BEYOND BEDROOM GUITAR

www.beyondbedroomguitar.com

The book that will change the way you think about and play guitar … forever

By Spencer Westwood

Limits of Liability and Disclaimer of Warranty
The author and publisher of this book and any accompanying materials make no representation or warranties with respect to the accuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness of the contents of this program. The author and publisher disclaim any warranties (expressed or implied), merchantability or fitness for any purpose. The author and publisher shall in no event be held liable for any loss or other damages, including but not limited to special, consequential, or other damages. This manual and accompanying materials are protected under International Copyright Laws and Treaties. Any unauthorised reprint, loan or resale is prohibited and unlawful.

© Spencer Westwood, 2003,2004 –All Rights reserved

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CONTENTS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 INTRODUCTION........................................................................... 3 LEARNING HOW TO LEARN..................................................... 13 RELAXED – AM I RELAXED ENOUGH?................................... 52 POSTURE ................................................................................... 65 FINGER STRENGTHENING....................................................... 68 TENSION – AM I REALLY THAT TENSE? ................................ 77 PRACTICE, ADJUSTMENTS AND LESSONS .......................... 82 PRACTICING FOR 24 HRS ........................................................ 99 READING MUSIC/TAB ............................................................. 108 TECHNIQUES ....................................................................... 144 UNLEARNING BAD HABITS................................................ 170

12 USING BACKING TAPES; ABERSOLD, BAND-IN-A-BOX AND HOMEBREWED ...................................................................... 184 13 14 15 DEEP TRANCE IDENTIFICATION ....................................... 185 PERFECT PITCH .................................................................. 193 CONCLUSION....................................................................... 215

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1 Introduction
‘A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step’ - LAO-TZU.
Welcome to Beyond Bedroom Guitar. The book that will literally change the way you think about and play guitar. This book contains a collection of hints and techniques that will improve your playing skills and your musical ability. In the book you will find a collection of NLP™ and DHE™ techniques Accelerated learning techniques Practical techniques (i.e. physical routines) Hypnosis techniques All of which have been specifically tailored for guitar playing and musical applications.

What’s different in this book from traditional guitar instruction books?
This book is different to every other guitar instruction book out there in many ways. Some of biggest differences are:It focuses on using your mind. Getting improved self-awareness, learning how your mind works and how to use it to accelerate your learning of practical guitar skills and musicality.

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It’s not full of pages and pages of music and diagrams that give you exercises to practice in the vain hope that you will learn to play better. Yes you can go and buy those and follow them to the letter if you want. Some of them are worth reading while your mastering the skills in this book. A lot more are not! It’s not biased towards one particular type of music or style. A common occurrence with guitar tutorials , in general, is that they are targeted towards a specific musical genre – even if they pretend not to be. I have purposely avoided doing that. There are some techniques that are specifically for Heavy Metal guitarists, Country/Pop players, Fingerstyle Steel string, Jazz and Classical, but most of the techniques apply equally well to all styles. It will be self-revealing I knew that when I started this project it was going to be a long slog. Some of the techniques, as I tried and refined them, were going to personally challenge me to the max. Some of them are going to challenge you too. Some of them will highlight your weaknesses even though you have managed to hide them away .Be honest with yourself - quite often it really is worth taking one step back in order to take two forward.

About the Author
My name is Spencer Westwood, but my friends call me Spenny or Spen. I’ve been playing guitar for over twenty years on and off. I went to Music College and then did a degree in Computer Engineering. Funny what’s a music college student doing computer engineering – well I got interested in the electronics side; building and repairing synths and amps. To learn more about how modern synths worked, I needed to understand more about the inside of computers. Hence the Computer Engineering.

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I’ve played on stages in the UK and USA and I’ve recorded and produced demo tapes, roadied for other bands, and all that fun stuff – All as a hobby. At the beginning of my working career I had a choice – either the music business or the computer business via computer animation. I chose the computer graphics and animation business and the music stayed a hobby albeit an important one. Since then I’ve had a variety of jobs, mostly IT related. When I started playing, I had help. My dad played guitar in a band in the sixties - a “shadows” clone called the Palamino's. He taught me how to hold the guitar, how to strum, some basic chords and how to hold a plectrum (wrongly so I later found out). He taught me how to read basic music and charts. I had a head start About four years ago, quite by accident, I got into the whole self-help and personal development thing that was sweeping through corporate cultures like a virus. Not content with skimming the surface that the few compulsory courses I attended taught, I got more and more interested. Especially on things that would increase my learning speed. Anyway to cut a long story short, I ended up taking some courses on Neuro Linguistic Programming, which allowed me to discover what was stopping me from being my best in all sorts of pursuits. During one of the courses, I chose musical applications for most of the self-help exercises. I learnt some very useful techniques that have helped improve my guitar playing and musical abilities generally. After that I spent quite a while searching for articles, books, tapes etc. that would allow me to find out even more musical applications of this ‘mind’ stuff. There wasn’t one book out there that specifically covered guitarists. Yes there was one about using this ‘stuff’ for music in general. There was one written for guitar teachers to help their students – but no book specifically for guitarists, especially one written by a primarily self taught guitar player. That’s when it struck me – I’ll write a book. I’ll learn even more in the process, I’m sure there are some other people out there that would want to know how to use this mental stuff , specifically for guitar playing.

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I selected or invented as many useful techniques as I could. I tried them out, adjusted them and then finally wrote them down for others to follow – this book is the result! I welcome you aboard this journey of self-discovery that will radically improving your playing.

How to use this e-book
Fiction is meant to be read from the start to the finish, page by page. Some people approach reading text books this way but the majority don’t. They dip into the book – especially if it has an index – looking for a specific answer to a specific problem. To get the best from this book, Read the whole of the second chapter first before skipping through to any of the others. This gives the background to the techniques and lays down some fundamental mental skills. It’s a long chapter so take it easy. Read it once quickly and then read it again doing the exercises as you go through. After completing chapter 2, I recommend that you read Chapter 3, the relaxation chapter, before dipping into the remainder of the book. Most of the other chapters are on specific topic areas. You can dip into them randomly in any order. Some of the chapters are for recent beginners or go over existing information – with a new slant. Others are for the more intermediate and advanced players. The chapters on Deep Trance Identification, Borrowed Genius and Perfect Pitch are advanced mental topics and should be left until you have tried and practiced some of the other materials. The First Appendix is a collection of the tab for all the exercises. This is so that you can just print out the pages you need rather than the whole book when practicing away from the computer. To save paper, when I am printing out e-books I select the two pages on every sheet option. This makes the tab a little small So if you do the same as me and print the books out half size,

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that’s why the tab is repeated – so you can print just those pages out full size. Exercises are marked out using this shaded box.

TIPS AND KEY POINTS ARE MARKED OUT IN BOLD CENTRED AND UPPERCASE

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Am I really going to improve?
I’m often awed by the amount of poor playing that I hear around me. Some of it technically perfect but not musical and lacking feel, some of it intonation is out or the guitar is not even in tune. Sometimes though you hear something wonderful, like the other evening when travelling back home on the London Tube I heard a classical guitarist busking and he was producing the most wonderful version of Francisco Tarrega's Recuerdos del la Alhambra. He was being completely ignored by the passers by rushing home. I missed two trains just listening. It was an amazing thing listening to him losing himself with the music, ignoring the interruptions and the flow of people around him. Yes I did tip him, and next time I see him, I will buy one of his CD’s. That’s a challenge – could you play like that with all those interruptions going on, people walking past constantly? Are you going to improve? Absolutely YES! If you use and practice even half the techniques presented your playing will be much better than before you started reading this book – in a much shorter time than ever before!! I can’t be there to look over your shoulder and force you to practice – every day. I can however give you some of the best ‘self-help’ (i.e. the ones that are proven to work) techniques to help you get better and better. The mental techniques will also allow you to practice even though you are away from your guitar for a few days.

What you wont you get from this book
As I have already said - this is not a complete beginner’s book. It’s not a ‘How To Play Guitar in 21 days’ book . The market is flooded with books that teach you how to play from scratch so if you’re a complete beginner contact me via email – I’ll give you some personally tailored recommendations depending on what style of music you want to play and what sort of guitar you have.

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If you are a total beginner, the techniques presented in the book will give you a head start once you have got the basic mechanics of playing mastered. When I was writing the book, I made the assumption that the baseline was that you’ve been playing for at least a couple of months, can strum a few chords and play single note lines without the frets buzzing. Of course some of you will have been playing for years, and be very accomplished – there are still plenty of things in the book for you too.

What tools are you going to need?
You are going to need some tools to help you improve. You should already have some of them - if you haven’t I recommend that you get at least these listed below. A metronome. A real one. There is nothing quite like the original wind up metronomes for learning rhythm. It has a visual, auditory and physical click. Electronic and computer ones miss the feeling effects of the tick (unless you have the volume up way loud), and sometimes the visual effect is not quite as good - The swinging of the little weight backwards and forwards teaches your unconscious the in-between spaces of the beats as well as the beats themselves. So go out and get yourself a proper mechanical wind-up metronome. An electronic Chromatic guitar tuner. I’ve found by experience that the more you pay the better the quality – up to a point. A strobe tuner is a little over the top – great in a Kiss rock video but just a tad too heavy for my liking. I personally use a Boss tuner but there are several great makes out there to choose from. Chromatic tuners are easier - they are usually hands free. Computer tuning software does work quite well but I wouldn’t want to drag my PC with me to a session along with a guitar, amp, leads etc. Using an electronic tuner is really important. Our ears are good but over the whole range of notes, they vary in accuracy. Some of the beginner books teach how to tune the guitar to itself which is fine

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and useful but if you want to play along with records, other instruments etc. a tuner is the only way to go. I’ll cover tuning again briefly in a later chapter A recording device – a cassette recorder, minidisk or direct recording via microphone on your computer. A Practice Journal – a notebook of some kind that is specifically used for recording information about your practice sessions, your thoughts and comments, results from the exercises etc. especially as you read the rest of the book. Download and install a copy of Powertab - its free, easy to use and its fantastic. The powertab .ptb files for all the exercises are included in the download. http://www.power-tab.net

These are optional although you might find them useful. Some fast fret – this is a type of gel that you rub onto the strings. I guess it’s got a silicone base because it makes the strings slippy again like when they are first put on the guitar – the rust and grime on metal strings makes your fingers stick and not slide about. I love that stuff. A headphone amp unit – for electric guitar players – allows you to hear the sound in a noisy environment. There are some really great ones like the Rockman box, and some very poor quality ones. It’s your choice but you wont need one with lots of special effects for practicing the routines in here. There will be other tools and software that I will mention along the way.

Acknowledgements
I’d like to first thank my wife Nicola for her support and patience, putting up with me spending hours and hours in front of the computer instead of with her whilst re-writing this book.

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Secondly a big thank you to Jim Oram for proofreading the first version of the book and picking up all the typos, spelling mistakes etc… that are easy to miss. Keep practicing Jim.

I’d also like to thank Dr. Richard Bandler, Paul McKenna and Michael Breen for opening my eyes to the possibilities of change. Win Wenger for his permission to include some of his many varied accelerated learning techniques. www.winwenger.com Steve Manning for his brilliant writing tools – this guy is a genius. I’ve been using his techniques for a lot of different projects over the last two years. His writing course has been my best buy on writing so far. Jim Edwards for his ebook that finally sparked me off writing this one www.beyondbedroomguitar.com/7dayebook.html Finally I’d like to thank my late father for buying me my first acoustic guitar and teaching me the basics, and then buying me my first electric guitar. I miss you Dad.

Finally, before we really start – a few words of warning
You are permitted to make backup copies of this file and the accompanying materials for your own use only. You may print out one complete copy of the book for your own use and four copies of the second appendix. Teachers wishing to print out multiple copies of any part of the book for their students must contact me for permission first. (I can do a discount on bulk orders –email for details spencer@beyondbedroomguitar.com)

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I cannot be held responsible for the misuse of any of the techniques in the book. If I gave you a hammer you could use it to bang nails into wood or use it to ‘brain’ someone. The choice on how you use the tools and techniques is yours alone to make. I would hope that you choose to use them wisely and for the benefit of yourself and others. When using any technique which uses visualisation, hypnosis or changing your mental state – do not drive or operate any heavy machinery. You should be sat in a comfortable chair or lying down resting whilst doing any of these types of techniques. When practicing any of the practical techniques, if you feel any pain in your hands, wrists, shoulders etc. STOP PLAYING and rest. If the pain continues when you start to practice seek medical advice before continuing.

Further contact info
As this is the first ever version of the book, there may be errors or things that you believe are missing. I want to know if there are things that you believe can be better or should be included in the second version. If you have completed the email form when you brought the book then I will inform you of updates when they become available. If you have any feedback – errors, improvements, things that you really liked or hated then send an email to: spencer@beyondbedroomguitar.com Spencer Westwood, August 2004

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2 Learning How to Learn
‘The mind is the limit. As long as you can envision something, you can do it.’ – ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER
When we are at school there are several different methods that teachers use to try and impart the subject matter to us; for example reading, lectures, lecturettes, open questions (Socratic and non Socratic styles), slides, films, videos, practical experiments etc. Sometimes you got it, sometimes you didn’t. It depended on the skill of the teacher, your own interest in the subject area and how it was presented to you. At school we are not taught how we think or learn. The situation is changing slowly but its still the case the world over that they don’t teach this! Keep reading - I’m going to let you into a few secrets. Did you get given a recorder to play when you were in kindergarten or nursery? If you did, how many hours did you spend holding it wrong, or blowing it wrong? Eventually most children give up on the thing even though the teacher was trying to show them how to play. It’s a terrible shame because that sets in their mind the belief that they are not musical, they don’t have any musical talent, and they don’t have the aptitude. WRONG! The same thing happens in art class by the way. Got given a pencil and paper and told to draw what you see? Unhappy with the results? Not artistic, no artistic talent, no aptitude for art? WRONG! Then some people don’t get maths, or can’t read or spell. WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG! What’s missing from all this. Three things:

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Always do this before any other exercises, and before beginning practicing. It gets the blood moving in your hands, heightens your finger sensitivity and thus touch - and reduces the possibility of injury. First shake both your hands vigorously for a count of 20, using a backwards and forwards ‘flapping motion’

Figure 5-1 Flapping Hands

Hand warm-up twist This loosens the wrist and gets blood pumping through your hands Twist your hands backwards and forwards in a circular motion vigorously for a count of 20.

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Figure 5-2 Twisting Hands

Finger independence Bend each finger down in turn. Try to do each finger independently and use your other hand to correct the movement or go the full path. To build some stamina and strength, when you’ve mastered doing each finger independently then hold a stress ball (or orange) against your palm with your right hand and press into the ball lightly with each bending finger. Do this 10 times with each hand. (Yes both hands we want them to remain balanced)

Figure 5-3 Five finger bends

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Finger side stretches Using your right hand fingers, separate and stretch out the gaps between your fingers. Do this ten times. The first time through be gentle and only use one or two fingers as a spacer. Widen the gap a little more each time. Repeat the exercise, without using your right hand as a guide (just move the fingers to make the gap on your left hand).

Figure 5-4 Finger sideways stretching

Massage the gaps between each knuckle. Top and sides. Start on first finger near the tip and work inwards. Then do the second finger, third finger etc. Finally shake your hands again with the flapping motion and then rest.

The beauty of this set of exercises is that it only takes a couple of minutes to do, and can be done anywhere.

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For the first week you should do it 4 or 5 times over each day, increasing to 10 times daily for a month. Then back to 3-4 times a day. After a month your hands will be naturally more supple and stronger and just need a little movement to keep them in form. It should also be done before and after your daily practice session.

There are lots of exercises that improve speed, accuracy etc. out on the Internet. Some of them are very good, but most of them are very boring and repetitive. Pianists use some practice exercises to warm their hands and extend their playing ability; one of the most popular is the set of Hanon exercises. Good but very boring after a while. Problem with boring is that the repetition becomes the norm and your mind shuts off concentrating on what you’re doing pretty quickly. If you don’t get it right at the beginning – bad habits and poor playing set in. The alternative is to make it so complex that your conscious mind is focused on the complexity and your unconscious does all the muscle memory learning etc. yet still have the desired benefit.

Finger exercises as part of your practice at the guitar
There are five different exercises for you to do. Not all at once, and not all in the same week. They are ordered in level of difficulty. 1. Pressure pumps 2. 1-2-3-4-3-2-1-1-4-3-4-2-4- single string 1st fret to 12th fret each string 3. The stretcher (1-3-5-7 starting at 9th fret) 4. The wasp 6 string Pressure pumps A very simple exercise – but don’t overdo it.

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Place your fingers, one fret apart, anywhere on the neck on any string. If you’re just starting use the G-string with your first finger on the 8th fret. Now press your first finger down on the fret and apply more pressure. More pressure and even more. Hold for a count of two and release the finger from the string. Do the same for each of the other fingers. Now repeat except this time whilst applying the pressure, rock the first knuckle backwards and forwards.

Figure 5-5 First knuckle bending backwards and forwards - Finger pumps

1-2-3-4-3-2-1-1-4-3-4-2-4- single string 1st fret to 12th fret each string This was the first exercise I ever learned, and it still proves useful even after 25 years. It Improves your 4th finger strength and it gets the muscles all working. Start slowly at first and don’t be afraid to stop if you get tired. If you do stop, count four beats and begin again. Set your metronome between 40-60 bpm. Play the following pattern using alternative picking and then move the whole pattern up one fret and play again. Keep going up until you reach the 12th fret and then go back down again.

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Figure 5-6 Simple Finger Warmup

Shift onto the B string and repeat – 1st to 12th fret to 1st and then the other four remaining strings. Stop and shake out your hands. The stretcher (1-3-5-7-5-3-1 starting at 9th fret) Simple to explain, more and more difficult to do – at first. Start with your first finger on the B string 8th fret and place fingers with a 1 fret gap in-between each one (so 8th 10th 12th 14th frets). If your guitar does not have a cutaway (steel string for example) then start lower say 5th fret Now play a 123432114342434 pattern keeping fingers in the same fret position. Slide down a fret and repeat

Figure 5-7 Finger Stretch Exercise

The wasp 6 string One of the most common exercises I’ve seen on the net is to play a repeating finger movement such as 1st fret, 2nd, 3rd 4th on each string with alternative picking – then move up a fret and repeat. Now this will build up speed and muscle memory – slowly – but it takes a long time.

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What happens is that after a while the finger movement becomes boring and unconscious. Something we want – but it also becomes programmed in and it’s all we want to play – not useful. The awareness goes to the wrong place. I developed the wasp exercise that overloads the conscious mind and forces you to keep track of what’s going on rather than it becoming a mindless repetitive (read boring!) exercise. There are 24 ways you can order your four fingers.
1234 1243 1324 1342 1423 1432 2134 2143 2341 2314 2413 2431 3124 3142 3214 3241 3412 3421 4123 4132 4213 4231 4312 4321

The exercise cycles through every one of these starting on the top E string and doing one pattern per string down to the low E. Then it moves up a fret and starts again with the second column, then the third and finally the fourth column. Practice this mentally first one column at a time – at a very slow 40 bpm playing one note per beat of the metronome. Hint: Each column starts with the column number finger Then do the physical practice for the first column. Repeat for each column Then combine columns 1 and 2 Then combine columns 3 and 4 Then combine columns 2 and 3 The whole lot 1,2,3 & 4 And rest it for a day.

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The Wasp 6 String © Spencer Westwood, 2003

Figure 5-8 The Wasp Exercise

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6 Tension – am I really that tense?
‘Sex relieves tension - love causes it.‘ - WOODY ALLEN

How can I realise when I’m tensing up?
(If you really can’t read guitar tab yet, skip this and go through the chapter on reading music and tab first then come back)

Lets try a little experiment. I want you to pick up your guitar and play a simple single note line below.

Figure 6-1 Tension Exercise

Now I want you to start to speed up each time you repeat the phrase. Get faster, and faster, and faster. Keep trying to play it even faster. Faster still – don’t worry if you start to make mistakes. Go faster.

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Verse Chorus Middle 8/Breakdown Verse Chorus Outro Now if you were to write that down without using repeats or any use of DC or Coda it would both get very long, and also would have a lot of the music looking exactly the same. Our brain is forever trying to simplify things so by just writing out the Intro, Verse, Chorus, Middle and Outro, we can then specify which bits to repeat, how many times and what leads on. So our music would look like Intro | : Verse Chorus : | % (repeat once notice the de capo symbol) Middle 8/Breakdown Chorus DC al Coda Outro You’ll find great examples of all of these in nearly every guitar instruction magazine out there. Work at your own pace to remember each one. Typically the structure comes first, then the dynamics, followed by the others.

How to Read Guitar Tab
There are two sorts of tab. ASCII tab produced by and or on a computer or full tab notation that is created with a notation program such as Sibelius or Finale. The only difference is the notation program versions are more polished and the symbols richer. Before we go any further get yourself a copy of powertab. It’s free and it’s one of the best tab programs I have found! http://www.power-tab.net Tab in its simplest ASCII form looks like this:-

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|-3-2-0--------|-!2----| |-3---3--0-1-3-|-!3----| |-0---0--------|-!2----| |-0---2--------|-!0----| |-2---3--------|-------| |-3------------|-------| This format is mostly seen in email, text files or newsgroup posts. Printed versions, using a tablature editor or printed books usually have the music line as well as the tablature, thus:-

Instead of the lines representing note names like the clefs on ordinary music, the lines represent the strings of the guitar the lowest note being at the bottom. A number is placed on each line showing which fret needs to be pressed (nothing on the string line means don’t play, 0 is an open string and X is a muted string if necessary). The spacing along the tab represents where in time that particular fretted note or notes are to be played. Some tab is quite accurate in this, using extra dashes to represent the space between the notes but I don’t always trust it – especially things posted in newsgroups.

There are other symbols, which are shown in the table below. Again some of these are more common or important than others.

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Text

ASCII TAB example
|--------| |-2h3----| |--------| |--------| |--------| |--------|

Musical notation and tab example

Action

h

hammer-on

p

|--------| |-3p2----| |--------| |--------| |--------| |--------|

pull-off

b

|---------| |-3b5r====| |---------| |---------| |---------| |---------|

bend

Pb

|----------| |-5pb7-----| |----------| |----------| |----------| |----------|

pre-bend

r

|---------| |-5b7r====| |---------| |---------| |---------| |---------|

bend release (if no number after the r, then release immediately)

/\

|-----------| |-\9--/7----| |-----------| |-----------| |-----------| |-----------|

slide into or out of (from/to "nowhere")

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Text

ASCII TAB example
|--------| |-5s7----| |--------| |--------| |--------| |--------|

Musical notation and tab example

Action

s

legato slide

S

|--------| |-5S7----| |--------| |--------| |--------| |--------|

shift slide

<n> [n] n(n)

|-------------------| |-<5>-[7]--5(17)----| |-------------------| |-------------------| |-------------------| |-------------------|

natural harmonic artificial harmonic tapped harmonic

~

~ |----------| |----------| |-7--------| |----------| |----------| |----------| |-------------| |-------------| |-7tr8--------| |-------------| |-------------| |-------------|

vibrato

tr

trill

Most guitar magazines that feature pieces, give their own list of the way the tablature is notated. This is worth studying at length, and I’ve written them out several times (it’s a good way of memorising them

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especially when I imagine playing them at the same time and imagine doing them and imagine the sound. Kind of re-enforces the symbol. Also because there are loads of different special techniques that can be done whilst playing (whammy bar tricks, harmonics etc.) it gives you a unique list of the techniques – even if you don’t know them at the moment. It won’t cover every possible thing, but its 99% there. One of my trademark licks is to bend the G string down towards the floor then release and bend it up towards the ceiling before playing a note using my pinkie on the B string – a double bend that sounds completely different if you just bend the string down to the floor twice – I’ve never seen that notated anywhere.

How do I increase my skills to read the music faster?
So now we’ve covered the facts that you need to read music and Tab. Granted there is more to learn about both but the basics are here. For more information then look out on the net using the resources. There’s loads of stuff out there on both. Knowing the information is one thing, using it is an entirely different thing. I’ve hinted along the way some of the mental tricks to get the information quickly to that Unconscious competence stage but I’ll add a few more here. Firstly break down the learning. Don’t try and learn all the tab symbols in one day. From my table there are 13 different symbols (I put the harmonics together. There are another 11 at least – look them up in powertab or a guitar magazine. Take them 4 a day. Learn them:• • • • Imagine seeing the notation written down for that fragment Imagine seeing yourself playing them on your guitar Imagine how it would feel to play that tab snippet. Hear how it would sound.

Then try playing them on your guitar, and then keep thinking about them during the day.

© Spencer Westwood, 2003,2004 –All Rights reserved

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For the more advanced players – Still do it. Take four a day, learn them play them and then think about them at odd times during the day. I usually do this mini reminder thing when I’m waiting for something like coffee to filter, or a can to drop out of the machine. The intention is that you’ll have at least 30 – 50 times during the day to specifically think about the three steps (I’m a busy person and I have at least that many interruptions over the whole day). On the second day, after learning the second four and thinking about them etc., remind yourself of the first 4, write them down, play them and imagine them just one more time. Continue this way reviewing the previous day’s stuff until you’ve got to the end of the table and then Review them all. Write them down one by one. Check them. Play them all one by one in your head and then physically. By now you might even have a few new techniques to add to your playing. Ok after a few days of working on the tab symbol stuff some of it will be UC, some CC. Go out and buy another edition of a guitar magazine and look at one of the pieces. Take out a piece of paper and write down each notation item that you can find on one page- for example if it’s a slide, imagine you doing that slide. Go through the whole of one page looking at each notation item in turn. Can you imagine your fingers actually doing those things? Cool huh… And your almost there. It’s a funny thing but when someone buys a new car, they notice more other cars that are similar on the road. For example if the car is metallic blue, they notice more metallic blue cars on the road. If it’s a Van or MPV as we call it over here in the UK, then you notice more of them on the road. It’s not that suddenly more people have bought the same as you it’s just that your awareness has changed.

© Spencer Westwood, 2003,2004 –All Rights reserved

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