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Day 1 Notes:

Standards: History 2. The key concepts of continuity and change,


cause and effect, complexity, unity and diversity over time.
Essential Question: How does the world end up at war and could
it happen again?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can explain the political mindsets of European countries
prior to 1914.
Warm-Up: What events might lead to the world as we know it
going to war? Please explain your thinking.

Initial Reflection: Students will complete a reflection sheet at


three points during our discussion of WWI. For the first reflection
students will be asked to brain dump everything that they already
know about WWI. It can be written in paragraph form or may just
be a list of the information that they know. These will be turned and
reviewed for background knowledge.

Mini-Lecture: The first mini-lecture will be about the political


climate in Europe in the years preceding 1914. Lecture will look at
political and social unrest within countries as well as unrest or
issues that exist between countries. PowerPoint lecture will only be
5-7 slides to keep it brief and to keep student attention.

Activity: Students will work in pairs to create a pre-World War I


worksheet. The worksheet will describe the pre-World War I events
in chronological order. The worksheet will be fill-in-the-blank with a
separate answer key created. Information on the work sheet should
come out of and be based on the text in our textbooks. Once the
worksheet is created students will trade their worksheet with
another pair and answer the questions.

Class Discussion: As a class we will have some discussion about


the events and issues that led up to the war. We will also use the
knowledge gained from the worksheet activity to create a class
timeline of the events leading up to the war that we will continue to
add to over the course of our study.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts,
comments, and questions during our next class period.
Day 2 Notes:
Standards: History 1.a. Evaluate a historical source for point of
view and historical context.
Essential Question: How can the world end up at war and could it
happen again?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can identify the events that led to the outbreak of WWI.
Warm Up: Students will need to set up their notes for the days
lecture. We will be looking at the four causes of WWI so they will
need to divide their papers into four sections with room to write.

Mini-Lecture: Using the note sheets set up during the warm up


time we will have a short lecture over the causes of World War I
(nationalism, imperialism, militarism, and the alliance system). We
will also look at the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. PowerPoint
should be no more than 10 slides.

Activity: Analysis of World War I era political cartoons. Using the


political cartoon analysis worksheet from the National Archives
students will be given a copy of the political cartoon. They will first
need to write down everything that they see within the political
cartoon. After writing down all of their observations they will then
begin to use the worksheet to analyze the cartoon that they are
given. The big question that they will be working to answer is: How
was the beginning of World War I viewed?

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have
already covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making
connections with what was happening in the historical period with
what is happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward
on this topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts,
comments, and questions during our next class period.
Day 3 Notes:
Standards: History 1.d. Differentiate between facts and historical
interpretations, recognizing that a historians narrative reflects his
or her judgement about the significance of particular facts.
Essential Question: In what ways is the United States getting
involved in a war beneficial for the country, both historically and
today?
Evidence Outcome:
I can research a World War I topic and identify important
details.
I can describe the four contributing factors that led to World
War I.
Warm Up: What do you think that the United States would gain by
entering the war in Europe? What might they have to lose?

Mini-Lecture: America enters the war. Focusing on American


debates of neutrality, the sinking of the Lusitania, and the
American declaration of war

Activity: Handout and go over mini-PowerPoint presentation


assignments. Students will be able to choose a topic within the era
of World War I. This might include battles, political leaders, cultural
phenomenon, or military technology. Students will need to create a
3-4 slide PowerPoint containing the necessary information about
the topic. These PowerPoints will be presented to the class over the
next several days. The assignment sheet will also have a rubric for
students to follow so that they can work to determine their own
grades. Before students are turned loose to begin working on their
projects we will go over what a sample presentation would look
like.

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have
already covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making
connections with what was happening in the historical period with
what is happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward
on this topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts,
comments, and questions during our next class period.

Day 4 Notes:
Standards:
Geography 3.d. Analyze how cooperation and conflict
influence the division and control of earth.
History 2.a. Evaluate continuity and change over the course
of world history.
Essential Question: In what ways is the United States getting
involved in a war beneficial for the country, both historically and
today?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can analyze a historical map for information.
Warm Up: We will start out by watching a short video Eddie
Rickenbacker and the First World War. How would you summarize
Rickenbackers experience of the war? Do you think that this was a
typical experience of the war or was his story unique?

Presentations: Four or five presentations regarding the war in


Europe. Each presentation should only take a couple of minutes to
go through.

Mini-Lecture: Mini-lecture over Americans raising an army and first


getting into the war in Europe. What happened once war was
declared by the US?

Activity: Looking at maps of the war. Work on building up our map


interpretation skills and answering questions based off of maps. We
will begin by looking at a couple of maps together as a class and
answering questions. Students will then be released to work in small
groups to interpret the maps, battles, and troops movements during
the first and later parts of the war in Europe.

Class Discussion: As a class we will further the discussion brought


up by the lecture and map activity. How did landscape affect troops
movements? Where did most of the battles take place? How did
these two things shape the progression of the war early on?

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have
already covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making
connections with what was happening in the historical period with
what is happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward
on this topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts,
comments, and questions during our next class period.

Day 5 Notes:
Standards: History 3.b. Investigate the historical development of
and impact of major scientific and technological innovations.
Essential Question: In what ways does technology affect the
outcome of a war?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can describe technological advancements during World War I.
I can connect Shell Shock to modern-day PTSD.
Warm Up: What were some of the new technologies that were
created or developed during this war?

Presentations: Four or five presentations regarding technological


and military development during the war. Each presentation should
only take a couple of minutes to go through.

Mini-Lecture: Mini-Lecture over the technological advancements


during the war. We will look at what was developed, by who it was
developed, and how it impacted the war. Topics will include: machine
guns, airships & airplanes, poison gas, and tanks among others. How
these weapons connect to the tactics of war will also be of
discussion.

Activity: We will watch a short video about the technology of the


war. There will be a graphic organizer to fill out as we watch that will
aid in discussion. We will then have a discussion surrounding the
video and what it brings up about technology.

Mini-Lecture: A second short lecture will cover the more personal


hazards of this war. This will look at medical treatments and
advancements as well as what shell shock was. We will be able to
make connections to the present day with this discussion.

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have already
covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making connections
with what was happening in the historical period with what is
happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward on this
topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts, comments,
and questions during our next class period.

Day 6 Notes:
Standards: History 2.h. Examine and evaluate issues of unity and
diversity from Reconstruction to present.
Essential Question: How does the support of a countrys citizens
affect how a country performs on a world scale?
Evidence Outcome:
I can explain the ways in which popular support was gained
for the war.
I can describe how the liberties of Americans were being
infringed upon.
Warm Up: Do you believe that it is disloyal or unpatriotic to voice
opposition to government policies during war time?

Mid-Point Reflection: This is the second reflection of the unit.


Students will again be asked to brain dump any information that
they know about WWI. At this point they should be able to start
making connections and diving deeper into their thoughts about
this event. This reflection should be written in paragraph form to
allow for connections to be made. This reflection will be turned in
and reviewed for growth and understanding since the first
reflection.

Presentations: Four or five presentations regarding the war at


home. Each presentation should only take a couple of minutes to
go through.

Mini-Lecture: Mini-lecture over paying and selling the war to the


American population and attacks on civil liberties. We will focus on
what was happening to the United States at home and what people
were dealing with.

Activity: Jigsaw reading of primary sources regarding the


infringement of civil liberties by the government, the anti-
immigrant hysteria sweeping the nation, and the espionage and
sedition acts. Students will be responsible for reading their article
noting the most important parts to share with their later groups.
They will then meet up with others who have different articles.
Ultimately the groups will be responsible for answering the
question: Why was there so much fear in the United States as a
result of the war in Europe? We will have a large group discussion
surrounding this question once the groups have had time to work
and discuss.

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have
already covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making
connections with what was happening in the historical period with
what is happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward
on this topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts,
comments, and questions during our next class period.

Day 7 Notes:
Standards: History 2.e. Analyze continuity and change in eras over
the course of United States history.
Essential Question: How does the support of a countrys citizens
affect how a country performs on a world scale?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can connect events from before, during, and after WWI.
Warm Up: How does widespread sickness affect a school? A
community? A country? A world?

Presentations: Four or five presentations regarding the war at


home. Each presentation should only take a couple of minutes to go
through.

Mini-Lecture: Lecture will cover the social changes that were taking
place in the United States during the war period. Topics include:
African Americans and the Great Migration, Women during the war,
and the Spanish flu epidemic.

Activity: Students will work in small groups to draw and fill out
concept maps connecting these three topics to what we have
learned already in class in other units and with what is going on
today. Concept maps should be detailed, specific and clear for each
topic. We will then come together and create a large scale class
concept map surrounding these topics. As a class we will make
predictions as to what will happen to these groups over the course of
the rest of the twentieth century.

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have already
covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making connections
with what was happening in the historical period with what is
happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward on this
topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts, comments,
and questions during our next class period.
Day 8 Notes:
Standards: History 2.g. Analyze the complexity of events in United
States history.
Essential Question: How can a world come back together after a
full on war?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can identify the ways in which Europe changed before and
after the war.
I can explain Wilsons Fourteen points.
I can describe the pros and cons of the League of Nations.
Warm Up: After a war has ended how can the parties involved settle
their differences so that they do not end up at war again?

Mini-Lecture: Lecture over Wilsons Fourteen Points and the Treaty


of Versailles. Lecture will begin wrapping up World War I. We will also
discuss the discussion that took place surrounding the League of
Nations.

Activity: Students will first be instructed to look at a map of Europe


before the war and a map of Europe after the war. What differences
are noticeable between the two maps? What happened to the
German territory over the course of 4 years? What new nations were
created? How do you think that these changes in Europes
geography will affect future relations between nations?

Students will then look at the discussions surrounding the


development and involvement in the League of Nations. They will be
provided with several sources to analyze. The first will be a
Point/Counterpoint article. They will also be provided with primary
source written documents and political cartoons to analyze. They will
need to question and draw out information from the sources. Were
different groups supportive or unsupportive of the organization? Why
was the United States unwilling to join when it was President Wilson
who proposed it to begin with?

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have already
covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making connections
with what was happening in the historical period with what is
happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward on this
topic.

Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are
to ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts
about the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class
discussion board. We will review some of these thoughts, comments,
and questions during our next class period.
Day 9 Notes:
Standards: History 2.e. Analyze continuity and change in eras over
the course of United States history.
Essential Question: What impact has World War I made on the
United States?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can describe the lasting impacts of World War I in the United
States.
I can describe the lasting impact of World War I on the world at
large.
Warm Up: What influences of World War I can be felt today?

Final Reflection: This is the final reflection for the World War I unit.
At this point students should be able to explain and make connections
between historical events and connections to events today. This
reflection should be written in paragraph form to allow for
connections to be made. This reflection will be turned in and reviewed
for growth and understanding since the first and second reflections.

Mini-Lecture: Mini-lecture over the lasting impacts of the war. This


includes impacts in Europe, within the United States, and how the
United States began to interact with the world at large. We can
discuss these different elements as we go through the lecture.

Review: We will use the latter part of class to review the information
for our test in the next class period. We will play the game attack to
recall the different information through question form. Time will also
be available to ask and answer any questions that have arisen from
the test review.

WWI Discussion Board: We will take the time to discuss 4-5


thoughts, comments, or questions from our sticky note wall. These
questions will allow for us to review information that we have already
covered, dive into some what-if situations, begin making connections
with what was happening in the historical period with what is
happening today, and begin driving our discussion forward on this
topic.
Exit Ticket: Students will be given a sticky note on which they are to
ask any questions, make any comments, or share any thoughts about
the topic of World War I and put the post-it on our class discussion
board. We will review some of these thoughts, comments, and
questions during our next class period.

Day 10 Notes:
Standards: History 1.c. Construct and defend a written historical
argument using relevant primary and secondary sources as evidence.
Essential Questions: Why was World War I so important and
influential to US history?
Evidence Outcomes:
I can synthesize the information provided about World War.
I can write a well-structured essay using historical facts.
Test: Upon coming to class for the day student will dive right into the
test. The test will be three essay questions that draw from the
information covered. Students will be permitted to use any notes or
previous worksheets that they have on the test. The use of books will
not be permitted: Test questions on the test will be selected from the
following options:
What were the reasons that led to war in Europe and how did
the United States become involved in this conflict?
Many social changes took place between 1914 and 1918 in the
United States. Please describe two of these changes and how
they affected the war effort in Europe.
Why was the Treaty and Versailles and the League of Nations so
controversial? How did the decisions surrounding these two
ideas affect Europe and the United States in the long run?
World War I is often referred to as The Great War. Based upon
what we have discussed, why would that be the title given to
this war? What made it so great as compared other wars?