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Grade Subject: 4th Grade Science

UNIT TOPIC AND LENGTH:


The Stars and Our Solar System
The length of time of the unit spent on classroom instruction of lessons and
administration of assessments approximately 2 months.

COMMON CORE CONTENT STANDARDS:

S4E1 Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns, and planets.
a. Recognize the physical attributes of stars in the night sky such as number, size, color, and patterns.
b. Compare the similarities and differences of planets to the stars in appearance, position, and number in the night
sky.
c. Explain why the pattern of stars in a constellation stays the same, but a planet can be seen in different locations
at different times.
d. Identify how technology is used to observe distant objects in the sky.

S4E2 Students will model the position and motion of the earth in the solar system and will explain the role of
relative position and motion in determining sequence of the phases of the moon.
a. Explain the day/night cycle of the earth using a model.
b. Explain the sequence of the phases of the moon.
c. Demonstrate the revolution of the earth around the sun and the earths tilt to explain the seasonal changes.
d. Demonstrate the relative size and order from the sun of the planets in the solar system.

S4E1 Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns, and planets.
a. Recognize the physical attributes of stars in the night sky such as number, size, color, and patterns.
b. Compare the similarities and differences of planets to the stars in appearance, position, and number in the night sky.
c. Explain why the pattern of stars in a constellation stays the same, but a planet can be seen in different locations at differen
d. Identify how technology is used to observe distant objects in the sky.

S4E2 Students will model the position and motion of the earth in the solar system and will explain the role of relative positio
a. Explain the day/night cycle of the earth using a model.
b. Explain the sequence of the phases of the moon.
c. Demonstrate the revolution of the earth around the sun and the earths tilt to explain the seasonal changes.
d. Demonstrate the relative size and order from the sun of the planets in the solar system.

BIGIDEAS/ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS:

Learning about the Solar System will give students a sense of curiosity, wonder,
and perspective.
Students will ponder and appreciate Earths crucial point in our solar system.
Perspective will also provide a sense of scale; how small our world is compared to
other planets.
Predicted misconceptions: Planets appear in the sky at the same place every night.
Planets cannot be seen with the naked eye. Day and night are caused by the sun
going around the earth. All Stars are alike.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

Why is learning about our Solar System important?


What is our sun made out of?
How does the Earths position in the Solar System effect our lives?
How do created and virtual models of the Solar System help us understand our
world?
How are stars alike and different from each other?
How does our Sun compare to other stars in the night sky?

CONTENT:
This unit will focus on physical attributes of the stars in our night sky, and how the
Earths position in our solar system affects us. How the Earths revolution around
the Sun and its tilt affects our seasons?
Stars are grouped together in patterns known as constellations.
Technological resources such as, telescopes and space probes, are used to observe
distant objects in the sky.
The position and the motion of the Earth in relation to the Sun causes night and
day.
When comparing stars and planets in regards to their appearance, they both
appear as lights in the night sky because of their distance. When one views these
objects through a telescope or binoculars, planets are not as bright as stars.
Because of the moons orbit, it appears to change shape every night.
Our Solar System includes different sized planets that are different distances from
the Sun.
Colors of stars vary by temperature.
Because of Earths tilt on its axis and its orbit around the Sun, we have seasons.
Stars come in many different shapes, sizes, and colors.

SKILLS:
Conduct scientific investigations using technology.
Participate in student to teacher, student to student, and group interactions.
Use technology to increase the power of observation and discovery.
Use technology to increase measurement and comparison accuracy.
Demonstrate comprehension of a variety of literary and informational contexts.
Produce informational writings (e.g. report, procedures, and correspondence).
Identify patterns of change in things such as steady, pattern, and irregular change
using records, tables, or graphs of measurements.
Describe, compare, and contrast differences in observations.
Use numbers sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, maps, and stories to
represent corresponding features of objects and processes in the real world. In
addition, students will be able to identify ways in which the representations do not
match their own counterparts.

VOCABULARY/KEY TERMS:

STARS, PLANETS, ORBIT, ROTATION, REVOLUTION, GALAXY, UNIVERSE, TELESCOPE, PHASES,


SATELLITE, MOON, CONSTELLATION, RELATIVE SIZE AND ORDER, AXIS, HYDROGEN, HELIUM,
ASTEROID, COMET, SEASONS, TERRESTRIAL, JOVIAN

FINAL PERFORMANCE TASK:


By the end of this unite students should be able to demonstrate the following
competencies:

Culminating Activity: Developing A Virtual Exhibit, The Stars and Our Solar System
GRASPS Goal:
(a) Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns,
and planets.
(b) Students will model the position and motion of the Earth in the solar system and
will explain the role of relative position and motion in determining sequence of the
phases of the moon.

Role: The curator of a science museum is requesting your help for the development of
a new virtual exhibit area, The Stars and Our Solar System. Your task is to create
exhibits using Omeka.net for the new museum area and to present a space-related
demonstration to museum visitors.
Audience: Science museum curator (teacher) and science museum visitors (classmates).

LEARNING PLAN & ACTIVITIES:


Integrate the arts into activities. Foster creativity through lessons such as
making a website, creating virtual exhibit, painting the solar system, or creating
song about how the Earths axis tilt and rotation changes our seasons.
Integrate technology through the use of websites about the solar system,
videos, and applications.
Weekly quizzes every Friday
Unit Test The Stars and Our Solar System
Homework assignment packets handed out on Mondays, they are due every
Friday
Journals keep notes, sketches, observations, graphs, maps, and other records.
Students will be able to reflect and assess their learning at home by observing
the night sky objects such as Moon phases, constellations, and planets that can
be seen with the naked eye.
Additional Support Strategies: Students may have difficulty
remembering vocabulary/key terms, or comprehending concepts. For
students who struggle to understand concepts, strategies such as
video clips (Its Okay to be Smart, Crash Course, and SciShow Space)
can be used. Supplying sentence starters to note observations with
peers may be used as well. Students will have guided notes they can
use to study their vocabulary and key terms.

RESOURCES: RESOURCES:
Georgia Science Hartcourt School Publishers ISBN: 0153585412

http://www.nineplanets.org

YouTube channels: Its Okay to be Smart, Crash Course, and SciShow Space

Jim Cherry Memorial Planetarium at Fernbank Science Center

StarGuide App on tablets

http://www.omeka.net