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GIFT OF

. W. Graham*
tMW3._^ '/^^

Xx^viU&>N- v\-\3b-4$L ,
HOMERIC DICTIONARY

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

FROM THE GEEMAN OF

Dk. georg autenkieth


EECTOR OF THE GYMNASIUM AT ZWEIBRt'CKEN

TRANSLATED, WITH ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS,

By ROBERT P. KEEP, Ph.D.

NEW YORK
HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS
FRANKLIN SQUARE
1880
li^^

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 187G, by

HARPER & BROTHERS,


In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

3-7/V?:,i

?-^*
PREFACE. M/t/ AJ

Dr. Georg Autenrieth, the compiler of the " Worterbuch zii


den Homerischen Gedichten," of which the present volume is a
translation, is the Director of the Gymnasium at Zweibriicken, in

the Bavarian Palatinate. A favorite scholar and intimate personal


friend of that admirable man, Yon Nagelsbach, of Erlangen, there
devolved upon him, on the death of the latter, the editorial charge
of his works, and Autenrieth's editions of the " Gymnasial Pada-
gogik," the " Homerische Theologie," and the " Commentary on
the First Three Books of Homer's Iliad" gained him the repute
of a thorough and judicious scholar, and led to his appointment,
at an unusually early age, to the important position which he now
holds.
In 1 868, at the request of the publishing house of Teubner k, Co.,
of Leipzig, he undertook the preparation of a school dictionary
of the Iliad and Odyssey, which appeared in 1873. This work
met with favorable criticism in Germany, was translated, Avithin a
year from its publication, into Dutch, and has passed to its second
German edition. Of Autenrieth's special fitness for the task of
compiling such a dictionary, his experience as a practical educator,
his devotion for many years to the study of Homer, his numer-
ous contributions to the admirable Commentary of Ameis, and
the frequent citation of his name in Crusius's Homeric Lexicon
(the last edition, that of Seller and Capelle) furnish sufficient proof.
Autenrieth's aim has been not only to convey, in the compactest
form consistent with clearness, the results of Homeric study and
criticism up to the present time, but also to communicate such col-

lateral information as may serve to render the study of Homer in-

teresting and attractive. Passages of doubtful or difficult interpre-

tation are translated, and the derivations of words receive from the

371488
iv PREFACE.

author, who has made the science of comparative philology a spe-


cial study, particular attention. A novel feature of the work is the
introduction into the text of nearly one hundred and fifty small
wood-cuts mainly representations of veritable antiques which
are designed to give to the student a vivid conception of the
things mentioned by Homer, by placing before his eyes the war-
fare, navigation, costume, and sacrificial rites of the Homeric age.

It was the test of actual use which suggested to the editor the
idea of translating this book. With it in his hand he read, first
the Odyssey, then the Iliad. Tried by this test, it seemed to com-
bine so many excellences that the wish arose in his mind that the
work might be made generally accessible to students in America
and in England. From the time when he decided to undertake
the translation to the present date he has been in frequent corre-
spondence with the author, calling his attention to articles which
seemed obscure, and receiving from him the corrections and
changes which have been incorporated into the second German
edition. The number of additions made by the editor himself is

considerable, and many articles have been entirely rewritten, as


a comparison of the present with the German edition Avill show.
Autenrieth's dictionary rests especially upon the labors of three
distinguished
Homeric scholars Von Nagelsbach, Doderlein, and
Ameis. The frequent references which, in the original edition,
are made to these commentators, have been omitted in the trans-
lation.

Autenrieth frequently employs a Latin to define a Greek word.


The practice commends itself from its conciseness and its precision,

and the translator has accordingly in most cases continued it ;


yet he
has not felt that he could presuppose, in the case of American stu-

dents, such an acquaintance with a large Latin vocabulary as would


justifyhim in omitting to add (in most cases) an English translation.
The present dictionary was intended to be primarily one of Ho-
meric forms. Hence the plan of the work requires that, in the
definitions of words which are inflected, the first inflexional form
actually occurring in Homer should begin the article, and not, in
all cases, the first person singular present indicative active or the
PREFACE. V

nominative singular. AVhenever, in rare cases, a non-Homeric


form occupies tlie first place, this is printed in thin-faced type.

Occasionally, moreover, a verb which occurs only in a historical


tense,

vhich the
and is

first

would properly occupy


therefore augmented, will be found in that place
person singular of
: e. g., -,
printed but once (to save space), and will be found where
its

-^, would
a ,
present indicative active
will be
(if it

. -/
occurred in Homer) the present, stand ; so, like-

wise, will occupy the place properly belonging to -


The necessity for extreme conciseness and the restriction of the

vrork to Homeric usage cause some articles to lack that full ac-

count of the various meanings of a word, as developed one from


the other, vhich is to be found in a general lexicon like that
of Liddell & Scott. A certain baldness and inadequateness in

the treatment of many words must, indeed, be a characteristic of


such a dictionary. The test of the book, hoAvever, is its practi-

cal adaptation to the ends it is intended to serve. The vriter's

own experience has led him to believe that it is well adapted to


meet the vants of the young student, as well as to be a com-
panion in the reading of those professional men Avho have un-
willingly let their acquaintance vith Homer drop because of the
inconvenience of carrying vitll them on a journey or to the sea-

shore a cumbrous lexicon. It is his earnest hope that this book


so attractive in form, and procurable at so low a price will

render possible, alike in our secondary schools and in our col-


leges, the reading of a considerably larger portion of Homer than
has heretofore been attempted.
The following suggestions as to the use of the book may be
found serviceable
Let the beginning be made by grounding the student carefully
and thoroughly upon the forms and peculiarities of the Homeric
dialect, with the necessary constant comparison of Homeric and
Attic forms. During this stage, the use of the larger lexicon in

connection with the present volume will be necessary. Two Books


read in this way vould suffice. This done, the second step would

k
vi PREFACE.

be to proceed much more rapidly, requiring of the students in

recitation only an accurate and intelligent translation of the text

and such knowledge as to the meaning and history of the words


as this dictionary furnishes.
The editor's him to believe that a pupil vith
own experience leads

this dictionary in his hands two pages of Homer in


will easily read

the time which, vith the large lexicon, would be required for one
page. The dictionary also supplies, in a good degree, the place of
a commentary, and will be found equally full upon all parts of the

two poems. The translator even ventures to hope that the pres-

ent volume, while offering only legitimate help to the student, may
operate to remove the temptation to resort to translations. He is

aware of the feeling of dislike vith which many teachers regard


all special lexicons. That there are grave objections to their use
when they cover only a part of the works of an author seems per-
fectly clear; for then the vocabulary becomes so brief and the
range of meaning of the definitions so narrow that translation is

rendered for the scholar a merely mechanical exercise. These ob-


jections, however, have little force as respects a special lexicon for
the Homeric Poems. These poems represent to us every thing,
in a connected form, which survives of Epic Greek literature. Not
only do their forms differ so widely from those of Attic usage as
to constitute a separate dialect, but their vocabulary is an extreme-
ly copious one,* and contains a great multitude of words which
are used only once, or but a very few times. This latter class of
words, it is evident, if occurring in Homer alone, can receive no
better elucidation from a large dictionary than from a small one,
while the outlay of time required in seeking them in a volume of
1600 pages is very great. The requirements of a scheme of lib-

eral study in our times are so extensive that the necessity of econ-
omizing labor, whenever it can be done without detriment to men-
tal discipline, is self-evident. It may be, indeed, that Greek and
Latin will only be able to hold their place in our courses of higher
education by welcoming and encouraging every legitimate help

The Hind nnd the Odyssey contain about 9000 different words.
I PREFACE.

bv Avhich the labor necessary for acquiring a knowledge of the


vii

two chief ancient languages, and gaining an acquaintance with


their literatures, may be abridged.
There remains for the translator the pleasant duty of mention-
ing that the proofs of the dictionary have passed under the eye
of Dr. Autenrieth, of Zveibrucken, and Prof. John II. AVright, late
of Columbus, Ohio. The references have all been twice verified by
himself. It will thus be seen that great pains have been taken to
secure that accuracy which is at once so indispensable and, in a

work like the present, so difficult to attain.

Robert Porter Keep.

WiLLiSTON Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., Sept. 1, 187G.

The editor avails himself of the opportunity afforded by a


new issue of the Dictionary to incorporate the corrections which
have accumulated since its first publication. He Avishes to ex-
press his thanks to Dr. Drisler, Professors F. D. Allen and T. D.
Seymour, and to Mr. Irving G. Stanton, an undergraduate student
in Harvard College, for the valuable corrections which they have
furnished, and to request similar favors in the future from all

who may use the book.


R. P. K.
Sept. 1, 1878.

The issue of a new edition of the Dictionary again gives op-


portunity for the insertion of corrections, and for some additions
which suggest a word of introduction.
On pp. xiii., xiv. will be found a new Index, in which the at-

tempt is made to enumerate, in connection Avith each cut, all the


important objects which it illustrates. This Index, which forms
an almost necessary supplement to that upon pp. xi., xii., was pre-

pared and furnished to the editor by Professor John Williams


AVhite, of Harvard College.
viii PREFACE.

Pp. xv.-xix. are occupied. by an outline of the Peculiarities of


the Homeric Dialect, based, in contents and arrangement, upon
the excellent sketch which forms the first appendix to Koch's
Griechische AS^cAw/^rammaii^, 2d ed., Leipzig: B.G.Teubner, 1871.
Such an outline seemed likely to be of especial service to those
friends of the Dictionary men in professional life who wish to
read Homer cursorily and from a text-edition, and who look to
the Dictionary to furnish all the aid they require.
The editor would renew his suggestion that the Dictionary
yields its best results if scholars are not encouraged to use it

much until they have mastered, by the aid of Liddell and Scott,
at least one book of Homer. Now that the amount of Xenophon
required for admission to college is generally read by the aid of
special vocabularies, the student comes to Homer, in most cases,

without having used a general dictionary. This is the point at


which the purchase of a Liddell and Scott should be insisted

upon- The thorough study of the Homeric forms involves at

every step their comparison with the corresponding Attic forms,


and cannot be satisfactorily prosecuted by the aid of the Auten-
rieth alone.
When three books of the Iliad have been mastered, the scholar
will be well prepared for the rapid reading of the Odyssey.
Passages especially suited for such reading are Bk. V. (Odys-
seus's departure for Calypso's island) ; Bks. VL and VH. (his meet'
ing with Nausicaa and his reception by Alcinous) ; Bks. IX. and
X. (his account of his adventures with Cyclops, and on Circe's
island). Any of these passages can be read by ordinary pupils,
with the use of the Dictionary alone, at the rate of fifty to seventy-
five lines per hour. And the result of a few weeks of such reading
will be to develop the confidence of the student in his own power
to translate (a prerequisite to reading at sight vith any success)
and to greatly increase his interest in Homer.
In addition to the obligations already acknowledged, the editor
has to thank for corrections the following friends : Professor J.

W. White, Professor O. M. Fernald, and Professor J. H. Wright.

Easthampton, Mass., July ], 1879. ^ ^' ^^'


I

EXPLANATION OF REFEEENCES.

References are made to the several books of the Iliad and the Odyssey re-
spectively,according to the usage of the ancient commentators, by the large
and small letters of the Greek alphabet. Thus A 10 signifies Iliad, Bk. I.,
line 10 ;and 8 signifies Odyssey, Bk. XXIV., line 8 or, in detail
;

A Iliad .1. . ..Odyssey, ad .XITL , Odyssey


.II. . .XIV. .

.III. . .XV. .

.IV. . .XVL .

.V. . .XVIL .

.VI. . .XVIIL.
.^. . .XIX. .

.VIII. .XX. .

.IX. . .XXL

..
.

.X. . X .. .XXII.
.XL . .XXIIL
.XIL. ... .XXIV.

The character f designates Homeric


Two references connected by the Avord and designate ^
II. or Od. affixed to a definition denotes that the word defined occurs only
in the Iliad or only in the Odyssey.
The references in general are to be understood as explanatory, and not
as exhaustive: they are uniformly made to the small Teubner edition of the
Iliad and Odyssey, edited by Dindorf.
To aid the eye, the first Avord of each article, or, if that chance not to occur
in Homer, the first Homeric form, is printed in full-faced type.
The characters and j represent the semi- vowel spirants and y.
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS.

acc. eignifles accusative.


INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

1. 'A/ivioi/, page 26.


INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
,
, .
93.

,
^, 223.
94, 95. oii'nov (two cuts), 226.
9(), 97.
98.
?,
(two cuts), 228.
229.
118.

119.
'.
.
,
,
9. . 289.

293.
See
See

99.

100.

101.
'^.
/?.
^,
/,
, <,
232.

'9, 230.
249.
See

See
^.
.
120.
121.

122.
123. ,
?,
, ?.
295.
298.

300.
307.
307.
See

,
124.

,
102. 254.

/,
103, TTtTT/Xos, 255. 125. 307.
104.
100.
106, 107.
108 .

109
.
^,
^
.
258.

',
.
,
,
259.

, .
7>6/\; (two cuts), 260.
264.

276.
See
126.

127.
128.
/7?,
//.
308.

308.

See
317,
See also

309, See also


and

,
110 TTypiJ,278. 129.

,
111 278. 130. 319.
112 pi'/yta, 280. 131. 324.
,

^,
113
114
115
116
117
,

.
//,
^
/?, ,,
281.
283.
286.
287.
289.
132,
133,
134.

135.
/5,
/.
324.
325.
330.
See
'/?, 335.
.
PLATES, AT END OF THE VOLUME.
I. (From ancient vase,)
Chariot at Rest,
II. (From relief of frieze of the Parthenon,)*
Chariot in Motion.
III. Ground-plan of House of Odysseus, as drawn by L, Gerlach.
IV, The Shi]) of the Homeric Age, (Inserted, by permission of Mr, Merry,
from Merry's " Odyssey." Macmillan, 1873.)*
V. Map of the Trojan Plain, with designation of the chief natural features,
and of the various sites where it has been sought to locate the city
Troja, (From Kiepert's Atlas of Hellas and the Hellenic Colonies.
Berlin, 1872,)*

Plates II,, IV., ami ^ have been added by the trauslator.


ilNDEX OF OBJECTS ILLUSTRATED BY EACH CUT.

le

,
number

,. , .
, ,
of the cut comes first,

,?,,, ?.
then the page, then the words that the cut illustrates.

?,
,
36, 94.

, '?.
26.

?, ~
I,

|2, 27.

^, /,
,?,.,",
,,'. . ?,
37, 112.
J, 28.

28.

5, 29.
6, 30.
),
9,

, ,?,
?. ,.
, .
- 38, 119.
39, 124.
40, 124.
41, 127. ,,,.
?,
?, ?,?,.'?, -
,?,
?. ,
.
"/?, ,
7,
8, 33.
,
30 and 31.

,,, .
?.?, '-,
42, 128.
43, 129.

,
, , ,
-

,
'?,
9, 40.
10, 41.
11, 41.
,
,
7],
, ?,, ?.",
?, -
44, 129.
45, 132. ",
. ?^-
'?,
-
. ,.
12, 42.

13, 44.
14, 51. .?, ,,.?,
,
'. [_b,
46, 132.
47, 134. '?,7?,',
?, "
'?,
.,
?
-
1, 54.
16, 56.
17, 56.
?.
?, ?, ?, .
?, ?. , ? C, 48, 136.
49, 141. //7,
d,
',
,
b, //,
^-

,
.
18, 57.

?
?,
?.
?.?, .
.
50, 141.

,,
19, 58.
20, 60.

21, 63.
22, 64.
, ?.
?,
, ?, -
?.?.
?, ?, ?, -
h,
51, 141.
52, 141.
53, 144.
54, 144.
55, 146.
56, 148.
],
.
.
?, '?.
?..
.
?, ?, ?.
,?,
?,
.
. 57, 154.

,
.
, ,,?,?, ...
23, 65. 58, 154.
24, 70.
25, 71. ?.
?, .
59, 154.
60, 158.
/, .
'?, ?, '?, *

?, , ?.
26, 76. 161.
61,
?.
.
27, 77. 161.
62,
?,
28, 78.
29, 78.
30, 79.
31, 81.
?.
?.
?. ?, ", ?,
?,
?.
63,
64,
65,
66,
161.
165.
166.
166. ,
?, ?,'?,
",
,
?,. ?..
?,
-?,

?-
32, 87. 167.
?. 67,

33, 88.
34, 90.
35, 94. , ?,
?,
?,
?,
, e.
,
'?, ?,
e.
C, "-
68,
69,
70,
71,
72,
73,
176.
177.
178.
178.
180.
180.
?.
?,,
?;|,
,.^
'?,
,. ',?,
xiv

74, 18L , , -,
INDEX OF OBJECTS ILLUSTRATED BY EACH CUT.
THE CHIEF PECULIARITIES

HOMERIC DIALECT.

IN GENERAL.

1.

2.

3.
,
is

.
Similarly, ci

More
.
regularly found when, in Attic,

rarely
is sometimes found for

is found for
A. VOWELS.

o, ai for a,
,
d only would be

for

for c,
, e. g.

e. g.
, , ,
,
admissible,

,,.
e. g.

By vhat called metathesis quantitatis, ao becomes ).


4.
Similarly,
is

we have and elog, 'and .. .


(for

2.
Contraction,
form ev, e. g.
when

But the contraction often does not take


,. it
. CONTRACTION OF \OWELS.
occurs, follows the ordinary rules, except that co and

place, e. g.

(), ; and a few unusual


*

3.
contractions occur,

Two
from

tion (synizesis),

Hiatus is allowed
-.
e. g. ,
e. g. (),
vowels which do not form a diphthong are often blended in pronuncia-

c. iiiAiLb.
, , .
instead of

^8
:

1. After the and .


2. AVlien the two words are separated by caesura or a mark of punctuation.
3. When the final (preceding) vowel is long and in arsis.
When the final (preceding) vowel, though naturally long, stands in thesis

,
4.
and has been shortened before the following short vowel.
5. When the final vowel of the preceding word has been lost by elision, e. g.:

'^, ',
',
1. iraidi ^^ w. |

2. ov w ^^ -_ | .

',
| |

3. ^^ ^w w. | |

4. e /, ^^ |

w ^.

'.
5. |

Remark. ISIany apparent cases of hiatus result from the loss of a di-
gamma, e. g. d'

D, ELISION.

much more
Elision is frequent than in prose,
and conjugation ; ai in the endings ,,, a, , i, are elided in declension
; in ; in '.
THE CHIEF TECULIARITIES OF THE

,
E.

Before a consonant, the final short vowel of


may be cut off (apocope).
APOCOPE.
,
and of the preps, ,,
,, .
Remark. The accent in this case recedes to the first syllable, and the
consonant (now final) is assimilated to the following consonant, e. g.

1. Single consonants, csp.


.
,, ,
, .. ,
CONSONANT-CHANGES.
,
, and at the beginning of a word, after a
vowel, are frequently doubled, e. g. So also a short final
vowel before a follg. liquid is often lengthened^ by doubling (in pronuncia-

2.
and .
tion, though not in Avriting) the liquid, e. g.
Metathesis of vowel and liquid is common, e. g. and

DECLENSION.

1,

2.
,, .
pi., e. g.

The
' . ()
G.

-, -<,, , ,
Tlie termination

three local suffixes


Avhither ? e. g.
SPECIAL CASE -ENDINGS.
serves for the ending of the gen. and dat. sing, and

answer the questions where ? whence ?

,, . , . FIRST DECLENSION.
1.
2.

3.
4.

5.
^.
The
The

The -, ', . ^,
- .
For d we find always ,
e. g.

The nom. sing, of some masculines in

gen. sing, of masculines ends in -ao or


gen. pi. of masculines ends in

dat. .
Attic, into -), e. g.
pi. ends in or -,
or

rarely in -ais,
- except
is shortened to

-,
-
e.
e. g.

g.
-et, e.

and
g.

(rarely contracted, as in

cxilyq, but

I. SECOND DECLENSION.
1. The gen. sing, has retained the old ending in -lo, Avhich, added to tlie stem,
gives the termination -oio. Rarely occurs the termination -oo more .

commonly the Attic ending -.
2.
3. The dat. pi. ends in -
The gen. and dat. dujil^cnd in -oitv.
or -ois.

1.

2.
The
Dat. pi. -<n, -,
.
K.

,,,.
THIRD DECLENSION.
pen. and dat. dual end in -oiiv, e. g.

-- usually joined to a consonant stem


and
by a connecting wel

,.
c, e.g.
3. Stems ending in -- are generally uncontracted in declension, but -cos often

,
contracts into -vs.

. ,.
4. Words in -is generally retain the

in all their cases, e.g.
Remark. For the various forms of
5. Stems in -v generally lengthen e to

if), c. g.
vid. sub voc. in Lex.
in compensation for the omitted
But proper names may retain the c, c. g.
I HOMERIC DIALECT.

ADJECTIVES.

,,
L.

1. The feminine of adjs. of the 1st and 2d declensions is always formed in , e.g.
exc. Sla.
2. The Attic rule, that compd. adjs. have only two terminations, is not strictly
observed, and, vice versa, some adjs. which in Attic have three termina-

3.

4.
tions have only two in Homer.
Adjs. in -
voc. in Lex.
are often of only two terminations, and often change the fem.
-ia to -ea or -.

The comp. and superl. endings and - -


For the various declensional forms of vid. sub

are much more


, extensively
used in the Homeric than in the Attic dialect.

1. For
:. >, ,.
M. PRONOUNS.

special forms of pers. prons.,vid. sub voce. ,,. ,,


2. 6,,, in Homer, dem. pron. In nom. pi. the forms
is and occur

3.
signif, vid. sub voc. in Lex.
is another form for .
by tbe side of oi and at. The forms beginning with
and
have often relative
are forms of due.

For peculiar forms of rel. pron., as well as for demonstr. meaning of some of
these forms, vid. sub voc. .
For peculiar forms of interrog., indef., and indef. rel. prons., vid. sub voce.
4.
, , '. and

CONJUGATION.
. AUGMENT AND REDUPLICATION.
The augment may be omitted

( thrown back as far


1. ; in this case the accent is

as possible toward the beginning of the word. Monosyllabic forms with


a long vowel take the circumflex, e. g.
The 2d aor. act. and midd. is often formed in Homer by a
),

,
'(t/3i;).

^
2. reduplication.
The only examples of a similar formation in Attic are
(--), and (jtPtftTrov). Among the examples of reduplicated

),
aorists

(). --
may be mentioned
(), : {'),
(),
and
(), ('-

-- ()
3.

1.
and

the reduplicated aor., e. g.

The
,.
Examples of a very peculiar reduplication are

the stem is repeated after a connecting a.

older endings of the sing, number


. ENDINGS.
().
Here the last consonant of

There are a few examples of a reduplicated fut. of similar formation with

, ,,
are common in Homer:
y). -
-
(subj.), (also written
2.
- in the act., -,
The ending of the 3d pers. dual in the historical tenses is
as well as in the midd., voice.
as well as
In 1st pers.

3.

,,
pi.,

. is used for and

.
for 1st pej-s. dual.
The 2d sing. midd. and pass, often loses <r and remains uncontracted, e. g.

for
2
(also ), In perf. midd., occurs
xviii

4. For the
e. g. , 3(1 pi.
THE CHIEF PECULIARITIES OF THE

yevotaro.
and
endings - and -, - -
are often substituted.
Before these endings (-rat and
or middle labial or palatal mutes are changed to rough, e. g.
().
smooth -)
-
5.

G.
The

The
vai, ^).
inf. act.

i^tii'itii'.

-ijvai
frequently ends in
The 2d

-
-, also
shortened to

There are one or two examples of a pres. inf. in


from verbs in
endings -oxov and
- and -, e. g.
e. g.
appears also in the iorm -cciv, e. g.
aor. inf.

express repetition of the action, and arc


and
( = ).
-,
-
qalled iterative endings. hey have the inflection of the ipf. of verbs in
-, and are rai-ely augmented. They are attached to the ipf. and 2d aor.
, --.- --, --
of verbs in by the connecting vowel , rarely a, e. g.
When joined to the 1st aor., these endings follow direct-

- - -
ly after the connecting vowel of the aor., e. g.

-,-
Verbs in append the iterative endings directly to the stem
(-), (= from
\-,
').
-.
-,:

The long raood-vowels

shortening
for

case, easily
, is
. MOOD-VOWELS

especially
be confounded
for
common
, OF SUBJUNCTIVE.
of the subj. are frequently shortenecl to and o,

in 1st aor. subj.,


Avith fut. indie.
for (
which might,
= ^).
e.
This
in that
g.

Q. CONTRACT- VERBS.
-
, ^, , '.
1. Verbs in appear in open, contracted, and resolved (expanded) forms.
The resolution or expansion consists in prefixing to the long contracted

2. Verbs in
,sometimes,
from from or
,
.
.
vowel a like-sounding, short, accented vowel, e. g.
Remark.
Sometimes, for the sake of the requirements of metre, a long
rowel is prefixed or the short vowel is affixed, instead of prefixed, to the
long, contracted vowel, e. g.
-
;

are generally uncontracted, but sometimes form ci from and


In uncontracted forms the stem-vo\\el c

3.
is
Verbs in -
7.
generally lengthened into
for
lengthened to
arc generally contracted
ci.

.
in open forms the stem -vowel
;

Resolved forms are: for > , is

. PECULIAR FORMATION OF PRESENT (EXPANDED) STE3I.

1. Many
(fut. ),
presents in -
--].
are formed from stems ending in
^). (aor. The stem
,
of
e. g.

ends in

2.

3.
-
pass. ptc.
c

shows a stem
),
, . ).,
g. aor. pass.
Several presents in

e. g.
are formed from lingual stems,
(aor.
e. g. (peif.

4. Several other vowel stems, additional


stem by the addition of i, e. g.
to
(perf. ).
and form the present

8. FOBMATION* OF FUTURE AND FIRST AND SECOND AORIST ACTIVE AND

1. Such pure verbs


MIDDLE.

let aor. act. and midd., c. g.


the stems in -
show a similar doubling of
, , ..
as do not lengthen the final stem-vowel, in the formation
of their tenses, before a single consonant, often double

c. g.
in the fut. and
Sometimes
,
2. The fut. of liquid verbs
HOMERIC DIALECT.
is generally uncontracted,
,
e. g, .
,(), xix

,
few liquid stems take the tense-sign e. g.

(), (^-).
3. few verbs form the
(),
, (),
1st aor. act. and midd. Avithout ,
(), , ' e. g. and

,,
subj.
{}. inf.
4. and
e. g. ,
e sometimes take the place of

and
{),
{-),
as connecting vowels of the 1st aor.,
(). Similarly, the imvs.
(),
(),
(), and the infins. -
A
, ^
Avith connecting
occur
is seen in
and a single example of an aor. ptc.
(a 24).
;

2d aor. act. and midd. is often formed, similarly to the aor. of verbs in -,

, ,,
5.
without a connecting vowel.
e. g.

(), opts,
). (),
The
(stem

imvs.
Of this formation there are many instances,


(), inf.

and
),
()),
ptc.
(),
(),
and
(--),
('-
are similarly formed from a redu-
,
plicated stem.

T. FORMATION OF PERFECT AND PLUPERFECT.


1. In the forms (')
and Ave see the same doubling ()
2.
of the initial consonant of the stem after the augment (reduplication), as if
the stem began with p. The reduplication has been lost in

The
), and
1st perf. is
mon, but always
is irregular in
formed from vowel-stems alone.
Avithout aspiration, e. g.
( =

There occur
()
' (),
().
and
The 2d perf. is
or .-
very com-

frequently forms from vowel-stems Avhich have lost the tense-sign ,


perf. ptcs., e.g. ( = (),
().
esp.
(-
3.
),
/, ^
e. g.

=^,
and
In the plupf. the older endings -ca, -cds, -6() contracted i(v) or
. r. \.(cf.
Avith Lat. videras
?^
with Lat. videram;
yav=yav,
with Lat. viderant>
;
,
appear,
7)

1. The 3d
, . pi. indie, is
U. AORIST PASSIVE.
often contracted from - to -cv, c. g. ,-
2. The

<^rt),
subj.
to t or , and
ay or
Remark. A
^
remains uncontracted, the

(,
().
8 )
the follg. mood

very peculiar form


2d aor. pass,

V.
from
is

IN
,
of the pass, sign is often lengthened
sign shortened to c or o, e. g.

-.
(3
(stem

by metathesis,
314).
for -
1. Forms of the pres. indie, of verbs in -
occur as if from verbs in - and -.
2.
of ,
As the ending of the 3d pi. of the ipf and 2d aor. act., often takes the place
e. g.
and
' (),
(), and
(). (),
and (),
In the 2d aor. subj. act, to meet the requirements of the verse, the mood

,
3.

such forms as , ^,
sign is sometimes shortened and the stem-vowel lengthened.
and Orjyg orijyg,
Thus ai-ise
and c(u>/. Some-
; -,
4.
times the

,,,
of the stem is Aveakened to , and this again protracted to ci.
Thus arise the forms and

,
For peculiar Homeric forms from the verbs
and vid. sub voce, in Lex.
(=),
', , ,
(=).
, ',
-
. -
- in composition
privativum, see

.
* -,
(1) so-called
(2) a copu- in his
, ,, deceived himself greatly
thought 95, ;

"
,(
w)

,
lativum, orig. English (
(cf. -^ (v. 1, see no. 1)

, ,,
;

same), then -,-, - contains the idea (b) trans, dupe, beguile,

,, -
of union or Iikeness,Lat. idem or una, 91, 129. [aor. 1, act.
and mid.
e. g.

cf. ,
tensivum
(in words like
the existence of an a in-
Avas formerly, but incor-
WW- and
doubtful deriv.
meaning, were
::i ii w- ;
pass. --
249 1
?
befooled,
[- ^ -
.]
w], of
?),
suspected
and

rectly,assumed).
(3) a prothet -
",
nothing.

,
e in

, ,, , ',
um, simple euphonic prefix (like i and

,., , ", ,
, Low Latin
-
istatus, ispero; Ital- 536. [---]
inhabitants of Euboia,

,
ian esperanza; French esperance, Trojan fountain-nvmph,
(^-^w-j

,
etat), e.g. 22.
son of dream-reader

-),
interjection expressive of pity or
horror, freq. with ^, ,, Eurydamas;

'')
slain bv Diomedes, 148.

-
6,
361, 816, 443.
[-' ^-'],acc.masc.andntr. ", , fabulous tribe of the North. [-
a Trojan, 32. [
), ,
^ -]

, ^]

-, ,
(-, invoicing harm, ruinous, (from
destructive; 271, as ^ non mis sum, not discharged, new,
banishing faithless mortals and per-

,- (, ),
jured deities to the lower world; - A 117t. [

-05,
--]
not hit, 540t. [- - -]

),
, -,
91. 3, v. 1. ('

not to be prothetic, only at beginning

-, ;, (,
broken, stout, 57 o'f. [^ ^1
7), i tr a c t a-
of verse.
178. (2)
(1) weak, feeble, 337,
gentle, 135,

, 282. [---]
biles, unapproachable;

-,
;

'),
A

, (
esp. freq. in II., c. g. 567, 502, 70, prothetic, loud-
248.

.5, lengthened from ., roaring, clamorous, 41; others, seVeni.


from e.

,
i.

, (1) injure; (a)


sing.aor.9 237; /c 68, (^y2
); (b) -<[- miss;
aor. subj. fail of,
65|. [^ ^ - ^]
divine night, 78|,

, -,
esp. of injury to understanding, mislead,
delude;
with

cf.
', (- - -), 296

685;
297, pass. 136;
61

113;
301. (2) mid. (a) commit afolhj,
; , ^ *'
,
;
429.

of Hellespont,

-,
500 ,
-,
-
;
[^-^], town on S.
836. Hence
584.
exceedingly, mirum
shore

in
( ^ ^ ) ; (-^ w ^) modum, mirum quantum.
, , r>yaa&Bai

,
-
,
ayaaa^aKf
miror.
.,,
&,
6, (
i

, - -

see
- - .'
'-.

6tc., sefe
I
'
see

miror.
strictly
'.

ajW.
;
*

= ad-


,
viire,
mi r a r
7 S03,
41,404,

joined with
29, and mirari, de-
gaze at with amazement, 7 1 in
i,

behold with wonder,


be astonished.
(2) in bad sense, (a) indignari, oe i-
;

,
3, /uai),
mirabilis, (jood, capable, in widest dignant, outraged at, Avith ace, 67;
of persons, valiant, brave, 565 ; be vexed, annoyed,

,,
signif. ( 1) Avith dat..
181, 1 341 ; 732,
Avitli ace. of specification,
179 freq. 639; Avith (b)invidere,
envy,grudge,\8l,^wthin'., 129; esp.
; ^,^;
common in signif. no6/e(cf. op tim a tes), freq. of envy of the gods, ^ 181, 21 1,
109,(.7,
A 113,
, 324); bold, 565, 442. [---]
*7,
daring, "N 238, 284, 314,
279,

V 246; advantageous,
347 ; noble,
632).

632,
(2)
280 (opp.
of
and circumstances, exce//ei, 478,t 27,
204,
611 ;
things

793,
Orestes, a
30.
.so?^ of Agamemnon,

His grandfather!
was Tantalos, Avhosc sons were Atreus
and Thyestes (father of Aigisthos);
', . ,

63
441 ;
;
,
,
blessing and curse, 237, 392, Atreus's sons, Agamemnon and Mene-
ytpaipnv, do honor, laos; Agamemnon's children, Orestes.
bene velle, Chrysothemis, Laodike, Iphianassa

,
wish one well, 43; sanamenteuti, cf.
think rightly,

,
162 tig or nestra.
104, I 287

diriiv, advise with friendly in- same time noWyniv


.
;
his wife, Klytaim-
King in Mykenai, but at the

,
;

"
tent

, ;(ig
counsel. [--
follow good

parallel form to
vov, viewing with indignation,
ships,
108; his wealth in
576, 610-14; commander-in-
son of Priamos, Q 249. chief of Grecian host before Troy;

16, size,
and

166,178; 477-83;
A 172;
- , , ;,,
his bodily

, .
tjoya, indignantis scelera; exploits, 91-661 ; honor accorded

-,
cf.
[^-^^-] him, 887; sceptre, 104; return
, (from ), only gen.
/3 67.
from Troia, 143 sqq., 156, 193 sqq.,
and voc, greatly renowned. [y ^\

don.
-,
trious, glorious,
-^,
571, a Myrmi-

3, praeclarus, illus- (cf. daughter of


epith. of men, of a Augeias. granddaughter of Sun-god,
'
234 sq. ; is murdered,
512-37,584,
]. Hence
387-463,
248 sqq., <? 91.

),
20-97 [--
fem. adj.

,, . -,
and of hecatombs. 740. [--
Nereid,

-<,
45, ]
(from ), tmmarried,

-*/7
2,

men
trious, of
3, praeclarus, i7/ms-
[^^ ^ ^]
r40t. l) (aya-ffvt0.,see
;

have joy in
only pros., ), A 420. 186; nivosum, cov-
(),
132,
462;
plume one's self upon,
222;

(),
473,
exult,
176, speeding
make display,
ghdly
ered

,, ,), -
icith deep snow, snow-capped.

3, (from lenis,
forward under Zeus's

,
fair wind. pleasant, gentle, ; kind,

splendid, beautiful, or precious,


any thing
144;
friendly,
), 230; common phrase,
(opp.
-
,
votive offerings, 274, 509, 347; Avith his (or her) gentle
applied to sacrificial victim, 438: to missiles, describing a {natm-al) sudden,
602 ; personal adornments, painless death dealt by Apollo upon

-- -<,
horses,
3 0, 257. [---]

}/
.
j)arallel

only in signif.
(also
form,
ipf.
; , 6-,
,
(y/), aor.
unaugmentcd)

1.
; the form
(1) admirari, ad-
; and from
men, by Artemis u])un women, 280.

tleness, Jriendliness,

ly, r4G7t [
//, comitas, gen-
203, cf.

com is,
]
230.

gentle, friend-
., , -) ,
- aycioiiai

see mir or. and //, (cf German gell-

,
-,
(parallel form of English yell, nigh tin -gale),
en,
and
ly,
12
, ,
7
464.
,/,
17.
only prs.,
ij

[-^-;-J
receive kind-
33; espouse the cause of,

214, / lovingly
u t i u s, u t i a, messenger ; common
phrase,
.,
715;
94; also of birds,
,, 526.
as, vase, bowl: for

, - , ,,,,;
-, and 6 289, art thou not there- victuals, 289, and drink.

,
received;
Avith content ? [- ^ -] , 6, (), particle like age,
, loi^ng -manliness, agedum; quick! come! after or
manly, 392. [^L_-] before ); with subj. or imp., cf. French
'

king of Arkadians, vassal of Aga-


memnon, to whom he brought the
609, allons ! often
475; see also
occurs
'
with

(cf gererey), aor.


. pi., e. g.

-, ), .
equipment of sixty ships.

,
always with
(), son, which
beloved, dear,
is to be
pass, pf
mid. aor.
aor.

(written by ancient grammari-


inf -
3 pi.

supplied in 365. [^-' ^] ans as pres. \)art.


/5

(-,, ),87^- (I) act. colligcre, congregare.


-
-
flowing ; 845, ace. collect, call togethei\assenible,T 197,
concionem advocare;

,
30. pr]v, pass,
(),

,
Au- and
geias, king in Elis,
{},
624.
son of

from ens,
',
mid. gather together;
aor.
consciousness
wits, presence of mind), came
( 152.
back

,,,
boisterous, epith. oi

a Trojan,
97|.

338.
again,

gregaria, belonging
{),
[^-^
to a herd, feed-

',
-, a Nereid,
), m42. [- - -]
admi-
ing at hirge.
{, ), ]

'.
(1) son of Da-

{
3, (from mastor, suitor, 131, 247,
rabi 1 i s ; illustrious (cf c 1 u s),
ar i ss i (2) son of Phradmon, a Trojan, 257.
honoris cans ,, (3) Greek, 302. [^ - - -]
an epithet applied,
),
.,
to

,;
rulers, nations
jans, V 272 to Phoinikes,N 5 to Hippe-
molgoi) also freq. to suitors ; *> 7 1 to
the noble
and
;

t 1 to Tithonos

thrice to Fcrsephoneia. [^
?'/,
^]
{),
tidings, mes-
(Phaiakians, Tro-


trix,bestower nfsjmil;
of Athene, only at end of verse,

^,
tle,

,
oxc.
ijc, {),
epith.
359.

grex, herd of cat-


281,Avhere it is a drove of
praeda-

sage, report,
174; ,]', -,S 416, I 422, 355,
Ac pa-
horses ;

<$,
487, with the herd.

. {), -
, 30; command, 150, crregatim, in herds,

. .
tre. 408, cf.
263; as causal gen., 206, he came 160. [-^--^]
(because of) on a mission respecting =
thee ; 140 cf also ; = ',', from
in 252, 640, 206; see
[ ^
(), inhonoratus,
A --
also --^ ivithout a gift of honor, [--

9, , nun tins,
119f.

;
messenger, handed down by old gram-
marians as nom. masc, like
-,
thus Ave mav explain
and
206,
j
sunt.
6, see

\ {, ).
, congregati

iinpetn-

, {), ,, -.,
252, 640, 384, 140; also ous, brave in combat; epith. of Trojans.
such passages as a 414, /3 92, 381. Mysians, Rhodians, and of Perikly-
menos. 286 ; formerly explained.
fut. very honorable, as if from a copul.
aor. inf 159; nuntiare, and [----' ^^j]
report, announce; , also 120, (de) miror, I am aston-
123; with inf., bid, 350, 517. ished, 221. [--]
'
'* ,
gregati erant,
&-, , (),
-,
ynanliness, couraf)e,
courage which will not
I 100, pride.
(aro), sec

(, ),
;,

46
let
; 457, of the
Hektor

ferox, very
con- vus,

virtus,

rest;

unco
-
chariot,

bent bow,

-, (),
bent, curved, epith. of

rostro
ov,
264.

848

pracditus, with
ad-
[--^]

;
(), bearing the
epith. of Paionians.
bow and of

manlt/.
(I) brave, bold, 43, a 106; hooked beak, nom. sing, only r 538,
high-hearted,
ing 406; also,
c 658

,
414, of helms-
; high-beat-

, , (),
elsewh. pi., epith. of birds of prey.


life,
{req. = noble,

, ,?,
man; elsewh. with , cubitus,
generous mind.
443. [_--]

(2) haughty, I 699, elbow, 494, 80 ; 252, in the mid-
dle of the arm, below the elbow 702, ;

son of Trojan An- 6,


rf corner of the wall.
(),
tenor and Theano,
340.
-5,
, ,
ternus, ageless, of undecaying
59,

2, (/),
579, 474,

ac-
vigor,
d e r e, take delight

beauty,
, ,
splendor,
78 ; dazzling beauty, of Pe-
in,

(),
fut.
33 1 f.
splen-
[- - -]

,,
always with 539; ay, nelope, 1 80 ; of horses display, 3 1 ;

-,
;

447. [----] scatter the fine things whicli you now

, (^),
,(-, , " -,
admirabilis have, 244 ; Epic dat. 510.
ace. of respect) su7pass- Avife of mother of

,
(with ;

X [- - -]
ingly beautiful,
(),
370,
inf -
-, - 1 77.
ipf. 672.

,
vtov and
age re,
493;
lead, bring, sc.
iter,
animals with shining fruit, 115,
apple-trees
589. [ ^
more comm.
492;
yon,
;

/ wood,
also, conduct, sc.
784.
a bride,
[^-^-]
(),
6, , (a-)'a\-a/'oc),only masc.


from the earth, 722|.
ipf.
were raising in their arms the

(1) son of Lykurgos, chief


body
and
brilliant.
polished
ntr.,

metal ; of ransom
splcndidus,
(1)
gifts,
epith. of clear water; of
csp. of gold or
shining, bright,

,- other
203 ;

-,
; of fame,
of Arkadians, 609. (2) wrestler so also in reproach, famous
from rieuron, vanquished by Nestor, with thy bow (and little else),
(2)
, 635.
(', from yK) iv
385.
, in wider sig-

X ,in c m 1 e u, j/j the ainns, only


nif.
ways
: illustrious,
at end of verse),

-
vwv, ^188
;
(al-
stately,

,
385 sunny grove,

,
555. 291,

,
503,

,,
,
;

adv.,brachiis, complexu, 506. [---]


(-'),
,,
into or in the arms, with

- (), (),
)^,
ham
(,i , s,

= ,ntr.,
with fish-hooks,
252.

332.
[ ^]
\n-
,
for yvor}a,
uncus), votiw,only aor. ind.

aor. part.
(Od.)
sync. aor.

218, part,
ignorare, ^7
iter,

95 ; from
subj.

to recognize,
-
-
15 ;

, Jo is A 537, neque eum conspicata


in complexu, in Zeus's embrace, Juno ignoravit, knew right Avell;

.-, ,, ,
261. so also 28, 78.
a^Kca, ,
(cf. ad- uncus), crooked (), only fern., intami-
winding valley, gorge.
- nata, holy; Artemis, Persephone;

-, aor. part,

, (), vcrsu-
from

,
^, aor.
259.
(^),
[

, ,
]

inf. pass. aor.


fut.

nos,

,
tus, crooked in counsel, cpith. of
205. 319; only

,
59 in nom.

(),
Kro-

only ntr., c ur-


{ =
shatter.
(at
(,
'),

exc.

(I ) act., spears,
cud of pole),
559),
f ran go, break, shiver,

40, II 371
yoke, chariot
shoots;
,
,
of trees,

, 148,

,,
-
769 ; ships, mast. c contione,//O7ra the as-

,{, ?
(2) pass., spear, sword, 367; cudgel,
A 559; barbs ofarro>v,A 214; neck of
Elpenor, 560; svffer shipwreck, 123.

, -6 -), igno-
sembly,

assembly,
264.
ad contionem,

(), contionator,
A 54.
to the

- , ,
ti,

bat. . ,
unknown,

unrecognized (with

,
79|.
see

(), reddam)
ignora-

ignotum,
;
haranguer, speaker (opp.
126);
ful;

dia, gift
loud speaking, power-

],
of speaking,
(),
eloquence,
facun-
168f.

, ,
unrecognizable, r 191. (Od.) [- ]

- , (),
,

i
a-vovos {yovog), unborn, 40f dux, chief, 519,

-
-,
(ayojor/), pres.
231. [--]

, palm a, with

,
,
I

6, 337 ipf. flat, outstretched hand, A 425, 508,

,
;

aor. only 3 sing, 520, A 452, 315, of mortally Avound-


-
', ,,
usually at end of verse Avith
and following oratio di- only
412; contionari, 162
recta,

-,
160,
(, ]),
,- ,
;

speak publicly, harangue in the assem- 410 belonging to the

,
!

bly; 1, held assembly. farm domestic cow,


enclosure, epith, of
as distinguished from the cows driA-en

only
(), and imp.
fut. aor. to or roaming in remote pasture ; epith.
also of herd of cattle, of calves.

; ,
ind. 29, inf.
more common; contionari, loqui, and 149 imp. from

, , ,
die ere, speak, say; freq.
kvi or
(, ),
used alone or with
quick! foi-wards!
fol- ,
with ace, speak to me not of, 99, X lowed by imp., or inf. used as imp.

',, - ,
261
/3 318
;

,
,
.
q u am d i , Avhich I mean,
,

freq. declare,
Avith part,
;

,
prophesy ;
and
(literally seize! lay
y'l, (),
were following the
hand upon!).
venatio, hunt,
chase,
-
, -
-
relate at length,

(),
,
contrary import, 66,
241,
speak (joined Avith idea of action of
15),
56 330.

in
(Od.)

119
2, yet shows fern, termination
agrestis, 2t'/Zc/. (1)

,
t

^, , , ;
speaking maliciously, 6 ; pe-
culiar phrase,
, were discussing in the assembly, cf.
796, 380; thou
788,
of beasts. JiVce, ferae. (2) of
men, ferocious ; of combatants, savage,
a 199, 120, 575. t 215 of Folyphe-
mos, Skylla,

119; Gigantcs,
:

206.

-
shouldst not insultingly jnention my (3) horrible, dreadful, of tumult of

, ,,
hungry belly (cf

",
,
also

("), contio.
64). conflict,
grimly like a lion. [-^^]
41, rages

,
'/, son of Portheus in Kaly-

,) , , , ,
(1)
aimy

,
convoked assembly
(cf.
(through the heralds),
;
]),
c'
of people or

-
don,

,
S 117.

to the harsh-voiced Sintians.


(), rure, fro7n
294f,

the

,
it 361; fleld, go home,
iiV 497. (2) pub- 268. (Od.)
ruricolae, peas-
lic speech, 275 ; discussion in assem- o\,
bly,
'400,
788,
106
283, 818, 1 441, 370,
debate be/ore iiibunal,
;
ants; also adj. rustic,

.^, part. aor.


272.
mid. from -
, 387.

assembly,
439

(3) phce of meetinq, market,
/8 1 50, 4 266, 44,

382
503,
meeting -places,
377, 362
16; phce of
time (afternoon),
[---]; hence
;
try-house,
-.01 ()[ ^^
ruricolae,
379.

ru?-a/.
,
rus, to the country, coun-

106f,
< (

ay
&Yp<is,

trt/;
,/
',
,,
(for term opp. to
, age ,
rus,Jield,/und;
out in the coun-
ruri, in the countri/
cf. 383,
182); villa,coMwir?/-seai,\188, o428,
,'^
- ,,,
proeliantes, fighting hand

tribes, [-w^--]
604,

(),
ntr. ace. with
adverbial force, prope, near; usually
/|0;
to hand
also of whole

,,;
330, 139. [--] with dat. with
aypartpo^y 3, for us, wi/il, - ), 205, 502; only in
260;

471,(, 352, e propin-


ranging through the fields, the huntress. quo conspicatus; 336, close after

ayp&raif
218t.

piscans,
guU.
,

(),
(), ,,
,
, -,
53f,
ever catching fish; of sea-
,,, ,
ruri col ae, peasants,
him Odysseus entered the house.

sion,

ther of
-voos
V 332f

(2) father, of
;
(),
guick o/apj)rehen-
self-possessed.
(1) son of

from
[- ^ ^ J
-, 268.
fa-

honey -sweet Jield grass, on Avhich

,
mules feed; identified by some with
dog^s tooth, by others with panic.
), (),
does not occur in
nom. sing.,'ia ublic a, tra^row road;
',
and darkness
, , ,
90f,

(2)
296. [

mum.
ti,
',.
]

see
(1)
[

, (), confer-
close together, one after another,
ww_J
754.

proxi-

overshadoAved all ways, i. e. every thing


also of the streets and public squares in
cities, plateae, 391;
, ' 361,

near,closeby;
118.
(), r
proxime aher at, least
mum , very

,
642,
[^ -'] in publi- distant, t 280; pi. nearest, \y\ih. gen.;
cum r g r c s s a e, on the open street,

,
and nearest re-

,[^
254. sembling, I compare (him) first Avith.
($ (),\\\
host;,
.(),
the shore),
iv, iem.
chance gathering (cf.
coetus,
company,
(fleet, laid up on
[^-'
{)^
), hard

', ',
(),
,^*
[---]
by, V 103.

(from
prope,
gen., prope

near,

was choking,
5.
a,

with

^-
284, colli- ipf ),

, ,),. ^,
gere, collect by begging. [-' 37 If.

) (, ), )
, ,
]
c i us m (ago), aor. (imp.
(^-
proeliantes, fighting hand to hand
,
inf.

,
(opp. ; otherwise explained as ; comm. form subj.
fighting in close array, 165. [ mid. (also unaug-

,
mented); age re, kad, bring,

,;
dHve;
(cogn. with ), rope, act. (1) lead, wndiict, bring, A
, ', 842,
I.

iuxta, near, hard by, 564 (in 218

,
close to, is prep., bi'ings like to
freq. with
301 ;
is dat. of disadvantage,
sc. 283,,
being
,
;
like),
put
cubs,
to ;
243, 248,

134 ; bones of the fallen,


312
A 43 1
;

; of lioness's

-
335
used absolutely, because the missile (a) biing or cxirry with one, 401, 664, 1
had struck and remained fixed so near 650, A 390, 184, ^ 601 of persons ;

.-
him. [--] and things ; (b) plunder, carry off, make
(a'Xc),acc.,
near the sea; epith. of XaXicifand
maritimam,
- away with; prisoners and booty, beside
Q764,cf. I 594, 194, 484,' 512;
[ -^^>^]
(^) ,* A 332, the goddesses of dark death

, ,,
413 f, Avere carrying away, cf 614 and
deep near the shore. [- ^ >-' 602.
(2) transport, remove, vcherc,
aYxi-6coi {),
diis propinqui,
related to the gods; of Phaiakians.

&-( (), C m i us
persons and things as subj.
172;
839
cf. A
;
also freq.
(a) can^f away,
598, A 338, (c
a

551
,
^,
;
even

recover, 268;
(b) fetch, things living or
A 184, 105, 368, 613, 50, 778,
life,
thet later form
;
[-^^ .
dens, shameless hound, as abusiA^e epi-
117, ;

326,

tempest.
424,
to pass, occasion,
(4)
nown, 6 311; of.
27,


266. (3) bring

,
547 ; sport,
spread abroad re-

raise a song of exultation.


ay.,
<1>

37,

392,
(5) guide,
X
and ,
-6, , , , (
-, ,
dignus, disgraceful;
(,},
copul.
uterus), f rater, own-brother.
decus), in-
273,
combat, 721; water, 262;
-,
slanderous gossip.

,, ,,
control,
esp. the army, steer ships, 580, 631, ov, (), crudus, un-
557;
The
}/, 469, insidias
part,

ness, a 130, c 525. 47, cf.


is

of motion, where it is not necessary to


the sense, for the sake of greater vivid-
118.
struere.
often added to verbs

,
,,, , } -
tanned,

part,
()
tiatum fastidire,
2 and 142.
only opt. aor.

and
also written
;
,
(sat-ur) sa-
be satiated, loathe
perf.

,
II. mid. (1) take with one one's eiFects, from excess, ;

or what one regards as one's own,


clothes,
booty,
263;'
58, cf 72,
35, 40,
455.
captives,
19,

(2)
cf.
116;

bring home as wife; of bridegroom, take


to ivife, II 46, 190, 471 ; of father,X
-,
363; prizes,

- -
, jv).
esp.
etc.,
be ve7'w helmed with.

to satiety,
(,
drive one into misery (war), until
he has had enough of it. [^ ; 203,
orig.
and

to excess;

Avho brings to his son in marriage,


10 ; of brother, to brother, 238
of master, to his slave, ^ 214 ; of those

, ',
who accompany the bride, 28.

place of meeting.
b, (),
(\) assemblt/,
,
(, ,
comitium, mean
',
t u s, uncontested,

from
(), non
42f .

326, seems to
sweet -singing, seducing Sirens
[-

).
depugna-
-]

[-' ^
258 ;
\, 1.

,(2) place where as-


-, , (),commotus,
,
sembly meets: (a) 298, area be- ,
fore the temple, temple enclosure;

,
hall of the gods, yet cf. 264;
376,
, of ,
481, moved, agitated. I. epith. (1)
throbbing loith anxiety, 516.

the ships;, ,
space behind the ships, i. e. between the
ships and the shore, the encampment at
iv 500, differs
(2)
ing;
87, 469, buzz-
oves trepidantes, 7-est-
less, jiunied, a 92, 320. (3) -,
,(,,
,
in meaning from 428; (b) place or

-, (), ,, , ,
sobbing, tvhifnpering lament, 316,
scene of combat, arena, including the 1 7, etc. see foreg.) II. ad-
space reserved for spectators, 531. verbial, vehemently, icith

(-
, ,,
utterance broken by sobs,\\\ih.

- inscitia,
-
-
244|. [----' w -] more
-|,
inexperience,

,
ov, gen. (//^),
imperitus, unacquainted with,
dolefully,
413. III. adv.
flebiliter suspiravit,
216),

314,
[^^
-, ,
.
p283 cf.338. [---]
(),
re

1 i
-
", ,
,
,
s, ,
shameless.
,
s.

-
, ", ,
inflexible,
see
(cp^;),lacrimis ca-
tearless, dry,

from Troja,

,
{),
{),
^186.

I 1 58t.
[-

771, 759.
inflexibi-
[- w _ ^]
imp ud ens,
^]
son of
tus.
cf
gin.
(1)
(Od.)

voke of beasts of draught,


266, 655.
;
untamed; of mules,

(),
unbroken, not yet brought under the
293,
637,
(2) nnmarried ; of a vir-
indomi-

indomitam,

, ,
taesus.

, , see
-5 (), intrepidus, undis-
niayed, 117, but
see

to satiety.

adStkg, impu-
per-

714.
fjlther of
289, 391, 532; husband

aor. 2 from
(see
713,

placui.
),
''],
';
, ,
disgust (with toil) entered his soul,
8

,-
,., ;/, -
,
always, ever;
atifmv

strengthened by

,
88t.

in

,*,
123.
*,
,
,
what

,
[--]

,
town on the Propontis,
wiis afterward
handmaid of
Mysia, 828.

,. (dAt^aj),fut.
aetffoVjinf.aftffat,
also

can tare,
aor.ind.

,, , ,', '
(1)
",
daughter of sing. trans, sing,
412|. [] minstrels' lays, heroic songs ;

from of something, " sing and say,"

, (1) fugi- (cf.


tive to

, succeeds
as king; becomes also king in Argos,

, ,
there Nibelungen Lied), relatein song,
a 326,
('
a

,
of ,
harbors

,
thence,
' 'from

830,
and gives him his

328.
489

founder of with ace. and inf. 516.


leader of Trojan allies from sing;

(3) Trojan slain adj. used adverbially,
by Menelaos,Z 37, 45, 63.
350,
daughter in marriage, cf. ? 121; his very becomingly, altogether in order)
swift steed

, , 347. (2) son 492, with 514, and


(2) intrans.
sing meiTily; with

(4) Tro- and often, so probably A 473,


a 155
570
,

jan slain by Patroklos,

,
694.
(), - ();
,/
loud, ',
254 also of nightingale
of bow string, it sang,
;

.)
ace. from

-
coupled with
hod'dy maturity,

448,512.
and
II. (Cf.
i. e. twanged under the

{), fanum, shrine, only


(),
touch, ^411.
[---,
-, ,
strictly
exc. |0

dedecus.
519.]
fern, (j'i,j^jov),
(1) dcformitas, -
a-cOXcveiv
tttte, or contend
cert are, insti-
a gymnastic contest;
in, ,
disfigurement,
308;
19. (2)
behave unseemly, pro-

,
,
Tivi, in honor of some one,

,
aeOXLov, TO, ().
274;
734, toiling for a merciless master.
(1) certa-
-6,
terve agere. [^

), i
2 and 3,
]

d e c r u s, t u r
shameful,
{j^k, from
i s, unseem-
ivretch-

,
ly, ;

m e n, contest a piize, 108,


for 590. ed, 2; 84, 341 ill-favored, filthy,

,
;

,-, (,
(2) implements of combat, weapons,
4, 117.
carry off;

(3) prizes in contest,

bring
,
^-]
in, I
win;
127. [
242, V 402, V 259,
^ ^ ^]
7 109,
(jjo), indignus, un-
vadari; Ger- becoming, unseemly.

(1)
man wetten, English bet). (1) pi. ., mind altogether faultless; ov rot
-6, ,
; adv.
319
357,

;
228 [--
ignominiously,
wretchedly,


231.

certamina,/?rt2;e contests, 160,

89. nee vero


(2) sing, and pi. prize; for such a graceful, ignominious;
num
. ,
,,, ',
dedecet. (2) dis-
indig-

(), ' ,
prize, 548 having come,
; entered, for facinus;

-? (,
the prize,

,
700. [-' - -]

, .
483,

,
(3) turpi s, mean, poor;
?].

, ,,,-
160), , thou art vilely clad,
(4)
(1)

ties,
572;
(in war),
241
,, ,,
certamen,
guished from
103,

126;

,,
262;
prize contest, distin-

646, 753;
135,

hardships of every sort,


350, esp.
; 248,
those imposed by
II 590 ; varie-

5. (2) combat
435,

,
11 545,
vilis,

a-ciKi^ei (),
aor. subj.
small, mean,

foedare,
222,
[^ ]
ipf.

pass,
mid. afj-

maltreat, insult,
54; disfigure,
fut.

26;

(), ,
-( (),
EuvTsthcus upon Hcrakles. for yea (), he even insults in his
(),
mium
away
horses,
,
ccrtaminis ferens,
the prize,
X 22.
victorious;

aUC, at close of verse, aUv


prae-
hearing
only of
wrath the lifeless clay

,
' (, ), ,and mid.
pi.
I.

plujif.
54.

aor.
pass.

(cogn. with aifwvf acvum), semper, toller C, raise up, (1) iu strict sense
-6,
I
^ntfrom ground and
stones, 411, S
otherwise), I 465;
268; corpses, 678,
S
eum salvum
-
safety, 31 Of.
) , esse, despairing of bis
[----]
724 ; the wounded,
on high the lash,
spear,

,
373,
429 swing
362; brandish a
424 freq. with
hence also
325
; ,
'-
;

juges aquae,
V lu9f
- (y.
(, 1.
(from

).
cogn. with augeo,
a'liv
never-failing springs,
[ ^ ^ >^]

,
e. g. ;

', ,
raising ones self on high, rising, German wach sen, English Avax),only

,
307. Also pass, 393,
432,
249, 255, and
375; of horses,
of birds, 501 ; ,
pres. and ipf., increase,
nourish, let grotv tip,
261,

cherish great grief;


360
111;
, ;
'-

'
, 63, 540,
of the Trojans rose aloft,

of bearing, placing, e. g.
; the fortunes
74. Part.
for greater vividness, with verbs
380, a 141,
),
,- ) ,',
come to manhood, of Telemachos,
426; prosper, ,,%&;
the sacred day advanced, 66, 1 5 6
(f pigritiae

carry,
,
425, 335. Of ships (y 312,

forth, produce ;
^.
(2) pro re, bring
264, esp. mid.
me
/ causa,

, ,
-05,
lazy. [---]
(JV,
s /,
(-),
251f. [-
piger, idle,
]

(out of one's store),

,--, 293, 106, 335.


, {), invitus,
-,, from
part, and 3
sublatus.
, pi. aor.

-
pass,
univillijigly, 135, 133; also with , (). to-

^^^'^

77f ,
quite against one's will. [- -^

literally
(^), tpya ,
unwished-jbr things, suffer
lutarii equi, quick -trotting, high-
stepping horses, cf.

, ,,
-:-] .,
501 (II.). [-

aor. f
irom ,
. .
dor-
doleful woes,
.-
cf. sq.

(g/cijrt), contra volunta-


mivi.
(), dat. pi.
tem, against
,
the icill of, with gen.,
-, , (, ),
tern ere, thoughtlessly, 470.
287 ;

-, ^), (,

esp. freq. Avith

invitus, unwilling.

,
(2)
8, 28.

from
(1) icithout de-
), ,
amens,
302, 603,
thoughtless,
1

, , , {),
83. [----]
light-headed,

ari-
sign,

,
one's will;
264.

me invito,
against their wish, to their annoyance,
487, cf.
retinebit,
369; vi me invitum

^,
186; notice also
Avith ace, vi nolen-
reluctant, against
gladly
in spite
; '-
of me;

y
,
,
,
dus, dy^y, parched, withered; of trees;
ox-hide shield,

513.
,{),
239;

[-----]
situ inquinatum,
covered with dust, dirt, 184f [
491. ,
the son of Azeus,

-?, , (),
.
]
tem privavit, robbed thee by force, penetrans,
against thy will,

acXXa,
wind, stormy wind,
;
r),
646, cf. A 430.

(), pro eel


also in simile, to
', la, gust of
293
,,
continuus,
trating, of

658, 3.
(),
unceasing, of pain; pene-
sound of combat; adverbial,
pcrpetuo,
[---]
only pres. and ipf.,
incessantly, A 435,

describe onset of heroes,


795. [---]
-9
297, 40,

, fore the gods, ;


vereri, dread, shrink from; esp. be-
religioni ha-
,
.
turbi- bere, Avith inf., 267, t 478 with
;

dus pulvis surrexit, thick cloud S261. [-^^]


/ dust rose, ISf. [- ] (), ares c ens, becoming
oicWiJ-'iros 'Ijotc, storm-footed, i. c, dry, A 487|. [----]
swift-footed Iris (II.); cf. (^) ?// , 1 usci i a,

d-eXirea,
%iven me
insperatari, Zeus has
to see land Avhich I never
',
the songstress in green foliage,

meant, the wife of


518;
the daughter of Fandareos, is
of Thebai,
expected to behold,
408f mother of Itylos, whom she slew by mis-
-65 (), desperantes take while intending, out of jealousy,
- 10

, , ,
.,
to kill the son of Niobe, her sister-in- also ;

law after this deed, transformed into joined hyperbolically with


; and
[-----]

,
a nightingale, she ever sadly repeated
the name of her murdered son, 'In, Athens, capital of Attika,
'Irv.
-^ () ',
erant, (the horses) were as yet unac-
customed to the sight of corpses, 493f
546, 549,

,, , ,^.
',
,
,
,
278, 307 also sing, ti-

, ,
,
,, , , ;
-,
-
-
insueti
, the
80.
;

goddess Athene,

(aiyioxoio),
'

\v

ci
i

, .
d),
part, atvTfg, ipf.
()
,(,
3 du.

blow, of wind, always act. ;

minds wavered
,
ventis exagitatus.
ivi
to
cf.

and
ventus, English
inf.

fro.
pass,

(2)386,
[^ -^3
their ,
ters the arts,

,
I 390,

.
232, 160, esp. do-
mestic and feminine accomplishments,
116; as goddess of war,
esp.

she protects cities, and


is the especial patron of wary warriors
cf.
fos-

, , ,
fem., gloom, 864, 144; fog, like Odysseus; see

,
nora
1

(=-) ,
43 ; see also

', A'iolenta, (keds of violence,


faci-
, 328,
Athenians,
196,689,0 337.
parallel form of
551, 558,

,,,. , , -<$ ),
876t. [ -]
;

ov, , {), ventus, - wind, etc. ; 80, the city Athens.


(},

),
only S 254 ; elsewh. with lit.

flatus, blast, gusts. chaff-desti-oyer, designation of winnow-


see ing-shovel in Teiresias's prophecy to

,,
courage, impetuoso animo,
(Of uncertain derivation; cf.
and
lated to .^ ('),
395f.

876; scarcely re-


with stormy Odysseus,

aor.
ceri,
, from
128|.

toil, drudge,
and

' 453,
,
laboribus exer-
30.
neque
(part,

.
3, immortal; enim certatoris similis es, nor

freq. vith
,
<$,. (,
also subst., e.g. A 503,
in phrase
61, A 265;

also predicated of bodily


;
;
dost thou resemble one
part in 7nanly contests,
see
who
1 64f
takes his

,, ..
members, 530,
<,
ishable possessions
A 19,
{ 79,
and of imper-
447) of
^-
from
thos
see
.

, .,(),(), , , ],
the gods
, S
opp.

Chary bd is,
199;

h u m a t u s, unbmied.
;

/i

sine nu-
11 8.
only masc.
A
265;
[- - - -]

[--
2, c

]
2 ;

in-
the stormy ?),

dike, now Monte Santo.


only aor.
intueri, cernere, gaze,

-,
S
229+, the well-known
rocky promontory of Akte in Chalki-

;
perceive,

,
aQiiy0vK comprehend, 478. [ -]

;
;

-
mine, not without divine guidance=it 3, only pi., cuncti, (all)

&, ,
353|. [---]

- .
is really a special providence that

, (), nefarius,
together, in aowds,
392;
S
freq.
38,

[ ^ ^]
497;

,
a, also Avritten
criminal; live im- (), animo destitut.i,

lese,l
opp.
(
temn
,, ,
^),
piously, godlessly.

,
63, e

ipf.
, despise, always
, (), [^ ^ ^]
n^

106; nefarius, tftcifceii;


363. [w ^ _ <^]
ferus. law-

(), con-
faint-hearted,

playthings,
nutulao, child's toys,
, (),
despondent,

363; elegantiae mi-


323; orna-
^]
ludicra,
463f.

^, (
with negation, ments, trinkets, 4 1 6 [^-^ .

A 261. 212, 174. [- ^ - ^] i)art. from 364f,


2, ? >), i m- per 1 u s u m, m
.<f/>o?/. [^ ]
111 e s u s, immeasurable, boundless al (obsolete case-form of relative; cf.
,,8
,
11

,

as also tl this relatiA^e 471, 260, 147, 391,
-
.
!

force

as
may be traced in

reign)
348, al Ktv
true as that I reign;
never stands alone,
,
511 (to be distinguished from it
7 82, 277), 353 i0kXya9a
so sure I
- (-
but I. expressing a wish, optative use.
(1)
yap, iitinam, icould that, al-
ways vith opt, (a) where fulfillment of
, ()ya)
=
prefix
is regarded in some Avords
as a strengthening
vert/, exceedinglij.

Avish is regarded as possible, 538, alo, /, otar, (probably from ),


825, 97, 464, 454, 205, 244, terra, earth, land,
; ;

,
339,
235,
523,
309,
156, 536, 163, 251,
236, <p 200, 372 yap (
/;;
, ,3
over the whole earth ; QpyKwv alav.

, , ,
cih 189, 536, 272, 346, d 697, (1) island yleaea,home
r 22, 513); (b) where fulfill-
169, of Kirke, 135, 70, py-
ment of wish is regarded as impossible,
7 99 the formula, i yap, Ztv re ira- 3 sq., a fabulous region far
Ttp
:

is fol- in N. . (the Komans located it at Cir-


loAved
371, 288,
(b) above,

(b), 376.
97,
132, d
inf. in sense of (a), i? 311

(2)
(cf.
,
by opt, in sense of (a) above,
235; in sense of
3U =
p 132; by
in sense of

,
;

uti- ),
ccii)
Kirke
of Aietes.
;

son, Peleus,
hence (2)
herself, t
the goddess
32

descendant of Aiakos, (1)


15, 433, 189. (2)
;
/Li 268, 273, sister

nam, oh that! would that! (a) where

-
grandson, Achilleus.
fulfillment of Avish is conceived as pos-
sible, with opt. 178, X 41, 331,
, (),
,,\7],
son of Zeus, father of Pe-
leus, grandfather of Achilleus, 189.

,,
440, 494, 202, 61 (b) where ful-
;
(1)
fillment is conceived as impossible, son of Te- eya,
with opt. 722 with ; ipf. ^ lamon from Salamis, half-brother of
',
84,
40,
401; with aor.
86,
tive use,
253,
415,
204. II. intciTOga-
(never separated by in-
A

- , Teukros, bulwark of
the Achaians ("a tower in battle"),

' rrvpyov,
'
A 485

,yya ,
tervening word), si, whether, with subj.
118, , tiTck al
, , '
229;
tpya
550,

/rf,
6249;
; so also after
279, (cf. 793) , ,',
543 sqq. (2)
;

Oile-

,
217; and freq. without a preceding Lokrians; for his
us's son, leader of
verbum A presumption swallowed up in the sea
tentandi, 66, 94,
',
",. '
243, 55, A 797, 799, 301, a 379, near the 499. (3) the
144,
so also
51,60,
92, 182, 34,

.
379, /3 144, 215, 252,
strictly = si qua, if,
;
two heroes often mentioned in dual
or pi. together, e. g. -
,,
if in any case; the opt. occurs only in
oratio obliqua, ykvoiTo, lit. " wave city," in Aya,
387, yet see A 207.
III. conditional a tow in Achaia, seat of

,
;

use, al (never sei)arated by inter- worship, 203, and favorite haunt, of


vening word), si, if, perhaps, (1) with
',
Poseidon, 21, 381.
subj., (a)
pal sentence,
where
496,
fut. follo\vs in princi-
230 ; (b) where
opt. follows in principal sentence,
688 ; (c) where inf. follows in princi-
pal sentence,
(where a wish
260.
(2) Avith opt.
involved) vhee opt. thrown for amusement. [ -^ .^
I

,
popular epithet of sea-giant
ace,

(the mighty, the crusher), only

,
nabulum,
gen.
lit.

^, , (), ve-
hunting-sjyear,
"wave - demon,"

156, also
404.

,
is

follows in principal sentence, 389. in interpolated ,


(3) in a period, \vhere there is an ellip- verse, A 265, Aigeus's son.
sis of one of
Xyaea,
its

457, c 322,
members,
49,
al 3, '- caprinus,
233 ; after belonging to a goat. (1)
of or
cheese
(),
,
. ,,
12

, (2)
of goat's milk, 639. goat- but refers as often rather

,
|

skin bottle, see ; goatskin |


to the by which the shield
cap, 231. Avas suspended over the shoulder; cf
, (?), populus ni-
j

also


,
gra,

,
Avorld,
blaclc
r 510.
(
poplar; as tree in lower

= aiytov) goatskin
son of Thyestes, seducer
of Klytaimnestra; despite the warn-
ing of Zeus, a 35, he murdered her re-

,,, . , , ),
bottle, 196t. turning husband,
daughter of Adrestos, iiri 0^,196,49,^512 sqq.;
wifeof Diomedes, 412|. [-w>^_w] wherefore eight years later Orestes slew
, or, lit us, shore, beach, him and his own mother Klvtaimnestra,
[ ^-'^] 410, 30, 196.
(or a maritima, coast- , (cogn, Avith splen-
line), (1) division in N. Peloponnesos, dor, radiance; gleaming bright-
afterward Achaia,

, , ,^
in Paphlagonia,

ure, V 246.
855f.

abounding in goats, d 606


(), capras alens,
[- w - w]
-,
575t.

;

(2) town

goat past-
ness of sky, of daylight,
sun and moon ; of weapons,
362, ovpavbv

de splendido Olympo, from


.
45 also of

(),
458,

, ;

re-

4, of doubtful deriv. and signif the


I 15,
; -<, , (, ),
splendent

,
Olympos, A 532.

-
vidture,

men

in,
,
second part is perhaps from

],
loved and haunted by goats alone, for

,
too steep. [ >- w]
name of village
or island near, Ithaka, 633|,
ace, island in Saronic gulf,
lammergexjer,

[
428,
;

(when ultima
be read with synizcsis),
to

Aegyptius. (1) an Egyptian, d 83.
with
302,

is
59.

long,

), ,
opposite Pciraieus, still bearing its

,
ancient name,

- (cf.
562|. [ ]
afterward
chief city of the Achaian league,
574t.

,
[-^^]
(),
(2) Egyptian, 263, 432.

kan, j3 15.

Nile,
name of an aged Itha-

r), A egy
(2) Aegypt,thc
257.
tus.

-
(1) river

epith. only of Zeus, though it might


Aigis-holding,

,
land of (magic) herbs,
in Aegyptum.
355 ;

^,
,,
also be with propriety applied to Athene = imp. from

,),
and ApoUon, 1 64. [- -- ^ w]
. (), ,
A'erere, respect, reverence, 269.

,,
^, /, (strictly tempest, storm, (^.), pr. imp. ipf
cf

en tassels,
Aigis, conceived of as
ponderous shield Avith a hundred gold-
448, hence the ;
aldtTO, fut.
and
3
^,
pi.
aor. mid.
pass,
yereri, feel
yC-

(1)
handiwork of Hephaistos,
means in Zeus's hands,
309 the
593,
or at his command, in the hands of
Apollon, of exciting tempests and
of spreading dismay among men,
166;
;

awe
I ;
shame.
of,
640;
ashamed of
the Phaiakians,
A 23, 442,
also joined Avith
reverence or stand in
124, X96, 28,
was
his tears in the presence of
86. (2) with inf
229 described,

,
; 738,
esp. in battle, seconded by
448 serves
,, ; vereri, shHnk from, by reason of re-
ligious or other scruples, 146, 75,

,
means of spreading terror
as 343, 312, 82, out of regard to
and flight; above all when borne by propriety, 221, 184, Avhcre

, ,, ,
Athene, 448, 297 in 738 and ; is to be supplied.
204, it would at first sight appear as or, (of doubtful derivation;
if the later conception, Avhich regards
the Aigis as the movable breast ar- ).
ai-, cf

or -
(1) pernieiosus, destroy-
mor of the goddess, and with which ing, TTvp. (2) protervus, violent, in-
she is uniformly represented in sculpt- solent, of Ares, 897, 309 Athene,
;

ure (cf. cut No. 18), might be traced, 880 ; suitors, 29, 303 Melau-;
8
, 13 (
,,
,06^, ^
thios,
violence,
165.
220.
gen.
[-
iviih

]
reckless

[^ ^ favorite of Zeus, Jovis ales, Q, 311;


aUrds (cogn. with
aquila, eagle,

,
avis),

,,
- -]
dat.

,
, ',
,
,

,
-
[^ -- -], and "At^oc [^ ^ ^], bird of omen
[^ W ii], AtcJwv^i, ace. 'Aidtjv, bird of prey; high-soaring,
Aides, Hades, god of lower Avorld, 308; hook-beaked,

,, , ,),"^ also
or
1 457,

/ ^//,
"^^
cf.

:
188,

freq.
538.

etc.
dusky
201, X
[----]
;

(,^ ,
318, eura deus
perillustre fecit exemplar, the
god made it a conspicuous omen.
( = ),
),
vegetus

,. , ,,
often also only (so. h m, vigorous man, only 520, 83.
or simply prep, ,
followed by gen. (at, cf. 7;/3?;?), vegetus, ro-

", case of proper


be-
bustus, vigorous, robust, with
and as subst. with

, " ,',
i

tween privi/ pirls and navel, 568|. ; used as equivalent to man,


alSotos, 3, ().
(1) verecun- /ti440.
d u s, \7], shamefaced, bashful, 578. son of and
(2) V e e r a d u s, revered, venerated, brother of .robbed by Jason of

,
;

,, , -
august, applied to all pei'sons connect- the golden fleece, 70 ;
ed with one by ties of relationship or ob-
ligation of the : 139; of kings, 41 0, epith. of

,
,
gods ; of friends, guests, suppliants ; of doubtful origin and meaning,

,
often joined with or ; 373, perhaps best explained as from

\\^0>,
t^(uica=have given to the with intensive prefix dt, breathing

, , , (),
needy;

,',. .
more respected

see
and beloved,
243, with due regard
to the claims of a guest, with Jit escort.

", see
strongly, hard-puffing.

smoke or soot,
414, 239 ; , ,,
sus, fuliginosus, smoky, black ivith
[

of ashes that have


burnt out and lost their glow, pulvis
-']
fumo-

6,^,((|0), inscitia,/(>//y,
piy , ,
,
niger.

257,
,
198, ju 41;
272. [-
,
]
{,
231,

), , ,
u tin am, see
name of mare,
a?, I. 2.
lit. fery. Sor-

,,
from rel, 295.
, (), aether,
,,,
ignarns, unacquainted
stupid, 219. [---]
, pudor.
' -
with,

(1) subj.
;

filed by light of day


under the heaven,
(), which to
space
situated
it
sense of shame; 171,
not a spark of shame;

,-,'-
is

by the clouds from the


,
considered to belong, and separated
which be-

,
,
sc7'uple, longs to the earth ; as
122, cf. 561, with 657; dat. of place (locative), dwelling in
revere
505 ;
ti a,
Avith ,
regard, with
480
aether. In
cord made fast in
20, Here hangs from a

-^, and swings

,
1 1 1, diffidence,

, - ,
;

14. (2) obj, disgrace, dishonor, used iv 365, as when


a cloud rises from Olympos, out of the
elliptically sc. 22, or y
24; with ace. and inf., 787; piivy gleaniing light of day, and mounts into
parts = 262, hide thy heaven, i. e. the cloud seems to be gen-

^-, , .
75;

-,.,
nakedness.
oUi, aicV, see

(regular formula for closing


the verse), born to unending life, eternal,
and
erated out of the transparent aether,
and then rising perpendicularly, sub-
sequently spreads over the sky.

1,
Sec

dat. pi., to the Aithikes,


immortal, 373. a tribe Avest of Mount Pindos, 744t.
aUi see
ing, never failing
ever flow- [ --]
7, , , and ,
,
' 6,
, 14

and
Aethioplans, "burnt faces,"
dwelling on Okeanos' stream, in two
divisions, east and west, a pious folk
whom the gods loved and often visited.
,
339, 870.

,
in sausage,

,,
(2) cruor, cama^-e,
119.
relationship, kin, joined with

gere, plant out a thorn-hedge.


septa
.
298
(3) of descent, ofooj

colli-
[
It is nowise unreasonable to suppose
that some tidings of the existence of a
/ ^ , san-
bloody. (1)

,
black race may have found its way to guineus, bloody wales,
cruentatus,
the Greeks of the
166 (),
-, ,
dens, burning,
ijg,
Homeric

etc.,
u s, ha/l, porch
rtic
,
age.
flag ran s, ar-
523.
drops o/
blood-besprinkled.
ViS, murderous,
,.
blood.

,
(2)
sanguinari-
(3)
[ ~^^
467|

, ,-6
epithets; polished (smoothly planked), from Thebes,
resounding. We distinguish two.aZ- 394t.
{'),

see plate III. at end of volume.


(1) on either side of vestibule, after
passing the entrance door

; . , ,, all bloody
and were eating pieces of
(crudas), 34^f.
flesh

390, 1 76, 449.


the >,
banqueting-hall,
(2) after traversing
just before entering into the skilled in the chase,
this latter, - ,
49f

,, persua-
(cogn.with amans?),

,,
;

cw/iaroc, served as sleeping-room sive, persistent, a 56f


for guests,
,
399, 297, and was roofed.
('),
ace. and dat. ful-
gidus, coruscus, radians, spark-
296f.
;

,-
terribly-brave (),\.
'-

Ung,

.
,
with flame,

,
day, clear sky,
75.
152. [- ^ ^]

[--]
,
red, of smoke mixed (contains at once recognition of bravery

, (), aether,
;

and censure for the faults vhich attend


light
44,
of
646,
and of Aphrodite as-
it),
31t.
Alvcias, gen. ,, ;

-, ,
mother of Theseus, follows cending pedigree as follows Anchi- :

Helene as captive to Troja, 144. ses, Kapys, Assarakos, Tros, Erichtho-


sprung from nios,Dardanos,Zeus repi'esented as in
;

,
aether, e 296t. feud with Priamos the great-grandson
-5, virb Bopeao, of Tros, 460, 1 80, 307 favorite of

^ (),
;

under the blast of aether-bom Boreas,

, ,
the gods, 344, 291.
171. prs., -r /, -, corn-

353.
,
({>

,,
frigore con- pro b are, approve, praise ; opp.
fectus, overcome by cold, 318|.
fem., water-hen, e 337 and
249 esp. of oracle,

fulgens,
with

fulvus,
ir 403.
and (), ;

,prae omnibus te
mortalibus praedico, praise thee
shining, taivny

,,
; of horses, sec

also of cattle, eagle, lion, and metal


implements, 372,

Odysseus,
839.
name
(1) assumed by
183.(2) of horse, 185,
;

487.
,
above

leus,
all

alv<S6ev
other mortals,

a Paionian, slain by Achil-


21 Of.
=
374 and

^
non ferendum modum,

^
which we should best describe as Sor- in horri-
rel.^
diic*,

&iKcL,
rum impetus,
, {),
see ai(w).
, telo-
bly,

520t.
97t.
Alviidcv, /roin Ainos

(), infortunatus,
(in Thrako),

-^
stoi-m or hail of ar-
rows, 709t. [
(ctj^.j'fjot):=fto>, tur-
] child q/'inis fortune.
(), ace. Avith ,
(1) iu the veins,
,,
pi te r, ignominiously
,,
X 336t. [^ ^
,

sanguis, bhwd,
717, also of gods,
me perquam infortunatam,
,
ine. jtoor sufferer!
1
201f.
a u d a t i o, 1 a u s, />ratie,
ah

7 95.
_
( 15 alpei

($, ^
terribilis, formido- olmicaaov, montuosam, high-ly-

,
),
Xosws, frightful, dreadful, horrible, in
different grades of intensity

, ;
ing, mountainous,
and a,
,
(), only with -
87f.

sometimes use dreadfuUij


exceedingly, very ;

,
52, 208

, ,;
,
; ;
dread son of Kronos; as
extremely,

-,
freq. ,',
'' =
dire woe
Xiv, and
in II. with
plunging sheer down.
properly, belonging to the
caprarum grex, herd of
high-lying,

often with
etc. ;

wretched mother that I


with
countered such sorrow, X
,,- ,
, ad erbial,
am, A 414;
having en-

goats;

goats, 101.
(for
sari), goatherd, also vith
Avide-
grazing (dispersed widely) herds of

., ver-
and

,,, ,
431 ;

adv. esp. with Stidia, ;


intens- with aiywp.
ively with 24, cf. 324. town subject to Xestor,
and part, 592t.
comprehendere, take, 374, alirvs, aa, v, praeceps, arduus,

,. , , .
prs.

,
580, 550, 459, 490, t 225, 232, precipitous, sheer. (1) of localities:

.,
429,

,,
',

,,
53

,
pra, caper, goat.

,
; seize,

,
iter, aor.,
son of
144,
6, dat.
500.

from
1.

Aiolos, see

island of
]-
Aiolos,
a-
Olympos, mountains, towns, islands,
lofty; of noose, hung high aloft, X 278.
(2)
utter,
duus, hard,
bursting

317, he shall find


AlirvTtov
headlong

it
toil of
hard.
at funeral
in,
(3)
combat
sudden,

;
ar-

surrounding wall of bronze, mound of Aipytos (progenitor of royal

,
Avith 1

,
identified by the ancients with Arkadia,

', , ,',
sqq. line) in 604|.
,
;

Strongyle or Lipara. -, aor.

, - {-, foX-, volvo), ore



(), iter. ; mid.

-
as when one prehen-

,
,


-,
turns this
of fat and blood,
way and that a paunch full
27|.
splendida lorica ,
dere,
of,
take.

by
(1) seize, lay hold
I. act.
258, 361 ;

,
the hand; by the hair,
armatus,

-,
(because plated
707t.
with glancing mail,
(),
with metal)

tvith glancing
icith
83.
glancing
girdle,

(with,
242; also vith ace,
397,
spear,
humum
416, 242;
406 c^at ;

(of mortally Avounded);


,
lay one's hands
319,

mordicus
335,
grasp the

metal trappings) steeds, upon some one's mouth, hold the mouth

() ,
185f.
ai6Xoc, ov, 01, (at-foX-, volvo), mi- shut with the hands; ol =
cans.

509 ;

(1) of movement; quick-mov-
ing, swift-footed,
buzzing,
404 wriggling, X

of wasps, pliant in the middle, because


300 ;
;

, , ', ments
779,
(also
embrace,
overtake in running,
;
252, 210
330

132).
win prizes,
;

on gar-
(2) meta-
,
;

their body in the middle is so slender.


,
phorically, take possession of

,). ,
(2) of the impression which rays of 805; so of various emotions,
light
surfaces
gleaming
falling
make
upon smooth, moving
shimmering, glancing,
of weapons, of snakes,
;
;

208.
ing, fear ;

,
joy, grief, coiu-age, astonishment, long-
taking up the story
where, 500. (3) toll ere, take aivay
(1) son of Hip- from, Q 579; rob, A 356; capture,
potes, lord of winds, 2 (36, 60, 37, 42 take captive,
; 102 slay, ;

for
154.
,
7,
(2) father of Sisyphos,

town on Messenian
306,

,
457, and freq.II. mid. (1), take
one's own, or for one's self; also with
,
,,,
210; lay off',
gulf, I 152, 294. 122; cf 125, 472, also spo'li-
($
tous, steep, of localities
('), arduus, precipi- are, sti-ip off, 206.
(2) take io ones
; cf. 123. self, as food,
16

take with one, 40, 501 ; receive, charge upon (strike, thrust, etc.) ;

297, 367, 500 enjoi/, 482 attain, 506, >vith these they rose quickly up,

.
; ;

reach a decision, 501 ; take an oath of, II. dep. =


act. signif.,X 195, 773,
Tivi and
235,
445.

.
, .
127, 121.
(3) choose, select,
(4) rob,

"-, No Los, unhappy Los,


246,

73 f.
- (,
510;
his hands.

of which
404, the reins slipped from

nothing is known or seen ; dis-


), ignotus,
,
, (),
see
see
port , allotted
appeared without leaving a trace, van-
ished, lost ; ;=; 258, and he would have
cast me out of the upper air, and sub-

,<, ,
/,

(1)
, . ,
merged me out of sight in the sea.

, ,,
share. pars, part, 84, 327;
iv
' ). ["-;a'lay (cf. Attic
, . .
(),
,. ,

,^,
phrase, iv irom
(2) propriety, suitably ; cause to disappear, 79, annihihte;

vitae
333.
portio, A 416.

(3) length of life, vanished,
for
259.
Q
(4) destiny, v. 1.

sors; to one destiny ; KaKy a., 347 "fyptincely.


to misfortune;

315.
r 127, j;

trary to fate's decree ;


,
197;

,
decree pronounced by Zeus, by divin-
ity; v-rrep in disregard of
Zeus's fateful decree,? 321
,
am
destined, c 206,
I
(5) destiny, as controlling power,
,
,
a., to death;

487, con-
a.,
(2)

) ,
Trojan, father of Antenor,

(6-
', ), or
(f
(1)

',
Alkathoos,
793|.
427|.
. 1. for
e far i us, high-handed, wicked,

and
(-),
only with
403f,

nefaria, turpia,

-

^,
; ;

a.

,
Zeus reached us

,,
the ill destiny sent by

handed over to fate.

Bukolion,
ace, son of Abarbaree and
; ^,
do or speak

,
in Thrake.

Q
-,
), (, ),
evil.

[
[ -^ ^J
304t,
^]
from Aisyme,

pHncely youth,

,
21|. 347 f.

, ), onanMount
always with
and
imam
river
ipf. part.
Ida.
{),
ef flans,
cf.
referee,
msc.
umpire, unpi-ejudiced
258|.
exspirans, breathing
468.
|, [^-^]
, ,^). (1) fatalis,
out one's life,

,
by Hektor,
ntr.
acc, Grecian chief, slain
303|.
(^/), ignom i ia,

ing,

,
i d
,
decreed by fate. (2) d ec or us,
e u s, suitable ; a e q u u s, just
think justly, be right-
oecoMi- dedecus,
spoken insults,
disgrace,
433, 225; pi.
351, 524, if I must
listen to words of contumely for thy

t
,
minded.

,
, (), -
),
u
. s,

^,
opportune,
(),
Q
-, aor. ^, (,
;
auspicious,
376|.

mid.
impetu

propi-

ferri,
aor.
sake ;229, outrageous acts.

216, ugly.
; adv.,
iously reproved.
turpis, disgraceful, (1)
(2)
(),
injurious, insulting,

aor.
ignomin-

foe-

, , ,, ,
move with eager haste. I, act. (1) hast- dare. (1) disfigure. 24, 180,12 418.

,
en, Q 1\\, 183,
flew rapidly;
fly, of
48S;
in haste;
(2) insult, 209, /3 86

wis/imyfame. (3)mid. verecundari,
have scruple, hesitation.
; 571, ?-

,
birds; of arrows (speed); of chariot
(sped over the ground),
thoughts (rove, 80)
369 of

but they^ii about like shad-


ows, trepidant, <c 495.
come rushing on,
esp. in liostile signif.,
(2) charge,
, ,.
,,
;

laolkos,

-,
acc, A ison, son of Ivretheus
and Tyro, father of Jason, king in
259.
atrci, imp. prs., fut.

one for
rogare; osk,
something; beg, sue for,
-, aor. part.
, some
Q 292,
Tivt Ti ; seek as wife, 365. ]
aiTiaourdai, see
(), only
. pres.
17

and 422,
-,
flowing, deep-streaming
434.
-
(), indefessus,
Okeanos,

|, ,
ipf., usually resolved, i ncus are, acci/se a,
0/'; a 32,' what charges the mortals untiring, 823.

,-
bring against the gods ! (1) son of Antenor
(),
only pres., only Od., and Theano, leader of Dardanians, S?

,
rogare. (1) ask, 650. (2) beg, im-
portune.
(), culpandus,
478. (2) son of Eussoros, leader of
Thrakians, 8.

(),
d e f e s s u s,

,
01, i

reus, ffuilty of something (in bad untiring, smouldering fire. [

,
, ,
sense), 86, of mine
'tis no fault
' the (), ace. from

,
COL ovTi pi.

",
,
/3

.87.

, ,
,, .
suitors are nowise responsible for that,

;
,
c ard u s, thistles, 328|. [-
king of Dulichion,
]
336|.

,, , ,,, ,-,
, , 3 pi. pres. indie., 3 pi. plupf.,
-, 2 and 3
- 471,
sing. opt.
A itoUan.
379; -, the
from

,
-) ; mid.
aor.
see

pf.
and

/-
,,
Aitolians in Hellas, I 531, 549, 597.
fut.
youths should hurl the spears,
from
3 1.
, inf.
aor.
part, also
plupf. 3
() 1.
;

,,
A 324t. distress, afflict, ir 432, 223; mid.
t), (, acutusj, cusp is, distress ones self, pf. grieve, -,

,
point, then the whole in heart ; because of something,

,,
;

).,
spear, 542. ; Avith part., 486 ;
and , spear- 84; 486; 16 (cf
man, warrior, 179 ; also a}.,^hting

(,
with spear, ivarlike,
from
543.
), , ex- ened, pointed ;
3,
. )), (
(), acutus, sharp-
temp

,
, ,
,
forthwith;
immediately after
very quickly ;
at once and quickly,
altpa, al\pa;

, (), citus,T 276, he


dissolved the quickly dispersing (pro-
lepsis) assembly, 257, 103, soon
\'
- -
'

axe,
,
, ),.
lance tipped (with sharp bronze point;

(1)
235.

(imp.
heal, repair,
see
6., ,
/c., double-edged

aor.
scdare, assuage.
383 viake good,
;
'
comes a surfeit of the chilling lament 69, 115. (2) slake thirst.
for the dead. -6-($, ('),
icith unsho7-n,
oiov (), ^,
when flowing hair, Phoibos, 39f
(),
I was breathing out my life,

.
aiov, sent
(),
,
perceive.

(2) by mind,
252f
only pres. and ipf. of alleviating pain,
(1) by senses,
11.

, -
pi., as means

394f.
gen., a king of
(3) learn Thrake, father of Periboia, 142|.
-,
( () ,
,,,
of, by hearsay knowest tractable,

^, , , (),
:

thou not ? by sense of hearing, 115t.


TTov, voice, usually with gen. seda-
exc. 48 regard, 378, tus,
; tacitus, silent, A 34; is
199.
',
, (>'/, form, (,
generally used adverbially
), a neuter
may have once
;

-
58), (cf.
aevum), lifetime,
anima, 27,
478,
58; with
415 life, existed, which was afterward con-
>7,
;

founded in common use with the


.
-, -
453,
-, ( 523.

deliverer, applied to

', ),
masc.

(/,
Hermes,
priv.,

from the smoothli/


),
-
10. ,-
part,

pitilessly^

(), negligere,
and ,
unburied,
465.
60;

from
disregard, slight.
-
esp. the dead, wounded; always with
18

, , , , coniux, -
-,
negative, 70.
, (ici/^of), incuriosus. 6,
band, wife, f 120, 1 397, and freq.
frusta, morsels, 222t.
319 ; with-
-.,

(1) act. unfeeling, 123,
out sorrow, 526.
(2) pass, neg- lack of care, neglect,
iected,
S2 554.

, ,
,
26, r 18;

, .
inflexible purpose,
unburied,

{,to charm),
329|.
ancient ace., cf.
187,

pla- ,
,
,
284.
(), ,(),
iaculari, hurl javelin,
;
, Soijpa,
aor.

ac,iaculatores, spear-
',

-
cide, tacite, silent, with taav; men, lancers, 262.
also common phrase, tykvovro ace. fem., game of the

393. [--] -^
auoiry, became hushed in silence, w dart, spear contest,
(),
622+. [>]
insatiabi-

, (),
meddka with, pure, olvov,
intactum, not 1 i s, insatiate,
0,
with gen.,
(), 2.
remedium,

-, ,
205f.

-- (),
-
cure, remedy, 481.
ov, (), integer, un- indecen-

-
1.

injured,
2.
,
touched, pure,

. ,,, ,
^,
nimus,
less,

see
,
, ,,
328.

dead.
(2)
cowardly, ^tog,
303.
{),
and
incolumes, un-

, (). (1)
ignavus,
812.

(?), neglec-
spirit-
tia, unbecoming,

fed abundantly (on


ing
ina- manger (II.).
(), ^,
a u s c u 1 1 , listen, hearL ;
ye are they who arefirst invited
feast.
(), auditus.
2l3t.

barley) at the

(),
hav-

343,
to the

-
ure ; more ivretched,

, , ,
a-KiKvs (),
3,
tus, miser, more insigmficant, in fig-

- 1 30.

imbecillus,yeeo^;
sound,

?/,

634, one hears it from faraway.


(2) fama, tidings, report (hearsay).
(),
filio caren-
tem, without male heir, 64t.
(1)

-
only in Od. [- -]
(), -,
,, ,
negata audio, hea}',

able,

-, , ,
.
lis,

better
adv.
,
, ,
perse qu ens, pursuing
75t.

), ,
(1) unwept.
[----]

(),
(),
(2)
pi.
the unattain-

iliac rimabi-
494, tearless.
ace. sing,
inglorious;
(1)
370,

with gen.
331),
442, 129,
;

291,
423 ; listen,
hear, with ace,

or Avith gen. of par-


(
265,
79,
221

(mid.,
or

(), sine patrimo-


; ;

-([>
, (), ,
95, t 497.
ticiple
nio, portionless, needy,
',
490t. (2) com per ire, learn of by heaisay,
543 with inf 386 with

6
iiri in ; ^ :

discrimine res
razor's edge,
(),
173t.
est, stands

, on the

full-
gen. of partic. in II., only
458,
5114;
115, 289; with
490
gen. alone,

,, 524
;

)
;

grown olive-tree, 19 It. ex aliquo and ire, 389,


(,
lie us, unsatisjied,
ieiunia), fame-
hungry, with gen.
,
374.
(3) ex and ire, give
ear to, with gen. and dat., also with
(only T). part.; audientem e s s e, o6f^, 256,
-., (), indefati- used with

&-
pi. 11, ;
prcs.

(-
^at\, fresh, unwearied (only II.).

(),
signif of perf., 688.

,
&,
().
(),
-, incudem,
spina dorsi,
the backbone,
rar,
161 f.
in
anvil-block.
es, anvil

in
accomplished, vain. [
&/ (, ),
and aia,

421. l--^^-]
irritus, un-
3
im-
petuosus, blowing strongly, fresh,
^
I ,
19

',
,
'
-, ,
(), sum ma

,
pars, siim- gen., descendant of

,
init, promontory a \er- ; Aktor, Echekles, 189t.

, ,/,
tice, from the summit; then, from attendant of Penelope,

{), .
top to bottom, i. e. utterly, 772. 228t.
in see name
for either of the
2, merus, sons of Aktor; the two Avere called

,
,(,
,
unmixed, pure, 73. and
also after
a\, locusts,
from ),
12t.
amid ",
their mother Molione, 750.
'^],

.
son of Azeus,

,
di, (1)

,--( (, ),
the -windy mountain-tops,

less
daughter

babbler,
319t.

246 ;
400. (Od.)
of Alaisios,

useless are the


sense-
,
513. (2) father of
14.
son of

(3) father of the

(4) father of
//,
brother of
'{/;.
edible acorn,
785,

242t.

-,
, .
confused dreams, r 560.

common,
2, ().

(1) undistin-
(2) endless,
, (), cusp is. point, of mis-

--
guislted, siles, X 16.
beyond measure, also \vith ; ad- ovToc, o,
"
(), iaculum,

,
-,
dart, 531.
verbially unceasingly.
', =
335, 137,

- ,, ,(),
u s,

,
thickly over- 1 i t umvillingly.
grown (with foliage), 868t. aXa8(c) (), in mare versus,
surface, icith troubled surface, 249t.
growing black on seaicard, . A 308, also Avith
see
[^ -^ -]
a gar i.

,
(),
with hair tied up , masc. da-
on the crown of head,
(),
533+,
summum,
rn

',
,
and,
.,
r, shout, war-cry ; also cry
463, ofjoy. [-^ -^ --]
offear,

-
point,

;,
summit, promontory. -tlv, -, see

-, name of a Fhaiakian,

), epithet of

- ,,,,,,,,
111. from the Boiotian city
citadel of Troja, onlv near the lake Triton (see
494, 504. 908. [---^--w]
(), upta- 8,

.
,
tv imp. ipf.

t r

,
on lofy mountains,

an sfi,rentes,
(/),
523.
acumine
with pene-
-,
aor.

gari, wander, rove, d 368,


, pf.

276, 492,
va-

-
trating points, sharp-pointed, 463f. 302, 377; vagatus,
acies), extremus,
3, (aV//,
summus, at the point or end or top,
outermost, topmost, highest, the extremity
of; tail,^519; hand, foot, 640, shoul-
, , ^.
errans.
6, ,
493. ,
caecus,

(), ' ,
blind [^-^^-,
or . 1.

,,\
der, rudder;
upper city ; edge, surface, etc.
,,
; nor did he keep a a
blind, i, e. careless

,
w
(, ), -
see ; adverbially
229, along the top.
Nereid,
watch. [^

caeca
>-^ _'

from

), , , , ,
41t. it, blinded, (Od.).
(),
1.

- , (),
(or
opposition to the Avhole kernels,

,,
429.

, -
mola, always
barley meal; in
Avith

, ,
3,
etc.
ipf.
infirmatus, yee6/e.

fut. -,

,
2. litus, coast, often aor. infir-

,, ,
tongues of land, promonto- mare, esp. Avith sack;

- (),
ries, 89.
(), - carens, not pos-
,
rout, also slay.
only ipf.
sessing, with gen.,

radiis, beams of Helios.


I 126.
fern., (),
', aor.
fero, be indignant.
Tros.
]iart.

463.
a eg re
,, . . ,(,
,',
du s,
, (),
never to he forgotten, dreadful,
h or ren-
20

1.

2.
{-),
(sol
.
?),
escape,
warmth of sun,
),
X 301 f.

farina
23t.

, .,

,
677. (2)

,, , ,
, <3) father of Tros.

excaecationem,
(),
(1)
Iciuler of the Tylians,

blinding,
a Lykian,

503t.
295.

-
tri ticca, wheaten flour,

757.
6,
,
lOSf.
,
aor. pass, part.,

town in Elis,
from

617,

,
aor. subj. part, di-inking gohkt, usually
(), dolere, ^/ pain; in costlv, cf. 469 ; with handles, 9.

, (), scelera-
11. of bodily pain Od., ;27, in more
general sense.

for

,
(comp. from
worse ; in exclamations

him;
d iff icil lima
also
domitu,
-),
peius,
of. French,
tant pis, so much the Avorse; with
dat. in threats, that shall be the worse
:

,,
v&i/ hard to
tus
121.

and

with
homo,
[
,,unguentum,
(),
dat.,
for anointing coi-pses
fat. [-
{),
,
]
reckless offender,

- -]
6,' -,
,
;
only gen.
ointment ; fat,
408, shining
28,

,,, -
tame, break. only
dolor, pain, grief distress, aor., and usually with un-

,
only of mind, esp. aKyea

,.
gere, anoint; oblinere, smear with
200. [- - -]
,
, *(, ',
xparip' Avax,

(--, a ), only

, .
., .
etc.
aor.
(Od.), aluit, she
/' Argonaut, 602t.
i. e.

oiKev, aXiv, see aor. from


an

,
t

. '-,
filed out his limbs. aor. mid.

sceritis, growing,

,.
see
oKfytivo^y 3
(-, a ),
599t.

(),
, , ,'
do lore affi-
cre- from

to ;
name given by Greeks
epithets, . . .

, .
ciens, painful.

,
(1) of bodily pain,

(2) in vider signif.,
molestus, aerumnosus,

, ', ,
mournful, ", grievous,
96 not characterized by Homer as so
;

effeminate and feeble as in later rep-


resentations (
16, 39, 59), yet usually
represented Avith the boAv (

,,
369, 507,
581), and as betraying a sensual char-

,
difficilis, hard,
(3)

ivith
], .
hard to struggle
hard to
acter cf. also
;

94.
442, 290, 39, Q
; 28, 763,
break, cf.
224. [^---]
655 ; hard to endure, dXc$-avcp.ov
tum arcentem,
(), protecting
xcn-
against

Alegenor,

contemno,

,^
ahout,
iXcYvvckv
S

. (),
503t.
{), always
not to concern one's self

parare cenam,
only with
^rit'e
son

Avith

,,
of

ov,

(strictly,
-,,
the wind, 529.

the brunt in the fight,

(),-
warding off ill or

-, -^,'-
(),
396t.
[-

n ae, stemmer of battle, one who bears


- - ^^ ^]
///, defensor pug-

(), mala arcane,


evil, protecting,K
inf.
20^.
fut.

,
prepare), a banquet, entertain (Od.). red. aor. subj.
(), trouble one's self, heed;
I 504, who follow, troubled, behind Ate

usually Avith negation: contemno, ,m^,


Kyoi, inf.
opt.
,,
and subj. mid.
arceo, ward off,
aor.

dat,
despise, hence
; c pi d i , ; mid. keep offfrom
(),

,,^
shameless, insolent ; 268 - one's self so dcfomlcro (ab
they attend to the rigging.
aXccivu
avoid, shun, ,
(),
only i)r. and ipf,
: also with inf.
aliquo).

7,
imp.
and -cvtoi,
-,
-.'',
opt.
iaf. ^
,' aor.;
i
,
aXcrai

,- , , 21

maritimi, Uoicing on good

-
part, (subj. the sea,
aor. or pres.), evitare, avoid, sea-winds, ^ 361 f.
'[^ v.- - ^ -]
escape, , esp. the weapons, the wrath Haliartos, in
meadows, 503f.
of any one, esp. of the gods,
711, t 277 hence, secondly,
;
444,
( ere ri),
Boiotia, Avith
{),
its rich
obstinatus,

), -,
stand in dread
of, be on one's guard be- stubboi-n, unceasing (only II.). [^ ^ v^ j
fore,

silierit.
274, Avith inf.
(aor, subj.
,
, from in- to
like, with which it seems

,
be etymologically connected.
('), maritinius,
aktrpevovai

who grinds com,


6=:/,
akiuiy see
{,,),
(),
,
(),
. . , . 105f.
grind, 104f.
female slave

see

muni-
349; elsewh. pise a tor.^s/ier, [-'^
tribe of Trojan allies
from Pontos led by

'-,
a Nereid, 40 f.

son of Mcstor, friend of


men
,
one ;
t

but
ni, defense,

(), 2 16, fight,


against some
fs- - - -] -, , (),
Odysseus, Ithakan, 157. p 78. (Od.)
maris
),
roaming without knowledge whither,
nor hope of rest, ceaseless wandering
oberrationes, aestu oppletus, reached by
briny,
1 . ,, t 460,
3, (</'), ariti
190.
u s, m
salt water,

,.
of Odvsseus and his companions,

, , (),
345. (bd.)

,
[--]
Veritas,
(de filio)
[-^

), ",]
truth,
the sea,

less
47.
2.
belonging to the sea; of old man of
365, etc. ; Nereids,

( /jut?
of missiles, words, speeches, e. g.
;
va-nus?),//m7-
=

,
vagatiis.

,, y 247 - -^ ,
(aor. part,

,
, (), verus,
elsewh.
from 715, i2 92. [---]
(1) a Lykian, 678.-. (2)
son of Alkinoos,0 119,370. [- - w]
(), in

,
;

verum marl nutritarum, the seals Avhich

, - ,
-
food 442 f.

,^
qui, speak the truth, tell truly; find their in the sea,
only 433 proba, honest.
(aor. from
TO, Aleian plain in ), render fruitless, baffle, 104

-
;

Asia Minor (v. sq. = plain Avhere no _ ii]

.
hurl in vain, 737. [_.
han-est grows barren waste),
{),

201f. {-(), ^^
ntr.

-
,,
verbially

from
sine arvis, with-
out corn land, poor,

), (, ), errabun-
c
(//),
of.

unceasing;
unceasingly.
(inf.
g^r e g a r
2 aor. pass,
[^

ad-

pi.

in
quantities,

352
90,

;
384,
{; ),
ur urata

heaps, in swarms, in ciOwds, in

abunde, abundantly, I 137,


122, 236 ;
54,
,
376, he has done it
enough (already) enough and more than
, sea-purjde (Od.).

S
confertim,

i.

enough, (), is it not


;

'
di, roving,

(),
saliat.
), , ,
, ,
(), (aor.
376.
subj. from
enough (that) ?

opt.
[-^ -]

,,
aor. 7;, subj.

,
inf.
vagari, roa7n part, capi, be taken captive, be

, ()
,
about, 1 14. (Od.) seized,of men, towns ; over-

( ,
y, masc. erro, taken by death ; be slain, fall in battle, X

',
tramp, beggar, 576. (Od.) 253, 300 ; 487, lest ye, as if caught

, ), ,
mother of

(, ) ,
heali7ig,
)
wife of

(from

-aecs~, , 417 j.
I
in
555f
KoXu-

was

venti with
in the meshes of a net, become a prey.

(I
violare,
375,

part.,
;

sin against,
265
?), aor.
part. pf.

; , 586;
22

, - ,
transgressor in the sight of the gods,
807.
., , (),
6 {),',
tus, transgressor,

fender, sinner;
157.
i

nefariiis, of-
against the
1 e -
, ',
53 1 safeguard.

wife of

oAkvOvos,
,

I
,
562.
, masc, (/), defnder,
name
[
given to
--^]

daughter of

,
|-
alcc-

, , ',. ),.
*
gods ; also in milder signif., rogve, ras- di i s, kingfisher, I 563f
= (1)
cal,
'-, 182. [---]
',
(2)

bes,
'-,
law of

"- 126t.
,
(=^),
428. [----]
son-in-

in The-

a Ly-
(from

190 freq. after negation, 404,


312,
;


orig. adv.,
then adversative conj., in contrasted
clauses, (1) but, on the contrary, A 25, a
276,
(2) subjoining additional cir-
kian, 678. cumstance, immo, nay, but, rather,
{),
protection, defense, safety, nvi,
only nom. and ace,
, A 94, 165; after question expecting
a negative answer, a 68. (3) coitc-
&, , ,
644 and 823. sponding to a concession, expressed or
, understood, but, yet, A 24, /^ 107
), (aXKy, 509), (a r C e in ;

power of
phrase,
fortis
defense,
,,
defensio, defense,
prowess; common
527, impet-
apodosis, after a condition expressed
or implied, A 281,
be
omitted,
154; or '
A 287, a 42
,
also

,
;

'
with

. ,
uous defense,

ness,
/ui/or,fuiy
237 with
;
i.e.

;
self-defense, cf
with steadfast-
330
'',
manly endur- ginning anew, changing
;

but not even thus.


but even thus;
(4)
subject, but,
be-

*<, '
, "),
ance, 509 freq.;

As divinity,
1

740.
30 yet, then,
22,
'
A 135, 233, 281,
195.(5) breaking off, but, yet, a
169,267; ?}rot, sed wero, but yet,
433, 6, 16,

sq
wife of

-|^, ,'., -
Thessaly, mother of
[-
see
AasjO/cfoc
of Pherai in

chief of
715|

, ',(
A 140. (6) repelling an ungrounded
assumption

275,
vv ), 79. (7) after
with negative, than,
311, /i 403, 70,

' ,'
377. (8) in
appeal, A 32, 259, 274, 1 269, 69 freq.

;

,
Myrmidons, 481, 197. [----] phrases, ayf, ayfrf,Avith subj.,
),
^25\.
(
[-^^-]
, (),
i. c., 404
other particles,
;

' ,, , 342. (9)


see
Avith

'-,
,
to ,
capable

',,
of self-defense,

127, also to .
defend ens,
brave, bold, opp,
278 ; applied also as epithet

father of Mentor.
, -,
yap,

from
355;

, see no. 5.

(),
but still,

ipf.
coU'i gore, gather.
and
A 81

aor.,

, ",, -
(1) alia, alibi, else-

/, -
(1)

, '-,
(2) charioteer

/
of Achilleus.
son of king in
where; aXXy, alium alibi, one

;) ,
one direction, another in another. (2)
of

,
-, ', -
; his
in
daughter
husband of aliorsum,
and his sons every one in a
; (distinction)the honor (due to me)
different direction;
alias alio,
A 120,

,, ,, -^,
tale of Odysseus at the comes to naught ; 51, mean very dif-
. [ w ^^ v^]

-,
court of Alkinoos,
slave
son of
brother of
124f.
and
ferently.

ivearied.
= ;,
gen. du.,
unceasing, un-

pi. -, -,
-, -,

-
248 f. -yai, inter se, of one an-
Greek, other, to one another, one another, mutu-
394t.
',
Thebes, mother of
wife of
by Zeus,
in
ally also with prepositions (avoided by
;

a periphrasis, t 47) ; 101, near to each


other are they (the rocks).
and of by Amphitryon. (yvutvai), tri ^,
,
23 aXoQt

apud exteros,
366t.
in

(),
a, foreign land, /3

,,
,
often ;
(d) Avith
cf alius alium,
other forms or cases of
75, see

-
extraneus,


6
subst., stranger.

,
ekewhere,
.
[_ ^
[),
75 ;
3,
strange,
[- w ^ ^]
foreign;

:z7^ ^:^^'],

318, ^;?
see
aliunde, from

alius aliunde, one from time, formerly


.
ex terns,

abroad;
also strangers, intruders,
^348.

184 and
{),
[---]
236.

204.
{), alias,
213.
(2) alieni,
(3) untrue,

to

or in another place,

at another
often doubled with or
one side, another from another without \-
;

; in first member,
que.

,{),
[---]
alibi, elsewhere,
often substituted for
in second member, often ' , ;


,' ,

,
now then, now 7ww,

-,
abroad; 131, but in 318=^ 464, 65,
procul a patria. (Od.) [ ^-] 159; modo huic,
-, gen. ace. pi. {- mod illi; modo
), always in hunc, modo in ilium. [ ~^^]

, -
or

- '
(Od.), aliter sonant iuni, talking

,
othe7-wise from one's own people, speak- ing
ing a st7-ange tongue.

,
trans for mi a,
(i. e.

looking differently,
_^ ,_, ^z:^),
to another.

and
3,
(1)
others' goods, cf.
160;
{),a lien us,
347 (cf
181), with distorted
cheeks they were laughing, laughed
strange, belong-

194t (cf

-
, , , , -',
,
looking ;

, .
.
7 181).
-, -ov,
ciei, of another sort ;
{), alius
181, diffei-ent
265, inferior, commonplace.
(salio), aor. 2 and 3 pers.
s e- ,
with strange grimaces. (2) exterus,
sti-anger, hence enemy,
foreign land.

without plume ;
(0),
',
102 ya'nj,

.)

258|.
;

cristatus,
(See cut

' .
sing,
part,

, ;
subj.
salio, leap, spring;
hasten, ; start
under

(),
cf
-, see
alio, to
Cf

another
vp,

--,
62
charge upon,

plied to Ares,
; /, 1 25 ; hasten
or Avith
-, ace. voc., ap- another;
to, alius alio,

279, the coward changes,


831 and 889 desul- from moment to moment, i. e. every mo-
;
;

noiv in one way, now in


place, always with
y,

^.
and
, {,
torius, inconstant, changeable (cf. fVfjO-
[-w^_^]
subst.,
, , (alius), (1)
]
with gen., with
403,
ment, his

275),
color. [ ^ --]

another, adj.
,
iter, ipf from ava-

ov
,-, ,
(Od.).
retexebat,

(),
unravel,

aliter, otherwise,
105, r 150.

alius nisi;

clauses,

536;
(or o, cf I 594, or
without,
'',
instead of
360, 200; and freq. in antithetical

267, , )
',
/, etc., (1) in strict signification,
besides,

melius,
218, S
267 for some other reason,

better,
53,
;

577; already, ivithout this, 87. (2)


176,
401. (3) incassum,
286, <p 429

211,

107,
in
. . ., verse 513.alioquin,
,
799 ;
vain, 124, 144. (4) in

, , , {),
marking, in Homer, a transition, 299 other circumstances,

,
(a) other, additional, reliquus, saltus,

() ,,
223;

, {) ,
besides, S 249
much more; (oi) the rest;
105
as
;

(b) used
when it can vith difficulty be trans-
;
leaping, as a

water, brine,
game,
, (), aqua marina, sea-
53. (Od.)
103 and 128.

aqua mari-
^\\8\ besides,
lated into
as for the rest (cf. nous autres Fran-
moreover, na, salt water, ^ 511. (Od.)
-<
temn ere,
{-, cf. ), con-

,
9ais),e211,B 191, 132, /3 412, 407, disregard, despise. 162,
622, a 157, 665, etc. (c) for em- 178.
phasis, in apposition with
;

com par., ('), , e mari, from the


569, X 106; and 81 and sea, 335 f. [----]
>
,,
24

(), from c - with pain 398, he dashed it with

^
his

,
ipf. ;

tu (lit, she smote; hands wildly from him. [^:=:_]


I 568f
$,
- (,, river in then the
(), adeps,
,
;

, _/<, river-god, y 489.


208, 390, 32 for rubbing in, to
; fiovc),ho\es
render pliant, 179; unguentum, comparans, biinging in cattle, i. e.
making wealthy, see
",
ointment, 220,
*6, 179.
ace, towns in -yv, -,
593 f.
(),
-<
ace,
domain of Acliilleus, 682|.

;
victum quaerentes, 8,
-
261,

- .
(',
sunus, hard-working, contrasted with
Gothic
son), gen. mari natae, daughter of others translate ^oMr-eaiiV/^r,

-, (),
the sea, 207,
sec
404. fruit-eating. (Od.)
(alb us),
,,, , - 355, bar-

,,,,.,^- .
uxor, she who ley-meal; elsewh. barley-groats

,
shares the bed, wife,
the concubine is called
tives,

, ],
299, 264
;
;

adjec-
also or meal (the porridge
290, etc.;

(),
[ ---]
aor. , ,
made

opt.
of them),

3
see va- 1.

, 383 so Ameis, (German


,
"',,
,= ,
gaj-i.
, sal, grain of

salt,
arbeit), parere, bring in, yield,
452, 250. (Od.)

-
, . (),
455 ne hilum quidem; ), the of Aloeus, the father of
A
,
briny deep, sea (near the shore), 308. and husband of
[-

,
saliisti.
2 sing.

,,
aor. from

, -., -
,
area, threshing-floor.
496 also orchard and vineyard, ;

,, ,,
,

, ,
ntr. (ale re), lu- 561 sec

,
;

cusj^rrot'e, usually with altar, and sa- from

,
',
cred to a divinity, 506, 321. capi.

,
of

.
,
saluit.
king of the
85.
3 sing. aor. from

304f word formed by a pun out of

',
,
father

captus sim.
out of Wandering,
,


from
from

, , , ^, ),
, ,
errans.
aor. subj.

una, simul,
(from
instead of
cf.
at once, at the
before labials.

same time.

,,;,
(1) adv., A 343; 255;
,f'om Alyhe, often Avith 281; with fol-


whence

ipf, e

was
t^Tr^3
silver

vitare, avoid,

seeking

(),
comes,
(),,
(),
how
, ,
to
857 f.
only pres. and

,, -
escape,

,
443,
effugiebat,

,'
'/,
581.

330f.
.
A
lowing
simul, at

so,, 348,
,
a 428 ;

149, swift as the wind.


.6%

242.
same time

,
(2) prep,

una,
go
with,
with dat.,
'
beside, with,
Avith, attend,
run after
C^--]
;

189, dwelt
a 98,

;<
,, ,
effugio, avoid, on the Thermodon
Pontos;

,
escape, river in
clam me subduxi made a plundering foray into Phrygla,

,
335,
sociis, X 363,382.

), confused,
(from
70, maddened
see
in spirit
- 814, 186. []

()
*Ao,aNercd,48t. [-'^--]
587 1>

^,
self [^^
(),
]
94, / ? beside my- he
,
fell into deep sand.
nijp,
[-
[^^^'\
solo aequat, de-

to be loosed,
{),
2,
360. -
insolubilis,
^ -]
perturb a- e
&-,
stroys,

s,
I 593t.

/no?*.?,
3,
179,
]
(//), saevi-
329; 311, the
ta meiite esse, furere, be beside mast tossed to and fro by the waves,
one's self{\) with joy, 333,393.(2) like a man reeling in drunkenness.
.,
, -,
{-,
.,
aor.

with
conterere,
(II.)
m
and

(,
(),
- -- (),
de
pass,
destroy;
?), only

only

),
25

-
bling up,

adj.
-|
364|.

used as subs., strictly signifies im-


adv., bub-

ambrosia,

- ,,,
- , mortal and conf&'7'ing immortality ; used

,,
hinder of sheaves,
-yoi,
(II.,

(mollis),
.)
teneram,
by the gods as food ; as ointment, for
embalming, for perfume; also as food

, ),
tender; of Iamb, doj?.
-|, {, r),

a u s t r u m, Jour - wheeled
parallel form
for horses of the gods.

immortal, divine,E 369.


(),
,
d i i u s,
(1) that which

,,
1

freight wagon, 241 also the constel-


; the gods send,
longs to them ; -
or (2) be-

,
,
lation of the Great Bear, 487, 273
', ],
-( {, ),
/,
[] even of their horses,

-,
of.
yv. and

, , , , via [ -^ -^ ^]
U b 1 i C a, wagon-road, 146.
,

(), immortal,

/or
{? mare ?), [^-'] .'., ', 358,
divine.
365,
oi',

; then like

- (),
irrigation, 259\. (1) (2) rev-

aor.
(-,
and
), (1) im- only sing.,
pertem invisus,

;
fieri esse,
155, t lose, unenviable, doleful, dreadful
512; then (2) in general, /(7 of, miss,
511, mistook not the word,
spoke the right word; 68, failed not -^,
(proleptically of battle,
blast,
420); mighty
400; miserable,
(moveo), fut.

,
219.
^^, -,
[]

,
to bring gifts ; 292, let not presence aor. alternare, alternate,

^,
of mind jfail her. e c c a r e, fail, change.
-, exchange, , for

,
(3) I. act.,

err; with 501; 154, 1 my- something, with some one


self

517.

,

'
{, ), m u
have overlooked

taneously,

,
-, ,
[]
-
[a]
-''6 (), temere
9>\.

u s, speaking thoughtlessly, l:i


this.
si 1, simul-

locii-
824f [a]
622,
.
cedendo;
II.
yovv

mid., (1)

ing one another;


oi
change
racers.
each other,
alternans, A
.,

604, reliev-
379, in quick alter-
nation (of dance) a 375, passing from

,
one house to another;

) ,,
684, leaps in turn.
;

(2) ansive?;
pedetentim

loith

- -, -

cursus
-
his burial in Messcne, with funeral
games, described,

- ),
-6
ning about after me.
630f.
see

(),
impactarum
running together, clash
422|.[^-^^-]
ace. pi.,

of
rotarum,
chariots,
con-
run-
382;

make beautiful
by, I

c ab
(), ,
409,

i 1

-, (), []
some one;
71;

gifts in return.
328^

e m, harsh, inexorable words.

2,
(, ,
{S) pass
impla-

inexora-
(II.)

-
^
(-, bills, implacable, relentless,
pale, dim, lurid, 824 and 835. (Od.) -,m ov (Old Lat. manus =

, , -, , ,
[] bonus), e I i r, better, more excellent,
(), sine pugna, superior, mo7'e favorable, more advanta-
without contest, 437f. [ij geous (opposed in signif. to A
(Ger. mahen, Eng. mow), ipf. 400); pky' prae-mult
aor. m an u stantior; 376, more profitable and
colligere, gather togethe?; collect,
-,
better.

-
247; mow. [^ only pr. and mulgeo,

-($ -.
ipf.,
]
-,
( ),
see
- ad u m
7nilk; pass.,

- (),
434, yielding vhite milk.

.,
i t [0]
pracbens, that may be scaled, 434. aor., always with
(/3/*), adv. ex- negation; curabat, he
orsa, as prelude, at first, X 476f. bethought himself of. []
-
, (),,
-, inf.
O^CVIU

from satiarc.
d e b i 1 i s, feeble,
26

, ntr., basin in which the blood


ofvictbns loas caught, y 444|. (See cut.)
.%>
,
2,
887; a, feeble heads
of the dead (periphrasis) == the feeble
dead
-6) (),unsubstantial, [a]

-,
;

debiiita-
vit,
1.
pass. pres.
made ineffective,
(//'), aor.
aor. subj.
,-;
562 f.

^,
[a]

r i V a r e, depiive, 64 ;
pass., lose,

and
- (),
be deprived of,
2.
pf.,
X 58.

make lustreless, blind,


only pres.
18;

-, (), m m
,
dazzle, blind by excess of light, 340.
2, i 6 s u s,

immeasurable,

er,
--^ {', ),

moderate loquax, immoderate

;5^67|.
212|.
(), messores,
[^_-^]
512 and 249. [--

im- Knosos,
talk-

?ea/?-
-
(^,
without trouble,
(
,
188t.
at Amnisos, harbor of
[t]
(oy'), sine

),
63 7 f. [i]
a1ic u d c
(or &s\), from any point soever; begin-
labor e,

- {), mess
is, reaping,
harvest; metaph. for slaughter,T 223f.

(), ,
ning with any point whatever, relate to
us, a lOf. [a]

, (), (), u t a 1 0-m

,
des e r a- ri a, for a change, 521 f. [a]

act,
-,
tio, helplessness, despair,

miser, wretched,
2, (//),
295f.
helpless.
363.(2) pass.,
[a]
(1)
(Od.)
>
-
-
/, retributi,
recompense, gift in return, restitution.

difficilis, impossible, S 262; 130, in turn, 506 and

'? ,
in-emediable mischief; 560, useless 310.
(),
(, - ,
dreams; unyielding, 14, succedanei, .<?
273; stub-

, ,
bom, hard-hearted, 29 726, thou substitutes (in exchange for former aid
;

canst not (for thou art too obstinate) furnished by Priam), 793f [a] .

yield to, etc. (), in darkness, of


night, [a]

^
), in Karia, 328|. [] bv
(, ), ;:,276|. slain
- -

ivearing coat of mail without girdle, or 6,


(,
[----w]
-, - 3, (also )=. []

, , .-.-,,
the word may mean wearing both coat moveo), vehe-
of mail and girdle, in this cmpd. m enter, insatiably, unceasingly, eager-
=/^, 419t,
[-----w] ly; esp. with
(), -, []

,
vapore obductam, foggy, misty, see
smoky, since Lemnos a volcanic isl- <5(), (-),
, , , .
is

-
and, 12 753t. [aj 561, 184, vitibus abundans,

-, aor. part,
sec
from
full of vines, abounding in vines; of

,
districts and towns. (II.)
admiscens.

76t. ,,
-, (), 2,
(/.), misfortune,

expers, 275,
'
-&, i

au-TTcp^S
'/, grape-vine, vine.

brans.
(,
aor. part,

),
(Oil.)
from

always
-
489, deprived of the bath of the
ocean, of the Great Bear, which never
sinks below the horizon in Greece;
elsewh. unfortunate.
through.
anktr-txtVy
e

,
i t

bat, covered, lay thick upon,


u s, through

circumda*
225|.
and
-, -,
-7
aor. from ,-, ex-
27

, -
109;

116;mid.,ward
182;

- (),
u i t. 75, 80. defend one's self

,<) ,,,{,
si 1 (2)
-,
-'. 106, , 514,
.-, see
head-hand, fillet,
62,
510; protect,
700;
off,
155,
170, 243.
531;

ornament of Avoman's head, 469.


(See cut.)
2
,
cro), ipf , fut. lacerare, scratch, tear,
284, out of grief; A 243, thou
mu-

-, -, (),
shalt gnaw thy soul with vexation.

-6 (),
ipf. act.
ceive hospitably,
and pres. mid.,
192,
am plecti, re-
381.

,
ipf., ,

circa eam conveniebant, we7e

-,
grouping themselves about her,
', 37 f.

- {<),
adj. open,
publicly declared, 288; esp.

,,-,
adv. palam, o/?en/y, 196. []
detegeretur,
that the thing should come to light;
pal am, openly, undisguisedly
(opp. 330; 296), ^^,
publicly.
' (), undi-

,, ^ , -
from
simul, at
;
(Aeolic

once, (1) together,


etc., ^,
),
instrumental case,
parallel form, una,

all to-
que concitantur,
from all

'
sides,
round his shoulders,
,
417;
spring

510,
(),
upon

267.
fioat
[]
aor. inf.,
it

gether,

,, , '
, -
mediately, I 6,

donia,
/i

336,
i%
413,
2 1 7,
, Amy don,

TTo/oj/tc, on the riA'cr


849 and 288.
385.
(2) at once, im-
305.

city of
in Make-

[]
[]
eru

mor
g e r e, anoint

crashed around him,


{),
(),
408|.
thoroughly,

speechlessness took possession of him,


aor., his ar-
582 f

,
, -
259|. [-----]
the Eurotas,
father of
ace, son of

,twenty
and

city in Lakonia, near


stadia S.E. of
and

-,
695,

dum
sound,
704.

circa sonabant, gave a


160f.
(),
-, -,
[i)]

-,
(),
part,
ipf. ari-
dull

-
Sparta, residence of Tyndareos, mid. inf. ipf.

-,
58ft

he u
[]
ovoc, [///], irrepre- around,
used esp. of exter-
cont recta re manibus, feel of
touch, grasp; also with , all

s s, faidtless,
-',
handle, 215.

,
nal appearance, but also in a more gen-

,
, ,
eral sense, excellent, glorious (fortunate,
232,

defensor,
/x 261). [-
-opa, -,
]

defender, protector,
(), [o
ace,
,-,
{'), '. -,
versabatur
circumvolitabat,
see
ipf. from

only aor.
circa, sounds about
315f.

-
vie,

of I

(,
448.

propulsare,M?r<Z 0^,(1) act.,N 814,


[a]
gen., father

munio), arcere,

, circumfundebatur,
.-6,
.
122

,-',
; rose about me,
devoravit,
369. (Od.)
see

, . -
Tivi Ti, I 674, 835 from some see
;

one, Ti,
defend,
402,
, 731
486, 674,
538 help,
500
;
(), utrimque acu-
;

tus, two-edged, of sword,


; 80.
.-,
-,
^circumiit, from - ,
28 - stand at zenith; , ten ere,

-,
-
possess, protect, esp. of perf and plupf.
,
cumvcrsabantur,

only '
9f.
cir- with dat.
fut. -, cast

,
-
{), t r i mquc about, (1) amicire, induere, />Mi on,
contectam, close-covered, A 45f of garments, weapons, etc., always in
(), ambiguum tmesi ,
also without ace. of the
( c t
i c m), doubtful (his victory person (also mid., clad one's self), ,
doubtful), Tivi (dat. of pers., 342 of thing,
382t.

both sides, often


(see
synonymous Avith
), utrimque,
. on 722, 36) ;
;

742,
putting on strength; fut. only mid., /

with
adv.,utrimque,/3l53,427,al73;
I.

,
round about,y 32,429, 122; exchanged
564, 647;
(sometimes wrongly written as one
will equip myself.
nere,

, , ,,
foundation)
208, or
; , (2) c i r c u
192, building upon

j) o- m
this
dtipy 'Ocu-
embrace ;
(as

yoi-
word),
,
10,
with ace,
191, 609;
760 ; so 262. , seize;
amplecti genua; ^454,
344, as much as his hands
IKprep., (1) with gen., de, about, con-
cerning,

,
825, 267. (2) with dat., -,
could hold in their clasp;
compass, resound about.

-6,
535,, en-

,
(a) local, circa, ai-ound, among, 388, resistance, 623t.
328, 231, 396,
proleptically, pierced the
493 ;

meat nem undique


-, (),
tegentis,
honii-
covering
so that
of.
with,
30
it

; ,
was around the spit, A 465,
on the fire, 426
423, I 470 (b) causal, because
;
the entire man, 389, 32. (II.)

of=/or, 70, 157, 48, 153, 546,


672; de, with respect to, 555, 151,
408.
(3) with ace, local; circa,
about,
706;
588,
,
461, A 409; within, A
any one in company
with those about him, 281, 146.
-'?,
-,
brave
'-,
sea-girt. (Od.)

gi'andson
; seer,
of ,,
a Phaiakian, 1 14. [t]
tv'lQaKy, marl cincta,

son of

and king of Argos


participated in the Argonautic expedi-
great-
pious and
; he

and

-
tion and in the Kalydonian boar-hunt,
finally, through
treachery of
Eriphyle, in the expedition of the Sev-
en against Thebes, 244. []

-,
shrieking about,
(),
as she flew
316f.
tiie

-
'6>
-' (),
593t.

, ", , -
town subject

usually subst. work-master, with


300.
to Nestor,

ambidexter,
strong-armed, only at close of verse,

(aor.
gere,n,/x74;
ipf pf plupf only ipf

occupies the thought, heart ;


',66;
,

359) in tmesi; swTound, cin-


, ;

355, 541,
. (),
acutis, sharp at both ends,
almost
always at close of verse, utrimque
474 see
(See annexed cuts.) [i]
;

.
ov-

OO
. .
-<Ccfc=0=
,- 29 '-
- ,
(),
.- ,
,
-,, -,
-, -6,
, -
rages round about,

, -6 ,268.(2) from
only
perf. plupf.,

{),
329, (II.)
(1) from
87.
circa
-
circa exarsit, with double bowl and base, which may
stand upon or be drunk from either

-
end, the base serving also as bowl

, ),
270. (.)
(),
reversible cup,

circumsili-
i.

(cf.
e.

-
villosam, shaggy around, with unt, run about, 413f.

-/, -,
all
shaggy border, 3U9f. a Nereid, 42 f.
pf. pass., (also in tmesi), with
562, round whose edge goes a border and aor. (calim, occulo, Ger.

-
fut.
(casting) of tin ; 405, encloses it. hullen, Eng. hull, of grain), obvol-
(), quae ge- vo, wrap around, veil, 262 shelter,
nas lace rat, with both cheeks torn enclose, >^91,i618, 511; becloud, of
;

from grief,

-,
700f
(),circa 1 ace-
rat ae, (both) torn from grief, 393f.
du
swoon,

180;
417 of sleep, 86

c e s, dovhle (out-
350, cf 116, 68,
love engrossed
my
,,heart
;

, surround, S
;

343,

,
1 i ;

er
-,
and inner harbor),
-, (),
847 f. 420,

- (), 132, 569, 507.


.

-
-ai, gen. double-headed, 1., 231.
sing., nom. and ace. pi., utrimque having hewed
curvatae, curved at both ends, only
of ships at rest, 162. [^^ ] "-,{),
off all around (the bark),
a Trojan,
12f.
313f.

-, ,
(The cut represents a Phoenician ship, fr d s 0, shady,
as represented on an Egyptian monu- 677|.
ment.) double-cupped

,
whose base is boAvl-shaped, and
goblet,

-,
may be drunk from, 63. [h']

from
-,
-
digging about,

",
s a r r i e b a t,

son of
a seer, 248f
(Ulcere),
242 f.
was

dilucu- ,

aor.
- -(),
or ipf),
(ivvvpi), fut.
and mid.
amicire, />?<i on, don,
-,-,, (no prcs.
-66,
1 u m, gray of early dawn,

-, ,
besiege,

-,
461.
1
airayyomi, wipe off all over,


433f []
aor. imp. mid.,

(2)
152f.
^^<
a prize), of defenders and assailants,
496; cf ',
526. (11.)
around, (1)
fight for (as
.

T393, 23;

,
one's self in,
mid.,induere s'ih\,dress

-'-, only
131, 23.
pr. (imp. and ,-,' , ,
leader of
(1) son of Krirtroc,
to/, 203. (2) son of

,
part.) leader of 870.
and ipf,
versari,
also in tmesi,
be busy about; 473,
su7-round (mid.); irvp, envelop inflame;
apparare, i/res5,0 61 ; arrange,B52b,
seduli,
, circa

-, ,
suitor,

both
242.

sides,
son of

dark on both sides),


darkened
-,
a

dark on
diaphragm,
(lit.

- ( ),
busily,
am bus sit,
1 18.
singed
metaph. of soul,
darkened by rage or grief, of instanta-

- (),
round about, 389 f.
circa adhae- - {,
neous effect of strong feeling. (II.)
circum-

,,
;-9 {),
rebat, seitled upon, 25|.
undiquc
af-
sonavit,
-,
-,
re-echoes,
-ov. resounded,
227;
260,
tm., aor.
460.
f 1 u ens, ? ich ; others interpret, having
father and mother still alive, X 496f
-c,vife
mother of
oi
41 6|.
grand- -,
*-5,
', ,
around or in,

a suitor,
pr.
521. 186
a Nereid,
son of
89.
and
;
ipf., dwell
tm.,
44.
from
499.

-
-, ^,
,- 30 -6
,-,
, ,
",
only
hewed round about, 196|.
dolavi, obsidere,

- ()
58.
233; in tmesi, ;

, c
4, t 380,

,. -, ,
(1) son of from i i t, crown-
ally of the Trojans,
(2) son of a Trojan chief,
612.
830.
circumsonet,
-6, ,
ed with, 205 f.
obside-

-^,
iounds, a 352 f.
and
re-
-
bant, were besieging,

turning all ways, A


(,.^),
40 f.
713f.
flexiles,

ipf.,

-7,
-
.
curant,

-7-,(),
attended,
tend (the wounded); assail,

,--, see
see
see . -,
467; taL up,
203, 184.

-
amplex-
in tmesi, yet
;

upon, 271 ; mid.


431 ; in tmesi, 416,
() ^,
bat, trembled round about,
6,
induerc, put

507 f,
circa
149.
on,
placed
girded on,

t re m e-

;
a t a, embracing, clinging to (her lifeless sea-goddess (not repre-

^6 (),
husbandX

',
523|.
only pr.,

-,, ,,
sented in Homer as wife of l^oscidon),
422, 97, 60.
'
-,
c ur arc, till, watch over;

-,
V 78, attend, serve (ironical). (Od.)

and
,
-,
-^/,
,

age never appears in public, 331.

fut.
(),
Jemale attendant (not a slave), without
whom the noble dame of the heroic

only ipf, -ciroveiTO


curare,
comes,

attend
tremble for,

' (),, (-
), king of
) ',6
and fear

^ h
and

-
lest,d 820f.
only with

392,

plumed,stnct]y, dou-
266.
(0-
douhle-

-, -,
(so also
tend, 159,

circumvolitabat, was
307.
only
681 ; superin-

fluttering
ble -ridged; helmet
with double or divid-
ed crest. (See cut,
a and b.)

-]
about, 31 5 f.
(), iv cir-
,
-0/3,7
-6,
,,['],
, aor. pass.
cumflua, sea-girt, a 50. (Od.) [] were put to flight around him,
(from
162; weakened to
old instr. case,
which orig. ,
290t.
, (, ), two-
stood before

,
748, r 46 and in composition,
634,
- handled vase or jar for wine also, 74, ;

,
; for ashes of the dead. (See the follow-
a 54, 486, 340 replaced at ; ing cuts, the first two from Egyptian,
close of verse by 4, 266, the others from Greek, originals.)
723, 442), utrimque, 0W both sides.
I. adv., (1) 519; 162, hurl the
spears yVom both hands at once:
have on both carry; a 54, hold
sides,
,
asunder; round about,

,
(2) apart,

221,
13, 345.
342, 115.
706 singly, 57, cf. X 1 17
;

flvai, TV 267, with gen., be far from,


709.(3) differently,

following the word it governs, except


before {)),

II. prep, (always

(1)
,
with gen.,
far away from, 352, 267, 444 on ;

end,
S
^, ,-,
one side of
rowly,

274,
393 in

723.
384.

266,
(3)
(2)
;

withwith
ace,
635, 748,
only ipf.
all its parts,

and
dat.,

46.

circumstarc,
on either
about, around,

aor.
nar-

-
- 31

{), irreprehe -
s,

1.
irreproachable,
(possibly from ,
109f.
strictly,

,
aliqua), somehow, similar in its use to
'; hence, I., with opt., mere (subjec-
tive) supposition, sumtio ficti;
711, oh yap
non enim Troes impugnaverit,
he would (could) not, unarmed, attack
the Trojans; in hypothetical periods,

-6,
fully,
()
254|.
,
aor. (),
weigh care-

devora-
s II m t i

defenderim,
/3 62;
f i c t i, conclusion of expressed
or implied supposition made without
regard to fact, i)
),
,
ego
I would defend myself,
in relative periods,
A-^ero
{
me

vit, yawns on every


-, aor. ,,
side, 79|.
circum- at least would fight
who now
even with father
fu d
dare, shed
aor. mid.

,
0.

were laid round



, (
1

270,
)

thronged about,
them,
ring in one's ears,
compass (tmesis), rivt,
also aor. pass.
in tmesi, ri rivi,
about,
498 ;
297 (tmesis);

544,
5 716,
41 ; en-

-, 414;
253, S
i

;
c r c u m-
278. (2)

, --
Zeus,

how
362; also
contrary to

fact,
(2) in interrogations,

quests,
should (could)
57,
sumtio

couldst
Avith assumption
falsi,
a

I forget?
65,

(Avouldst)
A 232.

in re-

thou

- -, -,
63 ; embrace, 214; 764, before the not? (3) in dependent relation after
dust-cloud rose.
see -, , past tenses,
ut acciperem, didst send me
6<pp' ()

,, , ',
amplexus. / might receive, 334 hypothet-
that ;

(), circumfusum, ically, in oration e obliqua,



encompassing (earthen wall),
(1) son of
145t.
and recta Avould be
(or at
he ),
, ',
,
king of 283. stood and boasted that he would con-

of

, ,
(2) son of Zeus and
founder of
(3) leader of the
brother
262.
692. [7]
, am bo, both; -
quer even though (as he said) the Muses
should sing,

,
597.
II. with indie, (1)
past tense (supposition contrary to
-

,,
fact), sumtio falsi,

-^ (), (
t],

(), utrumque non tam mult a


et et; 264 vaticinatus loquereris, wouldsi
( 416), ambabus (manibus); not be talking so much, disclosing (for-
398. sooth) the will of the gods, 184;
ne
, a Lykian, 41 5|. hypothetically,
quidem
39, quae ex

-
u trim que, from or Troia abstulisset, si

,
on both sides, at both ends,
in utramque
167. incolumis rediisset, as he would
par- not have brought away from Troy, had

-, - ,
tem, in both directions, 223. (II.) he returned home without mishap.
(ou^ac), humi, on the (2) with future, seldom, X 66,
'
ground, at his feet, 237 f. me ipsum
postremo dilaceraverint,melast
, agnosceret.
aor. from
of all shall the dogs rend. III. with

both

rent'
-
pieces,

,
(ambo), ambo, utrique, subj., denoting that which is soon to
(sides), A 363 (B 124)
424.

opt. pres.
the two take place, scarcely diiFerent from sim-

(),
,
two-handled,
from
;

lOf.
mete- he
ple future.
lose his
(1) in principal sentences,

thus esp. freq. with


life ;

aor. subj., also (2) in dependent sen-


-g, soon shaU
tence, ' , quem
32

. , , see

, -,-, -, -,-
1. I.

,,
conspicatus ero, whomsoever I 2. ova, voc. from
shall have perceived, 10 (yet subj.
pres.,

shall I speak?
quoad honorabunt,
iy,
quomodo ego locutus
332)

A
;

510, ' ,; ero


? how ace, ascend

goes
often in tmesi, go up,

29,
(to),

permeat homines,
abroad among men , 132,
77; Avith

,
until they shall
honor. "Avand in one sentence, 143 Si 287, 184, 143, 470 ; ,
;

259, 36 1 [^ but by position be- with dat.,


;

,
493, per corpora in-

,
.

fore fipvaaiT, 21 of 406, where gredientes; tv


; , 132;
orig. initial consonants have disap- 657, 399 with gen., ;

(),
peared.]
, ,
embark upon ; also absolute (be-

2. ov by apocope for

298; before ,
456 and in
;
167; before
sc.
755 (cf. 812, 709, and
3. -,
268,
110-118).
negative prefix, cf. Lat. in-,
, ,
before v, fore taking ship for Troy), 210, cf. A

(1) pro-
611 also trans, in tmesis, A 143,
;

pui on board; cf. 475,

-, -|,
having taken us into their ship.
,
Eng. iu n- (cogn. with avtv, possibly crastinare, j50si?po7ie, 584; tmesis,p
),
n-,

,
, . ).-
with shortened before consonants 262; raid., 436. (2) mid., ordiri,
to so-called privativum, which make a prelude,
also (as ava-) appears before vowels
when in the ancient form a spirant, , turivit, bubbled up,
a 155, 262.

54f (v. 1.
sca- () ', -
,
F, or J, was heard
/, before labials
up, aloft. I. adv.,
(opp.
:

but tip! ', ),


a Phaiakian, 113|.
dilatio,
--6,(),
quick! 2 1 78, 13 thereon, 562 upon, postponement,
; 380. (II.) ;

(-), -6,

,-,
416; mixed, pouring in (upon the aor. rattled
water) the wine, 390 often separated aloud, 13 creaked aloud,

, (-),
; 48. ;

by tmesis from the verb to which it only - 66(,,

belongs.
II. prep., (1) with gen., 240, as often as she gulped down ; and
()
',
embark, a 210. 586, vanished as if sucked
on, upon, A 15,0 152, up.
(2) with dat.,
-,
275, 177; 8, to each other. (3)
with ace, strictly per, along a line scaturivit.
(contrast successively Avith on
see

,
only aor. etc., (-), ,
,
different points of a surface, passim agnoscere, ^noer again, 250, 250;
per ; ii/,with dat, at one point within 734, maxime
vero ipse sentit,

, ,
my
,
a given boundary ; f , with ace, to such

132

a point. (1) of space, aloft to, or in, of all; 144, quomodo talem me
466; in agnoscat, recognize me for such as
;

my
the fortunate possessor knows it best

\,
,,
breast, and rose to mouth, I am.

339; ,
452;
straight
throughout, along, with verbs of motion,
318; along,
forward; (a) necessity, want,
300;
(

85 ;
necessitas,
dat., perforce,
143.
, (),
,,
74, 362, 298, 657, 101, 270, , (1) vio-

,,;
257, 546, 319, 321, 166, 136, lentus, constraining; day of
also figuratively, 716 ; (b) with other constraint, s e r i t us Avord of

/",
;

verbs, throughout the conjines of over, force, diranecessitat e.


amid,
', 117, 575, /3 291, coactus, perforce, (captivi),
(2)

, ,,;,
286

governed word,
temporal,
night through,
;

names) in thy mouth,


having
250
(ppovtXv, judge in one's soul

^ 80.
per no c tern,
[-^ >-']
:

follg.
32.
;
(their


-
also,
the
(2)
all
cessity,
necesse
251);
coacti;
sion.
,' ,
[-^
est,
inviti.
necessitas,

]
418,
\\,of necessity, 434, e 1
out of compul-
constraint, ne-
(with
667 (
inf.),
633,
-,
,
-
tro curvabant, unloosed, and
only -',
]
- ,- , ,
re-
33

applied to inanimate objects,


139, and 598.

-, -,
land,
was bent back, 44.

up, conduct, carry to

rior), cf.
forth,
board,
534,

,,89.
272,
aor. -,
a place. (1) on
441 (to the inte-
203; producere, bring out
(2) by Avater, on ship-
carry away (home,
bring

,
-
,
rentes,

,,
blood,

() -
bloodshed,
bloodless,

342 f.
(),
[^
i.

- - ^]
(), sine caede, with-
ipf.
etc.
149.
e.

[]
sanguine ca-
without mortal

aor.
negare,
272), 627, 48,
115; bring back,
292 despatch,
29; guide hither, I
338; avayovTO (opp. KaTayovTo),put to

-,
; deny,
refuse,
),500,
450,
149, 116;
204, 1 585 ;
rejyel, reject (opp.

-, -, -, --
recusare.
sp erne re,
93,

.,
sea, 202.
i e t, see mm
287, I 510, 679 ; 265, spurn.
aor.

-

{-), -6 6\,
toll ere, take up. (1) lift from

;
the ground, y 453; mid., take up for
aperuit oculos, opened again his one's self, take up in ; one's
eyes, S 436 f. arms, 8; lift up and sweep away, 66.
() (twisted (2) comprehendere, lay hold of
or plaited) head-band, A 301,16; mid., capere, take, arms,
X
{'),
,
469|.

cxce-
(Sec cut.) 296; cloak, 530; goblet, 9 come
to reason, 22. (3) accipere, bear
;

^117 (or

^, off, prizes, 736; mid., 823,


pit, received,
and ipf.
619;
to
-,
in signification
take into one's service,
357.
2). (4)

-,
conducerc,

suscepimus,
undergone,
(-),
in the forms
aor.
emerge,
-,
, -, -
563.

-^vy, -cvvai,
have

only

322 with gen., A 359, 337


;
emerge re, X
and 2
584, 40, for combat, etc.,
spring up,
rise suddenly from a sitting posture, A
106,
aor.

203 ; gush forth (pr. only in this sense),


148 ; Avith ace, leap upon,
(),
440.
in sons, innocent,

-,
with ace., arose to the wave (surface)
of the sea, A 496; recedere, draw
297, V 135.
always with only ov- ,
back, 377;
out prep.,

-- (-),
combat.
,
217; and ace. with-
225, cf 214, out of the
-, -, ^6
251 (
(and -ov), ace end it, kindled,
123).

., filled and mixed, y 390


(Od.)
only

- ),
without bridal gifis
(i.e.

,-, gifts from husband), 146. (11.)


I

-, -, ipf.
f.
gush forth,

,)
opt. -, -,
toll ere, lift
imp. -aeipe, aor. ind.
inf.

limbs,
up (tmesis,
298 ; the op-
part, -\,
130,X 399, -,- stream down.

and pass, part.,


only

reclino, 7aA;e to lean tipon.


(II.)
1 aor. act. (part,

(1)

-
;

])oncnt in wrestling, ca7rg off a prize. , 193 ; yaiy, brac-


(II.
-9 ^.)

/,
ing against the ground,
/), 113, cf r
(OijXiw), revirescet,
shxdl bloom again, A 236|.
(), , addi-
577 ; o/?i>>2, doors (opp,

-, (],
156,
leaning hack,
395;
525,
supinus,
78, t 371, ^ 794.

-, -,,
amenta cenae,

-
t ornavients, delights only

,
ipf.
of the banquet, 152, ^ 430. (Od.) shot forth,

.
1
13f.

,, - -
e u11a hounding, shoved

-,
s s, ipf. av-eKoirTC,
HOf.
-^,
-, ,-- { hack, <p 47f ; see
gen. ), aor. since I
trod the path of insolence, 424 ; have once for all broken silence, 467|.
I 372, clad in impudence. aor. part,
, (),i u d e s, m -, after she had hung it up, a 440f
Insolent, shameless, 449, of the suitors ; (^) belonging
to the master, 39 7f.
-,
,
- -, ^, -- 34

, -,-
vibratam, having poised

(.)

hi/
-
-, -,
fell rattling over,

,
-, , -
-
fear, 74.
ipf.
colligere, gather,

(U.)
379|. []
aor.

overmastered
inf.
321.
and drawn

,-,
siluit, sprang up,

-,
355.
back,
692, aor.
85.
(2) mid.

aor. av-ciravac,
arcuit, hinders from, 550f.
aor. part.

ex-

-}
-

,
(-, transfixa, having
-',
-,
ace. 375), spitted, 426f.
ignavus, defenseless, cowardly, 62. see vav^rvlf

,
(alere), insatiabilem, apertas.

-, -,
insatiable,
-\,
-', .
\\4:. (Od.)
ipf. iter.
aor.
--66,
solvere,
part, out; only (1)
unfurled, shook out the sails,
(2)
'
ex an do, spread

A 480, etc.

-,6 , -,
untie, 178 (in tmesi) ; retexere, w?2- apertas, open
ravel,

-, () , -, -
-],
105. (Od.)
grassatur
(opp.
aor.
121),
cxsi-

-
per, rages through, 490f. luit, sprang np out of, 379f.
fut. ay only fut.

,
shalt ivipe off on thy own head, expiate and explore,^"// up, accomplish
1 aor.,

-,
with thy life, r 92|. 34, A 263, 170

-
(one's fate), en-

-,
;

aor. -, exspec- dure woes, 207, 302, 132.

,
-, . .
tavi, was awaiting,

-,, -? ()
tirer, revieasure the road
see
(), 342f.

to,
aor., e

428f.
m e- sail up,

ering of
fut.

breath, respite
ad fretum,

from
and ipf.,
234;

recov-
A

-,
c'lva- aor,, battle,

., -, -,
commonuisti,

-,
hast reminded, 80 L (11.)^
ipf. and aor. - and

-,
,-, -
e,await, pass, and plupf.

-, 171; stand fast, 363. mid.

,
respirare, respire,

-- ,
(11.)
ipf. and aor. (tmesis), take breath, come to one's senses, 42
admiscere, <o inix with, mix receive from (only 1 aor. act.).
together, 235, 41, 529.
-- (),A non redemp-
-, -,
66, efferbuit, seethed up,
ipf. iter.

oritur,
238f.
I'ises,
tam, without ransom,

mas exprimens,
() /ei/?y
99f. [d]
lacri-
tears flow,
192t. 81.
l>-vf,onIyipf.andaor.,abnuere,

,
ai/-a7rrw,r el i gar e,aiiac/i, of cables,

,&,,
den I/, refuse, 311; with inf.,
forbid,
252;
468; without

-
162;

,
gantor ad malum,/*
imp. aor. pass., reli-
51; suspen-
inf.,

gods;
-,
,
^ 129 ;

KTOC,
dat. pi.
s

, ,,
u r s u m,
(),
557, tutor,
X 205.
up-hill,
voc.


11 6|.
of
dere, hang
fault,

-, '.
-6,
rious,
86.

274t.
tip,

(),
[]
274 ; impute

Ota, noto-

,' - ,
dominus, master, ruler. (1) as pos- see
sessor,
,
87.
(2) as rukr, (a) of gods, only aor.
-ijpira<r, -ap-
etc.; eripere, snatch out, X 276;
Apollo,

,
23;
Poseidon, Hephaistos,

-^ --,
(b) of men, e.
. 514;

com-
carry off, I 564 ; snatch away,

--,
esp. of sudden gusts of wind,
and - (),
515.
437,

,
; g., I 164 ;

mon phrase, A 172, A 7. lacerare, tear open; everterc, de-


aor. subj., stroy, U 461. (II.)
--',
exsiccat,
-(, i/r^ up, 347t.
(-,
' (,
only pres. and ipf.

bant.
-, see

only (1) aor. part.


a peri e-

4- turn up with oar-blades


78), aor. -ippiypav
130, is to be supplied),
; cf. torquent
spumas
-()-^
caerula verrunt.
35

e versus
^
est. Jell backward,

-,
64.

-,
it

-
(Od.)

rare,

-
-()-,
sivalloics up, 104. (Od.)
(),
alienati, not fit-
devo-
^^^)

-, 297
-ov. (1)
only pf.
up, spout up,
wales started up under the
;
-',
nm
and aor.

),
ting,

-,,
out leader,
incongruous, hence hostile (opp.
(Od.,
(), sine due
703, 726.
365).
e,

2 aor. mid., ex-


with-
-
blows, 717 437, shot up;

A 354, cito immensum.

-,
456. (Od.)
;


(), mutus,
412,
up 7-ises the sheer rock. (2) run back,

speechless,

-, -,
,
si lu it, sprang forth, 458|. only pres. act. and mid.,
tyxog,drew and aor. act. -^>; vat, monstrare. (1)

- by turns
his spearyb/'M, 574f. ivere feeding the flame (to give
, (), domina,
- rnis- light), 310.(2) disclose, A 87 ; dis-
tress, queen (only a 149 of mortal). playing, 411; show loquacity, 159;

dominari,
over.
--', -,

(1) persons
{^, -,
(ipf.
oe
), fut.

sovereign,
; comm. with
tueri,
aor. raid.

rule,
dat.,
A
reign
7,

A
bet?-ai/,

all.
254.
(3) mid., appear.
(-),
(.), openly, before
178f, and
the eyes of

180, also with

, -, (,
62 Avith A only aor.

-
61, tv, ; 1

-, ,
gen., 33 Avith ace. (duration of time),
; brought up, 625, and drew
ruled through three a long-draivn sigh, 314.

, , , -,
dat., -,
generations of men, y 245.

108 with tv,


;
(2) country
and city with gen., A 452, 443 Avith
572, 276. (3)
;
; liebat, Avaves
ipf. *
ivere boiling up,
aor. opt.
ebul-
36 If.

-, -,
a 117, cf. 93
be master oy Priam's sovereignty over
the Trojans,
177.
,,,-
30; pass., be ruled,
181 ; To,
39 If.
agnosceret, should

pres.,
reccdo, was
ipf.,
recognize,

part. aor.
retiring,

-,
-, - -,
.-, -,
gendo, standing
adv. (cf. araSiy), ass ur-
upright,
-<,
469. (II.)
ipf.,
600 ; also with

aor., infudit,

-
g e m u i t, loailed a loud, 9f poured

-
i therein, 209f

,
.-,
To,
211.
,
and ipf.
lamentari, bemoan, bewail aloud;
(II.)
cede, withdraw,
461, 210.
(),
pres., fut. aor. 1, re-
270 ; also with

-,
-, ,
and
-^- --,
(, (),,
\|/, cverterent,
v.

only aor. opt.


1.

overturn,
for

peragro, wan-
436;
575
gerare,
alleviate.
cool,
[-'
d 568;
]
pres. ipf.,
3 sing. aor. pass., refri-
795, assuage,
and

sua-
(>),

, ) (),
der through, 326. vis), ipf.
ov-pv(-p0),versans,
turning
-, -0,
-, -,
,
it over and over, 394f
see
pf.

light,
and '^, placere,
gratify ; esp. with
aor.

,( please, de-
(for

373 ;

-,. ,
perferre. Avith two datives, A 24, 674 398,
tol-
-,
by speech) 422, gratum, acceptable.

-, , , -
;

lens, see asunder, 412 ; in twain.

-,
aor. emisit,
caused to spring up (as food), (), spolia, spoils

,
777|.

i g
upon me,
-,
-
m

, ,,
i i

X
dure, withstand (poison),
lOOf.
fut.
a a f f i c i e t, will heap insult

part, of aor.

aor.
^, 327.
en-
(Od.)
in

each,
,
-,
of arms,

,
V 14f.
S 509|.

638,
i.

viritim, man by man,


(v. 1.
e.
king of
499.

'.)
IGSf.
-< 36 -
-
avSpa-iriSSeaai,
475t.
mancipiis, shves,

,
-ci
rentis, destitute of bedclothing,
- (),
(), gen.,

, veste ca-
348f.

-
, ,
-|
(),
ivith rnan-btirdening stones,

.
(),
ingentibus,
12 If.
homicidac,
terrogo, inquire,
231 ;
420,
ipf.

, ask respecting,
;
in-
with

- ,
man-slaying, 651. (II.) 238.
(), tolerabilis,

,
from ov-KT<Js, -or,

facto, wrought
dat. pi.
(),
by men's
in an ib US
hands, A
endurable, 83 ; usually with
350, in a fashion
',
no longer
also

371t.
() to be endured.
-,

,
, ordy gen, sg. aor. part, from

-, -,
,
and pi., nom. pi., caedes, slaughter of reversus.
men (in battle), ( 612, 11.) ipf. -\, attrahere,

,
daughter of draw tip, draw, 434, 128, 150; drav)
in ; wife of Hektor, back, A 375 ; mid., draw out and recover
371, (one's spear), 97 ; tear out (one's

,,
395, 460,

,
etc.
, (),
(II.)
-,, '.
hair), X 77.

human

,
' '
, ,,,
flesh, 297 ;
pieces of
hum an us,
human
,
see
vent us, wind;

,
-

-
374 blood, 19 body,
',
flesh, 1 ; 571 ;
; hurricane,

,- ,
tumult of men, tumultuous
,
186,
crowd,

- , ; 538.
(), ; as symbol of swiftness,

-
valor (better 207, 342, 437 ; Aiolos,
reading, as regards sense, than 21. Chief winds, see
vigor, but unmetrical).

homines dcvorans,
('),
eating man's
also
(,
tering against the whid,
195, 383.
443), shel-
224|.

-6, , (^),
,
flesh, 200. [] (/^), ventis auc-

", ",
,-, , viros oc- tu s, swollen by the wind, 625, 256
cidens, man- shying, made from a tree toughened by exposure

),
, 479, vegetable poi-
Achilleus, to ivind.
,
- ,, ,
,
son, 261. (for fn-

, see shu7i. t i 1 i s, useless, 1 23 ; a u s, vain,

,,
-5, pres., and 1 aor. 216 ; -la A 355 ; adv. -lov,

, ,
excitare, wake up, 474.
,-, 730 \7 2, encouraged.
;
'
, town in

-, ,
agnovi.
aor. from 521t.
see respi-

, -, -, -',
ipf. from ravit.
vibra-
-,
suscepimus, ?uc have sustained. see

^
aor. from cx- vit.
ortae sunt, started tip. aor.
-^,
-',
-,,
,
-,
-6,
), cohibebat,
, -,
- see
ipf.
ivas holding back,
sine dote.
(for avkf -
ab ripuerunt, snatched away, a

hoist,
aor.
402.
'
(Od.)
241.

,-, , -, (\) go up,


77 ; also 752. (II.) aor.
only 1 aor. part. cf -^5, 97 shoot up, 163.
(2)

&,
;

having placed him upon, 657 opt. return, ; ^, A 392, 187.


should bring upon the nuptial ipf. questioned
bed,

. ^,
S 209. (II.)
-, (itvai), subirc, (1) -^,
repeatedly, 251 f.
i m e re m ,

-,
go up,

332;
492.
,.
-^, ,
146,274;
oricnte, with the
redire, re/ni,X 499,
, 480;
290. (3) adire ad,
daivn, 362. (2)
see

siluit.
aor.,

aor.
dv-^trci

from
fut, from

ex-
-^
- 37

-
, ,, ,
(), hearthless, home- (), ace, non viri-
less, I I e m, unmanly, 30 1 (Od.)
63t.
-,
.

(-
avv
gen., sine, icithout; dtov,
372,
hostibus,
of. 213
556.
; ,
privative, in-, un-), with
invito deo,
procul ab cognate with Sabine word nero).
(perhaps

vir, 7nan, (a) as distinguished from


(1)
dat, pi.
65, A 371;

,,
, ,
avv66v, -0f, (1) procul, far away, yvvt), 163 ; (b) in age, 449 ; (c)

, ;,
27, 277, 300 (opp. iyyvQi), emphatically, 7nan indeed, hero, 529,
241 A 35 452. (2) 1 189 ; cf. in combat, 472 (d) of

,
;

sine, with gen., without,


invito deo,
;

X
185,
39,
cf.
239
89;'
;
occupation and nationality with
A 514, 319
;

;
;

-,
-
procul av

- ,
ii, far from, 554 ; fikya :

vwtr, remotissimum a nobis, 88. dr/juoi;, unus (2)


e plebe, 198.

,
!

'
innubilus
ther, cloudless blue sky,
.']
-, (.)
), , 45 f.
ae-
[d-
ms^rit\\s,husband,\327,l96,a292,
181 (3) homo, human
.
often with
among mortah, 354
being,

.
, ), -
, 544
;

and
fut.
aor.

(inf.
(inf.
), . mid.
aor.
gods,
[ in
119
arsi,
;

and
giants,
in trisyllabic forms.]
(),
303,
;

120.

, ,, ,
(imp. non culta, un-
, S 499,
-,
,",
sustinere, hold up. I. act. ploughed, 109. (Od.)

, ,
X

,
80, X 297, 291 ;
in combat perf. pass. imp. from av-
(boxing),
450
89 in prayer,
;

making
A
*= alligantor,
233.

,
; in oath,
412; maintain, rill; hold back,
jut forth, emerge, 320, 310.
426
.
;

., town in 1151.
son of -
(II.)

, ;,
dure,

- .6,
, ,
,
mid. (1) hold one's self up, bear up, en-
285, 7 277 with part. ; A 586,
587, forbear ; 375, stay aivake. (2) in Troia,
488t.

473|.
[--^-]
father of

(),
, ,
hold up before one, 321 ; , floridus,
100; often flowery, 467 ; adorned with flowers,
exsurgcns, lifting up arm for 440 275; cf. cut

,
;

(3) perferre, endure, 9'8.

,
,
striking, 362. No.
tolerate, , 423, 32
\y'
13 ;

895
entertain,
; with
/o

part., mentum, chin; to take


masc.
by the chin in
(),
would gladly
-(,
sit,

( epos),
595. token of supplication, A 501.
), '
,

, (
sisters son, gen. pi.

,
,

nephew,
-6 (), mutus,
(1) pi.

.
from
422,

; muti,
, yv, ',
speechless. per
227|.
aristas, oyer the ears of grain,Y

aor., bloom, 320|.


etc.,

93,
-,
323, I 30,

..
240. (2)

,
adv.,
508|.
()
ovoc, town in

- . florid um
aor. from
-,
-,
-5, (),
3 sing. aor. subj. from
sec
ov, insana-
t84t.
-,
c i b u m, food offlowers, flowers as food,

,,
i-^J] _

-', re-

-
ipf., aor.

(), ' -
,
bills, inappeasable, 394. (II.) sistcre, resist, 30.5, 70. (II.)

, obsequium detrcctavit, was flower, I 542 ; fig., 484


(ad-or), flos, blossom,
young shoots,

- .
;

rebellious, 236.
, (//),
,
(II.) xjouthful herbage, 449.
(y), unmilked, prunae,
[ wv^
439|. heap of glowing coals, I 213f.
(),
A
"peri., cbullivit,

-5< ()
gushed forth,

aimless, 1 1 1
f
266|. See
py, endless, 365,
107,
288),
ov, (f
homo,
48; to animals,
mi!, (.
125,
( ?), 65,
to gods,
315) ;
homines, mankind,
340,
123 and
400.
S 361,
29;
535,
quisquam,

,
the world,
125, 95, cf.
354,

awj/ one,
38

,
imder

195, 410, or
inf.
-,
from
,
I.), surgere, rise up.

bed, S 336,
-
(1)
from seat (of whatever sort), I 195, f
124.
for imp. see

sum esse,
460, 598, 300
(),
disgusted with, weary of,

indignant, grieved in heart,


indignari,
270,
87 ; trans, annoy, distress, 721, 323.
ipf.

,
, , ,
;, ,
pertae- (2) for action (of Avhatever sort),
258, /i 439, Avith inf, in cip ere,
to speak, '
or among them), cf

343, 694;
'
58
380;
rose up (before

; for combat, battle,


334; repeated,
- (3)
(), 709;

,
pass, freq. in tmesi, e. g. 118.
vt,Ct.,taedio&{t'icere,incotn- from sick-bed, 287 from grave,

-,
;

,
,-
viode, 178, r 66; pass,, he annoyed, 56.
wearied,
291,
117 ; a 133, 335 ;
indeed hard to return out of raising, 798, 369;
part, to liens,
' ^=
-,
'tis

weariness. [- ] hold thyself erect, i. e. be of


sine sudore, without good courage.
(), investigans,
sweat,
,, [-

-, /,
228 f. ]
moles tia, tracking back, 192. X

,
burden, weari-

,
ness, 394, 52 ; /i 223, unendurable av-viToi, see oritur.

, -, ,^^ ,
bane; trouble, plague, 192, 446. imprudens, unreflecting,
(Od.)

-,
-{,
-,
taesus.
[]

fut.

false reading,
subj.
-,
aor. pass,

2 sing,

,
3
aor.
sing,
-, 2
from
.

-, -, 2
1.

265), -rjy,
, ,

sing. opt.

-iy (conjectural
m
i 1 1 e r e.
per-
iter,
S
-
270.

168,

,,
-, .
(Od.)

228.

untouched by destruction,
see
aperio,

(), incolumes,
o/>e,

761 f.
ipf.,
389,
and

,,
,
forth.
(mid.
80 ;
), .
(1) send forth,

.
(2)
-^, skin,
loose,
laying bare her bosom,
568 ;

300) ; let go, 265,


105, vojnit
; open,
X
isti, silly, foolish heart,

-,
-,
{ =
see
quam excors
44 It.
see

-,
fu-

to,
,
eitare, ,-<5,
880.
34
(3)
1
;

18,
440, forsake ; give reins
loose upon, urge on, in-
185 against,
-, exsilio, spnng up,
130
only aor.

; ',
,
/3 ;

'
405, 882 ; Avith inf

,
tare, stir up against, impel,

($
\_1,
', ,
362 exci-
705, esp.
also with inf., X 252, 465.
; elsevvh.
, S

.]
;
climbed swiftly up the sky, y

clusum,
off his return,
-<$< (), reditu caren-
{), u
reddiderunt,
1 82f
redit
1.
i t e r-
cut

, - (),
{), molestus, trouble-

- -
some, 220, 377 ; the tes, made void their return,
more troublous for him, 190. (Od.) 528t.
a-vnTTO-iroSes, illotis pe- sine morbo,
dibus, with tmicashed feet, without disease, 255t.
{), non co minus
,
235f.
{),

,, ,-, ..
illotis, unwash-

,-,
ed,
-,
266 f.

aor. 1.
I.

-,-, ipf.
imp.
fut. {)-
vulneratus, unwounded,

near trithout
540f
nor did any one draw
inflicting a wound, X
part,
stand up, tj 163 ;
-, -, -,
exciere, bid or make 37it. [g
supporting with

-, 319
-4,-, A 191 ; wake etc., see

-
his hand, disperse,

-, - -
;

vp,

, .
32 ; call to life
deport, transfer,

,
up to battle,
fut.
64,

3
7; excitare, stir
358.II.
aor.
pi.
(du.
;

-, - -
-,
(), ,
the dead,

part,
756

see

b i 1 i a, unendurable,
see

63f
intolora-
etc.,
German
= (old instr. case,
prefix ant, ent), adversum,
opposite; adv., and prep, with gen.,
,
39

rere,
encounter,
; aor.
lueet,
-
, 293,
297 (vith dat., 127,
88,
etc.,
312,
occur-
551 ;

(I) e region e, in the vicinity of, 431, 147),Avith gen., 231 ; 290,

7
G26; coram, i presence of, before, strike; have or take part, share, with
remained standing before him,
141, she acc, only 31 A
elsewh. with gen., A
;

232 a 334, holding the veil before 67, 215,


356, 125, 643 (mid.

,
;
\_

lier cheeks straight forward, iSeip,


; 62), 25 ; 402, would that he

,
properly ore might enjoy just as much good luck as

, ,
;

(instr.)

,
countenance.
similis fuit, was

versus, contra,
, (2) in hostile sense,
against,
like him
ad-
75,
in , % 28;

-,
,
56, participate in the fu-
neral ceremonies of her son.
dat. pi.

, ,
('), adversis,

-
355; hostile, 304, 415 A ;

; having drawn back ad^, Avith verbs of combating, 20,


their hands (to strike): 159, before 435, A 386 ; so also A 278,
-,
thee, to thy face.

-, 220, 226. (Both advs. only 11.)


),
, -, (,ov, aequi pretii, equiva- -}, aor.

,
375,
aor.

encounter,
201
,
lent to, Avith gen., I
(),
,, ,
;

327
399
ipf.

158, then
401,

occur rere,
423,
514. (il.)

;
fut.
vieet,
;
A
16 ;
occurrere.
dentally, encounter,
Avith gen. only,
shall be my lot,
790,
come in the icay of

547
meet acci-
375, 275,

306 elsewh. with


272,
(1)
;
;
cf.


,- ,
might he soon take part in battle, i. e. dat, e. g. 114. (2) meet intentionally
find an opponent; meet in hostile en-
counter, 7 254.
,
(a) as friend,
as foe, A 365,
546,
465
19, 277 ; (b)
,
,.
847, ;

''AvTcia, wife of 229. A 342


(3) interesse, have part in,

, -,
160t. ;

{), strictly, the face, 3, godlike, distinguished


fiv, 15, 223, cf. 77 ; ace. of speci- in rank, might, size, beauty ; common
fication, in respect to countenance, Avith epithet of kings, 663 ; heroes, I 623,

-
acc. of direction, 257, a 21, 90; Odysseus's com-

,,
;

face to face, openly, co-oram, palam, panions, ^ 571 ; nations, 241, 408
A 187, 158, 247, 464, 120, suitors, 18 ; Penelope, 117 ; Poly-

,
221, 6> 213, 158; in battle, A 590, phemos, a 70. [i]
307, 109 forward, 399 in front, ; (), , opposite

-
;

^152.

,
the entrance (out of doors),
3<^", it 159f.

,,, , -, ,
rior.

band of
123

262,
;
1.

59, 262.
(), ,
son of

at the
59, sons of Ante-


hus-
'Avti-kXcici,

"-,
wife of

rior in the wooden

(1)
daughter oi

name
85,

horse,
358.
of a Greek war-

ex adverse,
286.

junction of the men's and women's


apartments, opposite the entrance of the
house (see table III. at end of volume),
opposite.
with,
310.
130, 819,
(2)
362 ;
straightforward,
coram, face to face

137;
",
ex adverso,
(locative from
387f.
prep. Avith
gen., strictly (\)in the face of, adver-
sum, 415, 481 ; ' 115, before the
),
outright, utterly,
867,
prep., e. g.
in compounds, e.g.
, ,,,
116, 380,

100;
673,
162; often joined Avith foil,
also
-
eyes.

546,
(2)
.
, -,
placed over against as
equivalent, loco, instead of, I 116,

, ,
307, 290.
},
-,
819.]
876, cf.
[]
481. [- - -,

son of
130,

, ^
457,

,
men, of
-

Amazons,
see

{),
189. (II.)
fut. ^
matching-
554,
452,5 187.
'-5,
138,
320,

188.
93,

a Trojan, A 123, 132,


569, 565,
'
' -voos

,
40 -
,
, . '.
-voos, 383 ; (5) son of leader of Greek

mother of
260.
-
the most insolent of the suitors,
7 418, 22, 424.

-,' see
(),
, ,, , 6,, , ,
,
daughter of
and
',
,
84, islanders,

hold, 411. (Od.)


678,
ovtXos, ov, o, sent'insL, bilge-water,

rising-places of the sun,


ortus,

at,
4f
(), only
3, (), adversus, against, pres., ipf., occurro, encounter, 595,
towards. (1) 463 412 203 join, 133

, ,, ,
; ; ; ;

113; 7 160, look up. (2) with come together with hostile purpose,
friendly intent, obviam (ire), (go) to

,
698, 788.
meet, 54, 257 ; 20 ; antrum, cave, 216, 6.

', , ,
185,

,
535.(3) with , 594, 539, 14 ; (Od.)

,
hostile intent, contra, town in Thessaly,

, {, -, , 445, 94, 216,


697t.
t), (rt'yoc?). (1) metal rim

,
,
553, 662) ;
e. g. 98, 8, 31,
584,
694,
422 ; elsewh.


90.
of shield,118; serving to bind to-
gether the layers of metal or leather,

,
()
adv., in opposition, against.
in friendly signif.,

,
coram, be/ore, in
(1) of which the shield was composed (see
the cut). (2) rim of chariot; rim sur-

,
presence of,

,,
,
203,
165,

195.
208,
529 answer,
213
218
334
etc., 198,
160, look up;
;

C2) in unfriendly signif.,


;

;
;

, con-
rounding the body (ci-

tra,

has
377.
,

ft Try, A
Similar significations
160.
(1) coram, 425,
(2) contra, against, with. Verbs
230 ;

,
uvai, 256 ;

,.
of combating,
78. []
see
ovTi-ircpoia
88, Sb, 113, 333, X 253,

(), ad vers a, the

-, --,
lands lying over against, 635f.
-
-,,
-, ,
,ite,o/}yoose,i/2ierpose (tables
an'ows), gen.

r are, only
,

aor.
74f

break into , 267;


contra


against

perfo-

pierce,

-,
vengeance,

191.

[]
-,
114.

(2) sou of
(3) king of the

; , (),
(),
51
cf. /3 76.;

,
,
337.

do, (1) a Trojan,


242.
talio, requital,

ace. -ija,

inatcJi

-,
one's self against,

y,
41 .

measure one's self


()

,
with, 701 Avith ace. of re-
( 238 and
;

-,
,
spect, 482. II.)

, .
"-,
489,
son of Priam,

109. (2) son of


19. (3)
250f
(1) a. son of Priam,

68.(4) son of
864 ; leader of
) of the chariot, sometimes double,
728 ; it served also as place of at-
41

{,, ,,
113, 508
)
(r<v, only 139)
439,
;

102,

-
tachment for the reins. (See the cut.) 322, 409, etc.
ipf. from ai/oiyiu,aperiebat.

- -,
i u s s i.
see
only

-
553f,
having shoved off from land.
(), necopinato, un-

I

expectedly,

imagined,

nameless,
' (),
92t.

39|.
[7]
( ), iuopinatum, un-
( t-ojua),
552f.
sine nomine,

,
r ex it, arose,
6,
iubete, etc.
-,
812,
aor. in tmesi,

-0, imp. from


3.

-,
, sur-

,., -,
-cwr0, -,
from
/, bipennis, double hat-
tle-axe of Trojans, 711. (See cut.)

9. -/,
1.
6.
10.

(^),
7.

ipf., cito ei

243t.

ment,
,
successit opus, was

-iv,
successus;
, (),
progressing,

accomplish-
347, they will
, ,,
equivalent,
a gift in return,
3, coiinterhahncing,
719,
( ),
562 ; worth
318 ; equal in
accomplish nothing 544. strength, 234 ; corresponding to one's

,-, -(), , .
;

('), fut. station or requirements, sm7a6/e, I 261,


con fie ere.
(2) (1)294, consume, 71. 46, 446, 383 ; worth, 885

- ),
;

357, traverse; pro- 405,


ficere,e^eci (nothing),
373.;^^-]

rai,
1.

, ,
icere completing,
ipt.

draw
,y 496.

K251,-w^]
to
conflcere.

a

56 ; mid.,7r

(1)
(2) pass, ave-
close, 251,
,*|05, river in Paionia, 141, 849.

,,
1^2|.
(-,
dan te, c?e?iseybresi,
son of
1 ignis a bun-
155t. [
in ',
^

473.
2.

, j;--;

(, (), sursum, upwards, X 534. (II.)


(axis), axle,

).
838,

- ,
porro,

--)(-,-),
596 ; the northward, 544. from (1)

-, , and
?), pf. (imp.
and
cant us,
595,
421
singing, the
731, 44, 253 ;
power
song,
to sing,
a 328, 159,
429, sti-ains of

; ,, -;,,,
;

inf. ;
plupf. (3 sing. the hard. (2) carmen, song, ballad,
and -, also forms story ; that song men hear most will-
like pres. ipf. ingly, 351 ; mournful song, 340 ;

fut. aor. iu- funeral lament, elegy, 721 ; Avith


bere, command, constr. like I
pregnant signif song, subject for song,
ooiStaci

),
42

-,- -,
197, 200,
580.

, , -, (^,
204, (. 1.

, abducere, feac?
fut. aor. -fjyayov,
away; always with

[]
, sweetly sings, only

cantabiles, subject for


song, notorious, (in fames), 35 8f.
227, e 61.
pers. obj., cxc.
from

,
their
pers. subj., exc.

campum
-
own
278, hing with them
estates; ahvays Avith
706.

petentem, vithdrawing
,
-(,
-, (, from the city, and seeking the plain,

,
cantor, singer 563t.
ov, (dPtidw),
(of funeral ode), 720 elsewh. singer ipf., also

,
;

- , ),
and poet, regarded with special favor -TO, cf. 419) only pres. and ipf., adi-
-
by the gods { 43, 479, 487, 518, mere, take aicay, rob, 582, 595,

), , 347 e. g. 419 322 (. 1.

, ), .
; ;

hence
and highly honored.

,
385, 479, sqq., 262.
*7<5, Trojan town, 828|; see
-
,
-^, fa, (-, con-

,, 6,--,(- ,
fcrti, crowded together, in throngs,
498,0 306; cuncti,N39,
all together,
only aor.
446.
165,412;
234t.
-
('),
desili-
ens, springing down from a crag,

res repetentes,
and
), -, (),
pass, reclaiming, 78|.

, , , {, ,
congregare, collect, 270, -, imp. and opt.
588.
, ('),
-,
(II.)
Eng-
2 aor., arc ere, ward
[]
off, 766, X 348,

,,
lish sAvord),
=
pi.,
- -^.^ -^, -, ,
gladius,
403, 406,
222. [-^
(See cut.)
- ;
swo7-d, in
294, 321
-^ -^ -- ,
;
form

in arsi
ace. mis, not knowing how
E597t. [a]
to
sine pal-
swim, helpless,

fut. and aor.


opt., arc ere, keep off
371 ; |0 364, but not CA'cn thus could

she keep some one from maliciously in-

'-6, , sulting him, cf. 462.


3 du. fut,,

405,419.
,
shall they be healed of their wounds,

, ,
,, (,,),-
- -

contudit pcnitus, crushed utterly,

,
522t.

,
-, ,
3, ten er, tender,

.), vpct, etc.,


balteus, sword-belt
masc.
= \-
(ai'ipw, , ijTop,
as
151;
like the
92, of

heart-

,
.
(see cut), 609 31, ily, 465.
;

of strap on 7-^, aiaXoio,bene sagi-


-,
with hooks or handles ;

wallet, V 438.
i]pa, , , masc. (so- '
natae,
(),
well-fed, 363t.
after having
c

- i u s,
in battle,
-]), 254
d e fe
helper, 5 165,
s
-(, -
^- ', '
r, companion

119.
cut (hacked) 301 off,
see
f.

(), non percussum, -<$., and

,,
;

ipf (former

-',
unwounded,

XcaKc, and
536 f.
only
renuntio,
ipf.
with
respondens,
latter
answering,
with
A 84,
),
824,

, 626
1 aor.,
bring tidings, nvi,
report,
640, -,
400, 347.
v. for

-,
I ; 1.

210.
4-, strangulans, throttling,
^ . ....
only aor. (in tmesi
230t. A 67, 59), act. and mid. ; and ipf.
, -
fmd ones
arcere, ward off, mid. de-
579, 738 de- ,
43

132,
,
192,
125,
-
{, 236,
291, 560,
296) ;
{^,
-, '.
self, ;

,
-., 430 (but gen.

,
not

-,
fend ones self against, 369, 72. 290) ;

only 185, 297.


Oir-av6v9e(v), (1)
recusare,

,
only aor.

procul, far
,
decline, refuse,
,
absol.), 88, 273,

and 2
ludificari,
107

aor.
see also ;

delude, beguile,
mid.

-.
away,
374.
425.
434


A 35 ; out from it,
;

(2) separatim, apart, 524,


(3) with gen., sine, without

, ,
only

. ,-. -
, ,,
217, 216.
air-Miirc, see
oir-ccpYc, see
[]
-,

- ),
the knowledge, A 549 far from, A 48, fut. ipf.

36 ; foUg. its gen., A 283.


;

(1) minari, threaten,


('), quoquoversus, 220, 201 ; 388
on every side, II. and 278. with inf, A 161, 415, 179. (2)
{), pervenerunt,
,
,,
gloriari, boast, 150 ; Avith inf,

, -,
accomplished the journey home again, 383. (3) vovere, utter a vow,
863,872. [--]
326t.
o-iral {-, semel, , minae, threats,

-,,
once,
22 once for 350. (Od.) I 244, 219 then iactantia, boast-
;
all,

only ,, and S 479,


;

200.

-'
aor. ing,
in tmesi detruncare, smote iactatores, boasters,
to the earth, 497. (II.) 96t.
{), -, -,
-, -,
, -, recon- 1. subj. -tyai, ipf

,,
ciliare sibi, that a king should con- fut. often in

-
;

-
ciliate a man,

ordiri,
183|.

to sacred rites by
begin the
sacra 169
tmesi,
;
abesse,
as far away, 400 ;
as far as a spear is cast;
be far from,

be

, -,
cutting off hair from the forehead of absent, wanting, 7, 146.
-, -,
the victim, 446.
-, -, 2. imp. part,
, ipf.

-,---
o-irds, universus, abire, go away, 478;
cuncti,

,
entire, all; pi., ; a all together 289.
158, nothing but kindness; 616, ar- '-7(^ voco), ind. also '-
gento solidum, of massive silver;
-{)
(subj.),

, (opt.),

,
196, in a year and a day. (The trisyl- (imp.), (inf.),
labic forms scarcely found, exc. at end (part.), and without oir- etc.

-5 {), -
;

of line.) speak out (fully), cMrer, an errand,


(1)
on pas- 7 340 ; a mission, 416 the truth,

,-, -, -
;

tus, not having eaten, fasting, with 361 ;


speak out
car ens, without food, cf 788. regardless of feelings, a 373. (2) ne-
gare, say no, A 515, 1 431, 510, 675.

,',,
fut. aor.

-,
() {-), fall , deceive, 348. [] (3) renuntiare, ^Ve solemn warning,

,
,
far from, 445.
, dolus,
seorsim,
[]
deceit,
apart,

168
587;

; 1.

-,
Apeira,
91 ;

-,
she who
35, 75, renounce.
comes from
?), 8, {"-

, ,
f al 1 a C i a e, tricks, 31. []
{, ),, , , and

-
ntr. fallacia, only
127, speaks falsely to her, and
288, skilled in deceit.
, ,.,,.
ntr. pi.
boundless, hifinite, vast,
infinitus,
r 1 74

- -
f allax, deceitful, A 526f
[]

-, {),
ipf.

q. v.,,-,
con temps it,

wrest away,
aor. part,
A
greatly insulted,
(cogn. with
as, a, fut.

356 ; , I 107
prorsus
113f.
?),

e rip ere,
;
only

,
unskillful,
tentatus,

-,
boundless,

tus, immeasurable,
((]), imperitus,
untried,
{),
-, {),
195f.
41.

545;
170; no

infinitus,

infini-
endless,
286 ; ,
found, indissoluble,
--
in which the end can not be
340.
44

-
-'7
,- (), speak out without
.
scruple,
-
only a
aTr-CK-XeXaBcaee

- , i

immeasurable,
{
1 i t i s t i a, forget altogether^
(),
imp., ob-
394f

vim,
?), i mm en
245 and im-
;
s am, mem,
373,

,-,
1 309.

uninjured,
{), 282 f.
aor. from -
in col u-

mensum quantum, sprang back


-, , {), deerravi.

-, ,
enormously far, 354. sine dam-
-66 (), evomuit, no. (1) fortunatus, safe, unharmed,

,
aor.,

-,,
sjjat out,

meminerunt.
A 437 f.
see
A 415, f 40, 519, V 39,
r s c , favoring, kindly,
speech, escort, healthful,
744.(2J

164.
266;

, ,
spoliabant, were
only
-, ,
195,0 343.
{tvapa),

,
oir*
despoiling,

,
tvrea, ipf.,
wagon, four vhceled,
like cover, 70
plan strum,
324; with tent-
not unlike the lio-
;
freight

,
man r a e d a. (See cut.)

,
aor. from

-,
abstulisti.

ves solvit.
ipf. from na-
13

see in fin i-
tus.

, -, -, arc ere, ward off,

* also in tmesi,
(),
156.

il

-,
ere, tear

,
go away,
off,
~(,
134|.

136,
tmesis
[]
-), 766
;

;
de tra-

abire,
leave,
514 (tmesis).
'- (),
thwarter, annihilator, ,-
exstinctor,

,-,
-< {),
361t.

,
opt. aor.

,
decederes, wouldst thou mis-
erably withdraw from battle, 723|.

-6 {),see aberant.

,- -,
(1) igna^us,
ignorant, only y 184. (2) ignotus,
unknoion, only 88. aor. from

, , ,
recusabant,
air-exeaipei, only 5 105,
-?, , , refused.

inf. -
makes hateful; and aor. subj.
/7|>, oderim, Aa<e, 415.
-,{), 2 sing., aor.
odisse,
-, -,
hate,
340

-,
;

202.
94

aor.
unfriendly, harsh,
;

from

,
35 ;
A

de-

,
114, of.
hated, Tivi,

-, -, -,
', -,
96;

aor.
elsewh. odio esse, be
53, 140, I 614,

fut.
-^/,
83.
pui.
-
truncavit,

(Odysseus hangs upon


ipf. t es, high-hanging
h i b e r c, keep away, hold off, one of the roots which project from the
r
struck
aor. from
off.

{), procul penden-


eri-

-
,

,
enemy, 96;
{', 19), 572; an land), 435t.
324 (tmesi); only fut., and aor. 1-,{),
aloof from,
, ,,
(so also mid. tmesi, 316), A 97, 263
33 mid., hold one's self only with
248,
;

35, S 78, ot-irivvaaciv, and -',


6,
adversari, disobey,
and ovd', 492.

par- amcntcm esse, lack understanding,


(),
206; absti nere, t 211;

cere, spare, 321, 489. 342 (acc), be unconscious, 10.


;
-,
, ., , ,
,
45

land,

Greek, , - ,,
A 270,

348. (2)
18.

[---]
(1)
from, a remote' from his swift hand

a
a Tro-
destruction

^ before
in
from
earnest,
;

his strong

.']
279, sending

359.
bow ;

[-'^;

jan,

-
-, (), 582.

,-, -,
-
desperavi, was

- ,
faithless,
{),
ipf.

106.
doubting,


sine fide,
339 f,

incredulous,

(1)
, mere.
-

adimere.
=

-, -,
adi-

, , ,-, ,-,
(2) fut. aor.
150.

95t. '",, = hold away, ^


3 sing,
away,
etc. dismount,
and abirc, go
4(38,
V
^
ace. 1. (), <

265,
;

cf. 619 ;

7],
459 ;
'-
single cloak or mantle, i. e. to be
j

],
480 disembark,
; 281 ;

,,
Avrapped only once around the body, '

forsake, 357.
only

case
230, 276.
a-irvcviTTos

,,
breathless, t 45 6 f.
(), sine
ab, prep, with gen., after
525 freq.
spirit u,

with words to
its

()
,
in tmesi,
100;
793, cast
abicere,

down from
the helmet;
aor. inf.

51;
throic off,

his
,
()
only
183.
63:
head

,
;

vhch the (orig. instr.) suflSx -0i is ap- let tears fall from his cheeks, 198;
pended,
347,
374, 351, 44,
246,
300, 313,
268 ; also with words - ^.vov,push off to sea,
-a, (/3),
,contem-
359.

- -, ,
having siiflSx -dtv; very freq. in tmesi, n end us, only found with not to
in which case the compound word be despised, b'361 and 65.
must be sought (e. g. 82 under ebulliens. letting spirt

,
ptiv).
away,

(1) from starting-point,
610, 714, 472, -|6 (, ), 13, 645
out,

;
out of the mouth, I 491 f.
con-
448, cf.
' ',
-, (), 730 figlit, nive t es having fallen asleep, 5

,
1

,
; , t

etc., from, i. e. on, and 7.

386, 49
' ;

, '-.fasten to (cf. pen- aor. subj., (yvia), dc-

-
dere a), 278; bilites, shouldst unnerve, 265.
depart/row life (cf. recens a), 725 Afida-
'
avToii,from the meal to some-
thing else, immediately after, 54 (no -,
tum arm is,

,
disarmed,
only fut.
301f

other examples of temporal use).


separation, atvay from, from,
437,

,, ,' --, --
53.5,
436, 733
278, 465, 575,
;
(2)
514, I
640,
364 after
151, outside of;
, ;
and
only
,
ened bach,
aor. inf.
118,

-<,
595, and
partiri, share.

52 f.
atiCYYw'w., fright-

231,

,' ,
322;

(\,
",
from,

-',
525

-,
315.
;

(3) remoteness jfar
227
454; out of my hearing,
;
:

men, 336,
(), iugulare,
22; sheep,
fut.. aor.
slaughter,
35.

,
,
intention -,
(), -,
, -,
e conspectu,
.
and meaning,
53;
contrary
344; .
to our ccpit, accept,
aor.
A 95 f.
from

aor. part.
re-

354. -,odio esse;

- - -),
672, cf.
131.
(4) origin
861,
out of from,
163, for thou didst not spring
-,
:

from
17,
97;
stealth, ()

(= ),
qui aufugit,
only
fut.
3 sing. subj.
( 65)
escape
516.

-(, opt.
aor.
by

-,
,-
an ancient oak nor from a rock, so inf. (tmesis
redd ere, deliver

-
also converse speaking from a tree or opt. aor. pass.,
a rock (as shepherd with shepherdess), up, 285, 651, 84, 58, 61 re- ;

X 126;
Graces
, (as source)
out of our
; 187,
mouth ;
from the

306,
stare,
',
nurture.
A 98, 499, 78,0 S\8 ;
requite parents for one's
- ,,
-(
-,
drive out of,

inflexam ponere,

-,
one

(^,
side,

aufugit.
372f.
see
{^),
763|.
(),
suhj.,
[i]
exturbem,

aor. part.,
bend to
46

qui 342;
-,
any one,

-,,
,
-,
8, ^
-/,
,
138; esp. ransom,

70.
A
OLTTo-XeiPcTai

111,
see
137.

g) away;
only
deserere, abandon, A 408,
digressus, absens,
A

jjis.,
13;
(II.)
,
auferam.
for

-,,
subj. aor. pass, -,
opt, aor. 3 sing, -dpvxps,
3 pi. celled,on]ye 127,219.
-',
ipf., superavit, ex

, 480
c litem lacerare, stripped
the muscles /roni the shoulder,
;
324;
426, then would his
skin (ace. of respect) have been stripped
only 3 sing. opt. aor.
(in tmesi), comburat,ci>7WM7rae,
eKairvaacv, aor. from
efflavit, gasped forth her life
336 f.
,
-/, [] -,
ojT, cf. 435.
exuit, threw
- -,-', (swooned), X 467t. []
only aor, ()
-
ipf. (in
tmesi), and diss ecu it, cut
-,
-,
off, 364; so also 2 aor. part,

, but fut.
;

nudare, strip off,


and aor. through,
261 spoli- hair,
546; totondit, sheared his
141. (II.)

-,
;

\\,(),

,
are, despoil of, 532, 83; also in du. part.

-.
tmesi.

-,
c 349, better reading

-,
negligentes, through your negligence,
413t.
oiro-/cti/lw,only aor. iter, -,
reddat.
6-
-7,
tire from,

-7,
,-.- .-,
aor. subj.

(),
and
see
from

imp.,
406f.
recede, re-
subj.
away, 636 and
amove bat,

aor.
aXXy, deflectentem, tuj-n off, inter-
preting differently, 556|. [< J
107, dislodge,

part.,
moved

(),

,
ipf.,

( ), separavit, held aloof from, airo-KiS^eiv, fut., and aor. -iKoipa,


599; removed from, 221; (), also in tmesi, abscind o, cut

-,
also in tmesi.
-, (),
A
325;
off, 474, cut
also in loose the out-running horse, i. e. the
146, 455, t

,
ipf.
tmesi, separare, keep away from; reins by which he drcAv.
325, 503 drive away, 238. ($, auferebant,
air^-epacjaor., subj. -|^, opt.
(, '),
;

abripuit, had washed


-, clear
-.,
-

off, 232|.
ipf.,

aor., (), in-


one away,
-<, 348. (II.)
aor., (), de- -^,
flexuit,

(), separati,
/ei ciroop, 879 f.
du. part. aor. pass.,
mirata
49t.
<$--,
-, -, -|(),
despised,
est, wondered at, with ace.,

--,
296f.
(),
part., pf.
spretus,
throng, 12|.

cult a re. hide, A 718 deny,


286 shelter, save,
; 465.
i.

aor., inf.
q.

;
parted from the

conceal,
oc-

-,
, ,
moribundus,

- -,
dofuncti.

, , , -, -,
-() -,
-,
expiring,

part., in
424

tmesi, 3
; X 432,
pi.
ing word.
1
aor. inf , see follow-

aor. usually 2

^
ipf. part. aor. aor. subj.
e s i 1 i , spring up, \p 32 spring -KTavy, inf. interim o, kill,

-, -^
; ,

down from, 702 ; fly 271; slaughter, 301 ; Avith pass,


from the string, 314; rise, a 58. signif. 2 aor. mid.
(), ntr., in grata, interemtus,
-^,
472, 494, 775.

-,
things displeasing, offense,
only aor. ,
S 261 f. [t']
de- bat, shone forth resplendent,
-tro,
295, <r
ipf., res pi en de-

mu
-, , (),
dux it, transferred,
1
135|.

c t a, flne, recompense, satisfaction,


poenae,
298, 381; X 319, flashed back (the
splendor from the spear-point).
-. (),
d est ill at,
trickles

-.,
linen), ;
of
107.
-
(from the closely

-iXtnnv, relin-
ipf.
47

mid.

,
(),
--,
-, fut.
solvere.
fut., aor.

(1)
aor.
- -
undo,
(),
392;
q 11 ere (with 169; leave
ovce), quit, from,
loose 46, 421. (2) re-
A ransom
over, 292, (I 437, tmesis, remain be- lease,
', 95, for (II.). (3) mid,

,
hind).
066|, (),
-,
- (),
ransom Avith gold,

-,
50 X

,
fut. inf., de- hosenfrom one''s self, untie, t 349, []
,
truncare,

-,
lit.

455f.
peel Oj[f,

aor. iter.,
cut

from
v. 1.

-, succensere,
772. [7]
fut., aor. part,
angry,

(),
378;

-,
",
-
peri bat.
-,
-(\)7^, -,
ipf. fut, -{),
-

therefore they have remembered (repaid)


aor.,

aor. subj.

,(),
opt. -()- him, 428|,
-, -, ipf., aor. -
-,
lig-urio),
from wound),
263,
166; vanishes,

-, ^
desistere, abandon, cease,

delambent,
151, 224 with part.,

{.,(, '
149.

.<,
123f.
see
fut.
;

lick o/f (blood

desis-
, (), iureiurando
tiare, swear not to do;

,
ge,VQ,vnpe
and

aor. mid.,
798;
(),
ipf.,

416 ,
and
,
-,--
renun-

abster-
381.

, -, {),
off, ;

tes.
-,, -, -,
,
idpe clean, 414; mia.wipe any thing

, ,-, - offfrom one's self, 739 wipe

-, -;.
fut, aor. 269, ;

I. perdere. (1) lose, one's self clean o/"any thing, 200,


/3 46, 814, 452, 49. ipf., dis-
(2) annihilate, destroy, 758, su as i, (earnestly) dissuaded, I 109f.
-<, kill,

648,

,
502),
^, ,
,
-, -,
), iter,
(1)
,
253.
,
II,

be
-,
lost,

230,perish81 (.
(2)

-',-, --
disappear,
aor.
pf.

;
62,
{--
perire.
586, 556, and aor.
-ova'iaro, see
only aor. subj.
mid,
mittant domum, send away; mid.
demigraverat, withdraw to, 254,
86, re-

, ",
, , 7], ,
',
brother of
87, 303,

like her,
son of and [_wv^ ],
go home, 467
ipf,
pres, subj., inf.

; with
red ire, return,
iiri ()

, god of the
bringing death, see with ace, -Of,

-,
;

-^
sun and of light,
of prophecy (his oracle in
;
(-ov).
(-), see

, , ,
79), A 72, '488

,
youth,

, ,;
-,
-, -,
86

,-,, .,-, -,
herds epithets,

,
of music, A 603 (yet
not known to Homer as
leader of the Muses); of poesy; of
;

guardian of flocks and


;

7],
-
-, 317
75
-, -, -,
;
ri,; 425,
and
frui,

aor.

abluere, wash
189 ; wash clean,
mid. wash offfrom one's self, 572
imp.
part, pres., ipf.

-, from
off,

-,
,
part.
pres,

-
(), abluere, wash
, 345 mid,
aor, subj., opt.

-, ojf, S 7;
wash one's self clean,

aor,
172, 179,
only fut. mid.,
(opt,
478.

->, part. -]-


,
,-,
-, , 219,
; fut.
wash from off one's

-', -', -,
aor,
self,
),
advantage,
perfrui, have enjoyment,

^', nihil profecit.


120; 30,
profit,
556 ;

(),
-,,,
one's self by bathing,

(),
sordes abluere,
A
ipf.

313 sq,
ace, - nom, pi.,
purgator, one who
cleanse
(II.)
after
60,
-,
aTTo-m'^ovrf ,

,
471,
abluere.

reditu rum esse,


.,(), always
etc.,

return,
see

A
clearsof the tables by devouring the or <$() (should always
iragments, plate-licker, 220 and 377, be written separately), (1) separa-
^ 48 -caKcSc

tim, apart,
555,
object,
33
244.
(o
,
548,

529); of.
268,
233; procul, away,
350. (2)
procul, A 541,
,
after its

416,
113, /i ,
A exhalans,

-,,
smell,

'-,
406.

a.
breathing forth,

669, ^ar away


334, not far from.
only -,
take away
life, fire,

-,
OTTO (), aor., abscidit,

-,
cm< from what
--^6,
lies before, 457 f.
--,
-, -,
{Vit. shaved) of , 81|. aor. from

-
taper,
smooth
and
praeacuere, bnng
269, t 326
off).
(),
aor. inf.
to
(v.
a

aor. part.,
1.
point,
, expo-
make
delegavit.

away,
would hold him aloof
procul,
218;

air6-7rpo6i, procul, far away,


(from) far
408, the house

^
liens, smoothing off (wrinkles), I 832.
(inf. -^
<-,
v. 326.)
1., t

-,
[i"-]
446f
oiro-irpo-ii//ut,
-, d
part, -icis and aor.
imp., fut. aor. ga' sent away, 26
-(,
, -, -, reprimo, keep
e1e
X 82; kt fall,
i t, ;

[---
shot

--,
327.

,
off, forth,
267; , 119;
check, hinder,
repress, 323 from any thing,
340; with ace. and inf., 126,
;

-,
only aor. part.
d e s e c a s, cut offfrom, Avith
-,
1 14 mid. -iravcai, imp. -to, fut.
;

desist , desist,
from something,
372, 288
340, A 422,
gen., 47 Sf.
,
airo-TTaiTTavcoviri, fut., (aaivoJ\
;

721, terga dabunt, will turn in fight, S

-,
-^,-/,
473.
ipf,
101 f.

,7-,65, from -
-,
- inf. aor. part,

-,
-
fut. and etc., 1 aor. avolans.
dimittere, send away, 3 sing, and part, pre?.,
108, 76 ; send
452, 83, 23,
off, (), exsputare, spit forth, 781

-,
113; dismiss, 146, 161; strangers
{),
dash forth, 426. [v^
with escort,

-,^,
-,
deciderit.
65, 73, 285.
aor. subj.,

only
from

follg. forais
-,
from having
-, ,
not destroyed,

set out from,


1 1 f
part., profectum,
excisa,

105|.
2 aor. airo cirraTO, -Trra-
:

/fvoc, 77, avolavit, ^7 awag, aiTow, , -, aor., also (),


-,
dream ; life,
r 163, r 454 ;

(),
(of animals),
(of men),
469,
222.
ipf.,-7rJ/t, subj. 2 aor.,
in tmesi, d e s i 1 i i t, sprang away,

-
483 rebounded,
20.
;
297,
593 ; sprang dotcn,

-,
351,

75,
^ ,
129.
dec! do, fall dawn, only

irXa^ci, in tmesi, pres. only a


keeps him away from;
elsewh. only aor. pass. etc., -\,
,
S
inf. aor.,

|, -,
from, a 404.

(),
atrh
('),
and

abrupit, break
fut. and
eripere, wrest away

aor. ind. and part.,


off, shatter,

-, -
he driven from one's course, 573 with 507, 587 hinges, 459.
gen. 382, t 259 {-\
285; rebound,
;

-<,
),
;

for pf., (Ppt-


X 291, 578,592.
-, per horrent, shrink from, 52 f.

(),
away,
a'TTO-TrXcieiv,

-, I 418,
navibus proficisci,
501.
aor.
inf.,

part.,
ipf.

(), - {, ), sail
oirb
1 aor., (
oxide (anger),
,
), 1517;
excuterc,jMi
veil, X 406.
off, lay

-
-6,
detru c a r e, stHke off 440t. branch (of the Styx), jc 514; morsel
ipf. iter., (), d i- {of Nectar), t 359; as adj. -,
-^, -,
1

339|.
^iro-^irvcU^v,
(, ), -,
u e b a t, was washing

ta est, had sailed away from,

()^
clean,

part.,
95f
ipf.,

(),
a vec-
. [i>]

(), se
396 ; ,
steep, V 98 f.

av-coic^Soacv,
ro r i
390.
u i t,

-,
aor.
Af/rrieci atcay,
mid.,

tmesis,
--
indie,
- and imp.
pulit, scattered,
aor., (), 385; dismissed,
pro-
49

for
161, 512, 168, 193 93, atone
slaying and despoiling Patro-
;

-,
309.

, , [-----]
di, disperse, 4f.
(),
(),
digre-
klos make good, A 128, I 634,
recompense,
;

186,
etc. fut., aor.
235 ; mid.
132 ;

avenge -, ,
--

-,
he indignant at, rivi,

-'
hsiXis, pouring out a
imp.,

part.,
libation,
65 f.
(^),
y 394. (Od.)
(),
11-
one's self upon, punish, ulcisci,
118, 386 ;

isfaction for his companions,

-|<,
exact sat-
312.

-^
-, -,
only

go away,
-5,
556,

imp.
132,
, and -,
143, standing far away.

A
part,

522.
adv.,

pres., and
abscedere,

niten-
aor.
part.-],
sever,
intercept,

-,
(hill-sides),
34, A
364, A
390.
146,
aor.
abscindere,
/c
opt,

440 fig. cut off,


;

-, -,
infortunatus,
;

468 plough, tear


cut of.

-', -, --),
pres. part, ill-

t e s, gleaming with with gen. , 408 f. starred, 388 sup. 219.

, -- oil,
-6',
-,
;

imp.

,
fut. part., prs., fut.
aor. iter., aor. avertere, turn away from,
(), aver to, twist back, hands and 249,
A
256, 109; redu-
cer e, turn
-,
-, ,
feet, X 173; turning about, 162; turn back, 758; scare back,
back inflight, 62; roll back, 597; 276 ; mid. aor. etc., turn
one's self away, 329
recall, 355.
(-
-,
;

-, aor., turn away the face, 350 turn about.


), .
-,
;

retudit,/urce(i back, 703; 200.


(),
158,

(),
opt.,
aor. subj., -, rentur, many
aberrare faciat, both sides about his head, as he is made
fut.,
footstools, thrown
dete-
from

cause to drift away, 320 ; lead them a target of throughout the house (gen.
astray from object of their labor, cause absol. of part.), (as they slip down)


,
abstinere.
'
them to fi\il of the result of their toil
(through the death of Menelaos),
-<,
-,-,-(-\
aor. inf , see
567.

(), d
shall swash his ribs ; coarse jest of goat-
herd Melantheus,
dxd - Tpoiros (