not aware of all the
library services. The library wants to encourage more participation from these users.

Internal Assessments:
There have been no internal assessments conducted by the Marcellus Free Library in order to
know if the program is something that the library needs.

External Assessments:
There have been no external assessments conducted to know if the program is something that the
community needs.

Benefits, Opportunities, Costs and Risks for Users:


Benefits:
o Users:
Increased social activities
Increased reading
Increased general knowledge
Decreased stress
Increased memory retention
Increased use of all aspects of the library
Stronger connection with the library and local businesses
Opportunities:
o Users:
Meet new people
Increased activity
Continuation of learning
Increased interaction with technology
Increased use of all aspects of the library
Costs:
o Users:
Increased time spent away from home
Travel to get to the library
Risks:
o Users:
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Increased travel
Not interested/not happy with program
Unable to read/see well, leading to embarrassment

Importance/Impact on Users:
The Adult Summer Reading Program can benefit its users in many ways. The benefit for the user
relies heavily on the extent the user participates in the program.
Increased reading ability
Increased socialization with varying members of the community
Increased love of reading
Increased knowledge of different aspects of the library
Increased activity in the library and in the community

Estimate Demand for the Service:


After looking at the demographics of Marcellus, there are approximately 730 people over the age
of 65 living in the town. Out of this population, it is assumed that approximately 100 - 150 senior
citizens will sign up for the program. For the individual programs, an average of 40 senior
citizens will participate. If any programs take place at the library, there will be a problem with
accommodating all of these participants in the library. There is a meeting space on the second
floor that seats fewer than 150 people. The library will partner with the senior living facilities
next door to the library. The library can also partner with other larger venues in the area in order
to accommodate larger programs.

Relevant literature
When planning summer reading programs, the focus is generally on children and how to develop
their literacy skills; consequently, adult patrons reading habits may be neglected. To consider
what is necessary for an adult summer reading program, one must first evaluate what outcomes
the adult population feels are important (Pershing and Cousin). In addition, who will benefit the
most from these outcomes?
When planning for a summer reading program, one must be cognizant of those who may be
resistant to marketing methods and other plans of the program. This population is made up of
alliterates, a term coined by G. Kylene Beers. These are people who can read, but choose not
to do so (Matthews). This group is further broken down into dormant readers, those who enjoy
reading but cant find the time, uncommitted readers, those who do not enjoy reading but say
they will read in the future, and unmotivated readers, those who do not enjoy reading and do not
plan on changing their minds (Matthews). To plan for and reach this population, the outcomes for
the population and program must be considered carefully. These outcomes include how the
program will influence voting for the library and how it will involve more members of the
community (Pershing and Cousin).
When focusing on adult summer reading programs, we must acknowledge all types and ages of
adults. One such group that is important to keep in mind when creating a summer reading
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 7

program is the senior citizen population. To reach this group of patrons, the California Library
Association proposes that those planning summer reading programs develop a summer reading
in a box (Outreach). This library brings services out into the community which may attract
individuals who typically do not visit the library or explore other library services. They also
suggest looking at the outcomes from the previous years summer reading programs and analyze
data about underserved populations of patrons (Outreach). This part of the planning stage
should also examine how patrons will earn credits in the program for prizes, what kind of
reviewing options will be utilized, and how to present reading logs (Gould).
To better understand the nature of adult summer reading programs, one must examine the types
of adults to serve, as well as what kind of incentives one could provide to keep the adults in the
program interested. Many libraries have partnered with local businesses to pledge money for
books or for prizes (Dieffenbach). These prizes encourage adults to participate in the program,
and helps to bring them into the library. To plan this program, one must also remember why the
library is providing the program. Many programs use their mission statement to guide the
planning of the program. It is important to remember that the goal of the program is to involve
the community in library services, increase circulation, and create positive publicity for the
library (Summer Reading Program-Planning). The library should also create goals about what
they would like to happen during the summer with the reading program, including who their
program is for (alliterate readers, parents, senior citizens, etc.), what underserved population to
include, what kind of rewards will be offered; in addition, are there parts of the collection or
services that the library wants to promote, and are contacts being made for more community
partnerships to support the program currently and in the future? (Summer Reading Program-
Planning). One must also consider the librarys current resources when planning, including
staff, space, and variation of the collection. This, as well as community support, will influence
the components of the program (Summer Reading Program-Planning).
To better get an idea of how the program should run, one should start by making the decisions
about the run time of the program and the desired population to serve about five months in
advance. This allows time for patrons to sign up. It also allows time for patrons who may already
be served to see marketing materials for the reading program (Summer Reading Program: Tips
for Librarians). When planning for having patrons register, the registration should begin two to
four weeks before the program starts (Gould). Approximately three months before the program
begins, the library should be enacting the major part of its marketing plan. Finally, four months
before the program, make plans for public service announcements, prizes, and additional
materials (Summer Reading Program: Tips for Librarians).
Recommendations for Action
Goals and Outcomes
The goals of the Marcellus Free Library Adult Summer Reading Program and their respective
outcomes are as follows:
To improve participants reading ability and promote a love of reading
Participants will demonstrate improved reading skills due to their participation in the program.
Patrons will express a love of reading following the completion of the program.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 8

To socialize patrons with other members of the community


Patrons will interact with each other and form new relationships.
To improve patrons use of library programs and improve the way in which they view the library
Patrons will use the library more often.
Patrons will use resources they have not used before.
Patrons will see the library as a welcoming place.
Patrons will ask for assistance from librarians or other patrons.
Patrons will utilize all services available.
Improve relations with the outside community
Local businesses will provide donations to support library services because of this program.
Budget
The Marcellus Free Library has dedicated $1000 for the duration of this project. Two separate
budgets have been developed for this project; one that uses solely the $1000 allocated by the
Marcellus Free Library and one that accounts for the actual cost of the program. They are both
indicated below.
Projected Budget
Projected Budget based on the $1000 allocated by the Marcellus Free Library.
Expense Cost Delegation Notes
Salary $0 As the primary
program developer is
on salary and has
allocated specific
amounts of time each
week to overseeing
this project, her hours
do not affect the
overall cost of the
program. Other
workers will also
schedule this program
into their regular
work hours.
Planning Costs $1280.00 Prize procurement, This is an estimation
purchasing of the of the types of
grand prize, materials purchases that will be
for making book made for the planning
displays within the phase. They are
library, website explained in further
maintenance, detail in the narrative
individual program and table below.
fees, end of summer Please note that this
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 9

party. is total cost excluding


any donations made
by friends of the
library
Marketing Costs $500.00 Marketing materials This is further broken
and advertising costs down in the
marketing section of
this document.
Total $1780.00

Actual Cost
Not all of these costs will be charged directly to the allocated budget for the MASRP Program.
Please also note that the totals for this section exceed the allocated $500 dedicated to the
planning section from above. These totals were created with the assumption that donations are
not included and all supplies will need to be bought at cost.

Expense Cost Delegation Notes

Salary - Program $1,944.00 (6- Salary costs based This cost was determined
manager month planning on the total time based on the assumption that
period leading up dedicated to this the program manager would
to the program) program. spend 3 hours a week working
on this program over a six-
$2,268.00 (12- month period. The program
week program manager will spend
period) approximately 7 hours a week
on the program while it is
For a total of ongoing. The hourly cost
$4,212.00 ($26.92) was determined
through the average national
yearly salary of a library
assistant director
($56,000.00). This is an
estimation as some weeks
require more or less work
than others. Additionally, the
tasks performed are in relation
to planning tasks only.

Salary - Other Librarians (2): Salary costs based This cost was determined
librarians and clerks $1,104.00 on the total time based on the assumption that
dedicated to this four other employees would
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 10

Clerks (2): program. spend up to 2 hours a week


$864.00 each on the program while it
was ongoing in regards to
Total: planning tasks only. Assumed
$1,968.00 salaries are $48,000 yearly
($23.08 hourly) for the
librarians and $38,000 yearly
($18.27 hourly) for the clerks.

Grand Prize $130 .00 Amazon Kindle This is an estimation of the


actual cost. Kindles range
from $80-$200. Either a
traditional Amazon Kindle
($80-$100) is recommended
or the well liked Kindle
Paperwhite ($120).

Weekly Prizes $110.00 for 11 Various gift This is based on the


$10 gift certificates to assumption that no donations
certificates, local businesses were made to the program and
$165.00 for 11 or area restaurants that there will be three prizes
$15 gift handed out each week (one
certificates, $15 gift certificate, one $25
$550.00 for 11 gift certificate, and one $50
$25 gift gift certificate)
certificates for a
total of:
$550.00

Individual Program Approximately Food/Drinks, This cost is based on the


Fees (for 5 Programs) $60 a program plates, napkins, assumption that 5 different
for a total of utensils, materials programs will be held over
$300.00 needed for the the course of the summer.
program

End of Summer Party $250.00 Food/Drink, The End of Summer Party


plates, napkins, will be held at the end of the
utensils summer to conclude the
program.

Display Creation $50.00 Materials to create This cost is based on the


displays based on assumption that new materials
the upcoming will need to be purchased for
weekly programs these displays.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 11

Total Cost $7,835.00

There are many factors to keep in mind while looking at these two different budgets. They are
broken down as follows:
Salaries: The salary calculations are focused on the program manager, other librarians, and
library clerks. As it is, the person in charge is currently the assistant library director, so an hourly
wage was determined from the estimated yearly salary for that position. The wage for the other
librarians and clerks were also estimated and compared to their assumed time input. While the
funds allocated for the MASRP will not be used to pay this wage, it is important information to
have.
Prizes: The MASRP will feature prizes for patron participation. Prizes are separated into two
categories.
o Weekly Prizes: Patrons are eligible for weekly prizes based on the amount of reading they do,
types of library services they use and types of items they check out over the course of the
summer. Based on the predetermined points per service and item, patrons receive one prize raffle
tickets per point. Once a patron has won a weekly prize, they will be ineligible to win another
weekly prize. This is done to ensure that no one person will win all the prizes. Prizes consist of
one $10 gift certificate, one $15 gift certificate, and one $25 gift certificate given out each week.
o Grand Prize: The grand prize will be handed out at the end of the summer during the end of
summer party. As there will be a grand prize handed out, no weekly prizes will be distributed at
this time. The recommended grand prize is an Amazon Kindle, either the classic Kindle or the
Paperwhite Kindle. This will lead to a cost range of $80 - $130 dollars depending on the selected
Kindle and shipping costs.
Programs: Programs held during the overall MASRP are expected to have varying costs all
averaging around $60.00. These costs account for materials to promote the program, materials
used during the program, and any food offered during the program. They do not include the cost
for staff members. There are expected to be approximately 5 programs held throughout the
duration of the summer, all focused on various topics. Some possible programs include:
o Summer Kick-Off and Library 101 - A kick off to the MASRP and a refresher on the various
programs and services offered at the Marcellus Free Library that are available to participants
year round.
o Books and Movies: One proposed program is pairing books with their movie counterpart, and
during a discussion, participants compare the two. This discussion based program is a take on the
regular book club, but it offers a wider variety to encourage more participation. Attendees will
earn more points towards prizes.
o Website-Walkthroughs - In this program, participants will get an introduction to two popular
websites: Lynda.com and Ancestery.com. These websites encourage lifelong learning and are
both offered through the library.
o Talking Books - In this program, participants will be able to speak about their personal favorite
books. Participants will be invited to give mini talks about their favorite books and authors they
have read during the program and encourage other readers to read those books in the time left.
Participants will gain credits towards prizes for participation.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 12

o Build-A-Book - In this program, participants will create their own books or book-related media.
These creations will be featured around the library and participants will have one last chance to
earn extra points towards the final prize.
Displays: Displays are included in the program fees as they pertain specifically to program
related events. The displays in mind will not be marketing the event, but rather tying in with
ongoing pieces of the program. Displays may be placed throughout the library or within the
community, based on the opinion of the program manager.

Cost Cutting Strategies:


Prizes: Prizes are anticipated to be collected through donations from local businesses or friends
of the library. This will substantially reduce the cost burden on the library planning budget.
In-Kind Donations: Some of the local businesses in the area may not be able to offer donations
that can account for prizes, but may be able to offer other resources instead. Examples include:
food for events, materials used in display development, or other materials used during the
program.
Potlucks: Some of the large costs stem from buying food and drink for library programs. These
costs can be cut through organizing potluck themed programs instead. This will especially be
beneficial in regards to the end of summer party. Additionally, if some local area businesses are
unable to offer gift certificates or complete food donations, discounts can be requested instead.
Displays: The assumption is that all new materials will need to be purchased to create the
program displays. Should the library already have ample resources, these costs will no longer
need to be included in the budget.
Finally, it is important to note that the budget is intended to be flexible. Many costs are
dependent on the development of strong relationships with local businesses and donations to the
program. These donations have not been factored in to the anticipated cost as they are subject to
change.

Responsible Parties
Responsible Competencies Required Time Commitments Deliverables
Party
Librarian in Communication skills Time to plan the 5 Obtaining permission
Charge programs (15 hrs. from the library
(Program Time management skills approx. at start of director and informing
Manager) Interpersonal skills summer) the board of trustees
about the program
Planning program
Time to host individual events to be held over
programs each month the course of the Adult
(6 hrs. approx./mo.) Summer Reading
Program and approving
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 13

the final plans for each


event
Time to discuss and
explain program with Ensuring that each
library staff (sporadic librarian and clerk is
over the course of the aware of what the
summer with emphasis program entails so that
on the start) they can promote it
accurately and answer
any questions patrons
Time to speak to local may have about the
businesses and senior program
living facilities about Developing
donations and relationships with local
partnership (6 hrs. prior business and other
to the start of the organizations that will
program) be featured in the
program and meeting
with them so they
know exactly what will
be required of them
Approving all
marketing materials
and assessment
materials that are
developed for this
project
Library Communication Skills Time to promote the Aiding in facilitation of
Clerks and program to patrons as different events during
other Complete understanding they use library the summer and
Librarians of the program itself and services (sporadic over throughout the program
the ability to communicate the course of the
effectively summer with emphasis Encouraging
on the start) participation by
discussing the
upcoming program
months in advance
Assist patrons in
signing up for the Posting marketing
program. materials to better
spread the word about
the program
Passing out and Passing out flyers and
hanging up marketing
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 14

materials (sporadic other marketing


over the course of the materials as patrons
summer) check out
Assisting in assessment
efforts by collecting
Assisting in assessment data, and interviewing
for program (sporadic patrons about their
over the course of the participation (this is
summer with emphasis further explained in the
on the end) marketing and
assessment sections of
this document)
Volunteers Communication Skills Sporadic and based on Helping oversee the
how much the success of individual
volunteer wishes to do. programs held over the
Knowledge of the Commitments may course of the MASRP
program include:
- A
ssisting patrons in
signing up for the
program
- P
osting flyers in the
community
- S
ocial media
posting and
sharing
- A
pproaching
organizations to
post information
about the program
- H
elping set up,
market, and
facilitate
programs

Action Plan & Timeline


DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 15

To begin the planning and launch of the MASRP, it is recommended that the Marcellus
Free Library begin the process six months prior to the start of the program. The suggested
breakdown of what must be accomplished each month before the program is as follows:

Timeframe Action(s) Required Responsible


Parties

Month 1: Assess the need for this program. Program


(Six months Plan for the initiation of the program. Manager
prior to the Decide the community to be served.
start) Decide when and how long the program will be
Meet with the library director to obtain his/her approval.
Notify the Board of Trustees about the program.

Month 2: Decide the dates and times of each program session. Program
Contact senior living facilities to see if they want to partner Manager
up.
Plan for any other accommodations that the senior citizens
may need.
Contact appropriate local businesses and organizations outside
the library for partnerships.
Finalize all outside agreements.
Reserve rooms and equipment (if needed) for the program.
Create the sign-up sheet for registration.
Finalize the goals and outcomes of the program.
Create a budget.

Month 3: Order the prizes. Program


Collaborate with the PR person to create a marketing plan. Manager

Mock ups of marketing materials and advertisements should Public Relations


be created. (PR) Person

Month 4: Finalize all of the decisions surrounding how registration of Program


participants will be done and how the participants will track Manager
their reading and library progress to earn credits for prizes.
Hold meetings to recruit volunteers to assist with the
program .

Finalize and create the releases for marketing. PR Person

Month 5: Put posters and flyers up around the community. Library staff
Prepare the library spaces for the program.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 16

Submit all advertisements to the local newspaper(s). PR Person

Registration starts. Program


participants

Month 6: Finalize all programing plans. Program


Post registration materials on the Marcellus Free Library Manager
website and distribute registration materials to the staff to
assist patrons with sign up.
If organizations are donating prizes, collect all the prizes.

Month 7: Greet people as they arrive at the first session of the program. Library Staff
(Day of the First
Give participants bookmarks that will help them track their
Program) reading and their interactions with the library.
Describe how these organizers will be used to give
participants credits towards earning prizes.

Month 7 Week The program will meet Monday at 4pm. Participants


1: This program will be held at the library.

Summer Kickoff and Library 101 - This serves as the program Librarian and
kick-off celebration. Teach seniors about the library catalog volunteers
and help participants find materials that interest them.
Participants will learn how to request books online.
Participants will learn how to renew books online.

Month 7 Week The program will not meet this week.


2: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 7 Week The program will not meet this week.


3: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 7 Week The program will meet Monday. Participants


4: This meeting will be held at the library.

Books and Movies - A different type of book club and a Librarian and
celebration of the progress that participants have made in the volunteers
program.

Month 8 Week The program will not meet this week.


1: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 8 Week The program will meet Monday at 4pm. Program


DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 17

2: This meeting will be held at the library. participants

Website Walkthroughs - Show seniors how to use lynda.com Librarian and


and ancestry.com. volunteers

Month 8 Week The program will not meet this week.


3: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 8 Week The program will meet Monday at 4pm. Program


4: This meeting will be held at the library. participants

Talking Books- Participants will give 5 minute presentations Library staff


to explain why other participants should read a book or other and volunteers
media that a given participant has already read.

Month 9 Week The program will not meet this week.


1: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 9 Week The program will meet Monday and Wednesday at 4pm. Program
2: Mondays meeting will be held at the library. participants
Wednesdays meeting will be at one of the senior living
facilities.

Build-A-Book - Participants will create cards, posters, or Library staff


anything else that relates to one of the materials they have and volunteers
read or discovered over the summer.
Ask participants if the projects can be displayed in the library.

Month 9 Week The program will not meet this week.


3: Participants can drop off library tracker to get points for
weekly prizes.

Month 9 Week The program will meet Saturday at 4pm. Program


4: This meeting will act as a wrap of the program. participants
Summer Sendoff - The participants will share their final
thoughts on what they have read and learned in the program.

Collect the participants trackers. Library staff


Tally the number of credits participants have earned. and volunteers
Provide food and drink.
Inform Program Manager about tally from trackers to
determine who will receive the grand prize.

Give out the Grand Prize and thank all those who participated Program
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 18

in the program. Manager

Communication Plan:
Internal Stakeholders:
Library Director: The librarian must obtain permission from the director to organize the
program.
Board of Trustees: The librarian will communicate the purpose of this program to demonstrate
its importance and need.
Library Staff: It is the job of the librarian to communicate program needs and the program
outline to the director and staff. This communication with the library staff will be extremely
important when the librarian begins to develop marketing materials.
Public Relations Person: It will be the librarians job to communicate what needs to be done to
promote the program through discussion with the librarys public relations person.
Librarian: The librarian will be responsible for the majority of program planning and will need
to communicate with all other parties to ensure the program is a success.
Volunteers: The librarian will need to communicate to the volunteers what they will need to do
while working before, during, and after the program. The librarian must communicate what
needs to be done during each program session. Volunteers will then be responsible for
communicating to the participants what the program is and how it is run. The volunteers will also
be responsible for communicating what the participants will be doing in each session that the
program meets.

External Stakeholders:
Patrons: The librarian will work in tandem with the staff and public relations person to explain
what the program entails. The staff will communicate how registration works to those who wish
to sign up for the program.
Local Businesses: It will be the librarians job to communicate and coordinate with local
businesses to develop a partnership and have prizes donated.
Newspapers: When it comes time for the marketing plan, the librarian will work alongside the
public relations person to write an advertisement and give it to the local newspapers to run.
Managers of the Senior Living Facilities: The librarian must communicate to the managers of
the senior living facilities how the program will be run and how the space (if provided for certain
program sessions) will be used. It will also be the job of the librarian to communicate how the
program will impact the senior living facility.
Pilot Test
Due to the size of the Adult Summer Reading Program, it is not possible to complete a pilot test.
Additionally, as the MASRP is set to premier this summer, there is not sufficient time to properly
conduct a pilot test.
Scalability
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 19

This program is scalable with many possible alterations to accommodate any outcome of the
program. Below are the different possibilities.

If expectations are exceeded:


If this occurs, then the following action can be taken:

Too many people sign up to participate. A request for more volunteers to help with
programming
The subsequent years, anticipate a larger
group.

A program audience is too big for the space. Split up the large group into smaller groups
that can be separated into different rooms.
If this is a program that requires sign-ups, we
can add another day for the program.
Reach out to some people who have signed-up
and ask if they could move to the other day.
Additionally, partner with the local senior
living facilities and programming to further
break up the groups. This will require
additional volunteers.

Individuals who do not fit the age limit ask to Count the number of people of different ages
participate. who request participation.
If a significant number request participation,
provide events that are not linked to MASRP
which would satisfy the younger participants.
Consider including a variety of ages in
subsequent years.
No one will be turned away from signing up
for the program.
Reminders will be posted that the program
this summer is aimed towards those 65 and
older. A record will be kept of those interested
in the program and modifications will be
made in subsequent years.

If expectations are not met:


If this occurs, then the following action can be taken:

Sign-ups for participation in overall program Reach out to the senior citizen living facilities
is low. surrounding the library to conduct events to
make it more accessible for the senior citizens
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 20

to participate. This may spark some interest


for late sign-ups.

Attendance at programs is low. Talk to the senior citizens to gauge what they
would be interested in participating in.
Ask what days and times work best to get the
senior citizens more involved.

Participants report a lack of enjoyment in the Organizers will constantly be listening or


program. asking for user feedback to monitor the
program.
Adjustments will be made to ensure a
successful and enjoyable program.

SWOT Analysis
Strengths Weaknesses
There have been many successful Adult There is a limited budget.
Summer Read Programs. Patrons may not be interested in the program.
The program has flexible timing to suit There is limited time to prepare for the first
participants needs. summer program.
There is the opportunity to reach new
audiences for library services.
The program is scalable so there is
opportunity for growth.
Opportunities Threats
Proximity to local nursing homes and adult Other available summer programs offered
care facilities outside of the library
Developing relationships with local Local businesses not willing to donate prizes
businesses or work with the library for additional
Bringing new community members into the program sessions.
library Alternative summer plans for our target
Local senior citizens will read more, be more audience outside of Marcellus
social and interact with the community more.

Limitations
Assumptions
o There is a community need for the program.
o Senior citizens will be interested in participating in the overall program.
o Local business will want to contribute and donate to the program.
o The programing events will be interesting to the senior citizen community.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 21

Limitations
o Budgetary constraints will negatively impact the program.
o Time in which senior citizens will be willing to participate might be difficult to schedule.
o The limited space will hinder possible programing events.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 22

Marketing Plan

Introduction
The Marcellus Free Library is initiating an adult summer reading program, aimed at the large
senior citizen (65 and older) population that makes up much of the surrounding area. Through
this program, the Marcellus Free Library seeks to encourage senior citizens to interact with each
other, improve their technology skills, and increase the seniors use of the library as a resource to
continue lifelong learning. In order to effectively market the Marcellus Adult Summer Reading
Program, decisive action must be taken in the months leading up to the official start of the
program. To this end, the Marcellus Free Library must raise awareness of the program, and thus
create a marketing plan to attract senior citizens to participate. The Marcellus Free Library will
use a variety of promotional and marketing methods in order to reach both patrons of the library
and other non-library users to inform them about the new program and encourage them to
register. Some of the suggested marketing strategies include: posting flyers and other paper
materials, social media marketing, and advertisements in other forms of media.
As this is a completely new program, there are no previous marketing methods. The Marcellus
Free Library currently has a childrens summer reading program, as well as other programing
events held at the library on a consistent basis. Many of these programs are featured in the
newsletter that is posted to their website and available in print form at the library. The Marcellus
Free Library does an excellent job at creating certain marketing materials like pamphlets and
posters, but these efforts will need to be built upon for this program. Additionally, the Marcellus
Free Library will need to start adding information in regards to the MASRP in their newsletter
and website so that patrons will be able to see that it is an upcoming event scheduled to begin in
June. Upcoming events are listed on their website and shared semi-consistently on their social
media pages. Information for this program will need to be posted more frequently to ensure that
the widest possible audience is being reached. Overall, the Marcellus Free Library has a solid
foundation for marketing plans and strategies. As they are expanded for this program, it will
benefit the overall marketing strategic plan for the library
Relevant Literature
It is important to consider how to market the community as a whole, in addition to the target
audience. Before beginning marketing, one must first decide on a plan for how to market the
program. What is the primary focus of the program? Is the focus reading or is the it library
planning and programming? In terms of promotion, what kinds of flyers are needed and what
information is necessary to attract different age groups? Other considerations include whether or
not the calendar will be viewed online or printed for community distribution. To reach the
community more, one must plan whether to use direct mailings or display a banner across the
main street in town. To continue an online presence, the library must update their website and
online promotions weekly throughout the program and in the weeks leading up to the programs
("Summer Reading Program Planning").
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 23

In considering how to implement the program and plan for those included, it is important to
market the program to both current population of patrons and those who do not utilize library
services. To serve these patrons and those in the community not typically seen in the library, the
adult summer reading program must be marketed in a timely manner while also being unique
(Summer Reading Program Tips for Librarians). When approaching marketing, one must
acknowledge that there are two types of marketing strategies, passive and interactive (Gould).
Passive marketing includes the use of posters, video displays, and a library hall of fame, which
is a board that features the months top readers. It is important to remember when using passive
types of marketing to keep them connected to the theme of the program, if there is one (Gould).
The other type of marketing that can be used for the program is interactive marketing. This type
of marketing uses patron and community member participation to promote the program, which
includes posters in which the community member or patron can add their own ideas, and posters
with face cutouts for photo-ops (Gould). These strategies provide the community members and
patrons with either a unique photo or poster that will stick with them. Other promotional ideas
include the basic, flyers, a custom logo, a display space within the library (sharing with the
childrens librarian to pair the two summer reading programs), and using incentives (Gould).
Other promotional options are social media, including YouTube, the local movie theater, press
releases, local ads, having staff wear related buttons or shirts, encouraging local businesses
involvement, and postcards (Gould). Libraries have found that a strong online campaign, being
inclusive, hanging posters in uncommon areas, i.e. public restrooms, and distributing pamphlets
all help to bring adults into the library (Pershing and Cousin). To market this program, one must
go to where the adults are and make the information readily available. To contact populations not
normally captured, one may consider sending notes to local offices and contacting listservs
(Pershing and Cousin). To reach those in the library, one library created a display of their
summer reading sign-up numbers for all programs and displayed the URL for people to sign up.
This display became the background images on the library computers and was updated weekly to
show the progress that the program was making (King).

Marketing Goals and Outcomes


The marketing plan has several goals and outcomes that can be measured. These goals and
outcomes focus on having senior citizens participate in the MASRP, which is critical to the
success of and future of the adult summer reading program in Marcellus.
Goal: To increase knowledge of the MASRP to the community
o Outcome: At least 100 senior citizens will participate in the program.
o Outcome: An increase of senior citizens attending library programs and using services by 10 %
after the program.
o Outcome: An increase of local businesses donations to the MASRP by 5% each year.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 24

Target Audience

Audience Demographics Lifestyle Library Usage Information Communicatio Service


Needs n Preferences Alternatives
Senior Citizen -External -Retired or -Low to high -Information on -Phone -Book clubs
Readers working library usage unused library
-Population levels services -Mail -Programs at the
percentage: -Have free time senior citizen
Ages 65+ 43.4% -Information on -In-person living facilities
-Sometimes online services
-Diversity: unable to drive -Email
library offers
Caucasian: -Facebook
97.9% -Usually wake -Information on
up early and go community
-Median to bed early services library
income: $71,089 offers
-Can have bad
eyesight,
hearing and/or
health
-Might have a
family member
or caretaker
looking after
them
Senior Citizen -External -Retired or -Typically does -Information -Phone -Programs at the
Non-Readers working not use the about how to senior citizen
-Population library find a book at -Mail living facilities
percentage: -Have free time the library
Ages 65+ 43.4% -May utilize -In-person -Other forms of
-Sometimes
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 25
-Diversity: unable to drive library as a -Information on -Email entertainment
Caucasian: social space online services
97.9% -Usually wake library offers -Facebook
up early and go
-Median to bed early -Information on
income: $71,089 community
-Can have bad services library
eyesight, offers
hearing and/or
health
-Might have a
family member
or caretaker
looking after
them
Local -External -Interested in the -Minimal usage -Information -Email -Partnerships
Businesses library or unless another about what the with other
-Community helping the program reached program is; -Phone calls organizations
business that community out for main idea and
donate money -Face to face -Other programs
donations or goals communication
for program -High level of involvement in need of
senior citizen before. -Information assistance
-Possibly able to customers about the type of
receive benefits people
from partnering participating
with MASRP.
-Information
about events
being offered
Library -Internal -Interest in -Low to high -Information -Email -Other volunteer
Volunteers helping the library usage about what the opportunities at
-Population community program is; -Phone calls the library
percentage:
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 26
Ages 18 and -Have free time main idea and -Face to face -Other volunteer
older 75.9% goals communication opportunities at
-High school other locations
students needing -How to help -Flyers around
community facilitate the library
service hours program and
complete staff -Facebook
duties
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 27

Positioning Statement
The Marcellus Adult Summer Reading Program is a service that invites people ages 65 and older
to participate in a program that promotes reading and lifelong learning, library use, and
community building. It is an opportunity for senior citizens to interact with one another,
participate in activities, and increase their frequency of reading. Most importantly, it encourages
users to discover the unknown services of the Marcellus Free Library and helps the library
provide services to an underrepresented group of patrons. This program hopes to make a positive
impact on the senior citizen community and promote values that will improve the quality of their
life.

Key Messages
Senior Citizen Readers: Expand your bookshelf and your social calendar.
Senior Citizen Non-Readers: Discover the wonders of the library while creating wonderful
friendships.
Community Partners: Get to know your community and let the community get to know you.
Library Volunteers: Want to be the part of a brand new program at the library? We want YOU!

Message Delivery Strategies


Tools
The MASRP will employ a variety of methods when marketing the program. Not only will the
program itself need to be marketed, but also the individual programs held throughout the
duration of the summer. The following is a list of tools to be used by the Marcellus Free Library
to promote both sides of this program.
Overall Program
o Slogans
Exercise Your Mind
For the pilot year, MASRP will be participating in the larger program run through the California
Library Association.
o Posters
Large posters that promote the overall program, directions for signing up, important dates, and
the slogan, Exercise your mind, will also be featured.
Posters of varying sizes will be created and hung up throughout the library, within the
community, distributed with checked-out items, and shared on social media.
o Bookmarks
Bookmarks promoting the program will be produced and distributed throughout the program.
These bookmarks double as a way for participants to track how many books they have read. New
bookmarks will be created each month so that participants can track their monthly totals, while
also continuing to promote the program itself.
o Bracelets
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 28
Rubber bracelets with the words Marcellus Adult Summer Reading Program will be distributed
to the first 100 people to sign up for the program.
o Press Releases
Newspapers
Newspapers and posts shared on newspaper websites can reach broader audiences than many
other forms of media. Some of the recommended newspapers include: Eagle Observer, Syracuse
News Times, Syracuse.com
Newsletters distributed in senior facilities
As many senior living facilities have newsletters of upcoming events distributed to residents,
partnering with these organizations for promotional needs is an additional resource that can be
very beneficial. Not only can promotions for the program be included, but also advertisements
and reminders for individual program events.
o Word of Mouth
Word of mouth will be one of the strongest forms of promotion as it will directly reach the
intended audience. Librarians, clerks, staff, and invested community members will be expected
or encouraged to talk about the program and inspire others to join.
o Community Boards
Community bulletin boards are typically free to post and will be viewed by many. This also may
help the library reach a wider audience.
o Church Bulletins and Religious Outlets
Another area to cover would be weekly church bulletins or community bulletins. These posts
typically require additional permission and should be sought out earlier in the planning phase.
Large populations visit churches each week and there are many opportunities for program
promotion. Posters will be placed on the preexisting boards in these buildings. There are many
churches and places of worship within Marcellus and in the surrounding areas.
Individual Programs
o Flyers
Flyers will be posted around the library, on the social media pages, and handed out with checked-
out items to promote individual programs that are part of the overall larger program. The various
sizes include:
8 x 11
11 x 17
Digital posts that are 800px x 800px for online posting
Digital posters at a 4:3 ratio that can be posted on monitors
o Newsletter
Following the development of an email list, a newsletter will be distributed at the start of each
month that includes the following:
Upcoming programs
Recent winners
Hall of Fame with top readers of the month
Thank-Yous

Action Plan & Timeline


DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 29
To hold their very first adult summer reading program, the Marcellus Free Library must raise
awareness of the program. To begin marketing and raising awareness of the adult summer
reading program, we recommend that the Marcellus Free Library begin their marketing plan four
months before the start of the program. We recommend that the Marcellus Free Library
accomplish the following tasks each month:
Timeframe Action(s) Required Responsible Party
Month 4 Create flyers. Program manager and PR
Contact local newspapers to create a newspaper Person
advertisement.
Create mock-up materials that will be used as
incentives to join the program.
Meet with local businesses to ensure that they would Program Manager
be willing to hand out advertising materials and
allow flyers for the program to hang.
Talk to the senior living facilities about hanging the
flyers and posters at the living facility and discuss
holding a meeting and giving out incentives to
seniors to join the summer reading program.

Month 5 Begin hanging flyers at the senior living facilities Library Staff and
and at local businesses. Volunteers
Finalize and begin newspaper advertisements. Project Manager
Begin meeting with senior citizens who live in local Project Manager and PR
senior living facilities and handing out the Person
incentives.
Month 6 Continue meeting with senior citizens at the senior Project Manager
living facilities.
Update flyers and go back to businesses and senior Project Manager and PR
living facilities to hang the updated flyers. Person
Update newspaper advertisements.

Continue handing out incentives through local Library Staff and


businesses, the senior living facilities, and the Volunteers
library circulation desk.
Register those interested in participating in the
program.

Budget
The marketing efforts for the MASRP are depicted in the following table. These efforts consist of
promotional materials, printing materials, and other miscellaneous costs further explained in the
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 30
table. Marcellus Free Library will be paying for the total of the marketing efforts for this
programs.
Expense Cost Delegation Notes
Poster Printing $50.00 600 posters Based on the assumption that 600
of varying posters (both for the overall program and
sizes the individual programs) will be created
and printed over the course of the
summer at $0.08 per color print.

Small Flyer $25.00 300 flyers Based on the assumption that 300 small
Printing flyers will be printed over the course of
the program at $0.08 per color print.

Bracelets $75.00 110 Based on the projected cost for 110


Customized silicon bracelets from
Bracelets www.reminderband.com.

Bookmarks $120.00 450 Total Based on the projected costs from


Bookmarks www.uprinting.com. This is the cost of
printing and shipping 450 bookmarks.
As there are three versions of the
bookmarks, three orders will need to be
printed. 150 bookmarks at $40.00 x 3.

Newspaper $200.00 Weekly Based on the average cost of


Advertisements Newspaper advertisements in Eagle Newspapers.
Ad Newspaper ads will be featured weekly
in the months leading up to the program
and through June.

Miscellaneous $30.00 These are costs that may come up over


the course of the program.

Program Manager $1,292.00 (6- Salary costs This cost was determined based on the
Salary Costs month planning based on the assumption that the program manager
period leading up total time would spend 2 hours a week working on
to the program) dedicated to this program over a six-month period.
this program. The program manager will spend
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 31
. approximately 3 hours a week on the
program while it is ongoing. The hourly
$970.00 (12- cost ($26.92) was determined through
week program the average national yearly salary of a
period) library assistant director ($56,000.00).
This is an estimation as some weeks
require more or less work than others.
For a total of Additionally, the tasks performed are in
$2,262.00 relation to marketing tasks only.

Salary - Other Librarians (2): Salary costs This cost was determined based on the
librarians and based on the assumption that four other employees
clerks $1,104.00 total time would spend up to 2 hours a week each
dedicated to on the program while it was ongoing in
this program. regards to marketing tasks only.
Clerks (2): Assumed salaries are $48,000 yearly
$864.00 ($23.08 hourly) for the librarians and
$38,000 yearly ($18.27 hourly) for the
clerks.
Total:
$1,968.00

Public Relations $1,008.00 (6- Salary costs This cost was determined based on the
Person Salary Costs month planning based on the assumption that the public relations
period leading total time person will spend 3 hours a week
up to the dedicated to leading up to the program working on
program) this marketing material development. During
program. the 12-week program period, the public
relations person is expected to spend
$840.00 (12- approximately 5 hours a week on the
week program program. Salary costs were determined
period) based on the assumption that the public
relations person has an hourly wage of
$14.00.
For a total of
$1,848.00

Total $6,578.00

Responsible Parties
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 32
Internal
Responsible Competencies Required Time Commitments Deliverables
Party
Librarian in Communication Skills Approve all flyers Initiate contact with
Charge developed by the local media outlets to
(Program public relations person promote the program.
Manager) Ability to make copies (sporadic over the
course of the summer).
Press Release
Skills required to write up
press releases promoting Time to host individual
the program programs each month MASRP Bracelets
(6 hrs. approx./mo.).

MASRP Bookmarks
Time to discuss and
promote the overall
MASRP and the MASRP Thank-You
individual sub- Notes and Wrap-Up
programs (sporadic Messages
over the course of the
summer).

Time to write press


releases (3 hrs. at the
start of the summer).

Procure additional
marketing materials
(bracelets, bookmarks,
etc.) (3 hrs. over the
summer).

Thank-You Notes and


Wrap-Up Messages (2
hrs. end of summer)
Library Communication Skills Time to promote the Flyer distribution and
Clerks and program to patrons as placement
other they use library
Librarians Ability to print and make services (sporadic over
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 33
copies the course of the
summer with emphasis
on the start).
Complete understanding
of the program itself and
the ability to communicate Time to print and
effectively distribute flyers and
posters throughout the
library (2-3 hrs./mo.).

Assist patrons in
signing up for the
program.

Public Social Networking Skills Monitor the social Social media updates
Relations media for the program
Person (2 hrs. each week or
Graphic Design Skills so). Development of
program posters

Communications Skills Development of all


program marketing Development of mini-
materials including program flyers
flyers and posters for
the individual programs
and the overall Website updates
program (sporadic over
the course of the
summer)

Adding posters and


promotional materials
to the MFL website
(sporadic over the
course of the summer).

Volunteers Communication Skills Sporadic and based on Based on volunteer


how much the needs and
volunteer wishes to do. competencies
Knowledge of the Commitments may
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 34
program include:
- P
osting flyers in the
community
- S
ocial media
posting and
sharing
- A
pproaching
organizations to
post information
about the program
- A
ssisting patrons in
signing up for the
program
- H
elping set up,
market, and
facilitate
programs

Mockups and Selected Materials Methods


Please see attached.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 35
Bookmarks
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 36
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 37

Bracelets
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 38
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 39
Flyer / Social Media Post / Poster

Local News Paper Blurb


MARCELLUS, NY The Marcellus Free Library is offering an Adult Summer Reading Program
throughout the months of June to August. This program offers participants the chance to win
weekly prizes and one grand prize at the end of the summer. To sign up, visit their website at
mflib.org
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 40

Press Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact Amanda Perrine January 1, 2016
Telephone 315-673-3221
Address 32 Maple Street
Marcellus, NY 13108
Email aperrine@onlib.org
Website http://mflib.org/

MARCELLUS FREE LIBRARY TO HOST ADULT READING PROGRAM


Premiering This Summer

Marcellus, NY, January 1, 2016 The Marcellus Free Library will be hosting its first ever Adult
Summer Reading Program this summer. The program will run from the start of June until the end
of August. Participants will have opportunities to win prizes, participate in events, and much
more. The event will conclude at the end of August with a Summer Reading Send Off Party in
which all participants are welcome to attend.
The theme of this years program is Exercise Your Mind to promote healthy living and healthy
lifestyles while also encouraging a lifelong love of reading and learning.
To sign up for the program, go to the Marcellus Free Library and sign up at the circulation desk
or visiting their website and follow the registration instructions. The library is located at 32
Maple Street in Marcellus. Visit their website at www.mflib.org. The first 100 participants to sign
up will receive a special prize!
###
If you would like more information about this event, please contact Amanda Perrine at 315-673-
3221 or email aperrine@onlib.org.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 41

Assessment Plan

Introduction
The Marcellus Adult Summer Reading Program (MASRP) will run from the start of June
through the end of August. The program is targeted towards the large population of senior
citizens who live in the Marcellus area and are frequent visitors of the Marcellus Free Library.
Through this program, the Marcellus Free Library seeks to encourage senior citizens to interact
with other senior citizens, improve their technology skills, and increase the seniors use of the
library as a resource. In order to ensure that the Marcellus Free Library is hosting a program that
is useful and beneficial for patrons, a series of assessments have been developed to measure both
the quantitative and qualitative data. Some of the data collection methods will include surveying,
observation, and physical data collection. Assessment will begin at the start of the program as we
continuously collect data in regards to participation numbers and sign ups, and will continue
beyond the end of the program. Assessed groups consist of the participants, the planning team,
and the local businesses that have helped make this program possible. It is important to ensure
that assessment is done properly and carefully so that the data collected is useful and can
accurately indicate the success of the program. Additionally, as this is the first year of the
program, it is strongly recommended that at least three years of data be collected in order to see
how successful and beneficial the program really is.
The outcomes of this program have been listed and ranked in priority order. While each outcome
is important in measuring the overall success of the program, the outcomes listed first have been
deemed most important due to the direct impact it has on the user and their relationship with the
library. The first outcome, patrons will see the library as a welcoming place, is ranked as the top
priority because it measures the direct impact the program has had on the way participants view
the library as a whole. The second outcome, patrons will use the library more, measures if the
program was successful in maintaining or increasing the number of visitors to the Marcellus Free
Library. The third outcome, patrons will utilize all services available, is ranked as such because it
measures if services are being utilized more frequently by the target audience. The fourth
outcome, patrons will use resources they have not used before, is ranked as such because it is
important that all patrons are exposed to the variety of opportunities offered at the Marcellus
Free Library. Fifth, patrons will ask for assistance from librarians or other patrons, is ranked here
as the staff hope to be viewed as a valuable resource by patrons, but should the earlier outcomes
be met, it is more likely that this outcome will be, too. The sixth outcome is whether patrons will
interact with each other and form new relationships. The MASRP is a social program that seeks
to introduce patrons to each other. As this outcome does not reflect the impact the program has
had on the ways patrons view the library, it did not rank higher than its predecessors. The seventh
outcome deals with the local businesses and the contributions they have made in support of the
program. While it is the hope that donations will fund large portions of the program, the earlier
outcomes are of more concern. The eighth outcome, participants will demonstrate improved
reading skills due to their participation in the program, ranks towards the bottom of the list as
many of the participants may not improve their reading skills in the course of one summer. This
outcome also does not reflect the impact the program has had on the ways in which participants
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 42
view the library. The last, and least important outcome, is whether patrons will express a love of
reading following the completion of the program. While this is a very important outcome, the
earlier outcomes were deemed more important based on the effect the outcome had on the
relationship the users had with the library.

Goals of Service
The goals of the Marcellus Free Library Adult Summer Reading Program are as follows:
To improve participants reading ability and promote a love of reading
To socialize patrons with other members of the community
To improve patrons use of library programs and improve the way in which they view the library
Improve relations with the outside community

Outcomes of Service
The following is a list of outcomes for this program listed in order of importance for assessment
purposes.
Patrons will see the library as a welcoming place.
Patrons will use the library more often.
Patrons will utilize all services available.
Patrons will use resources they have not used before.
Patrons will ask for assistance from librarians or other patrons.
Patrons will interact with each other and form new relationships.
Local businesses will provide donations to support library services because of this program.
Participants will demonstrate improved reading skills due to their participation in the program.
Patrons will express a love of reading following the completion of the program.

Relevant Literature
When the end of the program draws near, we must prepare to evaluate the success of the
program. The evaluation and assessment of the program can be done many ways. One way these
programs can be evaluated are surveys, which can be done online and should be brief to avoid
overwhelming the summer reading program participants (Surveys). To evaluate a summer
reading program, we must think back to the outcomes we wanted to see come out of the program
when it started. Were these outcomes achieved? To assess these, the library should have a set of
performance measures that can be reused every year (Matthews). These outcomes should
demonstrate an improvement in skill level, knowledge, confidence, behavior, or attitude based on
either a qualitative or quantitative assessment (Matthews). To make this outcome-based measure
resonate with stakeholders and decision makers, it needs to meet two forms of criteria. They
must be linked in a cause-and-effect relationship, as well as measurable in a consistent and
reliable manner (Matthews). These measurements and outcomes can be analyzed to show how
many participants registered, how many of those registered participants actually participated,
how the number of participants compares to that of the librarys total service population, how
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 43
many completed the program, number of books read by each participant, the time spent reading
per day by each participant, and data from a short questionnaire or survey (Matthews).
These outcomes and results from the questionnaire can be used to create evluation or focus
groups to help better the program for the next year. Using focus groups, the librarian can update
the website to show what the participants would like to see. These focus groups can also help to
improve the marketing strategy for the program. These assessments and information help the
librarian inform the stakeholders and patrons how well the program progressed and encourages
participants to look forward to the program the following summer (Using Outcome Results).
After completing all of the evaluation and assessment, one should consider the follow up to the
end of the program. This should include issuing certificates for completing the program, writing
thank you notes, placing ads thanking local businesses, and posting a list of all the supporters
(Gould). Upon thanking everyone, discuss with all the staff what lessons they have learned, the
relationships they have formed with patrons, and the statistical outcomes, but not focus solely on
them (Gould). To conclude the program for the summer, consider publishing a wrap up and make
a note of all the personal stories from the program (Summer Reading Program - Planning).

Assessment Plan for Outcomes


Outcome One:
Patrons will see the library as a welcoming place.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP.
Methods and Tools for The method to assess this outcome is a group interview of the
Evidence Collection participants to discover whether their attitudes about the library
have changed. We will collect this data by having clerks ask
participants about their attitudes towards the library during the
last program meeting of the summer. These notes taken from
these interviews will be shared with the librarian and the Board
of Trustees to demonstrate the effect of this program on library
patrons.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative method to assess this outcome is a survey. The
Tools survey distributed in August will include questions regarding
attitudes towards the library. The variation of questions will
focus on how the participants felt about the library before the
program, during the program, and after the program.
Analysis of Evidence Evidence will be analyzed by the clerks who performed the
interviews. The clerks will code the interviews and look for
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 44
specific instances in which a participant of the MASRP has an
attitude change towards the library.
How Assessors Will The assessors will know that the outcome has been met if 21-
Know the Outcome Has 30% of participants demonstrate a behavioral change in which
Been Met patrons interact with the library more.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome will exceed expectation if 31-100% of participants
Indicators
admit an attitude change towards the library. If this is the
outcome, then the library will need to create more programs to
service this population of patrons.

Outcome Met
This outcome will be met if 21-30% of participants demonstrate
a behavioral change in which patrons interact with the library
more. If this is the result, the library will need to prepare similar
programs for this target population.

Outcome Not Met


If 0-20% of patrons change their behaviors and attitudes towards
the library, the outcome will not have been met. If this is the
result, the librarian and Marcellus Free Library will need to
perform additional assessment to discover what they need to
improve to help the library feel welcoming.

Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information should be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of patron opinion.
Responsible Parties The responsible parties are those conducting the interviews and
those compiling the collected data into usable data. The clerks
who are performing the interviews will need to take detailed
notes during the interviews they conduct. This information will
be stored in a central location following each interview. The
clerks who analyze the collected data and compile this data will
be responsible for ensuring the information can be easily
understood. They will then include the data in a document that
will be distributed to the Board of Trustees and the library
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 45
director.
Timeline The first round of interviews will be at the last program of the
MASRP. The assessors will perform interviews again one month
after the end of the program. This will demonstrate that the
program has impacted the behaviors and attitudes of those who
participated in the program.

Outcome Two:
Patrons will use the library more often.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP.
Methods and Tools for The method that will be used to assess this outcome is reviewing
Evidence Collection existing records and comparing them to data collected after
the programs completion. Data will be reviewed and collected
by library clerks. The clerks will put this information into a
spreadsheet that demonstrates the difference in use patterns by
those who participated in the program.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative assessment method for this outcome is
Tools observation. The library clerks and staff will record the different
services that the program participants utilize after completing the
program. These assessors will compare these observations to
behaviors they observed before the reading program.
Analysis of Evidence The clerks who compile this date will put the information
regarding the usage of the library by participants of the program
into one column of a spreadsheet. After the program, the library
clerks will input the data collected about the usage of the library
by participants in another column of the spreadsheet. The clerks
will then analyze the data to see if there is a change in library
usage.
How Assessors Will The assessors will know that the outcome has been met if 20-
Know the Outcome Has 35% of the participants demonstrate an increased use of the
Been Met library.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome will exceed expectations if 36-100% of
Indicators
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 46
participants use the library more. If this is the result, the library
may need to hire more support staff and increase the amount of
space available for different meetings.

Outcome Met
The outcome will be met if 20-35% of the participants
demonstrate an increased use of the library. If this is the result,
the library will need to consider hiring more support staff. The
library may also need to develop more community meeting
areas.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome will not be met if less than 19% of the participants
demonstrate an increased use of the library. If this is the result,
the library will need to create a new program that encourages the
population of patrons in the target group to come to the library
more.

Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information should be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of library usage increases due
to library programs like the MASRP.
Responsible Parties The parties responsible for this assessment are the library clerks.
The clerks are responsible for collecting the data surrounding
library usage after the program and for gathering the data from
before the program. It is the responsibility of the clerks to
analyze the data and organize the data in the spreadsheet. The
clerks are also responsible for generating a report that is easily
understood by the librarian, Board of Trustees, and library
director.
Timeline The library clerks will collect existing data two weeks prior to
the start of the program. The clerks will begin to collect new
usage data from the start to the end of the program, and
continuously collect the data every six months after that. For
three years following the program, every six months the clerks
must generate a report that states the usage of the library by the
program participants.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 47

Outcome Three:
Patrons will utilize all services available.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP
Methods and Tools for The method that will be used to assess this outcome is reviewing
Evidence Collection existing records and comparing them to data collected after
the programs completion. Data centered on the use of online
services, like ancestry.com and library online book renewal, will
be reviewed and collected by library clerks. The clerks will put
this information into a spreadsheet that demonstrates the
difference in use patterns by those who participated in the
program.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative assessment method for this outcome is
Tools observation. The observation will occur during the program and
when the participants interact with the library and again after the
program ends. The library clerks and staff will record the
different services that the program participants utilize after
completing the program. These assessors will compare these
observations to behaviors they observed before the reading
program.
Analysis of Evidence The clerks who compile this data will put the information
regarding the usage of services by participants of the program
into a column per service offered by the library into a
spreadsheet. After the program, the library clerks will input the
data collected about the usage of the services by participants in
another set of columns within the spreadsheet to see if there is an
increase in the use of library services by program participants.
How Assessors Will The assessors will know that the outcome has been met if 21-
Know the Outcome Has 39% of the participants demonstrate an increased use of the
Been Met library services.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome will exceed expectations if 40-100% of
Indicators
participants use library services more often. If this is the result,
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 48
the library will need to make services more available. The
library will also need to allocate more space to accommodate
additional services. The library will need to have additional staff
to support the increased use of services.

Outcome Met
The outcome will be met if 21-39% of the participants
demonstrate an increased use of the library services. If this is the
result, the library will need to assign more staff to the services
that are staff run.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome will not be met if less than 20% of the participants
demonstrate an increased use of the library services. If this is the
result, the library will need to create a new, different program
that educates the participants on current services and encourages
the population of patrons in the target group to use more library
services.
Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information should be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of library service usage
increases due to library programs like the MASRP.
Responsible Parties The parties responsible for this assessment are the library clerks.
The clerks are responsible for collecting the data surrounding
service usage after the program and for gathering the data before
the program. It is the responsibility of the clerks to analyze the
data and organize the data in the spreadsheet. The clerks are also
responsible for generating a report that is easily understood by
the librarian, Board of Trustees, and library director.
Timeline The library clerks will collect existing data two weeks before the
beginning of the program. The clerks will begin to collect new
usage data at the beginning of the program, throughout the
program, and continuously collect the data every six months
after that. For three years following the program, every six
months the clerks will generate a report that states the usage of
the library by the program participants.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 49
Outcome Four:
Patrons will use resources they have not used before.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP.
Methods and Tools for The primary methods of evaluation for this outcome will be data
Evidence Collection collection. Throughout the program, the records of what
resources patrons use will be tracked. Library clerks will keep
track of information senior citizens hand in about their resource
usage to get points. This information will also be collected by
the clerks through the same system in which patrons take out
books. Different resources will include print books, e-books,
printers, computers, interlibrary loan, etc.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for evaluation is surveying. As part of the
Tools survey issued throughout the month of August, participants will
be asked a variation of the questions about their use of library
resources prior to the start of the program, during the program
and after the program. These answers will be collected, assessed,
and recorded so that that data can be converted into useful
information.
Analysis of Evidence The clerks who compile this data will put the information
regarding the usage of services by participants of the program
into a column per resource offered by the library into a
spreadsheet. After the program, the library clerks will input the
data collected about the usage of the services by participants in
another set of columns within the spreadsheet to see if there is an
increase in the use of library resource that they have not been
used by program participants before the program.
How Assessors Will The outcome will be met if there is a 25-50% increase in the use
Know the Outcome Has of different resources by the participating patrons than prior to
Been Met the start of the program.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome will exceed expectations if there is a 51-100%
Indicators
increase in the use of different resources by the participating
patrons than prior to the start of the program. If this is the result,
then the responsible parties and other staff members did a great
job at introducing the underused resources. This will be used as
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 50
an example for how to get other populations of patrons
interested in other library services.

Outcome Met
The outcome will be met if there is a 25-50% increase in the use
of different resources by the participating patrons than prior to
the start of the program. If this is the result, then the responsible
parties and other staff members did a great job at introducing the
underused resources. This will be used as an example for how to
get other populations of patrons interested in other library
services.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome will not be met if there a 0-24% increase in the use
of different resources by the participating patrons than prior to
the start of the program. If this is the result, then the librarians
and clerks need to do a better job at introducing the many
services that the library has to offer. There will be prizes for the
patron who uses the most resources at the library during the
MASRP. The library will also increase marketing for the
services that are used less frequently.
Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information will be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of incoming donations.
Additionally, the senior citizen living facilities will be informed
of this information. This might aid them in knowing how to get
their residents interested in new or different services at the
facilities.
Responsible Parties The responsible parties are the clerks and the program manager.
The clerks, or other staff members, will be in charge of inputting
the patron usage information into the computer system. The
program manager will be in charge of the final analysis of the
data.
Timeline This assessment is continuous throughout the program and
concludes when the program ends. Assessment begins the first
day of the program when the first patron signs up and continues
until the last day. As a way to continue assessment even after the
program and the participants stop tracking themselves, library
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 51
clerks collect usage data from the system which keeps track of
patrons checking books out. The clerks will collect the data
every six months after that. For three years following the
program, every six months the clerks must generate a report that
identifies the usage of the library by the program participants.

Outcome Five:
Patrons will ask for assistance from librarians or other patrons.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP.
Methods and Tools for The primary methods of evaluation for this outcome will be
Evidence Collection surveying. As part of a survey issued to the library staff at the
end of August, staff members will be asked various questions
about how many participants came to ask them questions and
how many participants they saw ask other patrons for help.
These questions will try to get the staff members to think about
before the program, throughout the program and after the
program. Surveys will be anonymous, but highly recommended
for staff to complete. These answers will be collected, assessed,
and recorded so that that data can be converted into useful
information.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for evaluation is observations. Staff
Tools members will conduct observations and take notes to see how
many times program participants ask them or patrons for help.
Analysis of Evidence All the responses will be recorded into one document. Responses
will be categorized into categories of Yes or No. All
responses will be counted so that they can be compared.
How Assessors Will The outcome will have been met if 26-55% of the responses
Know the Outcome Has indicate that the patrons are not hesitant to ask for help from
Been Met librarians or other patrons.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome will exceed expectations if 56-100% of the
Indicators
responses indicate that the patrons feel comfortable to ask for
help from librarians or other patrons. If this is the result, the
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 52
librarians did a good job at encouraging patrons to use various
library resources. This encouragement will be used for other
patrons outside the program as well.

Outcome Met
The outcome will be met if 26-55% of the responses indicate
that the patrons feel comfortable to ask for help from librarians
or other patrons. If this is the result, then the librarians did a
good job at encouraging patrons to use other library services.
Librarians will continue to encourage the library services to all
patrons, even after the program is completed. This
encouragement will be used for other patrons outside the
program as well.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome will not be met if only 0-25% of the responses
indicate that the patrons feel comfortable to ask for help from
librarians or other patrons. If this is the result, then the librarians
did not create a welcoming environment for the patrons to ask
for help. This creates problems outside of the program too, since
this might be true for other patrons. The librarians will review
the analysis and see what patrons indicated as wrong; this will
then be changed for use after and outside the program.

Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information will be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of what a good job their
employees are doing. Additionally, the senior citizen living
facilities will be informed of this information. This might help
them in knowing how to encourage their residents to feel more
comfortable asking for information or help.
Responsible Parties The responsible parties are volunteers, library clerks, librarians,
or the program manager. These individuals are in charge of
handing out the surveys, collecting the answers, and then
compiling those answers into usable data. Both the unused and
completed surveys will be stored in one location. The program
manager or a designated aide will evaluate the data and organize
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 53
it in a way that is meaningful and easy to understand.
Timeline The development of the final survey will begin in the middle of
the summer so that the developers will have an idea of what sort
of questions they want to ask. The surveys will be handed out
throughout the month of August and will be turned in by the
final program and celebration. Following the collection of the
survey answers, the information will be assessed and evaluated.
It will then be organized in a manner that is easy to understand
that will be handed in to the library director or the Board of
Trustees.

Outcome Six:
Patrons will interact with each other and form new relationships.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome is the senior
citizen population that attends the MASRP.
Methods and Tools for The method that we will use in order to properly assess this
Evidence Collection outcome is observation. Notes will be taken by librarians, clerks
or other staff members during and after the programs and
whenever participants come into the library. The program
manager will train staff members who are going to take the
observation notes so that the notes are completed in the same
manner.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for assessment is to conduct interviews
Tools with the patrons to ask them if they feel as though they formed
new relationships and interact with each other more.
Analysis of Evidence The program manager will go through the observation notes and
compile a clear, fluid summary of the observations.
How Assessors Will The outcome is met if the observation notes indicate that 35-
Know the Outcome Has 55% of the participants created new friendships or seemed to
Been Met interact more than at the start of the MASRP.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome exceeds expectations if the observation notes
Indicators
indicate that 55-100% of the participants created new friendships
or seemed to interact more than at the start of the MASRP. If this
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 54
is the result, the program did a good job at creating situations
where interactions are easy for patrons.

Outcome Met
The outcome is met if the observation notes indicate that 35-
55% of the participants created new friendships or seemed to
interact more than at the start of the MASRP. If this is the result,
the program did a good job at creating situations where
participants could interact. The library should increase the
number of programs and interaction opportunities.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome is not met if the observation notes indicate that 0-
34% of the participants created new friendships or seemed to
interact more than at the start of the MASRP. If this is the result,
the program needs to create more programs and opportunities for
the participants to interact with each other.

Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information will be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director. Additionally, the senior citizen living facilities
will be informed of this information. This might aid them in
knowledge about the social interactions of their residents.
Responsible Parties The main responsible parties are the librarians, clerks and staff
members who go to the program and take the observation notes.
Another responsible party would be the program manager since
he/she will be the one assembling the final summary analysis.
Timeline This assessment is continuous throughout the program.
Assessment starts with the first day of the program when the
first patron signs up and continues until the last day. The library
clerks and staff will continue to observe participants even after
the program concludes if they recognize the patrons in the
library.

Outcome Seven:
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 55
Local businesses will provide donations to support library services because of this program.
Group Assessed Those that will be assessed are the businesses that have donated
to the program.
Methods and Tools for The method that we will use in order to properly assess this
Evidence Collection outcome is data collection and recording. This detailed record
will be kept of each area business that has donated to the library
and will be updated as new donations come in. This way it will
be possible to track and graph what area businesses are donating,
how often they are donating if they do so more than once, and
during what time of year the most donations come in. This
information will be compiled into a spreadsheet so that it can be
easily transformed into useable graphs.
Recommendations for N/A
Pilot Assessment
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for assessment is to conduct interviews
Tools with the business owners who have donated in order to gauge
their willingness to donate again.
Analysis of Evidence The program manager will evaluate the data collected in order to
determine and calculate the cost value of the donations made to
the program. The program manager will compare that cost value
to the total cost of the program to determine what percentage of
total cost is made up of donations. This information will be used
in future planning to determine which businesses to approach
again.
How Assessors Will The outcome is met if 15-49% of the total costs of this program
Know the Outcome Has are covered through donations from local businesses. These
Been Met donations may cover the cost of prizes or program fees.
Additionally, if businesses express interest in donating to the
library or the program in the future, this outcome meets
expectations.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
The outcome exceeds expectations if the total number of
Indicators
donations exceeds half of the total cost of the program. In this
case, more than 50% of the program was paid for through
donations. Additionally, if local businesses make multiple
donations to the library and this program, the outcome will have
exceeded expectations. If this is the result, the relationship
between the library and the donating businesses should continue
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 56
to be developed, and the program manager will look for new
businesses to approach.

Outcome Met
The outcome is met if 15-49% of the total costs of this program
are covered through donations from local businesses. These
donations may cover the cost of prizes or program fees.
Additionally, if businesses express interest in donating to the
library or the program in the future, this outcome meets
expectations. If this is the result, the businesses that donated will
be approached again in the future, but not frequently.

Outcome Not Met


This outcome is not met if donations are 0-14% of the total cost
of the program. If local businesses are hesitant to donate and are
unwilling to make donations, the goal has not been met. If this is
the result, the method for approaching local businesses will be
evaluated in order to make it more effective. Additionally, new
businesses will be approached before businesses previously
contacted.

Recommendations for It is important that this data collection be well documented. This
Reporting information will be reported to the Board of Trustees and the
library director so they are aware of incoming donations.
Additionally, all organizations contributing donations will be
thanked both individually and publicly as it is good publicity for
both the library and the organization.
Responsible Parties The main responsible parties are those who collect the
donations. As new donations are made, the information will need
to be recorded into the shared document. As the program
manager will typically be the person who seeks out donations in
regards to this program, the responsibility will fall to him/her to
ensure that all donations are properly recorded and accounted.
Timeline This assessment is continuous throughout the program and
concludes when the program ends and all donations have been
collected, recorded, and the total value of donations has been
calculated. Assessment begins when the program manager or
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 57
other responsible party collects the first donation.

Outcome Eight:
Participants will demonstrate improved reading skills due to their participation in the program.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome are the
participants who have completed the program.
Methods and Tools for The primary method of evaluation is surveying. A brief informal
Evidence Collection survey will be issued when participants hand in their final book
count. One of the questions to be asked is whether participants
feel that this program helped them improve their reading skills.
Recommendations for It is not possible to pilot test this assessment as it is dependent
Pilot Assessment on participants completing the program first. However, a sample
survey can be sent out to staff to ensure that the questions are
easy to understand and the survey is not too complicated.
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for assessing this outcome is
Tools interviewing. Upon turning in their final reading count,
participants will be asked if they felt that their reading skills
improved by taking part in this program. The person collecting
their final reading count will record their answer.
Analysis of Evidence All the responses will be recorded into one document. Responses
will be categorized into categories of Yes or No. The
responses will be counted so that answers can be compared.
How Assessors Will Assessors will know this outcome has been met when 25-50% of
Know the Outcome Has the responses indicate they felt that their participation in this
Been Met program improved their reading skills.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
If 51-100% of the responses indicate that participation in the
Indicators
program has improved their reading skills, then the outcome
exceeds participation. If this is the case, programming will
continue to push participants to improve their reading skills.

Outcome Met
If 25-50% of the responses indicate that participants improved
their reading skills, then the outcome will have been met. If this
is the case, programming will continue to push participants to
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 58
improve their reading skills while also developing new
programming with the intention of reaching the remaining
participants.

Outcome Not Met


The outcome will not have been met if 0-24% of the respondents
indicate that their participation in this program has not improved
their reading abilities. If this is the case, a secondary survey will
be issued to participants to determine their current reading skills
so that programming can be developed that is challenging and
rewarding.

Recommendations for The data collected through this assessment will be reported to
Reporting the Board of Trustees and the library director with the final
program report. Additionally, through the press release at the end
of the program and within the library newsletter, it will be
indicated that participants reported improved reading skills
through participating in the program.
Responsible Parties Those handing out the surveys, collecting the answers, and then
compiling those answers into usable data could be volunteers,
library clerks, librarians, or the program manager. Collected
survey results will be stored in one central location. The program
manager or a designated aide will evaluate the data and organize
it in a way that is meaningful and easy to understand.
Timeline The development of the final survey will begin in the middle of
the summer so that the developers will have an idea of what sort
of questions they want to ask. The surveys will be handed out
throughout the month of August and will be turned in by the
final program and celebration. Following the collection of the
survey answers, the information will be assessed and evaluated.
It will then be organized in a manner easy to understand and
handed in to the library director or the Board of Trustees.

Outcome Nine:
Patrons will express a love of reading following the completion of the program.
Group Assessed The group that will be assessed for this outcome are the
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 59
participants who have completed the program.
Methods and Tools for The primary methods of evaluation for this outcome will be
Evidence Collection group interviewing. Following the completion of the program,
small groups of participants will be asked a few short, select
questions in regards to the program. Patrons will be asked about
how the program changed their view on reading, if it did at all.
Patrons will be able to provide open ended answers or answer
with a simple Yes or No.
Recommendations for It is not possible to pilot test this assessment as it is dependent
Pilot Assessment on participants completing the program first. However, practice
interviews can be conducted so that the questions can be
improved prior to the start of the official assessment.
Alternative Methods and An alternative method for evaluation is surveying. As part of the
Tools survey issued throughout the month of August, participants will
be asked a variation of the questions asked in the interview.
These answers will be collected, assessed, and recorded so that
that data can be converted into useful information.
Analysis of Evidence The person leading the interview will be asked to record notes
about what the participants say and how they answer the
questions. These answers will be evaluated so they can be turned
into usable data. The information will be organized so that a
count of participants who did express a love of reading can be
compared to the participants who did not.
How Assessors Will The outcome will be met if 35-65% of the participants
Know the Outcome Has interviewed express a love of reading following the completion
Been Met of the program.
Result Scenarios and Outcome Exceeds Expectations
Decision Making
If 66-100% of the interview responses indicate that participants
Indicators
expressed a love of reading, then the outcome will have
exceeded expectations. If this is the case, then the program will
continue as is and consideration should go into holding
additional programs like an Adult Winter Reading Program.

Outcome Met
If between 35 and 65% of the interview responses indicate that
participants expressed a love of reading, then the outcome will
have been met and the program will continue as it is.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 60
Development of programs not centered on reading will be
developed to ensure that the other half of the participants still
find the overall program enjoyable and useful in subsequent
summers.

Outcome Not Met


If 0-34% of those interviewed do not express a love of reading
following the completion of the program, this outcome will not
have been met. If this is the case, additional surveys will need to
be developed to determine why participants felt that way and
what changes to the program can be made to improve it for
subsequent summers.

Recommendations for The data collected through this assessment will be reported to
Reporting the Board of Trustees and the library director with the final
program report. Additionally, through the press release at the end
of the program and within the library newsletter, it will be
indicated that participants expressed a love of reading following
completion of the program.
Responsible Parties The responsible parties are those conducting the interview and
those compiling the collected data into usable data. Those
conducting the interview, either the program manager, library
clerks, other librarians, or volunteers, will need to take detailed
notes during their interviews. This information will be stored in
a central location following each interview. The person
compiling and assessing the information, either the program
manager or a designated aide, will be responsible for ensuring
the information can be easily understood and include it in the
document that will be distributed to the Board of Trustees or the
library director.
Timeline The development of interview questions will be completed at the
start of August in the last month of the program. The interviews
will be held in the two weeks following the program and will be
kept relatively short. The results of the assessment will be
released at the same time as many of the other short term results
and within the first two months after the program has been
completed.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 61
Timeline for Continuous Assessment

Timeframe Action(s) Required Responsible Party

Two weeks Gather data about patron use of the library Library Staff
before the and library services and organize this data
program into a spreadsheet.

Keep track of donations from local Program Manager


businesses.

Throughout Gather data about patron use of the library and Library Staff
the program library services and insert this data into a
spreadsheet.
Gather data from senior citizens tracking sheets of
their previously unused resource usage in the library.
Observe the participants interaction with each other
and see if they form new relationships.

Keep track of donations from local businesses. Program Manager

First week of Finalize interview questions for end of the program Program Manager
August interviews.
Finalize survey layout and questions to hand out at
end of program party.

Last day of Group interviews conducted to assess participants Library Staff


Program attitudes towards the library.

Two weeks Interviews begin and these interviews should last a Program Manager
after the week.
program Have participants hand in surveys to library staff or
mail it in.

One month Analyze end of the program surveys. Program Manager


after the Create a final assessment document.
program Distribute final assessment document to the Board
of Trustees and the library director.
Contact businesses that the library partnered with for
the donations for the program to see if they would
continue the partnership through donations and joint
programming.
Create final questions for six-month survey.

Six Months Gather data about patron use of the library, Library Staff
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 62
after the usage of all library services and usages of
program previously unused services. Analyze the data
to see if usage of the library and library
services has changed.
Send surveys out to reassess patron attitude
toward the library, reading skills, and
attitudes towards library staff to determine if
the program had a lasting impact on
participants view of the library.

One year Every six months, gather data about patron use of Library Staff
after the the library, usage of all library services and usages
program of previously unused services. Analyze the data to
see if usage of the library and library services has
changed.

Contact businesses that the library partnered with for Program Manager
the donations for the program to see if they would
continue the partnership through donations and joint
programming.

Two years Every six months, gather data about patron use of Library Staff
after the the library, usage of all library services and usages
program of previously unused services. Analyze the data to
see if usage of the library and library services has
changed.

Three years Every six months, gather data about patron Library Staff
after the use of the library, usage of all library
program services and usages of previously unused
services. Analyze the data to see if usage of
the library and library services has changed.

Complete a final document of the Program Manager


assessments done over the past 3 years for
the MASRP.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 63
Impact Rubric

Indicator Below Meets Exceeds Data Source


Expectations Expectations Expectations

Library Usage 0-19% of patrons 20-35% of 36-100% of Data


visit the library patrons visit the patrons visit the collection and
more often than library more often library more often recording,
they did prior to than they did prior than they did prior observation
participating in the to participating in to participating in
MASRP. the MASRP. the MASRP.
0-24% increase of 25-50% increase 51-100% increase
commonly unused of commonly of commonly
resources by unused resources unused resources
participating by participating by participating
patrons. patrons. patrons.
0-20% increase of 21-39% increase 40-100% increase
patron use of all of patron use of of patron use of all
services. all services. services.

Senior 0-14% of 25-50% of 51-100% or more Survey,


Citizens participants participants of participants interviews,
Reading indicate the indicate the indicate the group
program has program has program has interviews
improved their improved their improved their
reading skills. reading skills. reading skills.
0-34% of 35-65% of 66-100% of
participants participants participants
express a love of express a love of express a love of
reading following reading following reading following
the program. the program. the program.

Participation 0-34% of the 35-55% of the 56-100% of the Observation,


participants participants participants interviews
created new created new created new
friendships or friendships or friendships or
interact more than interact more than interact more than
at the start of the at the start of the at the start of the
MASRP. MASRP. MASRP.

Environment 0-20% of 21-40% of 41-100% of Group


participants state participants state participants state interviews,
that they have a that they have a that they have a MASRP
more positive view more positive more positive survey
of the library after view of the library view of the library
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 64
participation in the after participation after participation
program. in the program. in the program.
0-25% of patrons 26-55% of 56-100% of
feel comfortable to patrons feel patrons feel
ask for help from comfortable to comfortable to ask
librarians or other ask for help from for help from
patrons. librarians or other librarians or other
patrons. patrons.

Local 0-14% of the total 15-49% of the 50-100% of the Data


Business costs of this total costs of this total costs of this collection and
Donations program was program was program was recording,
covered through covered through covered through interviews
donations from donations from donations from
local businesses. local businesses. local businesses.
DaVolio, Griffin, & Voorhees 65
References
Gould, Rhonda. Exercise Your Mind. Read. 2015. 2016 Collaborative Summer Library Program
Adult Manual. Jackson, Mississippi.
Dieffenback, Heather. "Summer Reading Programs with Impact." Kentucky Department for
Libraries and Archives, January 2014.
King, David L. "Summer Reading Stats on Our Public Desktops!". 16 June 2011. Web. 5 Feb.
2016.
Lear, Brett, and Cynthia Leigh Welch. "2014 Adult Summer Reading Program: The Science and
Art of Successful Event Planning." Florida Library Webinars. 1 Jan. 2014. Web. 3 Feb.
2016.
Matthews, Joe. "Evaluating Summer Reading Programs: Suggested Improvements." Public
Libraries Online Evaluating Summer Reading Programs Suggested Improvements|
Comments. Public Library Association, July 2010. Web. 4 Feb. 2016.
Pershing, Morgan, and Cousin, Heather. Adults Are People, Too! Summer Reading Programs
for Grown-ups. January 2016. PowerPoint Presentation.

"Outcomes Project Checklist." Calchallengeorg. California Library Association. Web. 5 Feb.


2016.

"Outreach." Calchallengeorg. California Library Association. Web. 5 Feb. 2016.


"Summer Reading 2015 Edition." In Short, I Am Busy. 26 May 2015. Web. 3 Feb. 2016.
"Summer Reading Program - Planning." Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives. Web.
6 Feb. 2016.
Summer Reading Program Tips for Librarians. Idaho Commission for Libraries. Web. 5 Feb.
2016
"Surveys." Calchallengeorg. California Library Association. Web. 5 Feb. 2016.
"Survey on Summer Reading Trends - ALSC Blog." ALSC Blog. Association for Library Service
to Children, 17 Nov. 2015. Web. 4 Feb. 2016.
Using Outcome Results." Calchallengeorg. California Library Association. Web. 5 Feb. 2016.