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HAT Journal #1 (Cooper & Lautzenheiser Articles)

Cooper Article

H
This author seems to be emphasizing concert bands and orchestras as
the core of any music program. While I agree, should a small school who
maybe is unable to have such a program still offer other ensembles even
if their concert band isnt the strongest?
I feel like 2nd best syndrome has come into play in every ensemble that I
have ever played in. Even when performing in festivals and honor bands,
there always seems to be a top band and a bottom band. Do you
have any other suggestions, other than name, that might help alleviate
this issue?

A
A band program is like a wheel. It needs many spokes but ultimately a
strong core: concert band/orchestra
The large ensemble is where an instructor will teach the most musical
concepts
Some students may only be able to participate in extra ensembles, but
these cases should be few and far between
Music theory, composition, and history are important courses to offer
students!
When ensembles reach 100 or more, 2 ensembles should be created
There is such a thing as second best syndrome but healthy competition
should be encouraged!
Marching band is the most viewed ensemble!
Students can lead ensembles like pep band/chamber groups- delegate
responsibilities and then coach them
Sequential instruction=spiral curriculum even across courses: think of the
overall ability/knowledge of students and how best to expand it

T
As a teacher, it is my responsibility to organize my band program in such
a way that facilitates the best learning for my students. This means
having a strong concert band program while also offering plenty of other
musical ensembles to be involved with.
In order to allow every single student to participate in some type of music
experience, I have to be able to work with my fellow choir and orchestra
teachers to create an overall program that is the most inviting and
beneficial to students
I need to be careful when making decisions about how to divide and what
to call my ensembles to avoid any self-image issues with my students
Strive for balance: I dont want to get burnt out or have students quit
because of marching band
Dont shy away from improvisation, especially in jazz band: anyone can
do it
It is my responsibility to write clear and all-inclusive course descriptions
Develop good relationships with administrators and teachers and think
carefully about how to plan a good schedule for students

Lautzenheiser Article

H
The article discussed finding a balance between giving students the time
and space to self-evaluate and problem solve while simultaneously not
getting too far off topic or unfocused. What are some good ways to
redirect student discussion without making some feel unimportant?
One aspect of ensemble teaching I fear in my first couple of years of
teaching is that I will either try to prove myself to the ensemble by
using too much of an authoritarian style of teaching or I will try to gain
students trust by becoming too friendly with them, thus losing my
authority as a teacher. What recommendations do you have for times
when it seems you may have lost control of an ensemble and need to
regain students favor in an appropriate way?

A
Band directors are required to know so much, but learn very little about
how to lead
There is a difference between the demand for excellence and the desire
for excellence
A good teacher should blend both demand and desire for excellence
The energy of the students serves as the fuel for forward motion
The strongest teacher is the one able to say I dont know, but lets find
out
Successful directors are both people and result oriented, balancing the
emotional well being of the ensemble as well as the results that the
ensemble creates

T
It is my job to think about the kind of students and environment I want to
develop in my music program. I want my students to want to be good
musicians. I dont want them to fear me or punishment.
It is my responsibility to find a good balance between demand and desire
styles of teaching
I have to inspire my students and compel them to want to be in my class
PUT THE PEOPLE FIRST
Take responsibility for mistakes and share credit for success

HAT Journal #2 (Reynolds & Cramer)

Reynolds Article:

H
I understand the importance of playing good quality music, but in some
of my education classes (including MUSE 355) we have discussed using
pop songs and other non-classics as tools for teaching. Does this
qualification of music represent only the authors opinion? Is it simply and
old-school approach? And what recommendations do you have for
presenting a well-reasoned argument in favor of using pop songs in the
band classroom?
How would you handle a situation in which you feel you need to collect a
piece of music because the students were not technically proficient
enough to play it? I worry about damaging their self-esteem and giving
them the idea that its okay to opt out of something when it gets
difficult.

A
We must strive to select the finest repertoire, for only through
immersion in music of lasting quality can we engage in aesthetic
experiences of breadth and depth.
Interesting to think that choosing a piece may seem easy, but could be
hard because there is such a wide variety of pieces you dont choose that
may work perfectly
The repertoire is, in fact, a large portion of the curriculum used to teach
Most professional bands play pieces designed to affect the audience
more than the members-its the opposite with school ensembles
The purpose is not to present a technical display. The purpose is to
present the music.
the world is changing, and I must change with it. One is either
growing or dying; one is either a part of the past or the future. While
much can be gained from honoring the past, one must live for the
future.

T
It would be to the detriment of my students to choose pieces without first
carefully thinking about which pieces would work best in furthering their
academic/musical growth
Constant listening and researching for new, good music will be vital!
Organization is important- I need to keep good lists of possible repertoire
as well as repertoire the band has played in the past
Dont reinvent the wheel- use state repertoire lists
Its important to explain and interact with audiences so that they better
understand your musical selections
o Also a great way to educate more people than your students!
Pick technically achievable pieces so as to focus more time on other,
more important, concepts (tone, timbre, matching, style, etc)
Dont place reaching out to the community/administrators or student
wishes over the education of the students
Network and make friends in the music world by going to workshops
Dont stop learning about new music, performers, conductors, and
ensembles. Dont stop going to concerts

Cramer Article:

H
Cramer says, After all, our basic aim is to make the preparation and
performance of music as exciting for everyone as possible, but I
somewhat disagree with that statement. I think the basic aim of a band
conductor/teacher is to teach concepts, even if they arent quite as
exciting for all involved. I am curious as to what you think of this
statement. Should there be more of a balance between the two?
Similar to my question about the Reynolds article, Cramer is very much
encouraging careful selection of artistic music. Perhaps this is a
question more for the author himself, but if a teachers aim is to make
the music as exciting as possible for as many people as possible,
wouldnt that suggest a more open mind when it comes to musical
selection? Or would it simply mean that the teacher then has the
responsibility to make the artistic music exciting? I know a lot of
artistic pieces that I find enjoyable that very much bore my family and
friends.
o I realize that I may have too much of a closed mind when it comes
to choosing artistic pieces as I read Cramers discussion of a
examples of a good pieces. I guess artistic doesnt necessarily
mean Classical or from the most renowned composers. Some of
these pieces I do find overplayed, but some I hadnt heard of!

A
Similar to the Reynolds article: music is the most important job of a
conductor/teacher
Plan and procedures should be used to achieve musical satisfaction and
excitement
One must also consider scoring when it comes to choosing repertoire. Is
the piece scored well for the tone/timbre/style it suggests?
There is so much great music to share with our students. Why should we
settle for less?
Teaching concepts through musical performance are really just stepping
stones to encouraging overall excitement about music
o Musical electricity

T
It is my job to be invigorated and excited to teach my students every day,
and I should use repertoire to help spur this enthusiasm
I need to carefully think about and plan my repertoire so that I can teach
well and excite audiences when necessary
I have to share my musical soul with students by sharing all the research
and score study I have done on a composition
I need to be the strongest teacher I can be- I have to inspire and
influence students so that music becomes an integral, joyful, and
inspirational, part of their lives.

HAT Journal #3 (Feldman & Contzius Chapter 9)

H
What exactly is cross-cueing and is it really that common? This is the first
Ive heard of it.
Where are some good places to look when trying to find wind repertoire
from other historical/cultural styles?
I never received homework assignments as part of my wind band
experience, but would you recommend giving written assignments that
encourage students to explore history, culture, etc. of a given piece? Or
should the study sheet that the chapter discusses simply be a handout
made by the teacher?
I was wondering why they didnt include something along the lines of
finding ways to rehears difficult passages when the piece is only mostly
appropriate for the band. I understand that you dont want to set
students up for failure, but shouldnt they be technically/musically
challenged? Isnt it my responsibility to help lead them to overcome
these challenges?
Have you ever found that re-arranging music or asking other players to
step in has a negative impact on an ensembles self-esteem?

A
Curriculum for music is largely similar to curriculum of other subjects, but
some directors choose to vary their curriculum a lot from year to year
while others keep the same
Good repertoire has to be carefully planned: students should be able to
learn concepts, be engaged, perform successfully, and make art through
pieces
Music of high quality is subjective, but conductors should follow a basic
guide to help them choose good literature
Wind music can be compared to metal- its all about balance
It is helpful to categorize music to narrow down choices
thorny works-refer to works that stretch musical understanding as
opposed to technical ability
the process of teaching musical concepts beyond performance readiness
is often called Comprehensive Musicianship.
Repertoire logs can be used to help categorize works and keep a record
of important information about the work
Pop music has its place, but school should be used to study music not
often heard at home and which needs guidance to understand

T
My goal is to maximize the quality of works I put in front of my students
I need to demand quality in the music I buy so that more publishers will
produce quality works
My concerts and programs have to be balanced in such a way that I know
what pieces would be performed well in which positions on the program
list, and I know which pieces will take the most and least rehearsal
time/will challenge my students and how.
Teach comprehensive musicianship! Not just performance!
Commission works and have the composer work with students-give
opportunities to ask questions
Use formal analysis terminology in classrooms to aid in understanding of
the music
Dont shy away from incorporating other topics into music (history
especially)
I have to consider range, part interest, density of texture in melody and
harmony, and doubling when looking at a new piece of music
Weigh the pros and cons of competing carefully; it offers benefits but can
often take the focus off of good music making and put it onto sounding
good to get a high placement/good score
I have to listen to students and let them have a say in what they play, but
the ultimate decision is mine: give options, let them vote on choices, etc
HAT Journal #3 (Feldman & Contzius Chapter 9)

H
What exactly is cross-cueing and is it really that common? This is the first
Ive heard of it.
Where are some good places to look when trying to find wind repertoire
from other historical/cultural styles?
I never received homework assignments as part of my wind band
experience, but would you recommend giving written assignments that
encourage students to explore history, culture, etc. of a given piece? Or
should the study sheet that the chapter discusses simply be a handout
made by the teacher?
I was wondering why they didnt include something along the lines of
finding ways to rehears difficult passages when the piece is only mostly
appropriate for the band. I understand that you dont want to set
students up for failure, but shouldnt they be technically/musically
challenged? Isnt it my responsibility to help lead them to overcome
these challenges?
Have you ever found that re-arranging music or asking other players to
step in has a negative impact on an ensembles self-esteem?

A
Curriculum for music is largely similar to curriculum of other subjects, but
some directors choose to vary their curriculum a lot from year to year
while others keep the same
Good repertoire has to be carefully planned: students should be able to
learn concepts, be engaged, perform successfully, and make art through
pieces
Music of high quality is subjective, but conductors should follow a basic
guide to help them choose good literature
Wind music can be compared to metal- its all about balance
It is helpful to categorize music to narrow down choices
thorny works-refer to works that stretch musical understanding as
opposed to technical ability
the process of teaching musical concepts beyond performance readiness
is often called Comprehensive Musicianship.
Repertoire logs can be used to help categorize works and keep a record
of important information about the work
Pop music has its place, but school should be used to study music not
often heard at home and which needs guidance to understand

T
My goal is to maximize the quality of works I put in front of my students
I need to demand quality in the music I buy so that more publishers will
produce quality works
My concerts and programs have to be balanced in such a way that I know
what pieces would be performed well in which positions on the program
list, and I know which pieces will take the most and least rehearsal
time/will challenge my students and how.
Teach comprehensive musicianship! Not just performance!
Commission works and have the composer work with students-give
opportunities to ask questions
Use formal analysis terminology in classrooms to aid in understanding of
the music
Dont shy away from incorporating other topics into music (history
especially)
I have to consider range, part interest, density of texture in melody and
harmony, and doubling when looking at a new piece of music
Weigh the pros and cons of competing carefully; it offers benefits but can
often take the focus off of good music making and put it onto sounding
good to get a high placement/good score
I have to listen to students and let them have a say in what they play, but
the ultimate decision is mine: give options, let them vote on choices, etc.

HAT Journal #4 (Feldman & Contzius and Corporon)

Feldman & Contzius Pages


H
What are some ways to get all students involved when you are only
working with a specific section of students for a longer amount of time?
I know of a couple of instances where educators have discouraged the
use of written out lesson plans in rehearsal (particularly writing out
places needed to be rehearsed) because it discourages reacting to the
music in the moment. What are your thoughts on this?
What are some good tips on balancing notes/rhythms with musicality?
Ive found that focusing on musicality can automatically improve notes
and rhythm, but I agree that students cant fully grasp musicality until
they have a good understanding of their parts.

A
Basic rehearsal technique of Big-Small-Big
Conductor may need to do some trial and error before a problem can be
identified and fixed
Breaking music down by section allows the conductor to hear
components of the music not previously able to be heard as well as
giving the students the opportunity to hear how their parts fit in with
each other
I vs. We- I for authority and We for collaboration
Lesson plans need to balance review of old concepts and introduction of
new ones
Use Warm-ups to build musicality, ear training, and intonation
Warm-ups need a purpose-dont just go through the motions-use them to
enhance the repertoire

T
My responsibility to come to rehearsals prepared and organized
I have to know the score well enough to lead the ensemble through
rehearsal while diagnosing and fixing mistakes
Be clear when speaking with students- Who, to where, what
Give positive and critical feedback! Student want to know what they did
well and what they need to work on
Come into rehearsal with a lesson plan and a good ear-write schedule on
board
Provide students with the opportunity to play musical warm-ups, not just
scales/technique exercises
Reasonably plan rehearsals- dont overwhelm/overschedule, begin and
end with musical success, give students a break when needed, and know
when to keep going

Corporon Article

H
In this article Corporon discusses how overemphasizing correct notes can
detract from musicality- this seems to contradict the previous article a
little bit. How much do we focus on notes?
When working with such limited rehearsal time, what is the best way to
engage students and ask questions without devoting too much time to
open conversation? Every student wants to be heard, but we just dont
have time for all.

A
The ultimate goal is to connect with the work of art and with the people
who bring it to life
Many conductors waste a lot of time during rehearsals, causing them to
wish for more time at the end of a rehearsal cycle
The key to creating a good ensemble is developing personal responsibility
in students
The learning process should uncover emotion and meaning
Rehearsal goal: make it better every time you work on it- transcend
technique
Rehearsals culminate in an opportunity to perform for an audience- we
also want to experience the music not just perform it- be connected
Keeping practice logs/ critiques are very beneficial for future rehearsals
Music captures and preserves the essence of the various paradigms in
the world that we call culture

T
It is my responsibility to present a balanced learning process to my
students
I have to be understanding and bring imagination, humor, and
persistence to the ensemble
I have to translate and make clear the intentions of the musical notation
so that the students have a better idea about how to play
I have to take the time to prepare- study, analyze, listen to the score- try
to commit it to memory at least a little bit
Communicate effectively with students the intentions of the piece
Provide a firm but flexible rehearsal plan that is engaging to students
Good pacing during a rehearsal-working on a variety of things with
multiple zooms in and out
Dont become overly critical
Dont limit to comfortable cultures or you also limit your students!

HAT Journal #5 (Feldman & Contzius Chapter 10)

H
Are there any stable resources that can be used to double check
harmonic analysis of a piece? Many times I do an analysis but am not
always confident in the chords that seem to be used in the piece itself.
What are some tips you have for early conductors for practicing without
listening to a recording?

A
Knowing the score lets us anticipate problems before they occur, detect
errors, interpret the music correctly, and teach good concepts
Music is often ambiguous and can be difficult to study and describe- it is
constantly moving
Start by getting an overall macro level view of the score-study it as you
would a screenplay
Study the micro- analyze the harmonies and textures more closely
Perhaps make a second copy of the score to notate so you dont clutter
your only copy
It is important to hear the harmonies in an isolated way: play them on the
piano, using some sort of notational software, or playing through some on
your primary instrument
Deconstruct the composers intent by analyzing motives, melodies,
harmonies, textures cadences, form, and style
Moving to the music-translating motions into dance can be a very
effective way to come up with new conducting gestures that best convey
the style of the music
Dont listen to a recording too much! It will influence interpretation and
hide important harmonic or melodic lines

T
I have to be able to accurately interpret what is on the score and
translate that to movements and lessons so that my students are
learning as much as they can and giving expressive performances
It is my responsibility to take the time to analyze the piece harmonically
so I can better understand the parts of the piece and how they function
Teach the ensemble to embrace dissonances and be prepared with what
may need extra work (parts in high ranges, working on listening for the
melody or the most important line)
I serve as the composers advocate, teach important concepts and make
connections with students, and rehearse more efficiently and effectively
when I understand and analyze a score
I have to understand how to interpret every note
My score needs to be clearly marked with only the most important
information so as not to clutter and confuse the overall score- use of
short hand, colored symbols, etc are vital
Students and conductors need to have measure numbers written in to
save rehearsal time!