You are on page 1of 321

CONSTUCTION AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT

PRODUCT SAFETY

It is the responsibility of the owner of the construction essential that the owner/user establish and perform a
and industrial equipment products to be knowledgeable periodic inspection of the equipment. The objective of
about federal, state and local regulations that effect the inspection programs is to prevent accidents, reduce
total usage of his equipment, and responsibility to work- downtime and keep the equipment working efficiently.
ing personal and the public. Since regulations are sub- These inspection programs should be designed to dis-
ject to change, and also differ from one local to another, cover worn, cracked, broken or deteriorated parts and
this manual makes no attempt to provide such informa- loose or missing fasteners before they result in a prob-
tion. lem.

Terex Cranes provides appropriate operation and main-


tenance manuals for various construction and industrial Proper training and inspection programs are essential
equipment products that it manufactures and sells. In to avoiding injury to persons, damage to property and
addition, where applicable, appropriate national con- excessive maintenance costs.
sensus standards, industry standards and safety relat-
ed manuals are included with the Terex manuals in the
shipment of each product. It is company policy to pro- Read and understand the manuals provided with this
vide this information for the owner or user of the equip- equipment. Assistance is available from the distributors
ment. It is expected that the owner or user will utilize of your Terex product and from the Terex manufacturing
these manuals and standards to provide the appropriate facility.
information and training to those people who are to op-
erate, maintain and supervise the use of equipment in a
proper and safe manner.
Construction and industrial equipment is designed and
manufactured to perform heavy-duty work. Under nor-
mal usage, the equipment will wear. For this reason it is

When operating a hydraulic crane, the operator should realize that hydrau-
lic and structural competence, NOT TIPPING LOAD, is often the determi-
nant of lifting capacity.

Therefore, THE OPERATOR MUST BE GUIDED SOLELY BY THE APPRO-


PRIATE MANUFACTURERS LOAD RATING CHART when considering load
weights. The manufacturers rated loads must never be exceeded.

Follow the recommended operating and maintenance various types of equipment, we ask that you include
procedures and keep your machine operating at MAX- your machine model and serial number in all corre-
IMUM EFFICIENCY. Use the Suggested Crane Period- spondence so that we can provide the correct informa-
ic Inspection Check List provided. In addition, we tion.
STRONGLY URGE that a MAINTENANCE LOG be
kept in conjunction with all maintenance performed on The information, specifications, and illustrations in this
the machine. publication are based on the information in effect at the
time of approval for printing. We reserve the right to
If you desire any special information regarding the care make changes at any time without obligation.
and operation of the machine, we will gladly furnish it
upon request. Because we build

Issued: September 2004


SUGGESTED HYDRAULIC CRANE INSPECTION CHECK LIST
This check list is to be used in addition to the information provided in this manual to properly operate and maintain
the machine.

SATISFACTORY

SATISFACTORY
INSPECTION

INSPECTION
ADJUST

ADJUST
REPAIR

REPAIR
ITEMS TO BE ITEMS TO BE

CODE

CODE
INSPECTED INSPECTED
& CHECKED & CHECKED

VISUAL INSPECTION H HEAD/TAIL/BRAKE LIGHTS


(Complete Machine) D & 4 - WAY FLASHERS D

OVERALL HORN
CLEANLINESS D D

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM CABLE SPOOLING


(Leaks or Damage) D PROPERLY D

AIR SYSTEM WEDGE


(Leaks or Damage) D SOCKETS D

HYDRAULIC AXLE FLUID


FLUID D LEVEL W

TRANSMISSION D SWING REDUCER


FLUID LEVEL FLUID LEVEL W

ENGINE CRANKCASE DRIVE SHAFTS


FLUID LEVEL D & U JOINTS W

FUEL TANK TIRE & WHEEL CONDITION &


FLUID LEVEL D INFLATION PRESSURE W

RADIATOR AIR
FLUID LEVEL D REGULATORS W

MACHINE AIR CLEANER


LUBRICATION D ELEMENT W

ATTACHMENT CLUTCH & BRAKE


PIN BOLTS D LINKAGE & PINS W

MUFFLER/EXHAUST WHEEL LUG


SYSTEM D NUT TORQUE W

ALL CONTROL FAN BELT


MECHANISMS D TENSION W

INSTRUMENT STRUCTURAL MEMBERS &


GAUGES D WELDS W

CLUTCHES BOOM INSPECTION


& BRAKES D W

WIRE ROPE, SHEAVES BATTERIES &


& GUARDS D STARTING SYSTEM M

TWO BLOCK DAMAGE ALCOHOL


PREVENTION SYSTEM D EVAPORATOR M

LOAD SUPPORTING SWING BEARING


COMPONENTS CONDITION D BOLT TORQUE P

FIRE EXTINGUISHER MACHINERY


D GUARDS P

BACKUP ALARM LOAD CHART &


D SAFETY WARNINGS P

BOOM ANGLE
INDICATOR D

H Inspect OVERALL machine (including carrier) for cracks, weld separation, leaks, damage, vandalism.
INSPECTION CODE INTERVALS NOTES:
D - DAILY M - MONTHLY 1. Indicate inspection result by checking in the satisfactory, adjust, or repair boxes provided.
W - WEEKLY P - PERIODIC 2. When appropriate, enter your diagnosis on back of page for repairs or adjustments made.

Issued: September 2004


REPAIRS - ADJUSTMENTS - REMARKS

ITEM REQUIREMENT DATE

Issued: September 2004


NOMENCLATURE

This manual contains instructions and information on understanding of the material presented in the follow-
the operation, maintenance, lubrication and adjust- ing pages.
ments of the Rough Terrain Crane. The operator To aid in understanding the contents of this manual,
should not attempt to operate the machine before he the following terms will always have themeanings giv-
has gained a thorough en whenever they are used.

1. UPPERSTRUCTURE The upperstructure weldment, swing mechanism,


counterweight, cab.

2. BOOM ATTACHMENT The telescopic crane boom with hydraulic winch, lift
cylinder, hook block assembly, jib arrangement.

The chassis complete, power unit, swing bearing,


3. CARRIER transmission, planetary axles, outrigger assemblies.

The beams, cylinders, floats, boxes, hydraulic control


system.
4. OUTRIGGERS

All references to right or left hand will correspond to the


operators right or left hand when he is facing forward
RIGHT HAND/LEFT HAND from the operators seat, with the rear mounted engine
to his back.

2 1

4 3 4

Issued: September 2004


- TABLE OF CONTENTS -

SAFETY
1
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENT 2
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS 3
PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION 4
TROUBLESHOOTING
5
SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS 6
MACHINE STORAGE 7
GENERAL INFORMATION & SPECIFICATIONS 8
WIRE ROPE USERS MANUAL 9
WORK PLATFORMS 10

Issued: September 2004


SAFETY

INDEX

SECTION 1

SUBJECT PAGE

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1

Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 2

Handling Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 3

Training and Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 3

Operators Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 4

Signal Persons Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 5

Responsibilities of All Crew Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 6

Management Responsibilty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 6

Planning The Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 7

Operators Safety Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 8

Operator Aids Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 8

Operation Overload Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 9

Operation Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 10

Power Line Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 10

Slip and Fall Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 11

Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 11

Issued: September 2004


INTRODUCTION

Owners, Users, and Operators:

Terex Cranes appreciates your choice of our machine for your application. Our
number one priority is user safety, which is best achieved by our joint efforts. We
feel that you make a major contribution to safety if you as the equipment users
and operators:

1. Comply with OSHA, Federal, State, and Local Regulations.

2. Read, Understand, and Follow the instructions in this and other


manuals supplied with this machine.

3. Use Good, Safe Work Practices in a common sense way.

4. Only have trained operators - directed by informed and knowl-


edgeable supervision - running the machine.

NOTE: OSHA prohibits the alteration or modification of this crane without


written manufacturers approval. Use only factory approved parts to
service or repair this unit.

If there is anything in this manual that is not clear or which you believe should be
added, please send your comments to Technical Publications Coordinator, Terex
Cranes, 106 12th St SE, Waverly, Iowa 50677; or contact us by telephone at (319)
352-3920.

Thank you!

THIS SYMBOL MEANS YOUR SAFETY IS INVOLVED!


READ, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW ALL DANGER,

! WARNING, AND CAUTION DECALS ON YOUR


MACHINE.

Page 1-1 Issued: August 2004


INTRODUCTION

Many aspects of crane operation and testing are discussed in standards published
by the American National Standards Institute. These Standards are updated on
an annual basis with addendas, which are sent by ASME to the original purchas-
ers of the standard. Terex recommends that you purchase and refer to the follow-
ing standards.

ANSI/ASME B30.5 - Mobile & Locomotive Crane (Latest Ver-


sion)

These standards can be purchased from:

American Society of Mechanical Engineers


United Engineering Center
345 East 47th Street

SYMBOLS
The symbols below are used to inform the operator of important information con-
cerning the operation of this unit.

DANGER - Indicates an imminently


hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
will result in death or serious injury.

WARNING - Indicates a potentially


hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
could result in death or serious injury.

CAUTION - Indicates a potentially


hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
may result in minor or moderate injury.

ATTENTION - Indicates a situation which, if


not avoided, may result in property or
equipment damage.

Page 1-2 Issued: August 2004


SAFETY

!
These are general safety rules, which must be followed.
You are also required to read and understand the Operators
Manual as there are instructions, which are more detailed
specific to this machine.

! HANDLING PERSONNEL

1. Cranes can only be used to lift people when it is the least hazardous
way to do the job. (See OSHA 1926.550g, and ASME / ANSI B30.23.)

! TRAINING AND KNOWLEDGE

1. Safety must always be the operators most important concern.

2. Do not operate this crane until you have been trained in its operation.
This crane must only be operated by trained personnel, who have
demonstrated their ability to do so safely.

3. Comply with the requirements of current Occupational Safety and


Health Administration (OSHA) standards, the current American
National Standards Institute (ANSI) B30.5 latest edition.

4. Read and Understand all Decals and Warnings.

5. Read and Understand the Rating Chart.

6. Know that the crane can safely lift each load before attempting to lift.

Page 1-3 Issued: August 2004


7. Operator must understand crane signals and take signals only from
designated signal people; except the operator must obey the stop
signal from anyone.

! OPERATORS RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Read and understand the Operator's Manual.

2. Make sure the machine is in proper order and that all operational aids
and warning signals are functional before operating.

3. Keep the machine clean, including all instrumentation, windows, lights


and other glazed surfaces.

4. Remove all oil, grease, mud, ice and snow from walking surfaces.

5. Store tools and other necessary items in the tool box.

6. Never lift a load without a Rating Chart Manual in the cab.

7. Know the load to be lifted.

8. Be alert, physically fit and free from the influences of alcohol, drugs or
medications that might affect the operators eyesight, hearing, or
reactions.

9. Keep people, equipment and material out of the work area.

10. Signal person must be used when the operators vision is blocked or
working in hazardous areas such as power lines or people.

11. Keep a fully charged fire extinguisher and first aid kit in the cab at all
times, and be familiar with how to use these items.

12. Know about movements of other machinery, trucks and personnel at


the jobsite.

13. Never permit people on the machine platform while the machine is
working.

Page 1-4 Issued: August 2004


14. Make sure everyone is in a safe place before moving the hook, boom,
load or outriggers.

15. Start and stop movements smoothly and swing at speeds that will keep
the load under control.

16. Keep at least two full wraps of wire rope on drum when operating.

17. Feet must be kept on the pedals while foot pedal brake locks are in use.

18. Use tag lines to keep loads under control.

19. Keep load close to ground.

20. Use shortest boom possible.

21. Never leave a running machine unattended or load suspended.

22. Always use outriggers in accordance with requirements of Load Rating


Chart and operators manuals.

! SIGNAL PERSONS RESPONSIBILITY

1. Standard crane signals must be used, and understood.

2. Assist the operator in safe and efficient operation, without endangering


people or property.

3. Have a clear understanding of the work to be done.

4. Signal people must place themselves where they can be clearly seen
and where they can safely observe the entire operation.

Page 1-5 Issued: August 2004


! RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL CREW MEMBERS

1. Unsafe conditions or practices must be corrected.

2. Obey all warning signs.

3. Watch out for your safety and the safety of others.

4. Know and understand proper machine erection and rigging procedures.

5. Alert operator and signal person of dangers, such as power lines,


unstable ground etc.

! MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY

1. Operator's must be competent, physically fit and if required licensed.

2. Operator, signal people and riggers must be trained in correct crane


operation and use.

3. Operator and Signal people must know standard crane signals.

4. Have a supervisor at job site to be responsible for job safety.

5. Crew members given specific safety responsibilities and instructed to


report any unsafe conditions to supervisor.

6. Supply the weight on the load to be lifted to the operator.

7. Verify that all crew members are familiar with OSHA, ANSI B30.5
requirements as well as instructions in manuals.

Page 1-6 Issued: August 2004


! PLANNING THE JOB

1. Have a clear understanding of work to be done.

2. Consider all dangers at jobsite.

3. Know what crew members are needed?

4. Assign responsibilities.

5. Know the weight of load to be lifted.

6. Determine lift radius, boom angle, and the rated lifting capacity of
crane.

7. Establish how signal people will communicate with operator?

8. Utilize equipment which will do job safety.

9. Establish how equipment can be safety transported to job site?

10. Determine where gas lines, power lines, or structures are which must
be moved.

11. Ensure that surface is strong enough to support machine and load.

12. Determine how load will be rigged.

13. Establish special safety precautions, if necessary.

14. Consider weather conditions.

15. Keep unnecessary people and equipment away from work place.

16. Position machine to use shortest boom and radius possible.

Page 1-7 Issued: August 2004


! OPERATORS SAFETY CHECK

1. Safety related items must be in place.

2. Check machine log book, to see if periodic maintenance and


inspections have been performed.

3. Ensure that necessary repairs have been completed.

4. Inspect wire rope for damage (kinks, broken wires etc.)

5. Be sure no unauthorized field modifications have been made.

6. Check for air and hydraulic oil leaks.

7. Check control positions before starting engine.

8. After starting engine, check all gauges and indicators for proper
readings.

9. Test all controls.

10. Check brakes and clutches.

11. Check load brakes by lifting a load a few inches off the ground and
holding it.

! OPERATOR AIDS CHECK

Ensure that the listed items are in place and operational.

1. Boom hoist upper angle limit switch. (Lattice Boom).

2. Boom angle indicator.

3. Backup Alarms.

4. Anti-Two Block devices.

5. Overload Protection, Load Indicators, Rated Capacity Limiters

Page 1-8 Issued: August 2004


! OPERATION OVERLOAD PREVENTION

1. Know the weight of the load.

2. Load radius will increase when the load is lifted. Reduce radius at start
of lift to allow for this.

3. Know the weight of hook, and rigging.

4. Know boom length, jib length, parts of line and operating area.

5. Use next lower rated capacity when working at boom lengths or radius
between the figures on the rated lifting capacity chart.

6. Never lift a load without knowing whether it is within the rated capacity.

7. Never operate with anything other than recommended counterweight.

Unauthorized reduction or additions of counterweight constitute a safety


hazard.

8. Do not lift loads if winds create a hazard. Lower the boom if necessary.
See the Rating Chart Manual for possible restrictions.

9. Avoid side loading.

10. Never let the load or any other object strike the boom.

11. Release load slowly, be sure boom never tightens against back stops.
(Lattice Boom).

12. Place the boom point directly above the load when lifting.

13. Be sure loads are freely suspended.

Page 1-9 Issued: August 2004


! OPERATION SETUP

1. Be sure the load bearing surface is strong enough to support the


machine and load.

2. Be sure cranes are level, check frequently and relevel when necessary.

3. Stay away from rotating cranes, erect barricades to keep people away.
Make sure these area's are clear before swinging.

! POWER LINE SAFETY

1. Determine whether there are power lines in the area before starting any
job. Only operate around power lines in accordance with Federal, State
and Local Regulations as well as ANSI B30.5 latest edition.

2. Never remove materials from under powerlines with a crane if the boom
or machine is capable of contacting them.

3. No part of crane or load must come in contact with, or violate the


minimum allowable clearance required for operation of crane dear
electrical lines.

4. Should contact occur stay on crane until the boom is cleared or until the
current is turned off.

5. If in contact keep all personnel off the crane. If you must leave the
crane, JUMP, DO NOT STEP OFF, leave area by jumping with feet
together.

6. Use a signal person when working around power lines.

Page 1-10 Issued: August 2004


1. Always wait until machine has stopped before getting on and off
equipment. Do not jump on or off.

2. Do not use controls and steering wheel as hand holds.

3. Keep the machine clean and dry.

4. Replace all broken ladders.

5. Keep non-slip surfaces in good condition.

! TRAVEL

1. Care must be taken when cranes are driven (traveled) whether on or off
the job site.

2. Watch for people, power lines, low or narrow clearance, bridge or road
load limits, steep hills or uneven terrain.

3. Position boom in line with the direction of travel.

4. Inflate tires to specified pressure.

5. Travel slowly and avoid sudden stops and starts.

6. It is recommended that the seat belt be used during transit and travel.

7. Make sure travel surface can support weight of machine and load.

8. Always set parking brakes when parking machine.

Page 1-11 Issued: August 2004


! OPERATIONAL AIDS

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

When operational aids are inoperative or malfunctioning, the following requirements shall apply
for continued use or shutdown of the crane.

1. Steps shall be taken to schedule repairs immediately. The operational aids shall be put
back into service as soon as replacement parts, if required, are available and the repairs
and calibration can be carried out. Can be carried out does not mean, when convenient.
Every effort must be made to expedite the repairs and recalibration.

2. When a load indicator, rated capacity indicator, or rated capacity limiter is inoperative or
malfunctioning, the designated person responsible for supervising the lifting operations
shall establish procedures for determining load weights. Unknown loads shall not be lifted
without a properly functioning load indicating device.

3. When a boom angle or radius indicator is inoperative or malfunctioning, radii or boom


angle shall be determined by measurement.

4. When an anti-two-block device, two-blocking damage prevention or two-block warning


device is inoperative or malfunctioning, the designated person responsible for supervising
the lifting operations shall establish procedures, such as assigning and additional signal
person, to furnish equivalent protection. This does not apply when lifting personnel in load
line supported baskets. Personnel shall not be lifted in load supported baskets when two-
block devices are not functioning properly.

5. When a boom length indicator is inoperative or malfunctioning, the designated person


responsible for supervising the lifting operations shall establish the boom length at which
the lift will be made by actual measurement or marking on the boom.

6. When a level indicator is inoperative or malfunctioning, other means shall be used to level
the crane within the level requirements specified by the manufacturer.

In certain situations, it may be necessary to override the automatic motion limiter of the LMI / ATB
unit in order to safely operate the crane. These include but are not limited to:

The load block may lift the ATB weight before the load line can be tensioned while stowing the
boom. This will cause a motion cutout. Overriding the system, in this situation is acceptable in
order to continue to winch in slack line, securing the boom. Boom must be in the lowered
position.

If the Boom Up/Down control lever is pulled back after the boom is fully raised pressure will be
trapped in the base of the main cylinder. This will cause a motion cutout. Overriding the system is
acceptable in order to boom down enough to release the trapped pressure.

Page 1-12 Issued: March 2002


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

INDEX

SUBJECT PAGE

Universal Symbol Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1

Carrier Controls & Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4

Carrier Control And Instrument Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 5

Carrier Controls & Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 6

Upper Controls & Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 10

Upper Controls & Instruments Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 11

Upper Controls & Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 12

SECTION 2 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

This section is intended to familiarize the operator with Diagrams of the various carrier and upper controls are
the controls and instruments provided for the operation illustrated on the following pages. A list of these con-
of this machine. It should be emphasized, however, trols and instruments are shown opposite each illustra-
that merely knowing the controls is inadequate prepa- tion. More detailed explanations of each control or
ration for operating hydraulic cranes. Do not attempt to instrument follow in the same order as they appear in
operate the machine until the other sections of this the number key.
manual have been covered. Sections 1 and 3 are es-
pecially important with respect to machine operation.

UNIVERSAL SYMBOL IDENTIFICATION

FLOODLIGHTS PARKING BRAKE ENGINE OIL


PRESSURE

ELECTRICAL OUTRIGGERS COOLANT


ACCESSORIES TEMPERATURE

ELECTRICAL AIR PRESSURE WIPER


SYSTEM OFF

ELECTRICAL WASHER
SYSTEM ON HEADLIGHTS

IGNITION ON FAST

IGNITION
SLOW

ENGINE STOP AXLE


DISENGAGE/
RANGE SHIFT

T300-1 Page 2 - 1
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UNIVERSAL SYMBOL IDENTIFICATION (cont.)

AIR SUSPEN.
FILL KEY - ACC DIAGNOSTIC

AIR SUSPEN. INCR / IDLE ADJ


DUMP KEY - OFF INCREASE

HIGH SPEED INCR / IDLE ADJ


REAR AXLE KEY - ON DECREASE

STOP
LOW SPEED ENGINE
REAR AXLE KEY - START STOP

DIFF LOCK
ON PTO IN

DIFF LOCK
OFF PTO OUT

ENGINE
KEYSWITCH WARN

T300-1 Page 2 - 2
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

Page Intentionally Blank

T300-1 Page 2 - 3
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTS

18 19 25 27
4 5 3 2 1 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 26 28

45

29
30

31

32
8 33
9
34

35

38 10 11 12 13 14 47 15 37 39 36 40

T300-1 Page 2 - 4 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS KEY

1 TACHOMETER / HOURMETER 33 WARNING LAMP


2 ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE 34 ABS LIGHT
3 ENGINE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE 35 ABS DIAGNOSTIC SWITCH
4 FUEL GAUGE 36 IGNITION SWITCH
5 VOLTMETER 37 AIR SUSPENSION SWITCH
6 GAUGE LIGHT DIMMER SWITCH 38 HEADLIGHT DIMMER SWITCH
7 HEADLIGHT SWITCH 39 BRAKE PEDAL
8 WASHER SWITCH 40 ACCELERATOR PEDAL
9 WIPER SWITCH 41 TURN SIGNAL CONTROL
10 CRUISE [On/Off] (Opt.) 42 HORN
11 CRUISE [Set/Resume] (Opt.) 43 4 WAY FLASHER
12 ENGINE BRAKE [On/Off] 44 STEERING WHEEL
13 ENGINE BRAKE [Hi/Med/Lo] 45 CIRCUIT BREAKERS ON SIDE OF DASH
14 AC/FAN [HI/LO] 46 SHIFT LEVER (EATON)
15 TEMP ADJUST * See pages 2-6 to 2-9 for control operating instruc-
16 ENGINE BRAKE LIGHT (Opt.) tions.
17 LOW COOLANT LIGHT
18 HIGH BEAM INDICATOR LIGHT
19 TRANSMISSION LIGHT
20 IGNITION ON LIGHT
21 SPEEDOMTER / ODOMETER
22 AIR GAUGE (FRONT)
23 AIR GAUGE (REAR)
24 PUMP PTO LIGHT
25 LOW AIR LIGHT
26 PARKING BRAKE ON LIGHT
27 DIFF LOCK LIGHT
28 INTER-AXLE LOCKOUT VALVE
29 PTO AIR VALVE TOGGLE SWITCH
30 PARKING BRAKE CONTROL VALVE
31 DIAGNOSTIC SWITCH
32 STOP LAMP

T300-1 Page 2 - 5 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

6 5 4 3 2 1

18
7 17

16

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

1. TACHOMETER/HOURMETER - Indicates engine 10. CRUISE [On/Off] - Press to toggle cruise on and off.
speed to 3000 RPM and total running time of engine (Option)
to 99999.9 hours.
11. CRUISE [Set/Resume] - Press to set or resume cruise
2. ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE - speed. Hold Set to coast. Hold Resume to accelerate.
Measures engine coolant temperature. Registers Minimum cruise set speed is 40 MPH.
from 100 to 280 F (40 to 130C.
12. ENGINE BRAKE [On/Off] - Press to activate engine
3. ENGINE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE - Measures brake.
engine oil pressure. Graduated from 0 to 100 psi
and 0 to 700 kPa. 13. ENGINE BRAKE [Hi/Med/Lo] - Center for medium, up
for high, down for low.
4. FUEL GAUGE - Graduated in quarters of full tank.
14. AC/FAN [Hi/Lo] - Press down for fan low, up for fan
5. VOLTMETER - Registers 9 to 12 volts, indicates high. Also turns on AC with AC also in On position. AC
condition of battery, alternator, etc. control switch located on AC unit behind seat.

6. GAUGE LIGHT DIMMER SWITCH - Turn to adjust 15. TEMP ADJUST - Adjusts heat temperature.
brightness of gauge lights.

7. HEADLIGHT SWITCH - Pull to turn parking lights 16. ENGINE BRAKE LIGHT - Indicates engine brake acti-
on, pull to second position for headlights. vated.

8. WASHER SWITCH - Press for windshield wash. 17. LOW COOLANT LIGHT - Indicates engine coolant level
is too low.
9. WIPER SWITCH - Press for windshield wiper.

18. HIGH BEAM INDICATOR LIGHT - Indicates high beams


are activated on headlights.

T300-1 Page 2 - 6 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

24 26
25 27
21 22 23 28

20

19

19. TRANSMISSION LIGHT - Flashes trouble codes if 27. DIFF LOCK LIGHT - Indicates differential lock is activated.
there are issues with the transmission.
28. INTER AXLE LOCKOUT VALVE - Locks out inter-axle dif-
20. IGNITION ON LIGHT - Illuminates when ignition cir- ferential. Should the machine become stuck, a spinning
cuit is on. wheel will receive all power transmitted by the drivetrain
causing that wheel to spin faster and worsen the condition.
21. SPEEDOMETER - Incorporates odometer. Reads 0 to Use of the lockout divides the available power between the
80 m.p.h. and 0 to 130 km/h. two axles of the rear tandem. With the lockout engaged,
the stuck wheel may continue to spin but the other axle of
22. AIR GAUGE (FRONT) - Indicates air pressure in front the tandem will begin driving, thus helping to extricate the
air tank. Maintain 110 to 115 psi normal system air machine.
pressure.

23. AIR GAUGE (REAR) - Indicates air pressure in rear air


tank. Maintain 110 to 115 psi normal system air pres-
sure. Never allow a spinning wheel to spin for an extended
period of time.
24. PUMP PTO LIGHT - Illuminates whenever pumps are
engaged.

25. LOW AIR LIGHT - Indicates air pressure too low to


operate the carrier. (Activates at 65 psi) Never engage the lockout when any axle is revolving.
Engage only when all axles are stopped
26. PARKING BRAKE ON LIGHT - Indicates that park-
ing brakes are set. Never attempt to move the machine
until the light goes out.

T300-1 Page 2 - 7 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

24

29
30

B
A C

37 36 35 34 32 31
33

29. PTO AIR VALVE TOGGLE SWITCH - Push up to 33. WARNING LAMP - Lights and then flashes to indicate
engage pumps, push down to disengage. coolant temperature high, intake manifold temperature
high, oil pressure low, or coolant low condition. Lights to
indicate a fault code is present in diagnostic mode.

34. ABS LIGHT - Lights to indicate ABS event in run mode.


Flashes diagnostic codes in diagnostic mode.
It is important that you check to ensure that the
disconnect light (Item 24) on the carrier cab dash is on
35. ABS DIAGNOSTIC SWITCH - Down for normal operation,
after throwing the switch to engage the pumps and
up for ABS diagnostic mode.
before starting the engine. If the light is not on, bump
the starter to jog the engine, and align the pump
splines, until the light comes on before starting the 36. IGNITION SWITCH - Four positions (clockwise from left-
engine. most position):
A) Circuits other than ignition on
Failure to follow this procedure will cause damage to B) All circuits off
the pump disconnect splines. C) All circuits including ignition on
D) Engine start
30. PARKING BRAKE CONTROL VALVE - Controls
parking brakes. Pull to apply, push to release. 37. AIR SUSPENSION CONTROL - Up to fill suspension,
down to release air.
31. DIAGNOSTIC SWITCH - Down for normal operation,
up for diagnostic mode.

32. STOP LAMP - Flashes out fault codes in diagnostic


mode.

T300-1 Page 2 - 8 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

CARRIER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

41 42 44

43

46

45

38

39 40

38. HEADLIGHT DIMMER SWITCH - Depress to 44. STEERING WHEEL - Turn clockwise to steer the
switch between high and low beams. machine right; turn counter-clockwise to steer the
machine left.
39. BRAKE PEDAL - Depress to actuate.
45. CIRCUIT BREAKERS - Electrical circuit breakers are
40. ACCELERATOR PEDAL - Depress to accelerate. under this panel.

41. TURN SIGNAL CONTROL - Lift up to activate 46. SHIFT LEVER (EATON) - Move to select transmission
right turn signals; press down to activate left turn gear.
signals.

42. HORN - Press to activate horn.

43. 4 WAY FLASHER - Pull to activate flashers; push


to deactivate.

T300-1 Page 2 - 9 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

20
15 16
1 14 2 3 4

25 24
19 19 21 22
5 6 7 8

19 19 23
9 10 11 12
17
18
27 13

27

30

31
32
26 28 29

T300-1 Page 2 - 10 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS KEY

1. FUEL GAUGE 22. MODE B LIGHT

2. ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE 23. MODE SELECT SWITCH

3. ENGINE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE 24. BOOM FAULT INDICATOR

4. VOLTMETER 25. OK TO CHANGE MODE LIGHT

5. FRONT OUTRIGGER SWITCH 26. SWING BRAKE

6. WIPER SWITCH 27. SWING BRAKE RELEASE

7. DASH LIGHT SWITCH 28. BOOM EXTEND/RETRACT PEDAL

8. BEACON SWITCH (OPTION) 29. ACCELERATOR

9. WORK LIGHT SWITCH 30. HAND THROTTLE

10. WINDOW WASH SWITCH 31. SWING BEARING GREASE FITTING

11. DEFROSTER FAN SWITCH 32. SWING GEAR GREASE FITTING

12. OUTRIGGER EXTEND/RETRACT MASTER 33. SWING/AUX WINCH CONTROL


SWITCH (Not Shown / See Page 2-15)

13. SWING LOCK SWITCH 34. BOOM HOIST/MAIN WINCH CONTROL


(Not Shown / See Page 2-15)
14. FRONT JACK INDICATOR
35. FIRE EXTINGUISHER
15. LOW COOLANT INDICATOR (Not Shown / See Page 2-15)

16. SWING LOCKED INDICATOR 36. SWING LOCK


(Not Shown / See Page 2-15)
17. ENGINE STOP
37. MAIN WINCH DISABLE SWITCH
18. IGNITION SWITCH (Not Shown / See Page 2-16)

19. OUTRIGGER SWITCH 38. AUX WINCH DISABLE SWITCH


(Not Shown / See Page 2-16)
20. BUBBLE LEVEL
39. BOOM SEQUENCE OVERRIDE SWITCH
21. MODE A LIGHT (Not Shown / See Page 2-16)

T300-1 Page 2 - 11 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

1 14 2 15 3 16
4

5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12

13
27

1. FUEL GAUGE - Graduated in quarters of full tank.


10. WINDOW WASH SWITCH - Push in to dispense
2. ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE GAUGE - wash fluid.
Measures engine coolant temperature.
11. DEFROSTER FAN SWITCH - Push left for LO,
3. ENGINE OIL PRESSURE GAUGE - Measures center for OFF, right for HI.
engine oil pressure.
12. OUTRIGGER EXTEND/RETRACT MASTER
4. VOLTMETER - Indicates battery or alternator SWITCH - This switch is used in conduction with
condition. outrigger switches (19) to extend and retract the
outrigger beams and jacks. Push left to retract and
5. FRONT OUTRIGGER SWITCH - Extends and right to extend.
retracts the front outrigger jack. Push left to retract
front outrigger. To extend the front outrigger, the 13. SWING LOCK SWITCH - Push right to engage
engine must be idling and the switch must be held swing lock, left to disengage.
to the right.
14. FRONT JACK INDICATOR - Indicates that the
6. WIPER SWITCH - Push left for LO, center for front jack is retracted.
OFF, right for HI.
15. LOW COOLANT INDICATOR - Indicates engine
7. DASH LIGHT SWITCH - Push left for dash lights coolant level is too low.
only, push right for dash lights and head lights.
16. SWING LOCKED INDICATOR - Indicates that the
8. BEACON SWITCH (Option) - Push right to turn on superstructure is locked and will not rotate.
rotating beacon.

9. WORK LIGHT SWITCH - Push right to turn on


work lights.

T300-1 Page 2 - 12 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

20

25 21
19 19 24 22

17 19 19 23

18

17. ENGINE STOP - Shuts off fuel to the engine. Push 24. BOOM FAULT INDICATOR - Indicates that the
to activate. Pull to deactivate. boom is out of synch and must be overridden to
function. The boom sequence override switch is
18. IGNITION SWITCH - Turns ON and OFF behind the operators right shoulder on the forward
electrical circuits and stops the engine. surface of the control box.

19. OUTRIGGER SWITCHES - Four switches, used in 25. OK TO CHANGE MODE LIGHT - Indicates boom
conduction with switch (8), to extend and retract cylinders are either fully extended or retracted and
outrigger jacks and beams. in appropriate position for operator selected mode
change.
20. BUBBLE LEVEL - The machine must be leveled
prior to lifting loads.

21. MODE A LIGHT - Indicates boom telescope


function is in A Mode. (External Cylinder is
active.)

22. MODE B LIGHT - Indicates boom telescope


function is in B Mode. (Internal Cylinder is active.)

23. MODE SELECT SWITCH - Momentarily push


Mode A to select maximum structural chart
capacities. Momentarily push Mode B to select
maximum stability chart capacities.

T300-1 Page 2 - 13 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

27

30

31
32
26 29

28

26. SWING BRAKE - Apply to prohibit boom from 30. HAND THROTTLE - Holds engine throttle at an
swinging operator settable position. Place the accelerator
(27) at approximate RPM. Push in button on hand
27. SWING BRAKE RELEASE - Pull to disengage throttle. Pull throttle up and release button to lock.
swing brake. Make fine adjustments to engine RPM by rotating
the hand throttle clockwise to decrease RPM and
28. BOOM EXTEND RETRACT PEDAL - Tilt the counter-clockwise to increase RPM.
pedal halfway forward to power-extend the boom.
Tilt the pedal all the way forward for high speed 31. SWING BEARING GREASE FITTING
(regenerative) extend. The boom extend will stop
at the transition between power extend and high 32. SWING GEAR GREASE FITTING
speed. In high speed extend the boom extend has
minimal extend force. Tilt backward to retract
boom.

29. ACCELERATOR - Push to increase engine RPM


and release to decrease.

T300-1 Page 2 - 14 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

B B C
C
33
34
A A

33. SWING/AUX WINCH CONTROL - Move rope. Move joystick backward to take in main
joystick forward to pay out aux winch rope. winch rope. Move joystick left to raise boom.
Move joystick backward to take in aux winch Move joystick right to lower boom.
rope. Move joystick left to swing boom left. 34A Main Winch Rotation Indicator -
Move joystick right to swing boom right. Thumps to signal that rope is moving.
(Located internally in handle)
33A Aux Winch Rotation Indicator - 34B Horn - Press to sound horn. (Located
Thumps to signal that rope is moving. on underside of handle)
(Located internally in handle) 34C Hi-Speed Winch Switch - Press to
33B Horn - Press to sound horn. (Located toggle high speed winch.
on underside of handle)
33C Hi-Speed Winch Switch - Press to
toggle high speed winch.

34. BOOM HOIST/MAIN WINCH CONTROL -


Move joystick forward to pay out main winch

T300-1 Page 2 - 15 Issued: September 2004


CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS

UPPER CONTROLS & INSTRUMENTS

35 37 38
36

35. FIRE EXTINGUISHER 37. MAIN WINCH DISABLE SWITCH


Move switch down to disable the main winch
36. SWING LOCK - left of operator seat: function when it is not being utilized. This pre-
vents damage to the cable when it is on the
Gear type 360 lock allows upper to be locked winch, but not rigged over the boom head.
in any position. (Tied off to winch drum, etc.)

Push lever forward and down to engage either 38. AUX WINCH DISABLE SWITCH
lock. Always engage lock before traveling the Move switch down to disable the aux winch
crane. NEVER ENGAGE THE LOCK WHILE function when it is not being utilized. This pre-
SWINGING THE MACHINE. vents damage to the cable when it is on the
winch, but not rigged over the boom head.
(Tied off to winch drum, etc.)

T300-1 Page 2 - 16 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

INDEX

SECTION 3

SUBJECT PAGE

Seat Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1

Pre-Start Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 2

Starting The Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 3

Operating The Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 3

Cold Weather Starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 4

Jump Starting And Engine Booster Cable Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 5

Vehicular Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 6

Transmission Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 8

Travelling Around The Job Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 10

Making A Typical Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 11

Crane Hand Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 16

Hoist Line Reeving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 17

Wire Rope Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 18

Transporting The Crane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 19

Side Stow Jib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 19

Erecting The Jib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 20

Changing The Offset Of The Jib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 21

Extending And Retracting The Jib Pullout Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 22

Stowing The Jib . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 23

Unusual Operating Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 25

Load Rating Chart Interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 28

On Tires Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 30

On Tires Load Rating Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 31

Removable Counterweight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 32

Air Ride Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 39

Dual Mode Boom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 40

Remote Carrier Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 41

T300-1 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

SEAT BELTS

SOME SUGGESTED USAGE AND MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS


FOR SEAT BELTS

1. Wear your lap belt low and snug.

2. Manually adjustable lap belts and shoulder harnesses are adjusted


by pulling the loose end of the webbing through the buckle or
adjuster.

3. Seat belts using automatic-locking or emergency-locking retractors


are self-adjusting.

4. Hand wash webbing with warm water and mild soap. Rinse thor-
oughly and dry in the shade.

5. Do not bleach or re-dye, because such processing may severely


weaken the assembly.

6. Inspect seat belt assemble frequently. Anytime it does not operate


properly, or if there are any defects in the webbing (i.e. torn or
frayed), the seal belt must be replaced.

7. For a non-locking retractor belt, completely extend the lap belt from
the retractor(s). After adjusting the belt snugly (see # 2 above),
attempt to pull additional webbing from the retractor. If no additional
webbing can be pulled from the retractor after adjustment, then the
seat belt is adjusted properly.

T300-1 Page 3 - 1 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

PRE-START INSPECTION

The following items should be checked each day FUEL FILTER Water and sediment should be drained
before start-up and the start of operations. Also see from the two fuel filters by opening the drain cock at the
Section 4, Daily Check. bottom of each. See Section 4, daily Check.

ENGINE OIL The level should be at the full mark. ANTI TWO-BLOCK SYSTEM Inspect all anti-two block
switches found on boom, jib, and auxiliary sheave heads
COOLANT The level should be near the top of the for damage. Check the freedom of counterweight
radiator tank. attached to these switches; and also, that counterweight
is attached around correct line of hoisting cable in the
LEAKAGE Make a ground check below the machine proper manner. Inspect all electrical connections and
for signs of leaks. wires as well as the entire length of cable attached to the
cable reel and its connections for evidence of excessive
FUEL Fuel for the engine and for upper unit heater wear, damage, or improper installation. Check spring
should be adequate for sustained operations. loaded cable reel for proper tension and to insure that
reel is free to rotate. Verify visual and audible warning
LUBRICATION Perform the daily lubrication as devices by lifting each of the counter weights.
required in the Lubrication Recommendations. Lubri-
cate cylinder mounting bushings, and pins. This crane is equipped with a disconnect system on the
control linkages. A check of this system should be made
LINES AND BLOCKS Inspect the hoist lines, hoist prior to lifting. Hoist the hook block to the boom point so
block and ball hook, and the crane attachment in that actual contact between block and anti-two block
general for readiness. counterweight is made. If all functions are operating
properly, winch hoisting will cease and the boom cannot
SAFETY EQUIPMENT Check the safety equipment, be extended or lowered. Should any of these functions
including all lights, brakes, and hazard warning continue, disconnect system is functioning improperly
devices. and a complete system check must be made. Boom
raise, boom retract, and winch down-functions remain
TIRES The tires should be checked for proper pres- active and will be unaffected by anti-two block system.
sure before traveling the machine. The tires should
only be checked when cold. Refer to the Tire Pres-
sure Chart in the operators cab.
When performing disconnect test, care should
WHEEL NUTS Torque all lug nuts to 400-500ft. lbs.
be taken as damage may result if disconnect
Check tightness daily during the first 50 miles of ser-
system malfunctions and the hook block is
vice on new units and any time the wheels have been
drawn into the boom point.
removed. Ensure proper alignment of tire and rim
assemblies by following the Torque Procedure
given on page 6-34.

GENERAL CONDITION Inspect the machine in gen-


eral for wear, leakage, and damage.

AIR TANKS Open the air tank drain cocks to blow


out moisture and sediment.

T300-1 Page 3 - 2 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

PRE-START INSPECTION (cont.)


PUMP DISCONNECT

It is important that you check to ensure that the


disconnect light (See Page 2-8) on the carrier cab dash is
on after throwing the switch to engage the pumps and
before starting the engine. If the light is not on, bump the
starter to jog the engine, and align the pump splines,
until the light comes on before starting the engine.

Failure to follow this procedure will cause damage to the


pump disconnect splines.

STARTING THE ENGINE

If the engine has an emergency manual or automatic 1. Press the starter switch firmly.
shutdown system, make sure the control is set in the
open position before starting. The turbocharger may be
seriously damaged if the engine is cranked with the air
shutdown in the closed position. To prevent serious starting motor damage, do not
press the starter switch again after the engine has
The engine may require the use of a cold weather start- started.
ing aid if the ambient temperature is below 40F (4C).
2. If the engine fails to start within 15 seconds, release
the starter switch and allow the starting motor to cool
for 15 seconds before trying again. If the engine fails
Starting fluid used in capsules is highly flammable, to start after four attempts, an inspection should be
toxic, and possesses sleep-inducing properties. made to determine the cause.

To start a Series 60 DDEC engine be sure the trans- AIR STARTER - Because of the limited volume of most
mission is in neutral or park and turn the ignition key storage tanks and the relatively short duration of the
on. cranking cycle, it is important to make sure the engine
is ready to start before activating the air starter.
You will notice that both the Check Engine and Stop Start an engine equipped with an air starter as follows:
Engine lights will come on. This is a result of the
DDEC computer diagnosing the system to ensure 1. Check the pressure in the air storage tank. If neces-
everything is functional, including the light bulbs for the sary, add air to bring the pressure up to at least the
Check Engine and Stop Engine warning lights. If recommended minimum for starting.
everything is okay, both lights will go out in approxi-
mately five seconds. 2. With foot OFF the foot pedal, press the starter but-
ton firmly and hold until the engine starts.

If the warning lights stay on, consult with a DDEC tech-


nician. Operating the engine under these circum-
stances may result in engine damage.
Start the engine after the lights go out. If starting a vehi-
cle, start the engine with foot off the foot pedal.

T300-1 Page 3 - 3 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

RUNNING THE ENGINE

Oil Pressure has cooled.

Observe the oil pressure gauge immediately after start- Crankcase - If the engine oil was replaced, stop the
ing the engine. A good indicator that all of the moving engine after normal operating temperature has been
parts are getting lubrication is when the oil pressure reached. Allow the oil to drain back into the crankcase
gauge registers pressure (5 psi - 34.5 kPa at idle for approximately 20 minutes, and check the oil level. If
speed). If there is no oil pressure indicated within 10 to necessary, add oil to bring the level to the proper mark
15 seconds, stop the engine and check the lubricating on the dipstick.
system. The pressure should not fall below 28 psi (193
kPa) at 1800 rpm, and normal operating pressure Turbocharger - Make a visual inspection of the turbo-
should be higher. If pressure does not fall within these charger for oil leaks, exhaust leaks, excessive noise or
guidelines, it should be checked with a manual gauge. vibration. Stop the engine immediately if a leak or
unusual noise or vibration is noted. Do not restart the
engine until the cause of the concern has been
investigated and corrected.
To avoid personal injury from the hot oil, do not operate
a Series 60 engine with rocker cover removed for any Avoid unnecessary Idling
reason.
During long engine idling periods with the transmission
Warm-up in neutral, the engine coolant temperature may fall
below the normal operating range. The incomplete
Run the engine at part throttle for about five minutes to combustion of fuel in a cold engine will cause crank-
allow it to warm up before applying a load. case dilution, formation of lacquer or gummy deposits
on the valves, pistons, and rings, and rapid accumula-
Inspection tion of sludge in the engine. When prolonged idling is
necessary, maintain at least 850 rpm spring/summer
Transmission - While the engine is idling, check the and 1200 rpm fall/winter.
transmission for proper oil level and add oil as
required. Look for coolant, fuel, or lubricating oil leaks
at this time. If any are found, shut down the engine
immediately and have leaks repaired after the engine

STOPPING THE ENGINE

Normal Stopping

1. Decrease engine speed back to normal idle and put


all shift levers in the neutral position. Stopping a turbocharged engine immediately after high
speed operation may cause damage to the turbo-
2. Allow the engine to run between idle and 1000 rpm charger as it will continue to turn without an oil supply
with no load for four or five minutes. This allows the to the bearings.
engine to cool and permits the turbocharger(s) to
slow down. After four or five minutes, shut down the
engine.

T300-1 Page 3 - 4 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

JUMP STARTING AN ENGINE


BOOSTER CABLE INSTRUCTIONS

Position the vehicle with the booster battery adjacent to discharged battery.
the vehicle with the discharged battery so that booster
cables can be connected easily to the batteries in both 7. Make certain that all cables are clear of fan blades,
vehicles. Make certain vehicles do not touch each belts, and other moving parts of both engines and be
other. sure everyone is standing away from vehicles. Then
start the engine with the booster battery. Wait a few
1. On both vehicles, turn off all electrical loads. Set the minutes, then attempt to start the engine of the vehi-
parking brake. Place transmission in PARK or cle with the discharged battery.
NEUTRAL.
8. After starting, allow the engine to return to idle speed
2. Determine whether the discharged battery has the and remove the cable connection at the engine
negative (-) or positive (+) terminal connected to block or good metallic ground. Then remove the
ground. The ground lead is connected to the engine other end of the same cable from the booster bat-
block, frame, or some other good metallic ground. tery.
The battery terminal connected to the starter relay is
the one which is not grounded.

3. Be sure that vent caps are tight and level on both


batteries. Place a damp cloth over the vent caps of
each battery making certain it is clear of fan blades, WARNING - BATTERIES PRODUCE
belts, and other moving parts. EXPLOSIVE GASES. These instructions are
designed to minimize the explosion hazard.
The following steps must be performed in sequence: Keep sparks, flames, cigarettes, etc. away from
batteries at all times - protect eyes at all times -
4. On a negative grounded system, connect both ends do not lean over batteries during this
of one cable to positive(+) terminals of each battery. operation.

5. Connect one end of the other cable to negative (-) Both batteries should be of the same voltage.
terminal of the booster battery.

6. Connect other end of cable, away from battery, to


engine block, frame, or some other good metallic
ground - except carburetor or tubing on vehicle with

T300-1 Page 3 - 5 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

VEHICULAR OPERATION

The Hydraulic Crane is capable of both on-road and bypass the two block system disconnects. Failure to
limited off-road travel. The kind of travel undertaken pull the hook block up to the head when traveling, or to
determines how the carrier is operated. secure it to the bumper ring, will result in excessive
swinging of the hook block and possible damage to
Before moving the crane, either around the work site or machine.
between sites, carefully consider the terrain type, road
conditions, and any hazards likely to be encountered
en route. Think the move through in advance and carry
it out safely.
Continuing to pull the block up after contact
has been made may result in damage to the
CARRIER BREAK-IN Refer to special break in
boom head and sheaves.
requirements for new cranes on page 4-3.

4. Verify that the hydraulic outrigger beams are fully


retracted and secured with retaining pins.

5. Check tires for proper inflation pressure.


PRE-MOVE CHECK LIST Before moving the
6. Adjust the seat and mirrors for clear vision.
crane to and from job sites, make sure the following
safety checks have been made:
7. Disengage the main hydraulic pump drive. Never
travel with the main hydraulic pumps engaged.
1. Stow the boom in the boom rack.

8. Check the counterweight and removable slabs (if so


2. Lock the upper structure swing brake and engage
equipped) to ensure that they are properly secured
the mechanical swing lock.
for roading and that the weight is balanced so as
not to over load axles or tires (see the maximums
3. Secure hoist block to the bumper loop. If this is
on page 2 of the lift capacity chart).
impractical, pull the anti-two block system counter-
weight up to within approximately 1 of the load
sheaves, or until block lightly contacts boom head.

Use the anti two block override switch to temporarily

MOVING THE MACHINE: The general procedure for


moving a machine is as follows:

T300-1 Page 3 - 6 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

VEHICULAR OPERATION

1. Be seated in the drivers seat with the seat belt fas- pressures for tires used as duals.
tened low and snug.
The inflation pressures shown below are for those
2. Thoroughly review the shift pattern of the transmis- taken with the tires at the prevailing atmospheric tem-
sion. peratures and do not include any inflation pressure
build-up due to vehicle operation.
3. Start the engine, following the procedure in the topic
Starting the Engine.
Tire Size 11R22.5 425/65R22.5

4. Allow air pressure buildup. Ply 14 18


Rating
5. Make sure the boom is stowed in the boom rack. Pressure 95 110
(PSI)
4. Apply the swing brake. Pressure 6.7 7.7
(kg/cm2)
5. Apply the swing lock.
Before stopping the engine, put the transmission in
6. Apply the Service Brake. neutral, engage the parking brake and reduce engine
speed.
7. Release the Parking Brake.
Always idle the engine for at least 5 minutes before
8. Push in the clutch (if equipped with a manual trans- sopping it. This give the engine a chance to cool down
mission). and prevents overheating which can be caused by
localized hot spots in the engine. The idle speed must
9. Select the desired transmission range. be high enough to charge the battery but not higher
than half speed.
OFF-THE-ROAD OPERATION: Good judgement in
the selection of gear range and route of travel is essen- After several minutes at idle, the engine may be shut
tial when operating off the road. Holes and soft or off by pushing the engine stop button or turn the igni-
spongy ground subject the machine to excessive tion switch to the OFF position.
stresses and should be avoided.

HARD SURFACE OPERATION: When operating on


highways, the machine is subjected to the same regu-
lations as which govern the operation of other heavy
equipment on public roads. Adequate lighting, flares,
flags and safety equipment should be on the machine
at all times.
TIRE INFLATION: For maximum tire loading capaci-
ties, tire pressures should be maintained as indicated
in the following table. The pressures shown for 425/
65R22.5 are for tires used as singles.11R22.5 are

T300-1 Page 3 - 7 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

VEHICULAR OPERATION

Eaton Fuller 8 SPEED +LO&LO-LO


Transmissions DEEP REDUCTION RANGE
SELECTOR
SELECTOR
(LO-LO) HI
R R 1 5 7 IN
LO
OUT
R LL2 3 PRE-SELECT ALL RANGE SHIFTS
(MOVE RANGE SELECTOR BEFORE MOVING SHIFT LEVER)

Neutral UPSHIFTING
START WITH RANGE SELECTOR DOWN
SHIFT LO-1-2-3-4 RAISE RANGE SELECTOR
SHIFT 5-6-7-8

LO 6 8 DOWNSHIFTING
SHIFT 8-7-6-5 MOVE SELECTOR DOWN
SHIFT 4-3-2-1-LO

LL1 2 4 DO NOT CHANGE RANGE WHILE MOVING IN REVERSE

PUT TRANSMISSION IN
NEUTRAL

TRANSMISSION OPERATION 2. Move gear shift lever to neutral.

The transmission provides eight highway ratios, plus a 3. Release pedal to engage clutch.
LO gear and a LL1 and LL2 gear for extra pulling
power. There are three reverse ratios. A. Upshifts - decelerate engine until engine RPM and
road speed match.
B. Downshifts - accelerate engine until engine RPM
The transmission has a five speed front section and a
and road speed match.
three speed auxiliary section which has an extra deep
reduction gear. The LO ratio in the front section is used 4. Quickly depress pedal to disengage clutch and move
only as a starting gear. The other four ratios are used gear shift lever to next gear speed position.
once in Low Range and one again in High Range.
5. Release pedal to engage clutch.
Always preselect the range shift. After preselection and
moving the shift lever, the transmission will automati- NOTE: By engaging the clutch with the gear shift lever
cally make the synchronized range shift as the lever in the neutral position, the operator is able to
passes through neutral. control the RPM of the main shaft gears since
they are regulated by engine RPM. This
LL1 is selected by the Deep Reduction Button mounted procedure enables the operator to match the
on the shift lever. When operation in ratios from LO to RPM of the main shaft gears with those of the
8th the Deep Reduction Button should be in the REAR- main shaft driven by the cranes rear wheels.
WARD position. Move the Deep Reduction Button into
the FORWARD position to select LL1. This shift should UPSHIFTING:
only be made with the transmission in Low Range and 1. Move the gear shift lever into neutral.
the shift lever in the LO speed gear position.
2. Start the engine and wait for the vehicles air system
to reach normal line pressure.
DOUBLE - CLUTCHING Always double-clutch when
making lever shifts. Use the following double - clutch- 3. Make sure the Range Selector Lever is DOWN in the
Low Range position.
ing procedure when upshifting and downshifting:
4. Make sure the Deep Reduction Button is in the
1. Depress pedal to disengage clutch. REARWARD position. Or, in the FORWARD position
if you want to start in LL1 under adverse conditions.

T300-1 Page 3 - 8 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

VEHICULAR OPERATION

5. With clutch disengaged, move the gear shift lever to 3. Continue downshifting from 4th through 3rd, 2nd,
the LO speed gear position. Release clutch pedal to and 1st to LO while in Low Range.
start moving. If Deep Reduction was selected, the
crane will be moving in LL1. 4. DO NOT down shift into LL1 from LO unless operat-
ing conditions make it necessary. LL1 can be
6. To upshift from LL1 to LO in the same gear shift lever
obtained with the transmission in Low Range and
position, move the Deep Reduction Button to the
the shift lever in the LO speed gear position by mov-
REARWARD position and IMMEDIATELY release
ing the Deep Reduction Button to the FORWARD
accelerator. Depress the clutch pedal ONCE to
position. Then IMMEDIATELY release accelerator,
break torque and reengage the clutch. The transmis-
depress clutch pedal ONCE to break torque, reen-
sion will shift from /Deep Reduction to Low Range
gage clutch and accelerate. The transmission will
when synchronous is reached. Then accelerate.
shift from LO to LL1 when synchronous is reached.
7. To upshift form LO upshift from LO through 1st, 2nd
and 3rd to 4th while in Low Range. DOWN HILL DRIVING - The engine provides most effi-
cient braking when run at or near top RPM in the oper-
8. While in 4th and ready for the next upshift, PULL UP ating range - but remember, the governor has no
the Range Preselection Lever and move the shift control over the engine speed when it its being pushed
lever to the 5th speed gear position. As the shift by a load.
lever passes through neutral, the transmission will
automatically shift from Low Range to High Range.

When the engine speed exceeds the rated gov-


erned speed, while descending a grade or
Never move the shift lever into the LO speed downshifting at the high end of the operating
gear position after High Range preselection, or range, the engine over-speeds and can result
at anytime transmission is in High Range. in serious damage. On grades, use the vehicle
brakes and gears in combination to keep the
vehicle speed under control and engine RPM
below rated governed RPM.

In going down a steep or dangerous hill, close the


throttle and allow the engine to assist the brakes in
retarding the descent of the carrier. In going down
exceptionally steep hills, it is advisable to change to
3rd or 2nd gear, or even low to obtain greater braking
DOWNSHIFTING: action from the engine. Always leave the ignition switch
1. Move the gear shift lever, from 8th through 7th and ON. In all cases, the brakes must be the main factor in
6th to 5th while in High Range. retarding the descent of the vehicle. Never allow the
engine to operate in excess of the governor speed.
2. While in 5th and ready for the next downshift, PUSH
DOWN the Range Preselection Lever and move the
shift lever to the 4th speed gear position. As the shift
lever passes through neutral, the transmission will
automatically shift from High Range to Low Range.

T300-1 Page 3 - 9 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

VEHICULAR OPERATION

When traveling around a job site, it is very


important that the crane operator is very aware
of what is happening with the crane as well as
with other vehicles and personnel on the job
site. The crane operator should observe the
following rules as well as good common sense
while moving a crane around a job site.

NOTE: When PROPERLY ADJUSTED THE PARKING NOTE: See the ON TIRES LIFTS instructions found
BRAKE WILL HOLD THIS MACHINE ON a later in this section for instructions on moving
30% grade, if the tires have adequate traction. the crane with a load.
It is recommended that when parked on a
grade that the wheels be chocked.

TRAVELING AROUND THE JOB SITE


- Carry the boom over the front only.

- Lock the swing brake and swing lock. NOTE: This machine can travel on 15 side slopes
which have a firm level prepared surface. Due
- Secure the hook block or ball to the bumper loop to variations in surface, tire pressure, bumps,
or raise the hook block or ball close to the boom potholes, etc., we recommend that travel on
head sheaves before moving. side slopes be limited to 5 and that the boom
be horizontal or below.
- Make sure all outriggers are completely retracted
before moving the crane.
- Stow the boom in the boom rack.

- Watch for overhead obstructions such as trees,


power lines, or bridges.

- If the terrain is rough or uneven it may be neces-


sary to travel at a reduced speed to prevent
instability or damage to the crane.

- Operating on steep grades requires caution


because the oil in the engine or transmission will
move to one side of the engine or transmission.
As a result, the engine or transmission may not
be fully lubricated which could damage the
engine or transmission.

- The operator must be very careful on steep side


slopes to avoid tipping the crane.

T300-1 Page 3 - 10 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

MAKING A TYPICAL LIFT


LIFT PROCEDURE In making lifts, the operator must ities.
successfully coordinate several crane functions. These
include the boom raise/lower, boom extend/retract, 360 load rating chart capacities apply only to
load hoist/lower and swing functions. Although experi- machines equipped with a front outrigger jack and all
enced operators tend to operate two or more of these five (5) outrigger jacks properly set. If the front (5th)
functions simultaneously, the lift procedure can be bro- outrigger jack is not properly set, the work area is
ken down into the following sequence of operations. restricted to the over side and over rear areas as
shown on the Crane Working Positions diagram found
OUTRIGGERS Set the outriggers as follows before ini-
in the load chart. In this case, use the 360 load ratings
tiating any lifting operations:
in the over side work areas.
1. Remove the outrigger beam retaining pins.
The outrigger beams MUST BE PROPERLY POSI-
2. To set the four(4) outriggers evenly, operate switches TIONED FOR THE LOAD RATING CHART BEING
to raise crane to a level position. When level, retract USED, and the crane leveled prior to extending the
jacks (together) at one end of crane an inch or so, boom or lifting loads. To achieve this condition, the ver-
and then extend them again (together) until crane is tical jack cylinders should be extended until the tires
level. Then repeat this process for the opposite end are raised free of the supporting surface.
of crane. This equalizes pressure in all four jacks.
The controls for the out and down outriggers are
mounted on the dash. The extend/retract master
switch must be actuated before the appropriate func- FULL extension of the vertical jack cylinders
tion switches can be actuated to operate the outrig- should be avoided if not necessary to level
gers. crane and raise tires clear of ground because
FRONT OUTRIGGER JACK This jack is intended to oil expansion under extreme heat conditions
support the front of the crane only and should never be can cause cylinder seal failure. Check to
used to level the crane. Set this jack only after the four ensure that all beams are fully extended,
outriggers are set and the crane is leveled. swinging the upper if necessary to visually
check that each beam reaches full extension.
The yellow light on the dash will be on if the front jack is Level the crane using the bubble indicator to
not fully retracted. It will remain on any time the front determine when a level condition is achieved.
outrigger jack is extended. While operating the crane, frequently check
Note: When setting front outrigger, run the engine at and level the outriggers between lifts.
IDLE only. High RPM will increase jack cylinder
hydraulic pressure, causing excessive force on
the carrier frame. Extend the front outrigger jack
cylinder until the pad is on the ground and you
sense a slight lifting motion of the carrier frame. The operator must exercise sound judgment in
An automatic low pressure relief valve system positioning the outriggers. The outriggers
will prevent excessive loading on the carrier should not be set near holes, on rocky ground
frame during the setting of the front outrigger or on extremely soft ground. Setting the outrig-
jack. gers in such locations may result in the crane
tipping, causing personal injury or property
damage. Where a firms footing or level ground
is not otherwise available, it should be pro-
vided by substantial timbers, solid blocking, or
other structural members sufficient to distrib-
ute the load so as not to exceed the safe bear-
The fifth(5th) outrigger must be properly set to
ing capacity of the underlying material, and to
operate crane with 360 load rating chart capac-

T300-1 Page 3 - 11 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

MAKING A TYPICAL LIFT

enable leveling of the crane. drum as specified in all applicable crane oper-
ating safety standards.
Proper positioning of the outriggers is critically impor-
tant to both the safety and effectiveness of craning The intent of this caution is to prevent any possibility of
operations. either reverse winding of the rope on the winch drum,
which could cause breakage of the winch rope, or of
3. Use the load rating chart attached to the crane to in- unseating the rope wedge in the winch drum, which
terpret the conditions and limitations that exist when could result in the uncontrolled fall of the hook block
making a lift with the crane. The determining factors and load. Use of more parts of line than required for the
are lifted load, radius, boom angle, working position, lift increases likelihood of rope damage.
hoist line reeving, tire pressure, travel data, and use
of a jib. 4. Raise the boom to the required angle, consulting the
boom angle indicator which indicates boom angle
The examples given in this section are given for your relative to upper structure.
interpretation of the terminology used on the chart (see
The boom elevation is controlled by foot pedals or
hand lever. To RAISE the boom, slowly depress the
LEFT boom control pedal or pull the lever back. To
LOWER the boom, slowly depress the RIGHT boom
page 3.28). control pedal or push the lever forward. Improved con-
The load rating chart values used in the exam- trol is obtained by operating the engine at low speed
ples may not be the same as those on your while metering the controls. Always operate and
load rating chart. Use the numbers from the release the controls slowly to minimize dynamic effects
chart attached to your crane whenever making of the load. During a lift where precise control of the
lift calculation. load is required, do not attempt to use more than one
function at a time.
The increased possibility for inadequate wraps remain-
ing on the winch drum occurs when operating with a
higher number of parts of line than are required for the
load being lifted, particularly at longer boom lengths
and high boom angles. Always consider possible obstructions when
varying boom height or length; not only those
Sufficient wire rope is initially provided to allow the to the front of the cab at the time of the adjust-
hook block to reach ground level when reeved for the ment, but those which may be encountered
required parts of line indicated on the capacity chart for during swings.
all given loads. Reeving with more parts of line than Play the swing through, considering all obstacles,
required may result in all of the wire rope being payed prior to using swing function.
off the winch drum.

Never hold the controls in an activated posi-


Always consider, anticipate, and/or determine tion once the hoist/lower cylinder or extend/
by trial the maximum amount of wire rope retract cylinders have reached the limits of
which will be payed off the winch drum to per- their travel. This can cause overheating of the
form each different craning application of this hydraulic oil if it is run over relief for prolonged
crane. Be sure to provide for no less than two periods.
full wraps of wire rope remaining on the winch

T300-1 Page 3 - 12 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

MAKING A TYPICAL LIFT

5. Swing the boom over the load. tion as required to slow the swing.
Apply the swing brake, with the foot pedal, when the
Upper structure swing is controlled by the swing lever. swing is stopped or when emergency situations dictate
To swing the upper structure to the RIGHT, PUSH the that the swing be terminated abruptly.
lever forward. To swing LEFT, PULL the lever back-
wards. Swing speed increases as the lever is moved If properly executed, the load will hang motionless
further forward or back. Swing speed also varies with when the swing is terminated. If the load is oscillating,
the engine speed. the swing was made too rapidly and/or stopped too
abruptly.
Before attempting to swing the upper structure, make
sure the swing brake is not set and the swing lock is
not engaged. Be certain that no obstructions will block
the swing.

Never pull sideways with a crane boom. Crane


booms are not designed for excessive side
pull and may collapse if subjected to excessive
side loading.

Stopping the swing too abruptly will cause the 6. Extend the boom to the desired length. Do not extend
load to oscillate and impose side loads on the the boom further than necessary to per- form the lift.
boom. Because side loading can damage the
boom, ALWAYS START AND STOP SWINGS
GRADUALLY.

EXTEND the boom by pushing the extend-retract lever


FORWARD and RETRACT it by pulling the lever
BACK.
When ready, try for a smooth, controlled, safe swing.
The swing should be SLOW. Start the swing SLOWLY
and allow the load to build up only enough momentum
to carry it through to the point where it is to be lowered.
While extending the boom, be sure to pay out
sufficient hoist rope to prevent the hook block
Begin slowing the swing in advance of the point where
from being drawn up to the boom peak. The
the load is to be lowered. Slow the swing GRADUALLY,
force of the extend cylinders can easily break
so that it appears to coast to a stop over the desired
the hoist line, dropping the hook block and
spot.
load which may result in personal injury or
property damage.
GRADUALLY slow the swing by use of the swing lever.
First, move the lever to the neutral position and then
The boom extend function on this crane has two posi-
VERY SLOWLY into the opposite swing direction posi-

T300-1 Page 3 - 13 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

MAKING A TYPICAL LIFT

tions and two speeds. When the lever is all the way for- to an operating condition, either lower the hook or ball,
ward, the regenerative mode provides increased retract or raise the boom.
speed. With the lever approximately one half of the
way forward, increased PUSH is available at reduced The operator may need to raise the hook block beyond
speed. the point at which the anti two block system is activated
during rigging or travel. The operator may override the
7. Lower the hook block to the load and fasten the hook. system. (shown in control and instrument sections).

Before making any crane lift, make sure the hook is


properly engaged with the slings, or lifting device
employed to make the lift. Be certain the hook latch is
not supporting any of the load.
Continuing to pull the block up after contact
has been made with the boom head may result
in damage to boom head and sheaves or the
cable may be broken causing the load to drop.

Hoisting or lowering of the load with the winch is con- 9. Swing and spot the load over the location where it is
trolled by the winch lever. LOWER the load by pushing to be deposited.
the lever FORWARD and RAISE the load by pulling the
lever BACK. Improved control is obtained by operating
the engine at low speed while metering the control.
Always actuate and release this lever slowly to mini- 2nd
mize dynamic effects of the load and to prevent bird
nesting of the cable on the winch drum.

To shift the winch into the high-speed, select high


1st
speed using the two speed switch. When slowing the
winch, slowly return winch lever to neutral position to
bring the load to a gradual stop.

8. Lift the load to the desired height. It is good operating


practice to not lift the load any higher than necessary. 10. Lower the load and unfasten the hook.

The crane is equipped with an anti two-block system


which includes a warning light, audible alarm, and con-
trol disconnects. When the hook block or ball activate a
correctly installed and maintained anti two-block sys-
When spotting the load it may be necessary to
tem, the block or ball will not raise, the boom cannot be
alter the boom length or boom angle. In mak-
extended and the boom cannot be lowered. To return
ing these adjustments, the operator must

T300-1 Page 3 - 14 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

MAKING A TYPICAL LIFT

guard against exceeding the rated load as


determined by the load rating charts.

When operating a hydraulic crane, the operator should


realize that hydraulic and structural competence, NOT
TIPPING LOAD, is often the determinant of lifting
capacity.

Therefore, THE OPERATOR MUST BE GUIDED


SOLELY BY THE APPROPRIATE MANUFAC-
TURERS LOAD RATING CHART when considering
load weight. The manufacturers rated loads must
never be exceeded.

Cranes which are factory equipped with auxiliary


winches may require additional counterweight if the
auxiliary winch is removed. Refer to the capacity chart
(load rating plate) for the required counterweight total.

When lowering light loads, be sure to maintain


sufficient cable tension to prevent the cable
from becoming loose on the cable drum. Loose
cable can slip and then bind suddenly, causing
jerky lowering and shock loading of the
boom. Loose wraps may form loops which can
be overlain when the cable is wound onto the
winch drum. These conditions can result in
personal injury or property damage.

T300-1 Page 3 - 15 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

CRANE HAND SIGNALS

HOIST. With forearm vertical LOWER. With arm extended USE MAIN HOIST. Tap fist on USE WHIPLINE. (Auxiliary RAISE BOOM. Arm extended,
fore finger pointing up, move downward forefinger pointing head; then use regular signals. Hoist) Tap elbow with one fingers closed, thumb pointing
hand in small horizontal.circle. down, move hand in small circle. hand, then use regular signals. upward.

MOVE SLOWLY. Use one hand to RAISE THE BOOM AN LOWER THE BOOM AND
give any motion signal and place LOWER THE LOAD. With arm RAISE, THE LOAD With arm
LOWER BOOM. Arm other hand motionless in front of extended, thumb pointing up, extended, thumb pointing down,
hand giving the motion signal. SWING. Arm extended, point with
extended fingers closed, flex fingers in and out as load flex fingers in and out as long as finger in direction of swing of
thumb pointing downward. (Hoist slowly shown as example.) movement is desired. load movement is desired. boom.

TRAVEL.(Both Tracks.) Use both


TRAVEL. Arm extended forward,
EMERGENCY STOP. Both arms fists in front of body, making a
STOP. Arm extended, palm hand open and slightly raised,
extended, palms down, move arms DOG EVERYTHING. Clasp circular motion about each other,
down, move arm back and make pushing motion in direction
back and forth horizontally. hands in front of body. indicating direction of travel,
forth horizontally. of travel. forward or backward (for land
cranes only).

TRAVEL. (One Track) Lock the


track on one side indicated by
raised fist. Travel opposite track RETRACT BOOM. EXTEND BOOM. (Telescoping RETRACT BOOM. (Telescoping
in direction indicated by circular EXTEND BOOM. (Telescoping Telescoping Booms.) Both fists Boom.) One Hand Signal. One Boom.) One Hand Signal. One fist
motion of other fist, rotated in Booms.) Both fists in front of body in front of body with thumbs fist in front of chest with thumb in front of chest, thumb pointing
front of body (land cranes only). with thumbs pointing outward. pointing toward each other. tapping chest. outward and heel of fist tapping
chest.

KNOW THE CRANE SIGNALS! Poor communi-


cation between the operator and personnel
directing lifts can result in property damage or
personal injury.

T300-1 Page 3 - 16 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

HOIST LINE REEVING

AUXILIARY WINCH SEE PAGES 6-60 AND 6-62


FOR CABLE AND SOCKET
MAIN WINCH SPECIFICATIONS

IDLER
SHEAVE

DEAD END FOR LOAD


EVEN PARTS SHEAVE
OF LINE

DEAD END FOR


5 SHEAVE ODD PARTS
OF LINE BLOCK
SHEAVE

WINCH 4 SHEAVE
DEAD END

PARTS OF LINE BOOM HEAD HOOK BLOCK


(LOAD SHEAVE) (BLOCK SHEAVE)

1 1 D

2 1D 3

CABLE SOCKET 3 15 3D

4 14D 14

NOTE: 5 123 24D


SHEAVES IN BOOM HEAD AND HOOK
BLOCK ARE NUMBERED FROM LEFT 6 124D 234
TO RIGHT AS VIEWED FROM THE
OPERATORS STATION.
7 1234 234D
D INDICATES PINNED END OF
ROPE.
8 1234D 1234

9 12345 1234D

10 12345D 12345

These patterns represent some, though not all, of the options for
reeving patterns for hookblocks. Always use a reeving pattern that
allows the block to hang level.

T300-1 Page 3 - 17 Revised: February 2006


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

HOIST LINE REEVING

When reeving the crane in preparation for any job, it


should be kept in mind that hoisting and lowering
speeds decrease as the number of parts of line
increases. For the most efficient use of the crane, it is
therefore desirable to use the minimum required num-
ber of parts for lifting the load as determined by refer-
ring to the load rating chart.
48
This crane incorporates a Quick Reeving boom head
and block which do not require removal of the wedge
and socket from the rope in order to change the reev-
ing. Removal of two pins in the boom head and three in
the hook block will allow the wedge and socket to pass
through.

As shipped from the factory, the crane has sufficient


wire rope provided to allow the hook to reach ground
Never use less than the number of parts called level with any boom length and elevation when reeved
for by the load rating chart. with minimum parts of line required for the load being
lifted. Refer to the Crane Capacity Chart for parts of
If it is not practical to alter the reeving during the course line required.
of the work, the required number of rope parts must be
determined on the basis of the heaviest load to be lifted
during operations. WIRE ROPE SPECIFICATIONS

When the required number of rope parts has been


MAIN WINCH
determined, reeve the rope as shown on the previous
page. Attach a wedge type rope socket (refer to section
STD.-5/8 dia. 6X19 OR 6X37 CLASS
9) to the wire rope dead end and secure it to either the
IWRC REG. LAY WIRE ROPE
boom peak or hook block as required. Dead end the MINIMUM BREAKING STRENGTH-17.9 TONS
rope on the hook block for an odd number of line parts,
and on the boom peak for an even number of parts. OPT.- 5/8 ROTATION RESISTANT
COMPACTED STRAND 18X19 OR 19X19
Attach the anti two-block weight to the anti two-block MINIMUM BREAKING STRENGTH 22.7 TONS
switch and to the first part of line as shown on the pre-
vious page. The anti two-block chain should be 48 AUXILIARY WINCH
inches long. Verify that the chain is not twisted or knot-
ted after installation. STD.-5/8 dia. 6X19 OR 6X37 CLASS
IWRC REG. LAY WIRE ROPE
MINIMUM BREAKING STRENGTH-17.9 TONS
Test the anti two-block system by lifting the anti two-
block weight. The light and audible alarms should be
OPT.- 5/8 ROTATION RESISTANT
actuated in the cab and the boom down, boom extend, COMPACTED STRAND 18X19 OR 19X19
and winch up controls should disconnect. MINIMUM BREAKING STRENGTH 22.7 TONS

T300-1 Page 3 - 18 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

TRANSPORTING THE CRANE

Restrain the boom extend sections by snugging the


hook block against the boom head, or secure the boom
head back to the base section of the boom with chains
or cable. An extended(ing) boom can cause substantial
The boom must be stowed in the boom rack
before transporting the crane. damage.

The boom extend sections should be restrained to pre-


vent gradual roll-out when transporting the crane on a
semitrailer. The hydraulic system will not hold the sec-
tions against the hard breaking jolts while the crane is
being transported.

SIDE STOW JIB

DESCRIPTION

Two optional jib extensions are available to provide


additional boom reach. One is a 32ft (9.75 m) side
stow swing-on one-piece lattice type jib that is offset-
table at 0, 15, or 30.

The second jib option is a 33-57 ft. (10.05 - 17.37 m)


side stow swing-on lattice type jib. The jib is extend-
ible to 57 ft. (17.37 m) by means of a 25ft. (7.62 m)
manual pullout tip section.

Each optional jib extension is pinned directly to the


ends of the sheave pins. When not in use, the jib can
be unpinned from the boom head and stored on
mounting brackets on the right side of the boom base
section.

The 32ft (9.75 m) jib weighs 1,280 pounds (581 kg).


The 33-57 ft. (10.05-17.37 m) jib weighs 2,070 Before erecting or stowing the
pounds (939 kg). jib, ensure that no personnel or
obstacles are in the swing path
of the jib.

T300-1 Page 3 - 19 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

ERECTING THE JIB

Jib Mounting Pins (4)

Jib Storage Brackets

Anti Two-block Plug

Anti Two-block Socket

Anti Two-block
Switch T - Handle
to jib.
Guide Rope
10. With the engine at idle, slowly boom down to mini-
1. Extend and set the outriggers.
mum boom angle while another operator uses the
guide rope to control the speed of the jib rotation.
2. Rotate the upper structure to the over rear position.
The jib will swing around until the left side mount-
ing holes line up.
3. Retract the boom completely.
11. If cable from main boom is to be used on jib,
4. Boom down to minimum boom angle to allow ease of remove cable from boom head load sheaves and
installation of the jib pins. If necessary raise rear out- swing over top left jib cord before pinning jib to
riggers till boom head can be reached from ground boom. Install the left upper and lower jib mounting
level. pins.

5. Install the upper and lower jib mounting pins in the 12. Remove the guide rope.
right side of the boom head.
13. Disconnect the anti two-block plug from the jib anti
6. Attach a guide rope to the eye on the bottom tip of two-block socket and connect it to the socket on
the jib. the boom head. Move the dummy plug from the
boom head socket to the anti two-block socket on
7. Extend outriggers if retracted, to bring crane back to the jib.
level. Raise the boom to horizontal.
14. Reeve the hoist line over the jib sheave.
8. Pull down and rotate the T - handle to unlock the jib
from the storage bracket. 15. Test the anti two-block system by lifting the anti
two-block weight. The light and audible alarms
9. With the engine at idle, slowly extend the boom 2-3 should be actuated in the cab and the boom down,
feet (.6-1 m). As the jib clears the storage brackets, boom extend, and winch up controls should dis-
the jib will swing out approximately 45. connect.

Booming down to quickly can result in damage

T300-1 Page 3 - 20 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

CHANGING THE OFFSET OF


JIB

Attach hoist line


dead end

0 15 30

Jib Offset
Pin Holes
Sheave Shaft
Cap Screws

INCREASING OFFSET then place pins in tool box.

1. Retract the boom and set the outriggers. 7. With the engine at idle, slowly winch down to pay out
hoist cable. This will lower the tip of the jib until the
2. Boom down to minimum boom angle. jib comes in contact with the jib offset pins.

3. Loosen the two (2) cap screws on the left side of the NOTE: While lowering the tip of the jib, it may be
upper and lower sheave shafts. This will require a 3/ necessary to raise the boom to prevent the tip
4 inch hex wrench. of the jib from touching the ground.

4. Reeve the hoist line over the top center sheave on 8. Remove the hoist line from the tip of the jib and
the boom head, around the jib sheave, and attach to reeve the hoist line as needed.
the eye on the bottom of the jib tip.
DECREASING OFFSET
5. Winch up to take the slack out of the hoist line and to
take the weight of the jib off of the jib offset pins. 1. Reverse above procedure to return jib to 0 offset
position.
NOTE: To prevent damaging the jib, do not winch up
any more than is necessary to loosen the jib
offset pins.

6. Remove the jib offset pins from the 0 offset hole and
place in the 15 hole or if you are using 30 offset

T300-1 Page 3 - 21 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

EXTENDING AND RETRACTING THE JIB PULLOUT SECTION

Pull Out Retaining


Pin Hole

Anti Two-block Weight


Pull out
Anti Two-block
Plug

Attach Dead-end Of Rope

Anti Two-block
Extended Socket
Anti Two-block
Retracted Socket

EXTENDING THE PULLOUT SECTION RETRACTING THE PULLOUT SECTION

NOTE: The jib must be erected before extending the 1. Retract the boom completely and boom down to
pullout section. Do not attempt to extend the minimum boom angle.
pullout section while the jib is stowed.
2. Unplug the anti two-block plug from the anti two-
1. Retract the boom completely and boom down to block Extended socket. Move the dummy plug from
minimum boom angle. the retracted socket to the extended socket.
2. Attach the dead end of the wire rope to the eye on
3. Attach the dead end of the wire rope to the eye on
the bottom of the jib tip. This is done to prevent the
the bottom of the jib tip.
pullout from extending uncontrollably.

3. Unplug the pull out anti two-block plug from the anti 4. Remove pullout retaining pin from the erected retain-
two-block Retracted socket. Move the dummy plug ing pin hole.
from the extended socket to the retracted socket.
5. Winch up slowly to retract the pullout until the
4. Remove pullout retaining pin from the retaining pin retracted retaining pin holes line up and install
hole. retaining pin.

5. Pay out cable and extend the pullout until the retain- 6. Plug the anti two-block plug into the anti two-block
ing pin holes line up. Install retaining pin. Retracted socket.
6. Plug the anti two-block plug into the anti two-block
7. Test the anti two-block system by lifting the anti two-
Extended socket.
block weight. The light and audible alarms should be
7. Test the anti two-block system by lifting the anti two- actuated in the cab and the boom down, boom
block weight. The light and audible alarms should be extend, and winch up controls should disconnect.
actuated in the cab and the boom down, boom
extend, and winch up controls should disconnect.

T300-1 Page 3 - 22 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

STOWING THE JIB

Jib Mounting Pins (4)

Jib Storage Brackets

Anti Two-block Plug

Anti Two-block Socket

Wear Pad

T - Handle
Anti Two-block
Switch
Guide Rope

STOWING THE JIB


6. Disconnect the anti two-block plug from the boom
head and plug it in to the jib anti two-block socket.
Move the dummy plug from the jib anti two-block
socket to the boom head anti two-block socket.

7. Extend the boom to 2-3 feet (.6-1 m).


Before erecting or stowing the
jib, ensure that no personnel or 8. Attach the guide rope to the eye on the bottom tip of
obstacles are in the swing path the jib.
of the jib.
9. Remove the left upper and lower jib mounting pins.
With guide rope, pull left jib ears out of left boom
1. Extend and set the outriggers. head ears.

2. Rotate the upper structure to the over rear position. 10. With the engine at idle, slowly boom up while a sec-
ond operator holds the guide rope to control the
3. Make sure the stinger is in the stowed position and rotating speed of the jib.
the jib offset is at 0 offset.
11. Boom up to approximately 30. Allow the jib to
4. Boom down to minimum boom angle. swing around until the jib contacts the wear pad on
the boom. As the jib gets close to the side of the
5. Remove the hoist line from jib sheave and lay to left boom, make sure the jib does not strike the side of
side. the boom.

T300-1 Page 3 - 23 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

STOWING THE JIB

12. With the engine at idle, slowly retract the boom


completely. The jib will engage the jib storage
brackets as the boom is retracted.

13. Remove the guide rope from the tip of the jib.

Bracket mounted
to boom

Bracket mounted
to jib

14. As the boom is retracted, verify that the stowage


bracket mounted to the jib is engaging properly
with the stowage bracket mounted to the boom.

15. Rotate and release the T- handle to lock the jib to


the storage brackets.

16. Remove the right upper and lower jib mounting


pins.

17. Test the anti two-block system at the boom head by


lifting the anti two-block weight. The light and audi-
ble alarms should be actuated in the cab and the
boom down, boom extend, and winch up controls
should disconnect.

T300-1 Page 3 - 24 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

UNUSUAL OPERATING CONDITIONS

Special problems in maintenance and operation are and block the fuel flow to the engine. To minimize
caused by unusual conditions such as extremes in this possibility, keep the tank as full as is practical
heat, cold and humidity, high altitude, salt water, and during cold weather. This may entail refilling the tank
dusty or sandy work sites. When operating under such more frequently than usual, but the inconvenience is
conditions, special precautions must be taken to pre- small compared to clearing a blocked fuel line.
vent damage, minimize wear, and avoid component
deterioration. If water should be noticed in the fuel supply, drain the
tank and refill it with uncontaminated fuel.
EXTREME COLD In periods of extreme cold, the prob-
lems of freeze damage, adequate lubrication and bat- 3. Lubricate the crane with the lubricants recom-
tery failure may become particularly troublesome. With mended for cold weather operation on the Lubrica-
the onset of very cold weather, it is advisable to winter- tion Chart. If necessary, change the engine oil and
ize the crane by servicing the cooling system and other lubricants in order to con- form to the recom-
switching to the lubricants recommended for cold mendations.
weather usage. Follow the recommendations in this
manual when the crane must be operated in very cold 4. The battery is more likely to sustain freeze damage if
conditions. not kept fully charged because its electrolyte will
freeze at a higher temperature than that in a fully
1. To prevent freeze damage to the cooling system charged battery. Be certain the battery is charging
and cracking of the engine block or head, drain and when the engine is running and use an external
flush the cooling system. Clean the radiator exterior, charger to restore full charge when the crane is not
making certain the air passages through the core being operated.
and the cooling fins are free of foreign matter.
The battery can discharge if snow or ice short circuits
Refill the cooling system, adding an antifreeze solution the terminals. Keep the battery posts and cable con-
recommended by the engine manufacturer in an nectors clean and dry. Remove any corrosion with a
amount and strength appropriate to the anticipated solution of soda and water.
temperatures. A corrosion inhibitor is recom-
mended.Consult engine manufactures recommenda- During extremely cold weather, it is advisable to
tion. remove and store the battery in a heated area when
the crane is to remain idle for any extended period.

Never use a chromate base corrosion inhibitor


when the coolant contains ethylene glycol. Use Water added to the battery can freeze before it
only non-chromate base inhibitors. Chromate mixes with the electrolyte. During very cold
base inhibitors reacting with ethylene glycol weather, add water to the battery just prior to,
can produce chromium hydroxide, commonly or during, operation of the crane. If the crane is
known as green slime. This substance not to be run, water may be added if an
reduces the heat transfer rate and can cause external charger is connected to the battery.
serious engine overheating.
AIR BRAKES At least once a day, drain the water
Inspect the thermostat, clamps, radiator hoses and accumulation from the air tanks.
radiator core for proper condition. Replace or
repair any cooling system component found to be de- 5. Special attention must be given to the hydraulic oil
fective. during very cold weather.
2. Condensation in the fuel tank contaminates the fuel NEVER LOAD THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
supply with water, which can freeze in the fuel lines BEFORE THE HYDRAULIC OIL IS WARM. Cold,

T300-1 Page 3 - 25 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

UNUSUAL OPERATING CONDITIONS

the cooling system, clean any foreign matter from


the radiator cooling fins and through core air pas-
sages, replace defective hoses, tighten hose
clamps, inspect water pump drive belt properly, elim-
sluggish oil can cause pump cavitation. If the
inate any leaks detected and fill the system with a
crane is not equipped with a reservoir 50% solution of ethylene glycol. A corrosion inhibitor
immersion heater and running the oil over is recommended by the engine manufacture.
relief will not warm it sufficiently to prevent
pump cavitation with the engine running very
slowly, cease attempts to load the hydraulic
system until an external heat source can be
obtained.

The hydraulic oil may be run over relief to aid in the Allow the engine to cool before draining and
warm-up process. To do this, actuate a function, allow flushing the cooling system.
the cylinders involved to reach the limits of their travel
and hold the control in the engaged position for a few Water containing more than small concentrations of
seconds. salt or minerals should not be used in the cooling sys-
tem. Salt facilitates corrosion and minerals deposited
When running hydraulic oil over relief to warm it, be on the coolant passage walls. Both processes inhibit
sure to restrict the flow to as slow a speed as possible proper cooling.
by moderating pressure on the controls being engaged
and running the engine at low speed. 3. Air circulation around the engine and battery must
not be restricted. Keep air intake and exhaust open-
Continue warming the oil and slowly cycle all crane ings clear of leaves, paper or other foreign matter
functions, actuating all cylinders in turn, swinging the which may restrict air flow.
upper and operating the winches in both directions. 4. Keep the engine clean of dirt, grease and other sub-
stances which inhibit heat dissipation.
6. At the end of the work period, or whenever the crane
is to be left idle for extended periods, prevent it from 5. Use sound judgment in operating the engine. Avoid
being frozen to the ground by parking it on a wood, the two extremes of racing and lugging.
concrete, asphalt or mat surface.

EXTREME HEAT Like extreme cold, requires that pre-


cautions be taken with respect to the cooling system,
the battery and lubrication. Protect the crane by per- Advance the throttle only enough to handle the load,
forming the following recommended procedures: yet be certain that the engine speed is high enough to
maintain adequate fan speed for cooling.
1. High temperatures necessitate the use of lubricants
which are both more viscous and which resist deteri- SANDY OR DUSTY WORK SITES The presence of
oration at higher operating temperatures. Refer to large amounts of sand or dust at the work site can con-
the Lubrication Chart and lubricate the crane using tribute to accelerated component wear. Either sub-
the lubricants recommended for the expected tem- stance will act as an abrasive when de- posited on
peratures. moving parts of the crane. The problem is combated by
more frequent lubrication and by the servicing of
Crankcase oil is particularly important because it helps breathers and filters at shorter intervals. Follow the rec-
dissipate heat. Check the oil level frequently and add ommendations below when operating in sand or dust
oil as necessary to maintain required level. Too little oil on a regular basis.
will hinder heat dissipation.
1. Increase frequency of lubrication and service per
2. To ensure proper coolant circulation, drain and flush lube chart.

T300-1 Page 3 - 26 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

UNUSUAL OPERATING CONDITIONS

The increased frequency of lubrication and service dis-


cussed above should be determined by observations
made at the work site. Inspection will determine how
long it takes for lubricants, breathers and filters to accu-
mulate unacceptable amounts of sand or dust. The fre-
quency of lubrication and service should be adjusted
accordingly.

HIGH HUMIDITY OR SALTWATER In some locations,


such as coastal areas, the crane may be exposed to
the deteriorating effects of salt, moisture, or both. To
protect exposed metallic surfaces, wiring, hoist rope,
paint and other items, keep them dry and well lubri-
cated where salt or high humidity are encountered. Fol-
low the recommendations below when operating in
these conditions:

1. Make frequent inspections for rust and corrosion and


remove them as soon as they are detected. Dry and
paint exposed surfaces after rust and corrosion
have been removed.

2. Where paint may not be applied, such as on pol-


ished or machined surfaces, coat the area with
grease or lubricant to repel water.

3. Keep bearings and their surrounding surfaces well


lubricated to prevent the entry of water.

4. Hoist rope must be kept well lubricated to prevent


moisture and salt from penetrating the cable
strands.

HIGH ALTITUDES Variations in altitude alter the fuel-


air mixture burned in the engine and affect the engines
performance. At high altitudes, atmospheric pressures
are lower and less oxygen is available for combustion
of the fuel. Above 10,000 the engine fuel injectors may
have to be changed to ensure proper performance.
Consult engine manufacturer should this problem
arise.

Keeping the air cleaner clean and free of obstructions


will help alleviate high altitude problems.

At high altitudes, closely monitor the engine tempera-


ture for overheating.

T300-1 Page 3 - 27 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

LOAD RATING CHART INTERPRETATION


LOAD RATING CHART INTERPRETATION
Over Side when the crane is on outriggers is the area
In the following pages are examples of a load chart, inside the arc bounded by lines from the center line of
these example charts may differ from the chart supplied rotation through the rear outrigger vertical jack cylinders
with your crane. Always use the load rating chart sup- and a line passing thru the front vertical jack cylinders.
plied with the crane to interpret the conditions and limi-
tations that exist when making a lift with the crane. The 360means the load can be swung to any position
determining factors are lifted load, radius, boom angle, around the crane.
working position, hoist line reeving, tire pressure, travel
data, use of a jib, and other special conditions that exist, 360 capacities apply only to machines equipped with a
such as wind velocity, soil conditions, etc. front outrigger jack and all five(5) outrigger jacks prop-
erly set. If the front (5th) outrigger jack is not properly
DEFINITIONS OF LOAD CHART TERMS set, the work area is restricted to the over side and over
rear areas as shown on the Crane Working Positions di-
Lifted Load: agram. Use the 360 load rating in the overside work ar-
The lifted load is the total weight of all the items sus- eas.
pended on the wire rope.
Working Area: Areas measured in a circular arc about
Example: Hook Block 750 lbs. the centerline of rotation as shown in the diagram be-
Slings 215 lbs. low.
Object Lifted 19,000 lbs.
Lifted Load 19,965 lbs. CRANE WORKING POSI-
Load Radius: The horizontal distance from the axis of WITH OUTRIGGERS WITHOUT OUTRIG-

rotation before loading to the center of the vertical hoist


line or tackle with a load. OVE CENTER OF
SIDE ROTATION
360
ONLY WITH
Loaded Boom Angle: It is the angle between the boom FRONT OVE ST.
R
base section and the horizontal, after lifting the rated OUTRIG-
GER SET
REA

load at the rated radius. The boom angle before loading OVE
should be greater to account for deflections. The loaded SIDE

boom angle combined with the boom length give only THESE LINES DETERMINE THE LIMITS
an approximation of the operating radius. OF WORKING POSITIONS WHICH COR-
RESPOND TO THOSE SHOWN ON THE

Freely Suspended Load: Load hanging free with no di- Cut - Offs: Rated chart values of less than approxi-
rect external force applied except by the hoist rope. mately 1,000 lbs for on outriggers and side-stow jib are
not shown. This is done because the effects of wind,
Side Load: Horizontal force applied to the lifted load ei- pendulum action, jerking, etc., can cause a tip over.
ther on the ground or in the air.

No Load Stability Limit: The stability limit radius


shown on the range diagrams is the radius beyond
which it is not permitted to position the boom, when the
boom angle is less than the minimum shown on the ap- Extending the boom or boom and jib combination
plicable load chart, because the machine can overturn into unrated areas of the chart can cause tip over.
without any load. Do not operate at a longer radius than those listed
on the applicable load rating charts as tipping can
Over Rear, over Side and 360: The crane working occur without a load on the hook.
position diagram is a view looking straight down on the
crane with the upper structure and the boom removed.
Over Rear when the crane is on outriggers is the area
inside the arc bounded by lines from the center line of
rotation through the rear outrigger vertical jack cylin-
ders.

T300-1 Page 3 - 28 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

Example:
Hook Block 660 lbs.
Slings 215 lbs. 63.0
Object Lifted 18,700 lbs.
Lifted Load = 19,575 lbs. 19,575

On Outriggers Using Main Boom


To determine the lift capacity when lifting off the main
boom with the outriggers set, use the following proce-
dure: 20

1. Determine the weight of the load to be lifted.


- on outriggers (fully extended & partially
2. Determine the weight of slings, rigging hardware extended) with jib erected, jib pullout section
and hook block. extended, lifting over the jib pullout section
- on tires, lifting over main boom with jib
3. Calculate weight of lifted load. stowed
4. Determine load radius, boom angle, and boom
length. 6. If the auxiliary boom head is not erected, add 100
lbs to the chart rated capacity.
5. Determine which load chart to use for your lift. Indi-
vidual load charts exist for the following lift configu- 7. Compare load weight with chart rated capacity
rations: from the boom length, radius, and boom angle.
- on outriggers (fully extended, partially
8. The lifted load must not exceed the chart rated
extended & retracted), lifting off main boom
capacity for the boom length and radius.
with jib stowed or not present
- on outriggers (fully extended), lifting off main In this example, the lifted load of 19,575 lbs is less than
boom with jib erected but unused with jib pull- the rated load of 28,300 lbs and can be handled.
out extension retracted or not present
- on outriggers (fully extended), lifting off main
boom with jib erected but unused with pullout
extension extended
- on outriggers (fully extended & partially
extended) with jib erected, jib pullout section
retracted or not present, lifting over the jib

T300-1 Page 3 - 29 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

ON TIRES LIFTS

Listed below are special precautions for On Tires lifts.


Any variation from the above conditions will
All static crane load ratings are based on nonuse of the require the operator to consider the prevailing
travel function while handling loads. However, cranes conditions and reduce the lift capacities
may be utilized for pick and carry operations. Traveling accordingly.
with suspended loads involves so many variables such
as ground conditions, boom length, momentum in start- These precautions are necessary to prevent a swinging
ing and stopping, etc., that it is impossible to devise a load, which can cause a machine tip over.
single standard rating procedure with any assurance of
safety. For such operations the user must evaluate pre-
vailing conditions and determine safe practices, exer-
cising precautions, such as the following:
Any variation from the above conditions will
1. The boom shall be carried straight over the rear of the require the operator to consider the prevailing
crane. conditions and reduce the lift capacities
accordingly.
2. Travel speed reduced to suit conditions.

3. Maintain specified tire pressures.

4. Avoid sudden starts and stops.

5. Provide tag or restraint lines to snub swinging of the


load. Always carry the load as near the ground as
possible with the minimum boom length
6. Keep the load as close to ground as possible. necessary to carry the load, and straight over
the rear with the swing brake locked.
7. Set the swing brake and swing lock.
Travel over uneven terrain with excessive boom length
8. Travel must be on a smooth level surface that is ca-
can result in instability.
pable of supporting the weight of the loaded crane.
The travel surface must also be free of holes or de-
bris that can cause crane instability.

9. If equipped with rear air suspension, the rear air


should be dumped before lifting or travelling with a Insufficient tire pressure reduces the ON
load on tires. TIRES capacity. Attempts to pick rated
capacity without properly inflated tires may
These precautions are necessary to prevent a swinging cause crane to tip and/or result in damage to
load, which can cause a machine tip over. tires and rims.

Ensure that the tires are inflated as shown in the rec-


ommended tire pressure chart. Refer to tire chart in
cab of crane or to section on Vehicular Operation.

T300-1 Page 3 - 30 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

ON TIRES LOAD RATING CHART

crane is reduced rapidly when the height of the cranes


center of gravity is increased by elevating the boom.
Increased boom lengths and heights also expose more
boom to the wind which can contribute to loss of stabil-
On tires operation, particularly pick and carry,
ity.
must be done in a slow, smooth manner over
level terrain that will support the crane, with
the loads close to the ground and the boom as
low as possible to avoid the load swinging
unintentionally, causing injury or tip over. Do
Never move the crane carrying a load with the
not pick and carry with the jib since the load is
boom in any position except straight over the
further extended from the machine and the jib
rear.
can be easily damaged.
NOTE: Lifts on tires may be made at any boom angle
All pick and carry operations will be performed at 2.5
from horizontal to the maximum boom angle
mph or less.
provided the RADIUS and MAXIMUM BOOM
LENGTH stay within the limits set forth in the
Max Boom Length:
On Tires load rating chart
Do not exceed the MAX BOOM LENGTH shown for
the radius you will be working at as the stability of the

T300-1 Page 3 - 31 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT

INSTALLATION

NOTE: The counterweight slabs are an integral part of this crane. When the crane is to be traveled at highway
speeds, a portion of these slabs are intended to be moved to and carried on the counterweight supports
on the deck of the crane in order to equalize the axle loading.

1. Lower the outrigger jacks to


support the weight of the
crane.

2. Rotate the upper to a position


straight over the rear of the
crane.

3. With the crane still running, move to a position


under the superstructure, facing the
counterweight.

T300-1 Page 3 - 32 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

4. Lift both control levers to raise the


counterweight slabs up tightly against the shell
of the counterweight.

5. Remove the long horizontal pins, and the


locking pins that secure them, from the top
slab to free it from the counterweight shell.
Both pins should pull freely.

Note: If one or both will not release, it may be


necessary to slightly lower one side of the
slabs and raise the other to get the first pin
removed, then slightly lower the side still
pinned and pull the other side up tightly to
remove the second pin.

6. With the engine idling slowly and evenly push


down on both levers to lower the top
counterweight slab onto the second slab.

Do not continue to drive the slabs down after they


have seated.

T300-1 Page 3 - 33 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

7. Insert the long horizontal pins and the locking


pins into the top slab.

8. Remove the locking pins and long horizontal


pins from the lowermost slab that you wish to
attach to the counterweight.

9. Lift both control levers to raise the


counterweight slabs up tightly against the shell
of the counterweight.

T300-1 Page 3 - 34 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

10. Install horizontal pins and locking pins on


each side to attach the stack to the
counterweight.

T300-1 Page 3 - 35 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

REMOVAL

NOTE: The counterweight slabs are an integral part of this crane. When the crane is to be traveled at highway
speeds, a portion of these slabs are intended to be moved to and carried on the counterweight supports
on the deck of the crane in order to equalize the axle loading.

1. Lower the outrigger jacks to


support the weight of the
crane.

2. Rotate the upper to a position


straight over the rear of the
crane.

3. With the crane still running, move to a position


under the superstructure, facing the
counterweight.

T300-1 Page 3 - 36 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

4. Lift both control levers to raise the


counterweight slabs up tightly against the shell
of the counterweight.

5. Remove horizontal pins and locking pins on


each side to free the stack from the
counterweight.

6. With the engine idling slowly and evenly push


down on both levers to lower the counterweight
slabs onto the carrier.

Do not continue to drive the slabs down after they


have seated.

T300-1 Page 3 - 37 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVABLE COUNTERWEIGHT (cont.)

7. Remove the uppermost pins to free the top


slab from the slabs to be stowed on the carrier.
Insert the pins in the lower slab to secure it to
the counterweight supports.

8. Raise the control levers slowly and evenly to


raise the remaining slab(s) up tightly against
the counterweight shell.

9. Insert the long horizontal pins, and the locking


pins that secure them, into the top slab to
attach it to the counterweight shell.

T300-1 Page 3 - 38 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

AIR RIDE SUSPENSION

This machine is equipped with an air suspension on the front axles. Operation of the suspension is very simple. As
explained in Group 2, air is added or released from the air bags by depressing the switch in the carrier cab.

RIDE HEIGHT ADJUSTMENT

To adjust the ride height, begin by loosening clamp (A). This will allow the bar to slide so that the trailing arm can
be rotated relative to the frame. Adjust the suspension member so that its surface (B) is parallel to the frame sur-
face (C). Pass a small rod through the holes in the air yoke and the switch. The rod should pass through both out-
side holes (D) and between the two small bosses (E) on the switch. Tighten the clamp (A). Remove the small rod,
by moving arm (D) up to add air, pushing the trailing arm away from the frame, or down to bring it closer.

E
D

T300-1 Page 3 - 39 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

DUAL MODE BOOM

BOOM OPERATION

This machine is equipped with a dual mode boom. It is important that the load chart being used corresponds to the
boom mode that is selected.

BOOM MODE A

Boom Mode A is designed to maximize the structural load ratings. In Boom Mode A, Section II fully extends, then
Sections III, IV, and V extend synchronously.

BOOM MODE B

Boom Mode B is designed to maximize machine stability. In Boom Mode B, Sections III, IV, and V extend synchro-
nously, then Section II extends.

5 4

2 1

If there is an error in the boom sequencing, the Boom Sequence Fault Indicator (4) will be lit and the boom will
stop functioning. Use the boom override switch (located on the front vertical panel of the control box) to let the sys-
tem allow you to retract the boom. When the switch is activated , both Boom Mode (A & B) indicators will light and
allow you to RETRACT ONLY the cylinder you select. When both cylinders are fully retracted, the Boom
Sequence Fault Indicator will reset. When the boom is fully extended or fully retracted, the OK to Change Mode
Indicator (5) will light. When the Mode Indicator is lit you may press the mode switch and the appropriate Mode
Indicator (1 or 2) will light.

T300-1 Page 3 - 40 Issued: September 2004


OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

REMOTE CARRIER OPERATION


Note: The steering switch is a momentary type.
The electric remote option provides a means for the The longer you hold down the switch in
crane operator to maneuver the crane around the job either direction, the further the wheels will
site with (Pick & Carry) or without a load. turn. The wheels will stay in whatever
position they are left in, (they will not return
to the straight-ahead position
Engage the Remote Control automatically) you must actuate the switch
in the opposite direction to bring the
1) Set the parking brakes in the carrier cab. wheels back to center.
2) Ensure that the system air pressure is high enough
for operation (85 PSI or above). If the air pressure 4) Use the throttle, "Steering Switch", service brakes,
is low start the engine and build it up before going and "F", (forward) - "N", (neutral) - "R", (reverse)
any further. switch as necessary to position the crane as
3) Shut off the engine. desired.
4) Engage the pumps.
5) Push in the "Air Transfer" button, for "Crane" 5) To stop, depress the service brakes, shift the
operation. "Transmission" switch to "N", (neutral), and
engage the parking brakes with the parking brake
switch.

6) Turn off the "Remote Power" switch. The crane is


now ready for operation.

Disengage the Remote Control

1) With the parking brakes set, turn off the "Remote


Power" switch, turn off the ignition, move to the
carrier cab and reverse the steps under "Engage
the Remote Control".

6) Move to the upper (crane) cab.


7) Start the crane engine. If the red (Low Air) light is
on run the crane for a few minutes to allow air
pressure to build up before moving the carrier. B
A
8) Turn on the "Remote Power" switch (A).
D

Remote Operation of The Carrier


C
1) Apply the service brakes by pressing foot pedal
and release the parking brakes with the parking
brake switch (B) located on the dash panel.
2) Select the "Transmission" direction by pressing the
3-position dash mounted switch (C), "F", (forward)
- "N", (neutral) - "R", (reverse), as applicable.
3) Position the front wheels using the "Steering"
switch (D), "Left" - "Right" on the dash panel and
slowly release the brake until you begin to move.

T300-1 Page 3 - 41 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

INDEX

SECTION 4

SUBJECT PAGE

Lubrication Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 1

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 2

Operator Observation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 2

Special Break-In Requirements For New Cranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 3

Machine Maintenance Check Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 4

Daily Check (8 HOURS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 4


Weekly Check (40 HOURS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 4

Monthly Check (80 HOURS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 4

Quarterly Check (250 HOURS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 5

Semiannual Check (500 HOURS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 5

Annual Check (1000 HOURS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 5

Wire Rope Inspection Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 6

Hydraulic Oil Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 7

Engine Oils. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 7

Transmission Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 8
Koehring Spec 805 Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 10

Grade Selection Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 11

Premium Grade Anti-Wear Hydraulic Oils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 12

Cable Lubrication Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 13

Turntable & Swing Pinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 14

Power Steering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 15
Drive Shafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 16

Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 17

Air Dryer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 18

Slider Pads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 18

Boom Lubrication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 19

T300-1 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

T300-1 Page 4 - 1 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

INTRODUCTION

A regular program of periodic preventive maintenance OPERATOR OBSERVATION


is essential to prolong crane operating life, maximize ef- As the operator, it is your responsibility to observe and
ficient service and minimize downtime. This section de- report any unusual sounds, odors, or other signs of ab-
tails a series of checks and procedures which are to be normal performance that could indicate trouble ahead.
performed at daily, weekly, monthly and semiannual in- On a routine basis the following items should be
tervals. These intervals are stated both in terms of cal- checked before starting or while operating the crane.
endar periods and hours of operation.
Visual Inspection - Check complete machine for any un-
The checks prescribed for longer intervals include all usual condition.
the checks required for the shorter intervals. Thus, the
weekly check includes all items in the daily check, the Check for any leaks or damage to the hydraulic system.
monthly check includes weekly and daily checks, and
so on through the semi-annual check, which includes
Check in the engine compartment:
the quarterly, monthly, weekly and daily checks. * Belts for tension and wear
* Coolant level
A convenient check chart provides a means of record-
* Oil level
ing preventive maintenance performed and serves as a * Transmission oil level
tool detecting problem areas and reanalyzing mainte-
* Air cleaner sight gauge
nance requirements. The items in each check interval
* Air intake
on the check chart are grouped under their respective * Muffler and exhaust
headings and covered in detail over the course of Sec-
tion 6.
Check battery box - For battery condition

This maintenance schedule is a guide which ensures


Crane boom - Check for:
that basic preventive maintenance requirements will be
* Hook block for wear or damage
met under average operating conditions. Conditions * Two block system for proper function
which impose greater wear, loads or strain on the crane
* Cable and cable spooling on winch
may dictate reduced check intervals. Before altering the
* Cylinder pin connections for wear
maintenance schedule, reevaluate crane operation and
review the crane maintenance records. Consider all fac-
Check tires, axles, and drive lines, for wear or damage.
tors involved and develop a revised schedule adequate
to meet routine maintenance requirements. Check in the cab for:
* Instruments functioning properly
As a part of each periodic check, refer to the engine
* Control operation
manufacturers manual for engine maintenance require- * Glass for good visibility
ments. When servicing the engine, the engine manufac-
* Safety equipment is ready for use
turers recommendations take precedence over those in
* All lights work properly
this manual, should any discrepancy be noted. * Cleanliness - Free from mud and debris.

T300-1 Page 4 - 2 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

SPECIAL BREAK IN REQUIREMENTS FOR


NEW CRANES

8 HOURS - During the first 50 miles of service and


any time the wheels have been removed, retorque
the wheel nuts to 400-500ft. lbs.

30 HOURS - After thirty hours of travel, drain and


refill the transmission with new fluid. Replace filter
and strainer. All handles, steps, walkways and platforms
must be kept free of grease, oils, fuel, mud
40 HOURS - Retorque the swing bearing bolts to snow and ice at all times.
a torque of 725ft. lbs. Recheck every 40 hours un-
til all bolt are found properly torqued. Thereafter
checks should be performed quarterly.

40 HOURS - Make initial replacement of hydrau-


lic return line filter.

40 HOURS - Perform initial axle oil change at ap-


proximately 3,000 - 5,000 miles.

100 HOURS - After one hundred hours drain and


change the winch lubricant.

100 HOURS - Retighten winch base mounting


cap screws to 225 ft. lbs. of torque after one hun-
dred hours of operation.

100 HOURS - Retighten counterweight cap


screws to 845 ft. lbs.

100 HOURS - Check the driveshaft connections


and the driving belts on the engine accessary
drives.

T700
T300-1 Page 4 - 3 Issued:
Issued:
September
March 2002
2004
PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

MACHINE MAINTENANCE CHECK


LIST

DAILY CHECK (8 HOURS)


Perform Daily Lubrication Drain Air Tanks

Check Hydraulic Reservoir Fluid Level Check Wire Rope And Related Components

Fill Fuel Tank Check Air Cleaner

Check Engine Oil Level Check Controls

Check Coolant Level Check Instruments, Gauges, Lights, & Safety


Equipment
Check Hydraulic Cylinder Mounting Bushings
And Pins Make Overall Visual Inspection

Check Hydraulic Components Check Anti-Two Block System

Check Transmission Oil Level Check Engine Manufacturers Manual For Addi-
tional Maintenance Requirements
Drain Fuel Filters or Water Separator
Ensure Swing Brake Is Able To Hold Against Full
Check Boom Front Slider Pads Torque Of Swing Motor

Check Boom Chains And Ends

WEEKLY CHECK (40 HOURS)


Perform The Daily Check Check Hydraulic Cylinders And Rods

Perform Weekly Lubrication Make Thorough Inspection Of Wire Rope

Check Swing Reducer Oil Level Visually Inspect All Structural Members And
Welds For Cracks, Alignment and Wear
Check Axle Oil Level (after initial change)
Check Boom For Wear Cracked Welds, Align-
Check Battery Condition ment And Missing Or Illegible Decals

Check Tire Pressure And Condition Check Engine Manufacturers Manual For Addi-
tional Maintenance Requirements
Check Air System Safety Valve
Clean Machine Weekly If Salt Covered To Pre-
Check Torque On Wheel Lug Nuts vent Rust And Corrosion

MONTHLY CHECK (80 HOURS)


Perform Daily And Weekly Checks Check All Slider Pads

Perform Monthly Lubrication Have Hydraulic Oil Sample Analyzed

Check Engine Belts Clean Radiator & Oil Cooler Exterior

Check Hydraulic Reservoir For Moisture Check Engine Manufacturers Manual For Addi-
tional Maintenance Requirements

T300-1 Page 4 - 4 Revised: November 2005


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

MACHINE MAINTENANCE CHECK


LIST
QUARTERLY CHECK (250 HOURS)
Perform Daily, Weekly And Monthly Checks Replenish Cooling System Corrosion Inhibitor
(refer to engine manufactures manual)
Perform Quarterly Lubrication
Check Engine Manufacturers Manual For Addi-
Drain Fuel Tank Of Water And Sediment If Nec- tional Maintenance Requirements
essary
Lubricate Valve Disconnects
Check Brake Shoes for Wear Condition
Clean And Wax All Exterior Painted Surfaces
Change Transmission Oil And Shift Air Filter

Change Hydraulic Return Line Filters

SEMIANNUAL CHECK (500 HOURS)


Perform Daily, Weekly, Monthly And Quarterly Check Hydraulic Relief Valve Pressure Settings
Checks
Torque Swing Bearing Bolts (725 ft. lbs. accord-
Perform Semiannual Lubrication ing to tightening sequence)

Clean Crankcase Breather Check Engine Manufacturers Manual For Addi-


tional Maintenance Requirements
Check Hydraulic Reservoir Relief Valve
Check All Adjustments Specified In The Service
Clean Hydraulic Reservoir Intake Suction Filter And Adjustments Section Of This Manual And
Any Vendor Manuals Supplied
Check Air Dryer Desiccant For Signs Of Oil Accu-
mulation

Change Power Steering Filter Element

ANNUAL CHECK (1000 HOURS)


Perform Daily,Weekly,Monthly,Quartly and Semi- Change Hydraulic Fluid (unless checked by oil
annual Checks analysis).

Perform Annual Lubrication Drain and Refill The Winch Lubricant

Disassemble Winch And Inspect Change Axle Oil

Drain And Clean Hydraulic Reservoir

T300-1 Page 4 - 5 Revised: November 2005


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

WIRE ROPE INSPECTION RECORD


(Refer to Wire Rope Users Manual For Criteria)

PLACE OF INSPECTION DATE

DESCRIPTION OF CRANE

Make Model Serial No.

Type and Arrangement of Attachments

DATE OF LAST ROPE INSPECTION

HOURS AND TIME OF SERVICE SINCE LAST INSPECTION

RESULTS OF INSPECTION

Rope Inspected Type and Size Conditions Noted Recommendations

INSPECTOR:

T300-1 Page 4 - 6 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

A good lubrication program requires that all nor- mal should any discrepancy occur. If there is any doubt
wear points be lubricated according to a set schedule about the proper lubricants, intervals or lubrication pro-
with specific types of lubricants. Refer to the lubrication cedures, refer to the original manufacturers manual.
chart and the special items covered in this section for
the recommended lubricants, time intervals and lubrica- The lubrication intervals recommended in this section
tion procedures. assume normal operating conditions. Where dust, dirt,
high humidity or extreme heat
Where components such as the engine, transmission are encountered, lubrication intervals should be short-
and axles are not manufactured by Koehring, the origi- ened accordingly.
nal manufacturers recommendations take precedence

HYDRAULIC OIL REQUIREMENTS


The hydraulic system is filled with KOEHRING SPEC 4. Check the hydraulic system efficiency - a pump may
805 hydraulic oil to give the unit the highest perfor- be failing or a relief valve set low.
mance as a hydraulic machine and to provide proper lu-
brication for the hydraulic components. To ensure the 5. Reduce the duty cycle of the machine.
longest life for this piece of equipment, particular atten-
tion must be paid to maintain oil at the proper level with 6. Consult an authorized distributor.
an approved hydraulic oil and to keep the circuit system
clean. ENGINE OILS
Engine oils that meet Mil Spec 2104 and have the anti-
The oil for the hydraulic system performs the dual func- wear additive zinc dithiophosphate can be used as hy-
tion of lubrication and transmission of power. Oil must,
draulic oils. DO NOT USE C.D. rated engine oil, some
therefore, be selected with care and with the assistance
of which will not protect against wear in hydraulic pumps
of a reputable supplier. To guide in the selection of this and motors.
oil, the general requirements are specified below. Good
oils are economical in the long run. Check with the oil
manufacturer prior to the use of his product.

Oils which conform to Koehring Specification 805 are


recommended for most conditions. Under certain cli- Not all motor oils have zinc dithiophosphate. Those that
mate and operating conditions, it may be advisable to do not have this heavy duty additive can cause immedi-
use a fluid of heavier or lighter viscosity in order to main- ate failure of pumps.
tain a viscosity less than 7500 SSU at start-up and more
Engine oils tend to form sludge in the presence of water.
than 50 SSU during operation. These machines should
This sludge can plug the filters so they will require fre-
not be operated with hydraulic reservoir temperatures in quent changing. This is not detrimental to the machine
excess of 200F (87C) due to possible excessive unless the filters are allowed to plug so badly that they
damage to the hydraulic oil and rubber components by-pass oil.
(hoses, seals, shaft seals, motor seals etc.). If over-
heating occurs, discontinue operation and: Never use multi-viscosity grades of engine oil because
of the shear and thin out characteristics of this type
1. Check the hydraulic fluid level. of oil.

2. Check the oil cooler for cleanliness. TRANSMISSION FLUIDS


DO NOT use transmission fluids. These fluids have
3. Check the oil viscosity versus the recommended Am- been designed to work in automatic transmissions and
bient Temperature - may require an oil change. they will not necessarily work in hydraulic systems.

T300-1 Page 4 - 7 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

HYDRAULIC OIL REQUIREMENTS

MIXING: Mixing different brands of oil is not recom- neutralization number. The oxidation process is typical-
mended. Various companies use different additive ly slow at first and then increases sharply in the final
packages, which when mixed together, may cause stages of complete oxidation. A sharp increase (by fac-
problems in a hydraulic system. This type of problem is tor of 2 - 3) in a neutralization number is a good indica-
rare but can cause sludge which can plug the filters or tion that the fluid is reaching the limit of its oxidation life
acid which will etch the pump plates. In either case, the and should be replaced.
warranty would be voided. If, knowing all this, you still
choose to add oil different from the initial fill, stay with a Water Contamination - All hydraulic oils in the follow-
single brand as this will minimize the likelihood of prob- ing charts will readily separate water which will settle to
lems occurring. Then at the first complete oil change the bottom of the reservoir. This water should be
you may switch to the brand you prefer to use. drained off. The water that is measured in the oil sample
will be dissolved water. This should be less than .05%.
PRE-FILTER: Oil should be filtered through a 10 micron If it is greater than .05%, the oil in the system should be
nominal filter before it enters the hydraulic system. New drained and replaced.
hydraulic fluid as received by the user is generally not in
a satisfactory cleanliness condition for long component Particle Contamination - Excess contamination in a
life. hydraulic system will greatly shorten the life of pumps
and motors. Your oil sample analysis will show the num-
OIL MAINTENANCE: Optimum life from hydraulic ber of particles per milliliter greater than a given micron
equipment can only be obtained with proper hydraulic size. The number of particles in your sample should be
oil maintenance. This includes checking the oil every less than the following:
three to six months. An oil should be checked for viscos-
ity, oxidation, water content, contamination and copper Particle Size No. of Particles/Milliliter
particles. A record should be kept of each check to de-
tect signs of progressive deterioration. Oil samples 10 micron or larger 3,000
should be taken with the system running at normal op-
erating temperature. It is important to use good tech- 20 micron or larger 300
nique in obtaining an oil sample. The exact same
30 micron or larger 100
procedure should be followed each time an oil sample
is taken. Most fluid suppliers will provide assistance in 40 micron or larger 30
analyzing your oil sample. The following are some
guidelines to use in this analysis. 50 micron or larger 10

Viscosity - Many hydraulic fluids will shear or thin out 100 micron or larger 1
with use. The viscosity at each check should be com- If your oil sample shows numbers greater than in the
pared to the viscosity when new. At no time should the chart, your hydraulic system is contaminated. The sys-
viscosity be less than 45 SSU at 210 F. If viscosity is tem should be checked for broken or torn filters,
less than 45 SSU at 210 F, the oil must be replaced im- plugged filters, stuck filter bypass valves and so forth.
mediately. Continued operation with particle counts greater than
those shown in the chart will result in short pump and
Oxidation - Oil oxidation will occur with age and use motor life.
and is evidenced by a change in color and/or odor, in-
creased acidity, and possible formation of sludge, gum Copper Particle Counts - The oil sample analysis
or varnish in the system. The rate of oxidation increases should include a copper particle count in parts/million.
significantly with operations at temperatures over 140 This number should normally be less than 100. A high
F (60C). The oil should be checked more often if oper- copper particle count indicates that a gear pump or mo-
ation is a high temperature. The oxidation process in- tor is rapidly deteriorating. A count of 200 or more would
creases the acidity of the fluid and is measured by a be cause for concern. The most important thing to look

T300-1 Page 4 - 8 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

HYDRAULIC OIL REQUIREMENTS

for is a sudden increase in the copper particle count.


This indicates that a gear pump or motor has suddenly
begun deteriorating and a catastrophic failure can be
expected shortly.

VISCOSITY: Oils are available in various grades (vis-


cosities). The ISO (International Organization for Stan-
dardization) viscosity classification system is currently
being adopted. The ISO grade applies strictly to viscos-
ity and does NOT imply type of oil. (engine, anti-wear,
hydraulic, gear.etc.). A viscosity grade should be select-
ed that will meet the minimum start up temperature re-
quirement and the maximum operating hydraulic oil
temperature.

This machine is factory filled with Koehring


spec 805 hydraulic fluid that is acceptable for
start-up at ambient temperatures of 20F and
should not be operated above a hydraulic res-
ervoir temperature of 200F. If these limits are
exceeded damage can result. For operation
outside these ranges, select the proper
hydraulic fluid from the charts on this and the
following pages or from a reputable supplier.

T300-1 Page 4 - 9 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

KOEHRING SPEC 805 DATA

PHYSICAL
PROPERTIES TEST METHOD REQUIRMENT

A. A.P.I. Gravity ASTM D287 28 Min.

B. FLash Point ASTM D92 380 F Min.

C. Viscosity Index 100F ASTM D445 200-220 SSU


210F ASTM D445 46 SSU MIn.

D. Viscosity Index ASTM D2270 95 Min.

E. Pour Point ASTM D97 -25 F Max.

F. Oxidation Test ASTM D943 2500 Hours Min.


to 2.0 Neut. No.

G. Rust Test ASTM D665 Procedure A Pass

H. Foam Test ASTM D892 Foam Tendency Foam Stability


Sequence I 25 ml Max. Nil
Sequence II 50 ml Max. 10 ml Max.
Sequence III 25 ml Max. Nil

I. Demulsibility ASTM D1401 to 40-37-3 point 30 Min. Max.

J. Aniline Point ASTM D611 200-230 F

K. Pump Wear Dennison HFO Satisfactory


or Vickers M2905 (100
Hrs.@150 F)

L. % Zn ASTM D1549 .07 Min.

M. Filterability Fluid shall show no additive loss when


filtered through 5.0 micron filter.

N. Cleanliness Fluid shall appear bright and clear and shall


be free of visible contaminates or sludge.

T300-1 Page 4 - 10 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

GRADE SELECTION CHART

Maximum life of pumps, motors, hoses, and seals will be obtained by selecting an oil as far down the chart as pos-
sible.
Viscosity Minimum Ideal Cont. Maximum
Grade Start-UP Operating Operating Selection Guide
I.S.O. A.S.L.E. Temp. Hyd. Oil Hyd. Oil Lines
* Temp.
(New) (Old)
* Temp.
Extreme cold start can be
-30F 160F 195F
used year round in most
Synthetic (-8C) (71C) (91C)
machines in temperature
climates

Cold Climate Year Round.


Multi. Must Be Changed More
Viscosity 0F 130F 190F Frequently Than Straight
(-17.8C) (54C) (88C) Grades

Winter Oil For


Ambient Temperatures
22 0 F 105F 160F Up TO 60F
(-17.8C) (41C) (71C) (16C)

150 5F 120F 180F For Ambient


(-15C) (49C) (82C) Temperatures Up To 80F
(27C)

32 10F 120F 180F


(-12.2C) (49C) (82C)
Can Be Used Year
Round In Most Machines
215 15F 140F 200F In Temperate
(-9.4C) (60C) (93C) Climates

46 20F 145F 200F


(-6.7C) (63C) (93C) Well Suited For Most Ma-
chines In Southern U.S.
315 25F 155F 200F And As Summer Oil For
(-3.9C) (68C) (93C) Heavily Loaded Machines
In Central And Northern
U.S.
68 30F 160F 200F
(-1.1C) (71C) (93C) Especially Suited For Re-
gions With Ambient Temp.
Range From 100F To
100 35F 175F 200F 120F
(-1.1C) (80C) (93C)

* Minimum temperature for starting without extended warm-up. For lower temperatures, follow warm up proce-
dure in the operators manual.

T300-1 Page 4 - 11 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

PREMIUM GRADE ANTI-WEAR HYDRAULIC OILS

OIL COMPANY ISO BRAND NAME OIL COMPANY ISO BRAND NAME

32 Ama-Oil R&O 100 AW 32 Kenoil R&O AW 32


Amalie Refining Co. 46 Ama-Oil R&O 200 AW Kendll Refining Co. 46 Kenoil R&O AW 46
(USA) 68 Ama-Oil R&O 300 AW (USA) 68 Kenoil R&O AW 68
100 Ama-Oil R&O 500 AW 100 Kenoil R&O AW 100

32 Amoco AW 32 32 DTE 24/DTE-13M


Amoco Oil Co. 46 Amoco AW 46 Mobil Oil Corp. 46 DTE 25/DTE-15M
(USA) 68 Amoco AW 68 68 DTE 26/DTE-16M

32 Duro AW 32 Northland 32 Talamar 150


Arco 46
68
Duro AW 46
Duro AW 68
Products
(USA)
46
68
Talamar 215
Talamar 315 *
100 Duro AW 100 100 Talamar 465

Conoco DN 600 (Artic) AWX Multi-Viscosity


Conoco Super Hyd. 5W-20 Pennzoil Products Co. 32 AW 32 Hyd. Fluids
Conoco (Multi Viscosity) (USA) 46 AW 46 Hyd. Fluids
32 Conoco Super Hyd. 32 68 AW 68 Hyd. Fluids
46 Conoco Super Hyd. 46 100 AW 100 Hyd. Fluids
68 Conoco Super Hyd. 68 Shell Co. (Canada)
100 Conoco Super Hyd. 100 37 Tellus T37 (Multigrade)

D-A Lubricant Co. Inc 32 D-A Hydra Shield 32 Shell Co. 23 Tellus 23
(USA) 46 D-A Hydra Shield 46 (USA) 32 Tellus 32
68 D-A Hydra Shield 68 46 Tellus 46 (XSL 9101)
100 D-A Hydra Shield 100 68 Tellus 68
100 Tellus 100
Dryden Oil Co. 32 Paradene Anti-Wear 32 AW
(USA) 46 Paradene Anti-Wear 46 AW Sun Oil Co. 32 Sunvis 816 WR
68 Paradene Anti-Wear 68 AW (USA) 46 Sunvis 821 WR
100 Paradene Anti-Wear 100 AW 68 Sunvis 831 WR
100 Sunvis 851 WR
Exxon Co. 32 Nuto-H 32
(USA) 46 Nuto-H 46 Texaco Inc. Rando Oil HD A2 (5w-20)
68 Nuto-H 68 (USA) 32 Rando Oil HD 32
100 Nuto-H 100 46 Rando Oil HD 46
68 Rando Oil HD 68
Gulf Oil Co. 32 Gulf Harmony AW 32
(USA) 46 Gulf Harmony AW 46
68
100
Gulf Harmony AW 68
Gulf Harmony AW 100
** Factory
alent.
filled with Northland Talamar 215 or equiv-

Imperial Oil Limited 32 Nuto H 32


(Canada) 46 Nuto H 46
68 Nuto H 68
80 Nuto H 80
100 Nuto H 100

KOEHRING SPEC 805 IS EQUIVALENT TO HYDRAULIC OILS SHOWN ABOVE

T300-1 Page 4 - 12 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

CABLE LUBRICATION METHODS

GENERAL We are covering the more commonly used


Hot Application
methods of lubricating cable (wire rope). For special ca-
ble lubrication problems consult the cable manufactur-
er.

HOT APPLICATION A heated bath is placed in the path


of the wire rope, and the rope is passed through the hot
lubrication over sheaves and a center guide wheel. Hot
oils or greases have excellent penetrating qualities and
upon cooling have high adhesive and film strength
around each wire.
Continuous Bath
CONTINUOUS BATH Run an operating rope through a
specially constructed casing that has been packed with
swabbing and loaded with lubricant. This affords contin-
uous lubrication.

DRIPPING A container can be placed above the


sheave, so that the rope can be lubricated by opening a
Dripping
spigot. Sheaves are the best location for lubricating op-
erating wire ropes, because the wires and strands open
somewhat as they bend along the groove.

POURING Lubricant can be poured on. The rope


should be lightly loaded and run slowly while being lu-
bricated.

Pouring SWABBING AND PAINTING Lubricant can be


swabbed on with rags, or painted on with a brush. Both
are quick methods which can be made part of the oper-
ating routine.

SPRAYING A light lubricant containing solvents can be


applied to a wire rope by a properly directed spray noz-
zle.
Swabbing
And Painting AEROSOL SPRAYING Installations requiring only
small amounts of lubricants, or only occasional applica-
tions, may find the new aerosol cans of lubricant useful.
They are available from several lubricant manufactur-
ers.

Aerosol Spraying

T300-1 Page 4 - 13 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

TURNTABLE & SWING PINION

Standard lubrication frequencies are shown on lube grease. Under less severe conditions, add grease until
chart. it appears at the bottom seal.

RACE LUBRICATION - Inject grease as recommend- GEAR LUBRICATION - While swinging the machine,
ed through fitting located to rear of console in opera- apply gear grease through the second grease fitting lo-
tors cab just behind the shift lever, as the machine is cated to the rear of the console to the internal ring gear
rotated at least two complete revolutions. When com- with sufficient frequency to insure that the teeth remain
plete rotation is impractical, inject grease through fit- coated.
ting and rotate machine back and forth as far as
possible. Some lubricants recommended by the manufacturer
are:
Under extremely dirty or dusty conditions, sufficient
grease should be added to flush out contaminated

MOBIL TEXACO SUNOCO AMOCO EXON

RACE Mobilux Mutifak Prestige Amolith Beacon


EP1 EP1 742EP EP1 EP1

GEAR Mobiltac Crater 407 Amovis Surett


375NC 2X Compound B 8-X Fluid 4k

NOTE: Other manufacturers lubricants of the same quality are suitable.

T300-1 Page 4 - 14 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

POWER STEERING

LUBRICATION - STEERING GEARS The lubricant wheel from left to right and continue filling until proper
used in the power steering system is the medium by level is maintained. (See final adjustments section for
which hydraulic pressures are applied and relieved, un- system bleeding procedures).
der control, to effect steering assist.
A replaceable type filter element is located in the reser-
In addition the lubricant also lubricates moving parts voir. Carefully clean any build-up of dirt and grease form
and dissipates heat which reduces efficiency and accel- the reservoir cover. Remove the reservoir cover and fil-
erates wear. It is of the utmost importance to use a lu- ter element. Clean inside of reservoir with a lint free
bricant specified and approved by R.H. Sheppard Co., cloth. Install a new filter element refill with oil and re-
Inc. in the Sheppard Steering Gear. place cover.

The Sheppard Gear requires the use of 10W-30 Motor LUBRICATION - BEARING CAPS To lubricate the dirt
Oil. Highway vehicles should have the oil changed twice and salt seals in the bearing cap, and flush out any con-
a year or every 50,000 miles. Off highway vehicles will taminants that have passed these seals, chassis grease
require more frequent change intervals. should be added with low pressure per the lube chart.

The power steering pump reservoir must be kept filled


to the proper indicator level and free of air. When filling
the reservoir, start the engine and turn the steering

T300-1 Page 4 - 15 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

DRIVE SHAFTS

on the drive shaft in the direction opposite to the journal


cross seal not relieving while lube gun pressure is being
applied to the alemite fitting.
Rotating shafts can be dangerous.
You can snag clothes, skin, hair, NOTE: It is recommended that all universal joints be
hands, etc. This can cause seri- relubed after installation of the drive shaft prior
ous injury or death. to putting a vehicle in service.

Do not work on a shaft (with or JOURNAL AND BEARING KITS It is necessary to


without a guard) when the engine completely lubricate each replacement kit prior to as-
is running. sembly into the drive shaft yokes. Each journal cross
lube reservoir should be fully packed with a recom-
mended grease and each bearing assembly should also
UNIVERSAL JOINTS To insure proper lubrication of be wiped with the same grease; filling all the cavities be-
the bearing assemblies, it is essential to add lubricant tween the rollers and applying a liberal grease coating
until it appears at all journal cross bearing seals. This on the bottom of each race. After the kits are installed
assures removal of dirt particles and other contami- into the drive shaft yokes and prior to placing into ser-
nants that may find their way into the bearings and indi- vice, they should be relubed, through the zerks, using
cates to the mechanic that the bearings are fully the same grease.
lubricated.
SLIDING SPLINE SECTIONS Steel drive shaft splines
should be lubricated with good extreme pressure (EP)
grease as recommended by lubricant manufacturers.
Extreme pressure grease satisfying NLFI Grade 1 has
been adapted by the factory. Relube spline at the inter-
Do not assume that bearing cavities have been filled
vals prescribed below. Apply grease gun pressure to lu-
with new lubricant unless flow is noticed around all four
brication zerk until lubricant appears at pressure relief
bearing seals!
hole in welch plug at the sleeve yoke end of spline.

LUBE

LUBE

LUBE PRESSURE
RELIEF
HOLE

If all the seals do not pop when being lubed, move the
drive shaft laterally in all four directions and pull or push

T300-1 Page 4 - 16 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

DRIVE SHAFTS

Cover pressure relief hole with finger and continue to universal joints should be used. Lithium soap base
apply pressure until grease appears at sleeve yoke greases meeting National Lubricating Grease Institute
seal. This insures complete lubrication of spline. (NLGI) Grade 1 and Grade 2 specifications are pre-
ferred. The use of greases which tend to separate and
cake should be avoided.

Lubrication cycles for drive shaft universal joints and


slip splines will vary with service requirements and op-
erating conditions.

RE-LUBE CYCLE
OPERATING CONDI-
TION Miles Hours

NORMAL 6000-8000 150-200


* SEVERE 2000-3000 50-75

* For applications where conditions such as high


speeds, high ambient temperatures or high angles are
present.

LUBRICANTS A high quality extreme pressure (EP)


grease recommended by lubrication manufacturers for

BRAKES

REAR BRAKES Using a pressure gun, lubricate the


brackets and slack adjusters. An application of lubricant
should be applied to the grease fittings each time
(weekly) a general lubrication of chassis components is
required. Any high quality chassis grease may be used.

Grease should be supplied to the bracket until it begins


to squirt out around the camshaft adjacent to the slack
adjuster. The slack adjuster should be filled until grease
becomes visible around the camshaft.

NOTE: Camshaft brackets with metal plugs instead of


grease fittings are fitted with special seals and
packed with extended lubrication interval
chassis grease.

T300-1 Page 4 - 17 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

AIR DRYER

Desiccant cartridge life will vary depending on operating conditions, speeds, loads, air usage and compressor con-
dition. It is recommended that the desiccant cartridge be replaced approximately every 2 years. If system perfor-
mance is reduced, desiccant cartridge replacement is necessary. It is also recommended that the desiccant
cartridge be replaced if the compressor has been rebuilt.

SLIDER PADS

The front bottom slider pad should be checked daily for wear. The remainder of the slider pads should be checked
monthly for wear.

Chamfer

All the slider pads contain a chamfer on the wearing surface. When this chamfer is worn off, the slider pad must be
replaced.

With boom extended brush grease on areas of boom where wear pads contact is evident. he inside of the top plate
of all sections except the tip section also require grease. This can be applied through the holes in the side plates
and piled on top of the next section out just in front of the top rear pads on that section so that extending the boom
to the next hole smears the grease onto the inside of the top plate. Remember to do both sides.

Grease intervals vary and should be more frequent if noise or jerking of the boom is evident.

T300-1 Page 4 - 18 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

BOOM LUBRICATION

5 SECTION BOOM (138)

1. Set rear outriggers.

2. Fully extend the internal boom


extend cylinder so that boom
sections 3, 4, and 5 are fully
extended. (Adjust hoist cylin-
der so boom is at appropriate
working height.)

3. Apply multi-purpose grease to


the bottom side of boom sec-
tions 3,4, and 5. Grease
approximately the outer 5 of
the bottom plates.

T300-1 Page 4 - 19 Issued: September 2004


PERIODIC MAINTENANCE AND LUBRICATION

BOOM LUBRICATION

5 SECTION BOOM (138)

4. Through the holes in the tip


end of section 4, apply a liberal
amount of multi-purpose
grease to the foot of section 5.
Also apply grease to approxi-
mately the center 12 of the
floor of section 4 along the
entire length of the section.

5. Apply multi-purpose grease to


the outer 5 of both sides of the
top plate of Section 4. This
area can be accessed through
the holes in the #4 section.
Apply grease along the entire
length of the section.

6. Apply grease to the outer 5 of


the floor of Section 3 through
holes in 3rd section. Also put a
fist sized portion of grease in
the center of the bottom plate
on the inside through each of
the holes in the boom on the
path wear the cylinder slides.

7. Cycle the boom several times.

T300-1 Page 4 - 20 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

INDEX

SECTION 5
SUBJECT PAGE

General Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 1

Hydraulic - General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 2
Operator Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 3

Power Steering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 4

Front Axle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 5
Steering Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 7

Rear Axle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 13

Alternator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 13

Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 15

Engine Clutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 15

Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 17

Parking Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 19

Air Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 20

Swing Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 21

Boom Hoist Circuit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 22

Boom Telescope Circuit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 23

Winch Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 24

Outrigger Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 26
Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 28

Control Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 31

Relief Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 33
Fluid Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 34

Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 36

Cylinder Leakage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 37

Excessive Heating Of Oil In System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 38

Electrical Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 39

Propane Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 40
Maintenance Free Battery Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 43

Anti Two Block System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 45

T300-1 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

As the operator, it is your responsibility to detect any un- If you cant answer YES to all three questions, rely on
usual, sounds, odors, or other signs of abnormal perfor- your Distributor Serviceman. He has the right tools, test-
mance that could indicate trouble ahead. ing equipment and service knowledge to pin-point the
problem in minutes instead of the hours consumed in
By detecting any problems in their early stages, you can hit-or-miss methods. TIME IS MONEY! He will save it for
save yourself unnecessary downtime and your employ- you.
er a lot of money! Therefore, it is also your responsibility
to use good judgment in detecting failures in quickly and If you decide to attempt an adjustment yourself, follow a
repairing them. If you dont, one failure can lead to an- logical TROUBLE SHOOTING PROCEDURE. Dont
other. simply replace parts until the trouble is found.

Before attempting to make an adjustment yourself, ask


yourself if you have the RIGHT TOOLS, IF you have the
PROPER TEST EQUIPMENT and IF you can accurate-
ly DIAGNOSE the cause of the problem.

GENERAL PROCEDURE

I - KNOW THE SYSTEM Study this manual and learn 6 - TEST YOUR CONCLUSION Test your conclusions,
what makes the machine tick, how it should behave, in order of obviousness, until the source of the failure is
sound and smell. found. The machine can then be repaired at minimal
cost and downtime. Make the repair. Recheck to ensure
2 - OPERATE THE MACHINE Test operate all machine that nothing has been overlooked, functionally test the
functions. Note all abnormal sounds, odors and move- repaired part in the system.
ments. Always proceed in the most logical order to de-
termine the cause. 7 - REVIEW MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES Prevent
recurrences of all premature failures by regularly check-
3 - INSPECT THE MACHINE Look for leaks, listen for ing the filters, temperature, adjust- ments and lubrica-
the source of abnormal sounds, detect the origin of un- tion. Make daily inspections.
usual odors. Check the condition of the oil and filters.
NOTE: Your safety and that of others is always the
4 - LIST THE POSSIBLE CAUSES Use your best judg- number one consideration when working around
ment in listing all possible causes of the failure. cranes. Safety is a matter of thoroughly understanding
the job to be done and the application of good common
5 - REACH A CONCLUSION Review your list of possi- sense. It is not just a matter of dos and donts. Stay
ble causes and decide which are the most likely to clear of all moving parts.
cause the failure. Consider the most obvious first.

T300-1 Page 5 - 1 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

HYDRAULICS - GENERAL

Before any troubleshooting is attempted, become fully If, in spite of these precautions, improper opera- tion
acquainted with the following two (2) basic fundamental does occur, the cause can generally be traced to one of
facts of a hydraulic system: the following:

1 - SPEED The speed of a hydraulic function is directly 1. Use of the wrong viscosity or type of oil.
related to the system flow. A reduction in speed of a cyl-
inder or motor is caused by an insufficient quantity of oil 2. Insufficient fluid in the system.
being delivered to the component.
3. Presence of air in the system.
2 - POWER The power or force of a hydraulic function
is related to pressure. 4. Mechanical damage or structural failure.

If an understanding of the differences between speed 5. Internal or external leakage.


and power of a hydraulic system is under- stood cor-
rectly, then accurate troubleshooting can be accom- 6. Dirt, decomposed packing, water, sludge, rust, etc., in
plished in a minimum amount of time. the system.

7. Improper adjustments.

8. Oil cooler plugged, dirty or leaking.

Whenever hydraulic, fuel, lubricating oil lines, or air lines


are to be disconnected, clean the adjacent area as well
as the point of disconnect. As soon disconnected, cap,
plug or tape each line or opening to prevent the entry of
NEVER resort to increasing the valve relief pres- foreign material. The same recommendations for clean-
sure in an attempt to cure the ills of the system. Ful- ing and covering apply when access covers or inspec-
ly diagnose the problem. tion plates are removed.

Hydraulic components are precision units and their con- Clean and inspect all parts. Be sure all passages and
tinued smooth operation depends on proper care. holes are open. Cover all parts to keep them clean. Be
Therefore, do not neglect hydraulic systems. Keep sure parts are clean when they are installed. Leave new
them clean and change the oil and oil filter at estab- parts in their containers until ready for assembly.
lished intervals.
Clean the preservative compound from all machined
surfaces of new parts before installing them.

T300-1 Page 5 - 2 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

OPERATOR - CONTROLS

WITH THE ELECTRICALLY CONTROLLED VALVES


on the outriggers, three (3) spools must be checked.

The diverter valve should be checked by using a test


gauge on the test port and activating the outrigger con-
trols. If pressure (2500 psi) is indicated, the spool is
shifting.

Check the outrigger extend-retract and function valves


by pushing the. pins in prior to activating the functions.
Check to see if the appropriate pin has been pushed
back out as the functions are activated. If they have, the
spools are shifting.

If the spools do not all shift, check the electrical connec-


tions. fREQUENTLY GROUND CONNECTION ARE A
PROBLEM.

If no electrical power is present at the valve, check the


electrical wiring and correct the fault. Most controls re-
quire a minimum of 10 volts.

If power is present, repair or replace the solenoid or


valve section which is not shifting.

If the spools shift, see page 5-26, Outrigger Cir- cuit.

T300-1 Page 5 - 3 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

POWER STEERING

GENERAL DIAGNOSIS Whenever steering complaints VISUAL INSPECTION


are encountered, it is important that the complete steer-
ing system be inspected. Special body or equipment in- a. Look for poor loading practices.
stallations should also be considered for their effect on b. Check tires for mismatch and proper air pressure.
steering performance. c. Check suspension for sagging or shifting (out of line
rear axles will tend to steer the front end of the vehi-
The steering system consists of the Sheppard Integral cle).
Power Steering Gear, a hydraulic supply pump with
pressure and flow controls and an oil reservoir, the front MECHANICAL COMPONENTS INSPECTION
axle and mechanical components and the steering col-
umn or input shaft and connecting linkages. The front a. Check all front axle components for wear, looseness
tires and wheels must also be considered as part of the or seizure.
total steering system. b. Inspect front and rear suspension components.
c. Check steering gear mounting to be sure it is tight
Steering performance can be affected by out of line con- and not shifting on the chassis or axle.
ditions anywhere in the total steering system. Other d. Inspect steering column components.
factors outside the steering system can also contribute
to poor steering performance. Note: Keep in mind that the same problems that upset
manual steering will also affect power steering.
Many times a steering gear is removed and disassem-
bled needlessly, because an organized diagnosis pro- HYDRAULIC SUPPLY SYSTEM INSPECTION
cedure has not been followed. Start your diagnosis by:
Evaluate hydraulic supply system performance. Follow
DEFINING THE COMPLAINT procedures in the Hydraulic Supply Diagnosis section
of Power Steering Manual. Oil pressure and oil flow
a. Talk to and question the driver. must be within the vehicle manufacturers specifica-
b. Drive the vehicle. tions.

For specific diagnosis and repair of power steering com-


ponents refer to the manufacturers manual for special
procedures to follow.

T300-1 Page 5 - 4 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

FRONT AXLES

RAPID OR UNEVEN TIRE WEAR

CAUSE REMEDY

Incorrect toe-setting ................................................................... Check and reset toe-in if necessary.

Improper tire inflation ................................................................. Inflate to proper pressure.

Unbalanced Tires ....................................................................... Balance.

HARD STEERING

CAUSE REMEDY

Inadequate or improper lubrication of knuckle pins ................... Consult lubrication chart for proper lubricant,
lubrication intervals and procedures.

Improper caster .......................................................................... Adjust caster.

RAPID WEAR OF TIE ROD ENDS

CAUSE REMEDY

Inadequate or improper lubrication ............................................ Consult lubrication chart for proper lubricant,
lubrication intervals and procedures.

Severely contaminative environment ......................................... Clean and lubricate more often.

T300-1 Page 5 - 5 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

FRONT AXLES

BENT OR BROKEN TIE ROD, STEERING ARM,


TIE ROD ARM, OR BALL STUD

CAUSE REMEDY

Excessive power steering pressure ........................................... Check steering pump relief setting, check
steering system relief setting; adjust as
required.

Misadjusted steering relief plungers .......................................... Adjust plungers to unload steering system
when wheels are turned to extreme positions.

HEAVILY WORN STEERING ARM


BALL STUD

CAUSE REMEDY

Inadequate or improper lubrication ............................................ Consult lubrication chart for proper lubricant,
lubrication intervals and procedures.

Spring and seat in drag link worn............................................... Replace spring and seat, replace ball stud.

EXCESSIVE WEAR OF KNUCKLE PINS


AND BUSHINGS

CAUSE REMEDY

Inadequate or improper lubrication ............................................ Consult lubrication chart for proper lubricant,
lubrication intervals and procedures. Increase
lubrication frequency when operating in extrem
conditions.

FRONT AXLE SHIMMY OR VIBRATION

CAUSE REMEDY

Incorrect caster setting............................................................... Adjust caster.

Wheels and/or tires not properly balanced ................................ Balance.

Worn shock absorbers ............................................................... Replace.

T300-1 Page 5 - 6 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

STEERING CIRCUIT

OIL LEAKING AT OUTPUT SHAFT OF STEERING GEAR

CAUSE REMEDY

Clogged oil filter in reservoir (high back pressure)..................... Replace filter.


Increase change frequency.

Pinched or restricted oil return line ............................................ Locate and correct.


Check back pressure.

Damaged quad ring seal ............................................................ Replace quad ring seal.

Damaged bronze bearings......................................................... Replace bronze bearings.


Polish output shaft or replace to remove
bronze deposits.

Damaged roller bearings............................................................ Replace roller bearings.


Polish output shaft or replace to remove pitting
& grooving in seal area.

OIL LEAKING AT ACTUATING SHAFT OF STEERING GEAR

CAUSE REMEDY

Worn or damaged oil seal .......................................................... Replace seals.

Damaged actuating seal surface ............................................... Replace damaged parts


Lube bearing cap more often.

OIL LEAKING AT SUPPLY PUMP DRIVE SHAFT

CAUSE REMEDY

Damaged oil seal ....................................................................... Replace oil seal.

Oil seal heat damaged ............................................................... Check operating temperature.

Loose or damaged bushing on pump drive shaft ....................... Repair pump per pump service instructions.

OIL LEAKING BETWEEN RESERVOIR AND PUMP BODY

CAUSE REMEDY

Seal or gasket damaged ............................................................ Replace damaged parts.

T300-1 Page 5 - 7 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

LUBRICANT MILKY OR WHITE IN APPEARANCE

CAUSE REMEDY

Water entry through reservoir venting system ........................... Clean vent system or replace cap assembly.

OIL FORCED OUT OF RESERVOIR

CAUSE REMEDY

Clogged oil filter ......................................................................... Change oil and oil filter.


Increase change intervals.

Air in system .............................................................................. Bleed air from system. Check for air leak on
suction side of supply pump.

Faulty supply pump (Cavitation)................................................. Check supply pump following Hydraulic Sup-
ply-Diagnosis. Repair pump per pump service
instruction.

Relief plungers of steering gear


not adjusted properly ................................................................. Adjust relief plungers
(see final adjustments)

LUBRICATING OIL DISCOLORED OR SMELLS BAD

CAUSE REMEDY

Operating temperatures too high ............................................... Check and correct cause of overheating.

Change intervals too long .......................................................... Increase oil change frequency.

Incorrect lubricant used.............................................................. Drain, flush and refill with 10W-40 motor oil.

T300-1 Page 5 - 8 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

OIL IN RESERVOIR - FOAMING

CAUSE REMEDY

Air leak in suction side of supply pump ...................................... Refer to pump servicing instructions.

Pump cavitating.......................................................................... Check for restriction in pump supply.

Oil overheating ........................................................................... See high operating temperatures.

Incorrect lubricant ...................................................................... Change to 10W-40 motor oil.

EXCESSIVE PUMP PRESSURE WITH STEERING GEAR IN NEUTRAL POSITION

CAUSE REMEDY

Pinched oil return line. High back pressure .............................. Relocate line.

Binding steering column............................................................. Repair steering column.

Damaged actuating shaft bearing .............................................. Replace damaged parts as required.

WHEEL CUTS RESTRICTED

CAUSE REMEDY

Relief plungers misadjusted ....................................................... Adjust relief plungers


(see final adjustments).

ERRATIC STEERING OR NO STEERING AT ALL

CAUSE REMEDY

Insufficient volume of oil being metered by


flow divider to steering gear induced by foreign
particles on flow divider valve, causing the
valve to hang up in the bore....................................................... Polish flow divider valve to remove foreign par-
ticles and burrs. Refer to pump servicing
instructions.

T300-1 Page 5 - 9 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

HARD STEERING

CAUSE REMEDY

Faulty supply pump .................................................................... Refer to pump servicing procedures.

Front axle overloaded ................................................................ Correct loading practices.

Faulty steering geometry ........................................................... Align front end.

High operating temperature ....................................................... Locate and correct cause of overheating.

WHEEL STEERING HARD IN ONE OR BOTH DIRECTIONS

CAUSE REMEDY

Bent or damaged king pins and tie rods .................................... Repair or replace king pins and tie rods.
Refer to servicing instructions.

Front end load too great for rated axle capacity......................... Lighten load or install larger steering gear.

Fatigued by-pass valve spring in pump...................................... Replace with flow control valve assembly.
Refer to pump servicing instructions.

Low oil level in steering system ................................................. Fill oil reservoir as required.
See Lubrication.

Air in system .............................................................................. Bleed system and check for cause of air.

Caster and camber degree incorrect ......................................... Correct to Specifications.

Metal or foreign material caught in actuating valve.................... Remove actuating valve. Clean and check
parts for damage.

Actuating valve worn or chipped by dirt ..................................... If damage is excessive replace damaged parts
as required.

WHEEL STEERING HARD IN ONE DIRECTION

CAUSE REMEDY

Broken reversing springs in steering gear ................................. Replace reversing springs and damaged parts.
Refer to repair procedures to check for addi-
tional damage.

T300-1 Page 5 - 10 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

WHEEL STEERING HARD IN ONE DIRECTION (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Metal or foreign material in relief


ball seat in piston of steering gear. ............................................ Remove piston and clean relief valve seats or
replace damaged parts.

Foreign material in relief valve ................................................... Clean relief valve.

STEERING EXTREMELY LIGHT IN ONE OR BOTH DIRECTIONS

CAUSE REMEDY

Bent or damaged reversing springs ........................................... Check for impact or accident damage. Replace
damaged parts.

EXCESSIVE BACKLASH

CAUSE REMEDY

Worn universal joint.................................................................... Replace universal joint.

Worn pins and keys in universal joint


to actuating shaft and universal joint
to steering shaft ......................................................................... Replace pins and keys.

Low oil volume ........................................................................... Check flow divider and pump drive belts.

Pitman arm ball worn egg-shaped ........................................... Replace pitman arm assembly where riveted
ball is used or only where bolted ball is used
(vertical socket).

Improperly adjusted drag link, pitman arm


to drag link and steering arm to drag link ................................... Adjust drag link, drag link to pitman arm and
drag link to steering arm.

Loose bracket frame to bracket or bracket to gear .................... Remove bracket. Clean frame and bracket.
Check radius of frame making sure bracket is
not bearing on radius surface. Check bracket
for wear from working. Replace bracket and
tighten to recommended torque rating accord-
ing to size and grade of bolts. If necessary,
replace bracket with new one.

T300-1 Page 5 - 11 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

EXCESSIVE BACKLASH (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Rack on piston damaged ........................................................... Replace parts as required.

Damaged pinion gear on output shaft ........................................ Replace pinion gear.

Damaged output shaft splines ................................................... Replace output shaft.

Worn output shaft bushings ....................................................... Replace bushings and polish shaft to remove
bronze deposits.

Worn pitman arm splines ........................................................... Replace worn parts.

Worn actuating shaft and valve threads..................................... Replace worn parts as required. Follow
Hydraulic Supply Diagnosis procedures to
locate cause of wear.

Damaged reversing springs ....................................................... Check and repair as required.

Universal joint yoke loose on actuating shaft ............................. Repair or replace damaged parts, check for
spline wear.

NO ATTEMPT TO RETURN STRAIGHT AHEAD FROM TURNS

CAUSE REMEDY

No positive caster ...................................................................... Set to 4 to 6 positive caster.

Steering column bind ................................................................. Check and repair U-joints and support bear-
ings.

Steering gear mounting distorted ............................................... Shim mounting pads to correct piston to bore
interference.

Linkage ball sockets seized or binding....................................... Check and repair or replace.

T300-1 Page 5 - 12 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

REAR AXLE

HUMMING NOISE WHILE DRIVING

CAUSE REMEDY

Improper or inadequate lubrication ............................................ Consult lubrication chart for proper lubricant,
lubrication interval, and procedure.

Bearing rollers worn ................................................................... Replace bearing. Always replace both cups
and cones.

EXCESSIVE VIBRATION

CAUSE REMEDY

Twisted or broken axle shaft ...................................................... Replace axle shaft.

Fractured axle shaft at flange .................................................... Replace axle shaft. Examine axle housing for
bent condition. Make certain wheel bearings
are correctly adjusted.
See page 6 - 12.

ALTERNATOR

OPERATION NOISY

CAUSE REMEDY

Worn or dry bearings.................................................................. Replace worn bearings.

Alternator mounting loose .......................................................... Tighten alternator mounting.

Belt loose ................................................................................... Replace worn belt or tighten loose belt.

Brush holders out of alignment .................................................. Replace brush holders.

Brushes not seated properly ...................................................... Reseat or replace brushes.

Armature unbalanced................................................................. Replace armature.

Commutator out-of-round........................................................... Dress commutator.

T300-1 Page 5 - 13 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

OPERATION NOISY (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Loose windings .......................................................................... Replace defective windings.

Armature rubbing ....................................................................... Replace bearings.

EXCESSIVELY HIGH ALTERNATOR ELECTRICAL OUTPUT

CAUSE REMEDY

Alternator regulator out of adjustment........................................ Replace regulator.

Field leads shorted..................................................................... Replace or repair alternator.

Alternator regulator shorted ....................................................... Replace regulator.

ALTERNATOR MECHANICALLY INOPERATIVE

CAUSE REMEDY

Belt loose ................................................................................... Tighten belt.

Armature shaft sheared ............................................................. Replace or repair alternator.

LOW OR NO ALTERNATOR ELECTRICAL OUPUT

CAUSE REMEDY

Field coil open ............................................................................ Replace or repair alternator.

Brushes dirty, worn, pitted, or burned ........................................ Replace or repair alternator.

Alternator regulator defective ..................................................... Replace regulator.

Alternator to regulator field leads


open or connections loose ......................................................... Tighten connections or replace field leads.

T300-1 Page 5 - 14 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

ALTERNATOR OVERHEATS

CAUSE REMEDY

Loose or worn belt or pulley ....................................................... Adjust belt, or replace worn belt or pulleys.

Misalignment .............................................................................. Inspect mounting brackets and tension adjust-


ing arm for looseness. Tighten or replace parts
as required.

STARTER

STARTER INOPERATIVE

CAUSE REMEDY

Commutator dirty........................................................................ Clean commutator.

Brushes worn ............................................................................. Replace brushes.

Starter relay malfunctioning........................................................ Repair or replace relay.

Pinion spring broken or weak..................................................... Replace or repair starter.

Frame housing defective............................................................ Replace or repair starter.

ENGINE CLUTCH

CLUTCH SLIPPAGE

CAUSE REMEDY

Insufficient clutch pedal free play ............................................... Adjust release bearing position, then adjust
linkage if necessary.

Linkage blocked from complete return ....................................... Remove blockage.

Linkage needs lubrication .......................................................... Lubricate linkage.

Release bearing locknut loose ................................................... Adjust release bearing length and tighten lock-
nut.

T300-1 Page 5 - 15 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

CLUTCH SLIPPAGE (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Worn clutch disc facings ............................................................ Replace clutch disc.

Worn or damaged flywheel ........................................................ Resurface or replace flywheel.

Worn or damaged clutch pressure plate .................................... Replace pressure plate and cover assembly.

Grease or oil contamination on facings...................................... Clean facings and repair cause of contamina-
tion. If contaminant cannot be removed,
replace clutch disc.

New clutch installation needs break-in....................................... Perform clutch break-in procedure.

CLUTCH DRAG/HARD SHIFTING

CAUSE REMEDY

Linkage blocked from full travel ................................................. Remove blockage.

Linkage incorrectly adjusted ...................................................... Adjust clutch linkage.

Linkage worn/damaged.............................................................. Replace faulty linkage components.

Clutch damaged
- damaged clutch disc hub splines
- bent clutch disc
- bent drive straps
- broken/warped pressure plate ................................................. Replace damaged component.

Contamination/grease in release bearing bore .......................... Clean release bearing bore and transmission
input shaft.

Excessive side loading on release bearing ................................ Eliminate source of excessive side loading
(worn/damaged cross shaft bushings, worn/
damaged cross shaft, worn/damaged or bent
release yoke tips, worn/damaged or uneven
release bearing yoke contact wear pads, exces-
sive release bearing travel during disengage-
ment, worn/damaged pilot bearing, excessive
flywheel runout, excessive engine to transmis-
sion misalignment, etc.).

T300-1 Page 5 - 16 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

CLUTCH DRAG/HARD SHIFTING (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Failed pilot bearing..................................................................... Replace pilot bearing and input shaft if dam-
aged.

Transmission input shaft splines worn/damaged ....................... Replace input shaft.

Tight or contaminated clutch disc splines .................................. Clean clutch disc and input shaft splines or
replace clutch disc as necessary.
Flywheel housing to clutch housing
excessive misalignment ............................................................. Replace faulty housing.

Grease or oil contamination on facings...................................... Clean facings and repair cause of contamina-
tion. If contaminant cannot be removed,
replace clutch disc.

BRAKES

INSUFFICENT BRAKE ACTION

CAUSE REMEDY

Improper brake shoe adjustment ............................................... Adjust brake shoes.

Worn brake linings ..................................................................... Adjust for lining wear or replace brake shoes.

Blocked, bent, or broken tubing or hose .................................... Remove obstructions in line or replace faulty
tubing.

Brake valve delivery pressure below normal.............................. Clean and replace worn parts if brake valve is
defective, replace unit.

Insufficient parking brake valve delivery pressure ..................... Clean and replace worn parts, or if valve is
defective, replace unit.

T300-1 Page 5 - 17 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

BRAKES RELEASE TOO SLOWLY WITH PEDAL RELEASED

CAUSE REMEDY

Insufficient brake shoe clearance............................................... Adjust brake shoes.

Weak or broken valve diaphragm return spring ......................... Replace brake valve.

Relay or quick-release valve exhaust


ports obstructed ......................................................................... Clean or replace faulty unit.

ONE BRAKE DRAGS WITH PEDAL RELEASED

CAUSE REMEDY

Insufficient brake shoe clearance............................................... Adjust brake shoe clearance.

Brake shoe binding on anchor pin ............................................. Remove shoe, clean and lubricate anchor pins.

Weak or broken brake shoe return springs ................................ Replace faulty spring

BRAKES ACT UNEVENLY OR GRAB WHEN PEDAL IS DEPRESSED

CAUSE REMEDY

Brake shoe clearance is too great ............................................. Adjust clearance.

Grease or oil on linings .............................................................. Clean linings or replace linings or shoe assem-
blies.

Drums out of round .................................................................... Replace drum.

Defective brake valve................................................................. Replace faulty unit.

Brakes need relining .................................................................. Replace brake shoes.

Brake chamber diaphragm leaking ............................................ Tighten all fittings; if caused by broken or
faulty unit, replace the unit.

T300-1 Page 5 - 18 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

PARKING BRAKE

MAXI-BRAKES WONT APPLY


(From Park Brake Button)

CAUSE REMEDY

Restricted hose or tube .............................................................. Remove restriction or replace.

Defective relay valve .................................................................. Repair or replace.

Defective spring brake valve ...................................................... Repair or replace.

Defective control valve ............................................................... Repair or replace.

MAXI-BRAKES WONT APPLY


(With loss of air pressure in one service reservoir)

CAUSE REMEDY

Restricted hose or tube .............................................................. Remove restriction or replace.

Defective control valve ............................................................... Repair or replace control valve.

BRAKES WONT APPLY ON REAR AXLE


(With loss of air pressure in one service reservoir)

CAUSE REMEDY

Restricted hose or tube .............................................................. Remove restriction or replace.

Defective spring brake valve ...................................................... Repair or replace spring brake valve.

T300-1 Page 5 - 19 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

MAXI-BRAKES WONT RELEASE

CAUSE REMEDY

Control valve not pulled out ....................................................... Pull out.

Insufficient system air pressure.................................................. Allow engine to run to increase pressure to


above 70 p.s.i.

Restricted hose or tube .............................................................. Remove restriction or replace.

Insufficient hold off pressure ...................................................... Check for system (or excessive valve) leaks.

Leaking brake actuator diaphragm ............................................ Replace brake actuator (spring pot).

Defective relay valve .................................................................. Repair or replace relay valve.

Defective spring brake valve ...................................................... Repair or replace spring brake valve.

Defective control valve ............................................................... Repair or replace control valve.

AIR PRESSURE

INADEQUATE AIR PRESSURE

CAUSE REMEDY

Leaks in system ......................................................................... Repair leaks.

Frozen lines ............................................................................... Thaw out lines.

Defective compressor ................................................................ Inspect for sticking unloader valve, replace if


necessary.

Reservoir leaking ....................................................................... Replace.

Tank to compressor supply line damaged.................................. Replace.

T300-1 Page 5 - 20 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

SWING CIRCUIT

SWING COMPLETELY INOPERATIVE

CAUSE REMEDY

Mechanical swing lock applied, if equipped ............................... Disengage the swing lock.

Swing brake applied................................................................... Disengage the swing brake.

Spring brake stuck in applied position ....................................... Disassemble swing brake and free-up unit.

Swing valve main relief valve stuck in open position ................. See section on Relief Valves.

Swing motor leaks excessively internally ................................... See section of Fluid Motor.

Mechanical fault in swing reducer


gear box or swing bearing.......................................................... Repair swing reducer or replace swing bearing.

Hose plugged or liner collapsed................................................. Replace hose.

Rotary manifold leaking internally .............................................. Reseal rotary manifold.

Swing pump faulty...................................................................... See section on Pumps.

SWING MOTION SLUGGISH

CAUSE REMEDY

Main relief valve stuck in open position ..................................... Replace.

Faulty swing pump ..................................................................... Repair or replace swing pump.

Swing motor leaks excessively, internally .................................. Replace or reseal motor.

Excessive leakage around swing control valve spool ................ Replace or replace control valve.

SWING MOTION ERRATIC

CAUSE REMEDY

Brake not releasing completely .................................................. Check operation of swing brake and/or swing
lock.

Low hydraulic oil level ................................................................ Add oil as required.

T300-1 Page 5 - 21 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

SWING MOTION ERRATIC (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Swing bearing not lubricated properly........................................ Lubricate swing bearing.

Main relief malfunctioning .......................................................... See section on Relief Valves.

BOOM HOIST CIRCUIT

BOOM DRIFTS DOWN

CAUSE REMEDY

Hold valve not seating properly.................................................. Replace hold valve.

Hoist cylinder by-passing ........................................................... See section on Cylinder Leakage.

BOOM HOIST ONLY - INOPERATIVE OR ERRATIC

CAUSE REMEDY

Boom will drift down ................................................................... Repair or replace hold valve.

Boom wont lower....................................................................... Repair, replace, or backflush hold valve.

Boom hoist cylinder binding ....................................................... Repair or replace.

Load is too great ........................................................................ Consult capacity chart, check RCI.

Piston packings damaged .......................................................... Replace packings.

Low oil level ............................................................................... Add oil as required.

Hose plugged or liner collapsed................................................. Replace hose.

Air in cylinder ............................................................................. Bleed cylinder.

BOOM DROPS SLIGHTLY AS RAISE CONTROL IS RELEASED

CAUSE REMEDY

Air in cylinder ............................................................................. Bleed cylinder.

Boom hoist hold valve free flow check


not seating properly ................................................................... Replace hold valve.

T300-1 Page 5 - 22 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

BOOM HOIST AND TELESCOPE INOPERATIVE OR ERRATIC

CAUSE REMEDY

Pump disconnect not engaged .................................................. Engage pump disconnect.

Main relief valve malfunctioning ................................................. See section on Relief Valves.

Low oil level ............................................................................... Add oil as required.

Rotary manifold leaking internally .............................................. Reset rotary manifold.

Tandem pump faulty................................................................... See section on Pumps.

BOOM TELESCOPE CIRCUIT

TELESCOPE FUNCTION ONLY - WILL NOT OPERATE

CAUSE REMEDY

Load too great ............................................................................ Move lever to first position, not high speed.
Reduce load or set boom length before lifting
load.

Both port relief valves sticking ................................................... See section on Relief Valves.

Hose plugged or liner collapsed................................................. Replace hose.

BOOM EXTENSION JERKY OR ERRATIC

CAUSE REMEDY

Inadequate grease on boom pad surfaces................................. Lubricate boom where pads contact boom.

Wear pads damaged.................................................................. Replace wear pads.

Wear pads shimmed to boom too tight ...................................... Reshim wear pads.

Faulty counter balance valve ..................................................... Replace counter balance valve.

Loose chain system ................................................................... Adjust chains as required.

T300-1 Page 5 - 23 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

TELESCOPE CYLINDER EXTENDS BUT WILL NOT RETRACT

CAUSE REMEDY

Port relief valve sticking ............................................................. See section on Relief Valves.

Hold valve malfunctioning .......................................................... Repair or replace.

Internal leakage in cylinder ........................................................ See section on Cylinder Leakage.

Extend valve malfunctioning ...................................................... Repair or replace.

BOOM SECTIONS RETRACT UNDER LOAD

CAUSE REMEDY

O ring around hold valve damaged ......................................... Replace O rings.

Hold valve not seating properly.................................................. Repair or replace.

Telescope cylinder by-passing ................................................... See section on Cylinder Leakage.

WINCH CIRCUIT

WINCH WILL NOT DEVELOP MAXIMUM LINE PULL

CAUSE REMEDY

Main relief valve is set too low ................................................... Readjust the main relief.

Main relief valve is sticking ........................................................ See section on Relief Valves.

Winch motor worn excessively or damaged............................... See section on Fluid Motor.

Tandem pump worn excessively or damaged ............................ See section on Pumps.

Rotary manifold leaking internally .............................................. Reseal rotary manifold.

Low oil level ............................................................................... Add oil as required.

T300-1 Page 5 - 24 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

WINCH WILL LOWER BUT WILL NOT RAISE

CAUSE REMEDY

The sprag clutch is assembled backwards ................................ Be certain that the winch is assembled prop-
erly.

Insufficient parts of line for the load being lifted ......................... See the reeving diagram on the capacity chart.

WINCH WILL RAISE BUT WILL NOT LOWER

CAUSE REMEDY

The winch hold valve is mounted


on the winch motor incorrectly ................................................... Be certain that the winch is assembled prop-
erly.

The winch hold valve spool is sticking ....................................... Repair or replace.

The winch brake is not releasing ............................................... Be certain that the brake release line is open. If
necessary, disassemble and inspect the brake
components.

Winch brake piston O ring damaged ....................................... Replace O ring.

WINCH WILL NOT HOLD LOAD


(LOAD DRIFTS DOWN)

CAUSE REMEDY

System back pressure too high.................................................. Warm oil: check for restriction in down stream
flow.

The over-running sprag on the brake is broken ......................... Inspect and replace, if necessary.

The automatic brake is not applying .......................................... Be certain that the winch brake release line is
not plugged and no foreign objects are in the
brake assembly.

The winch brake friction plates are worn ................................... Replace friction plates.

T300-1 Page 5 - 25 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

WINCH CHATTERS WHEN LOWERING

CAUSE REMEDY

The winch hold valve is set


wrong or is malfunctioning ......................................................... Check the hold valve setting. If the winch con-
tinues to chatter, the holding valve is sticking.
Inspect it for worn or damaged seals or con-
tamination.

OUTRIGGER CIRCUIT

ALL OUTRIGGERS INOPERATIVE

CAUSE REMEDY

Electrical malfunction ................................................................. See section on Electrical Controls.

Outrigger relief valve malfunctioning.......................................... See section on Relief Valves.

Outrigger diverter valve malfunctioning ..................................... Repair or replace.

Line to or from steer pump


plugged or liner collapsed .......................................................... Clear blockage or replace hose.

Low oil level ............................................................................... Add oil as required.

Steer pump worn or damaged.................................................... See section on Pumps.

T300-1 Page 5 - 26 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

INDIVIDUAL OUTRIGGER INOPERATIVE

CAUSE REMEDY

Electrical malfunction ................................................................. See section on Electrical Controls.

Cylinder leaking internally .......................................................... See section on Cylinders.

Hold valve on jack cylinder not operating .................................. Repair or replace.

Line plugged or collapsed between


outrigger valve and cylinder ....................................................... Replace hose.

Beam wedged in extended position ........................................... Extend jack far enough to pick up end of beam
and retract. Replace slider pad block on top of
outrigger box to pick up end of beams.

OUTRIGGERS WILL NOT LIFT MACHINE

CAUSE REMEDY

Outrigger relief valve malfunctioning.......................................... See section on Relief Valves.

Outrigger diverter valve malfunctioning ..................................... Repair or replace.

Outrigger pump worn or damaged ............................................. See section on Pumps.

Cylinder by-passing.................................................................... See section on Cylinders.

JACK CYLINDER DRIFTS DOWN (OUT & DOWN)

CAUSE REMEDY

Hold valve on top of cylinder malfunctioning.............................. Replace cartridge.

Thermal relief cartridge mounted in wrong end ......................... Check for proper assembly.

Cylinder by-passing.................................................................... See section on Cylinders.

T300-1 Page 5 - 27 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

SWING
PUMPS
CIRCUIT

FAILURE OF PUMP TO DELIVER FLUID

CAUSE REMEDY

Pumps not engaged ................................................................... Engage pumps.

Low fluid level in reservoir.......................................................... Add recommended oil and check level.

Oil intake suction filter plugged .................................................. Clean filter.

Air leak in suction line, preventing priming or causing


noise and irregular action of control circuit ................................ Repair leaks.

Oil viscosity too heavy to pick up prime ..................................... Use lighter viscosity oil. Follow recommenda-
tion for temperatures encountered.

Broken pump shaft or parts broken inside pump ....................... Contact your local distributor; if necessary,
refer to the manufacturers manual for the cor-
rect instructions in pump disassembly and
repair.

NO PRESSURE IN SYSTEM

CAUSE REMEDY

Pumps not engaged ................................................................... Engage pumps.

Pump not delivering oil for any of


the reasons listed previously...................................................... Follow remedies given previously.

Relief valve not functioning due to:

Valve setting not high enough .................................................... Increase pressure setting of valves.

Valve leaking .............................................................................. Check seat for score marks and reseat.

Spring in relief valve broken....................................................... Replace spring and readjust valve.

Internal leakage in control valves or cylinders ........................... To determine location, progressively block off
various parts of circuit. When trouble is
located, repair. (Do not block between pump
and relief valve).

T300-1 Page 5 - 28 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

NO PRESSURE IN SYSTEM (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Relief valve not functioning due to:

Cold fluid .................................................................................... Warm up system. Work with oil at recom-


mended operating temperature range.
(See Operation section).

Air leak or restriction at inlet line ................................................ Repair or clean.

Internal parts of pump are worn excessively.............................. Replace pump.

PUMP MAKING NOISE

CAUSE REMEDY

Pump disconnect notengaged ................................................... Shut engine off and engage pump disconnect.

Partially clogged intake line, intake filter


or restricted intake pipe.............................................................. Clean out intake filter screen or eliminate
restriction. Be sure suction line is completely
open.

Air leaks:

At pump intake pipe joints .......................................................... Test by pouring oil on joints while listening for
change in sound of operation. Tighten as
required.

Air drawn in through inlet opening ............................................. Check and add oil to reservoir if necessary.

Air bubbles in oil......................................................................... Use hydraulic oil containing a foam depres-


sant.

Too high oil viscosity .................................................................. Work only with oil at recommended operation
temperature.

Oil intake suction filter plugged .................................................. Clean filter.

Rag, paper, etc., pulled into suction line or pump ...................... Remove.

Worn or broken parts ................................................................. Replace.

T300-1 Page 5 - 29 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

EXTERNAL OIL LEAKAGE AROUND PUMP

CAUSE REMEDY

Shaft seal worn causing oil to


leak into gear drive housing ....................................................... Replace.

Loose fitting on pump intake or discharge ................................. Keep all joints tight.

Damaged O ring seals between pump sections ...................... Replace.

Damaged O rings at fittings ..................................................... Replace.

EXCESSIVE WEAR

CAUSE REMEDY

Abrasive matter in the hydraulic oil


being circulated through the pump............................................. Clean suction filter and replace return filter.
Drain & flush system as necessary.

Viscosity of oil too low at working conditions1 ........................... Check oil recommendation.

Sustained high pressure above


maximum pump rating ............................................................... Check relief valve setting.

Air recirculation causing chatter in system................................. Check for air being drawn into system. Use
hydraulic oil with a foam depressant.

BREAKAGE OF PARTS INSIDE PUMP HOUSING

CAUSE REMEDY

Excessive pressure above maximum pump rating..................... Check relief valve setting.

Seizure due to lack of oil ............................................................ Check reservoir level, oil filter and possibility
of restriction in suction line more often.

Solid matter being wedged in pump........................................... Check suction line filter, drain and flush system
as necessary.

T300-1 Page 5 - 30 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

CONTROL
SWING CIRCUIT
VALVES

STICKING PLUNGERS

CAUSE REMEDY

Excessively high oil temperature ............................................... See section on Excessive Heating of Oil in
System.

Dirt in oil ..................................................................................... Change oil. Clean system.

Fittings too tight.......................................................................... Check torque.

Valve warped from mounting...................................................... Loosen valve mounting bolts and check.

Excessively high flow in valve .................................................... Check to see if hoses from pump are not
crossed or reversed.

Linkage binding .......................................................................... Free up linkage.

Plunger damaged....................................................................... Replace valve.

Return spring damaged ............................................................. Replace faulty parts.

Spring or detent cap binding ...................................................... Loosen cap, re-center and re-tighten.

Valve not at thermal equilibrium ................................................. Let system warm up.

LEAKING SEALS

CAUSE REMEDY

Paint on or under seal ................................................................ Remove and clean.

Excessive back pressure ........................................................... Open or enlarge line to reservoir.

Dirt under seal............................................................................ Remove and clean.

Scored plunger........................................................................... Replace valve.

Loose seal plates ....................................................................... Clean and tighten.

Cut or scored seal ...................................................................... Replace faulty parts.

T300-1 Page 5 - 31 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

UNABLE TO MOVE PLUNGER IN OR OUT

CAUSE REMEDY

Water frozen in plunger caps ..................................................... Remove caps to clean out.

Dirt in valve ................................................................................ Clean and flush out.

Plunger cap full of oil.................................................................. Replace seals.

Bind in linkage............................................................................ Free up linkage.

LOAD DROPS WHEN PLUNGER MOVED FROM NEUTRAL

CAUSE REMEDY

Dirt in check valve ...................................................................... Disassemble and clean.

Scored check valve poppet or seat ............................................ Replace poppet or lap poppet to seat.

POOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OR FAILURE

CAUSE REMEDY

Dirt in relief valve ....................................................................... Disassemble and clean.

Relief valve defective ................................................................. See section on Relief Valves.

Load too heavy .......................................................................... Check line pressure.

Internal valve crack .................................................................... Replace valve.

Plunger not at full stroke ............................................................ Check movement and linkage.

T300-1 Page 5 - 32 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

SWING
RELIEF CIRCUIT
VALVES

CANT GET PRESSURE

CAUSE REMEDY

Poppet stuck open or dirt under seal ......................................... Check for foreign matter between poppets and
their mating members. Members must slide
freely.

ERRATIC PRESSURE

CAUSE REMEDY

Poppet seal damaged ................................................................ Replace damaged parts. Clean dirt and remove
surface marks for free movement.

PRESSURE SETTING NOT CORRECT

CAUSE REMEDY

Wear due to dirt. Lock nut adj. screw loose .............................. See section on Valve Adjustments.

T300-1 Page 5 - 33 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

LEAK

CAUSE REMEDY

Damaged seats, worn O rings,


parts sticking due to dirt ............................................................. Replace worn or damaged parts. Inspect for
free movement of components. Check seats
for scratches, nicks, or other marks.

FLUID MOTOR

MOTOR WILL NOT TURN

Pumps not engaged ................................................................... Engage pumps.

No oil .......................................................................................... Fill reservoir to proper oil level.

Pump broken.............................................................................. Replace pump.

Relief valve stuck open or set too low........................................ Clean and free relief valve spool and adjust to
proper setting.

Work load jammed or stuck........................................................ Remove obstruction from work load.

Large contaminating foreign bodies in fluid................................ Flush hydraulic system completely. Use new
oil and install new filters.

SLOW OPERATION

CAUSE REMEDY

Wrong oil viscosity ..................................................................... Use proper viscosity oil.

Rotary manifold leaking.............................................................. Reseal rotary manifold.

Worn pump................................................................................. Repair or replace pump.

Extremely high fluid temperatures causing


pump and motor to slip (temperature increases
as pump and motor wear) .......................................................... Add heat exchangers.

Relief setting too low .................................................................. Set relief valve for proper psi.

T300-1 Page 5 - 34 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

MOTOR TURNS IN WRONG DIRECTION

CAUSE REMEDY

Hose connections wrong............................................................ Reverse connections.

Wrong timing .............................................................................. Re-time motor.

ERRATIC MOTOR OPERATION

CAUSE REMEDY

Relief valve pressure set too low ............................................... Adjust relief valve setting.

Low oil level in reservoir permitting air


to enter system .......................................................................... Fill reservoir to proper level.

Air being sucked in on inlet side of pump ................................ Tighten fitting(s) on pump inlet side.

LEAK AT SHAFT

CAUSE REMEDY

Worn or cut shaft seal ................................................................ Replace shaft seal.

LEAK BETWEEN HOUSING AND WEAR PLATE OR


BETWEEN WEAR PLATE AND GEROLER ASSEMBLY

CAUSE REMEDY

Motor housing bolts loose .......................................................... Clean mating surfaces and tighten nuts to
appropriate value.

Pinched O ring seal ................................................................. Replace.

LEAK AT OIL PORTS

CAUSE REMEDY

Damaged seal or O ring .......................................................... Replace O ring or seal.

T300-1 Page 5 - 35 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

LEAK AT OIL PORTS (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Poor fittings ................................................................................ Replace fittings carefully.

Damaged threads ...................................................................... Replace housing.

CYLINDERS

CYLINDER STICKING OR BINDING

CAUSE REMEDY

Damaged parts........................................................................... Repair or replace.

Dirt or contamination .................................................................. Check oil condition. Check filters. Clean or


replace filter elements. Change oil if condition
requires it.

Loose parts ................................................................................ Tighten cylinder rod eyes, if loose. Check cyl-
inder heads and tighten, if loose.

Misalignment .............................................................................. Check mounting pins and bushings. Tighten


rod eyes.

ERRATIC ACTION OF CYLINDERS

CAUSE REMEDY

Air in system:

Oil level is too low ...................................................................... Add or change.

Air leak ....................................................................................... Locate and correct.

Foaming in reservoir .................................................................. Use hydraulic oil containing a foam depres-


sant.

Internal leakage ......................................................................... See Cylinder Leakage next page.

Main Relief pressure too low or valve sticking ........................... See section on Relief Valve.

T300-1 Page 5 - 36 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

CYLINDER LEAKAGE

Hydraulic cylinders may retract due to the cooling of the An alternate method to test the hold valve would be to
oil in cylinder. Oil shrinks approximately 1% per 100F disconnect the two hoses coming from the valve bank
of cooling, or as an example, if a cylinder is extended and then elevate the boom . If oil continues to flow
100 and it cools 100F, it would shorten approximately slowly from the extend line then it is a hold problem. If
1. oil continues to flow from retract, then it is faulty or leak-
ing by piston in cylinder.
TELESCOPE CYLINDER
Note: With hollow rod telescope cylinders you can drain
If excessive leak-down is encountered, check items in in excess of 40 gallons of oil from the rod. If the
the following sequence: boom comes in while doing this test, then the cyl-
inder is faulty or leaking by the piston in the cylin-
1 With boom offside and horizontal, extend the boom der.
approximately 6 ft. per section. Mark the first tele-
scoping section at the end of the base section. IF THE HOLD VALVE IS NOT FOUND DEFECTIVE,
the cylinder must be removed from the boom assembly
2 Elevate the boom to maximum angle and suspend for repacking and checking. Prior to reassembly of the
a load on the hook. (7 tons on a 2-part line would cylinder, conduct an air test on the piston rod by block-
approximate manufacturers inspection proce- ing the retract ports on the rod near the piston end. Slip
dures.) a plastic bag over piston end of rod and retain and seal
with rubber band. Apply and hold a slight amount of air
3 With engine shut off, hold or tie the telescope func- pressure at the retract port of the rod. (Port stamped
tion lever in the full extend position for approxi- with R.) Expansion of the plastic bag indicates a
mately 15 minutes. defective rod weldment or seals on the port tube in the
rod.
4 Return the telescope lever to neutral, start engine,
ground the load, and return the boom to horizontal. WHEN REASSEMBLING THE CYLINDER, care
Re-mark the boom section as in (1). Measure the should be taken to keep the piston rod assembly paral-
distance between marks to determine leak-down of lel in all planes with the cylinder barrel as the piston
the cylinder. enters and is pushed down the barrel prior to gland
engagement.
The manufacturers allowable drift specification for pro-
duction machines is as follows: NOTE: An external leak from telescope cylinders or
hydraulic line within the boom assembly does not
With 14,300 lb. hook load, 2-part hoist line, boom cause leak-down without also having one or more of
extended about 6 ft. per section at maximum boom the above conditions present.
angle, and 160 degree F. hydraulic oil temperature, the
leak-down per cylinder is not to exceed 3/4 inch in a BOOM LIFT CYLINDER
15-minute period.
The suggested procedure for identifying the specific
IDENTIFY A DEFECTIVE HOLD VALVE in the cylinder cause of leak-down should be performed in the follow-
which drifts excessively by interchanging the hold valve ing sequence:
cartridge with one removed from a cylinder that is not
drifting, or by replacement with a new cartridge. Before ELEVATE THE BOOM TO NEAR MAXIMUM ANGLE,
installing the cartridge, visually inspect the external O not completely extended, with a boom length sufficient
rings and backup washers. Retest per the procedure to winch up a convenient payload approximately one
above to determine if hold was defective. (1) foot from ground level. Shut of engine.

T300-1 Page 5 - 37 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

BOOM LIFT CYLINDER (CONTINUED) SET THE OUTRIGGERS.

DISCONNECT THE EXTEND HOSE, PILOT DRAIN ELEVATE THE BOOM TO NEAR MAXIMUM ANGLE,
HOSE, AND THE SMALL PILOT LINE HOSE at the not completely extended, with a boom length sufficient
holding valve ports and cap the pilot line hose and drain to winch up a convenient payload approximately one
hose ends. (1) foot from ground level. Shut off engine and remove
pressure from the hydraulic reservoir by loosening the
IF HYDRAULIC OIL CONTINUES TO RUN after the ini- filler cap.
tial draining from either port of the hold valve as the
hoist cylinder continues to leak-down, the cause is with- DISCONNECT THE EXTEND HOSE FROM THE
in the hold valve. HOLD VALVE. This is a hose farthest away from the
port tube and should have an E stamped next to it.
IF CYLINDER LEAK-DOWN OCCURS with no oil leak
from the hold valve ports, the cause is within the cylin- IF HYDRAULIC OIL CONTINUES TO RUN after the
der. initial draining from the port of the hold valve as the jack
cylinder continues to leak-down, the cause is within the
OUTRIGGER JACK CYLINDER hold valve.

The suggested procedure for identifying the specific IF CYLINDER LEAK-DOWN OCCURS with no oil leak
cause of leak-down is similar to the boom lift cylinder from the hold valve port, the cause is within the cylin-
procedure: der.

DO NOT START THE ENGINE UNTIL THE HOSES


HAVE BEEN RECONNECTED. The control valve
spool is open-center to reservoir in the neutral position
and return line oil would be pumped out.

EXCESSIVE HEATING OF OIL


IN SYSTEM

HEATING CAUSED BY POWER UNIT


(RESERVOIR, PUMP, RELIEF VALVE, AND COOLERS)

CAUSE REMEDY

Relief valve set at a higher or lower pressure than


specified. Excess oil dissipated through increased
slippage in various parts, or through relief valve ........................ Reset relief valve to recommended pressure.

Internal oil leakage due to wear ................................................. Repair or replace faulty component.

Viscosity of oil too high or too low .............................................. Follow recommendations for correct viscosity
grade to be used.

Pumps assembled after overhaul may be assembled


too tightly. This reduces clearances and increases
rubbing friction ........................................................................... Follow instructions when reassembling.

T300-1 Page 5 - 38 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

HEATING CAUSED BY POWER UNIT


(RESERVOIR, PUMP, RELIEF VALVE AND COOLERS) (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Leaking relief valves .................................................................. Repair.

Improper functioning of oil cooler ............................................... Inspect cooler and see that it is working prop-
erly.

Improper machine operation ...................................................... Return control to neutral when stalled, cylinder
at end of stroke, etc.

HEATING BECAUSE OF CONDITIONS IN SYSTEM

CAUSE REMEDY

Restricted lines .......................................................................... If lines are crimped, replace; if partially plugged


for any reason, remove obstruction.

Internal leaks.............................................................................. Locate leaks and correct.

Low oil level ............................................................................... Check oil level and fill if necessary.

ELECTRICAL CONTROLS

ELECTRICAL FAILURE

CAUSE REMEDY

Rocker switch sticking................................................................ Remove switch, check if hole is too tight. Cut
out decal or file hole larger.

Tripped circuit breakers.............................................................. Reset breaker

Disconnected or broken wires.................................................... Replace or repair.

Open circuit ................................................................................ Check with test light. Repair or replace.

Low voltage ................................................................................ Check wires and grounds.

Poor engine solenoid connection ............................................... Clean and tighten.

Defective solenoid...................................................................... Replace.

Solenoid failure .......................................................................... Replace.

Poor ground connections ........................................................... Clean and tighten connections.

T300-1 Page 5 - 39 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

PROPANE
SWING CIRCUIT
HEATER

HEATER FAILS TO START


(MOTOR DOES NOT RUN)

CAUSE REMEDY

Fuse defective or burnt out ........................................................ Check fuse; replace if necessary.

Electrical connection(s) defective .............................................. Check all electrical connections, including


ground; repair any defects.

Full voltage not available at heater ............................................ Check for power at the heater: at least 11 VDC
with heater turned on. Trace system to find any
fault(s).

Motor defective .......................................................................... Check motor. Replace if necessary.

MOTOR RUNS, BUT NO COMBUSTION

CAUSE REMEDY

Fuel supply blocked ................................................................... Check fuel supply by loosening the fitting on
the outside of the heater and checking for pro-
pane odor. If propane odor is present, pull off
the igniter wire completely and remove the
igniter. Try to start the heater and listen for the
solenoid click. Check for the odor of propane
in the burner. If propane odor is present at
bulkhead fitting, but not the burner head, the
solenoid valve is defective or contaminated
with some foreign object. The solenoid valve
can become contaminated when a liquid take-
off bottle is used instead of the required vapor
take-off bottle. If the fuel system is contami-
nated, the lines and solenoid must be cleaned
with a degreasing solvent.

Temperature control &/or microswitch


defective or out of adjustment .................................................... Check temperature control switch and
microswitch and microswitch for adjustment.
Adjust, repair, or replace as necessary. See
Section 6, Repairs and Adjustments.

T300-1 Page 5 - 40 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

MOTOR RUNS, BUT NO COMBUSTION (CONTINUED)

CAUSE REMEDY

Ignition pack defective or inoperative......................................... Check for spark by holding an insulated-handle


screwdriver with the shaft grounded and the tip
approximately 1/8 away from the high tension
lug of the ignition coil. There should be a con-
tinuous strong spark. If no spark is produced,
check that there is voltage applied to the igni-
tion pack. If input voltage is present and no
spark or a weak spark is produced, replace or
repair the ignition pack.

Tilt switch defective, improperly


mounted or not getting power .................................................... Check tilt switch. The switch must be secure in
its bracket and be in the vertical position with
the electrical leads pointing down. Check
leads on both sides of switch for power.
Replace if defective.

Igniter defective or inoperative ................................................... Check the igniter. To check, shut off the fuel
tank and depress the start switch until the lines
are purged of fuel. Remove the burner head
and check the gap between the igniter and the
burner tube. It should be 1/16 to 1/8. With
the burner head grounded, move the START-
RUN-OFF switch to the START position and
check the gap for spark. If no spark is pro-
duced, the igniter may be dirty or defective.
Before removing the igniter from burner head,
check inside the burner head to determine if
any carbon threads or chips are present which
could short the plug.

Fuel not suitable for temperatures encountered ........................ Check with your propane supplier to be sure
your fuel is suitable for the temperatures
encountered. Around -10F, propane may not
produce enough pressure to pass through the
regulator.

T300-1 Page 5 - 41 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

HEATER REMAINS ON BURNER CYCLE AFTER HEAT DEMANDS ARE MET

CAUSE REMEDY

Temperature control &/or microswitch


defective or out of adjustment .................................................... Check temperature control switch and
microswitch and microswitch for adjustment.
Adjust, repair, or replace as necessary.

Bi-metal blade broken or linkage out of adjustment ................... Check bi-metal blade and linkage and adjust,
repair or replace as necessary.

Dirt on fuel solenoid valve lip ..................................................... Clean solenoid valve lip.

EXCESSIVE POPPING OR BACKFIRING

Ignition pack defective or inoperative......................................... Check for spark by holding an insulated-handle


screw driver with the shaft grounded and the
tip approximately 1/8 away from the high ten-
sion lug of the ignition coil. There should be a
continuous strong spark. If no spark is pro-
duced, check that here is voltage applied to the
ignition pack. If input voltage is present and no
spark or a weak spark is produced, replace or
repair the ignition pack.

Full voltage not available at heater ............................................ Using voltmeter, check to be sure full voltage is
available for heater operation, at least 11 VDC
with heater turned on. Trace system to find
fault.

Solenoid defective...................................................................... Check solenoid. When the START-RUN-OFF


switch is in the RUN position, the solenoid
should produce an audible click and remain
open until heater cycles off.

In extremely cold weather, the regulator may


become frosted. As it thaws and freezes, the
heater will burn intermittently ..................................................... No action recommended.

Clogged or restricted exhaust .................................................... Check exhaust for blockage or restrictions.


Clean and clear as necessary.

T300-1 Page 5 - 42 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

EXCESSIVE SMOKING AT EXHAUST PORT AND BUILDUP OF CARBON IN HEAT EXCHANGER

CAUSE REMEDY

Air inlet tube blocked.................................................................. Check for plugged or blocked air inlet tube and
clear if necessary.

Low voltage ................................................................................ Check for low voltage, at least 11 VDC.

Defective pressure regulator ...................................................... Check for defective pressure regulator. There
should be 11 inches water pressure in the pro-
pane supply line at the connector.

HEATER DOESNT SWITCH OFF AFTER PURGE (COOL DOWN) CYCLE

CAUSE REMEDY

Flame switch will not open ......................................................... Replace.

MAINTENANCE FREE BATTERY TESTING

VISUAL INSPECTION

CAUSE REMEDY

Visible damage, terminal leakage, etc. ...................................... Cannot be used. Replace.

ELECTROLYTE LEVELS & STATE OF CHARGE


NOTE: PROCEED DIRECTLY TO CAUSE THAT APPLIES

CAUSE REMEDY

Level at top of plates. Water cannot be added.......................... Replace.

If there is an indicator and it shows low level ............................. Replace.

T300-1 Page 5 - 43 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

ELECTROLYTE LEVELS & STATE OF CHARGE (CONTINUED)


NOTE: PROCEED DIRECTLY TO CAUSE THAT APPLIES

CAUSE REMEDY

Level OK, unknown, or water can be added.


Stabilized voltage below 12.4 volts* ........................................... Add water if needed (if possible). Charge, then
turn on high-beam head lamps (or 15 amp load
for 15 seconds). Proceed to load test.

If there is an indicator and it shows low charge ......................... Charge, then turn on high-beam head lamps (or
15 amp load for 15 seconds). Proceed to load
test.

Stabilized voltage above 12.4 volts* or indicator


indicates charged ....................................................................... Perform load test.

LOAD TEST

CAUSE REMEDY

Perform load test using the following procedure:


1. Connect voltmeter and ampere load equal to 1/2
cold cranking amperes @ 0F (-18C) rating of battery
for 15 seconds.
2. Observe voltage at 15 seconds with load on.
3. Refer to voltage chart............................................................. If the voltage remains below the voltage chart
levels, replace battery. If the voltage is equal to
or above chart values, return to service.

* IF WATER CAN BE ADDED TO A BATTERY, A HYDROMETER READING OF 1.225 @ 80 F (27 C)


CAN BE USED INSTEAD OF THE 12.4 VOLTAGE READING.

T300-1 Page 5 - 44 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

TWO
SWING
BLOCK
CIRCUIT
SYSTEM

PANEL LIGHT & HORN WILL NOT COME ON WITH BOOM SWITCH WEIGHT LIFTED
(IF EQUIPPED WITH DISCONNECTS, CONTROLS WILL NOT ENGAGE)

CAUSE REMEDY

Burned out fuse.......................................................................... Check and replace fuse (8 amp only).

Broken wire ................................................................................ Check voltage in control panel between termi-


nals #0 and #37. If 0 volts, check between igni-
tion post of ignition switch and ground. If 12
volts available, wire to control panel is bad.
Correct.

HORN WORKS, BUT NO LIGHT WITH SWITCH WEIGHT LIFTED


(AND IF EQUIPPED W/ DISCONNECTS, CONTROLS WILL ENGAGE)

CAUSE REMEDY

Light bulb burned out ................................................................. Replace bulb.

LIGHT AND HORN ARE ON WITH HOOK BLOCK NOT CONTACTING SWITCH WEIGHT
(IF EQUIPPED W/ DISCONNECTS, CONTROLS WILL NOT ENGAGE)

CAUSE REMEDY

Jumper wire or jib/rooster sheave not


plugged in boom head ............................................................... Plug in.

Boom head weight wire rope broken or hung up ....................... Check that weight is attached to wire and hang-
ing freely. If rope is caught up on something,
correct.

Jib or auxiliary boom head switch plugged in,


but no weight.............................................................................. Attach weight.

Broken electrical cable or bad connection ................................. Check all cable for visible damage, then
remove wire from terminals #3 and #6 in control
panel and check for continuity. If circuit is
open, check the wires inside cable reel, and
wires from the reel to the boom head switch. If
the wires are OK, check the anti-two block
switch. If there is continuity between #3 and #6
check the relay in the panel.

T300-1 Page 5 - 45 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

LIGHT AND HORN ARE ON WITH HOOK BLOCK NOT


CONTACTING SWITCH WEIGHT (CONTINUED)
(IF EQUIPPED WITH DISCONNECTS, CONTROLS WILL NOT ENGAGE)

CAUSE REMEDY

Defective two block switch ......................................................... Check for correct mechanical operation. If OK,
remove cover and wires from terminals #1 and
#2. With arm pulled down, there should be a
closed circuit between them. With the arm up,
the circuit should be open. If all conditions are
not met, replace switch.

Defective relay in panel.............................................................. Check for 12 volts between relay pins #30 (hot)
and #86 (ground). If voltage is 0, check for volt-
age between pin #87a and ground. If 12 volt,
replace relay (With no electrical power to the
relay, pins #30 and #87a should show continu-
ity. With 12 volts to either #85 or #86 and the
other grounded, there should be continuity
between pins #87 and #30.)

ANTI-TWO BLOCK SYSTEM


FOR CRANES EQUIPPED WITH FUNCTION DISCONNECTS ONLY

LIGHT AND HORN ARE ON, BUT CONTROLS WILL NOT DISENGAGE

CAUSE REMEDY

Defective function disconnect .................................................... Check voltage across disconnect terminals. If


12 volts, check override key switch in control
panel. If 0 volts, repair or replace disconnect.
(Check other disconnects for condition.) To
operate the crane the solenoid must have 12
volts supplied to one side and have a good
ground on the other side. Under this condition,
the disconnect should act as a solid link. With
the 12 volts removed, the disconnect should
allow free motion of the control lever in one
direction and operate the valve spool in the
other direction.

Defective override key switch .................................................... Check to insure that the switch is in the off
position and the key removed. Check for 12
volts in the control panel. If so, replace the
switch or control panel.

T300-1 Page 5 - 46 Issued: September 2004


TROUBLESHOOTING

NO LIGHT AND HORN, BUT CONTROL WILL NOT ENGAGE

CAUSE REMEDY

Broken wire or bad connection .................................................. Check voltage across disconnect terminals. If
0 volts, check voltage across terminals in the
control panel. If 12 volts, replace wire. If 12
volts across disconnect, then disconnect is
defective.

Defective function disconnect .................................................... Check solenoid for function. Applying 12 volts
to disconnect, solenoid should engage with a
distinct snap. If not, the solenoid must be
replaced. If the solenoid engages, but the dis-
connect breaks under load, the spool, ball,
and case should be replaced.

Contaminated function disconnect ............................................. 1. Ensure that a drain hole is present in the end
of the rubber tube covering the solenoid.

2. Lubricate solenoid with SAE 30 oil.

3. Remove solenoid from disconnect and check


for proper operation. DO NOT lose the stain-
less steel ball under the solenoid. If the sole-
noid does not operate replace the disconnect.
If disassembly and cleaning corrects the prob-
lem reassemble and replace the silicon sealant.

T300-1 Page 5 - 47 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

INDEX

SECTION 6
SUBJECT PAGE

GENERAL SERVICE INFORMATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 1


WELDING INSTRUCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 2
WELDING & CUTTING ON PAINTED SURFACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 3
OUTRIGGERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 4
REAR SUSPENSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 11
FRONT AXLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 12
REAR AXLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 13
WHEEL AND RIM MOUNTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 14
TIRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 17
ENGINE RADIATOR MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 19
ENGINE CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 20
SHIFT CONTROL ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 21
ENGINE MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 23
TRANSMISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 25
PROPELLER SHAFT & UNIVERSAL JOINTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 28
AIR SYSTEM MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 31
STEERING AND POWER STEERING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 33
SWING BEARING BOLTING PROCEDURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 34
TORQUE WRENCH EXTENSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 35
SWING REDUCER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 36
HYDRAULIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 37
PUMPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 40
VALVE ADJUSTMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 42
ROTARY MANIFOLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 46
CONTROL LINKAGE ADJUSTMENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 48
ANTI-TWO BLOCK SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 49
HEATER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 50
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM BATTERY CHECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 51
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COLLECTOR RING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 54
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM VOLTMETER DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 55
HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 57
HYDRAULIC CYLINDER MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 58
WIRE ROPE AND REEVING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 61
SPOOLING WIRE ROPE ON DRUMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 61
CABLE SOCKETS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 63
BOOM CHAIN ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 64
BOOM CENTERING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 66
SETTING BOOM PROXIMITY SENSORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 67

T300-1 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

GENERAL SERVICE INFORMATION

Machine productivity, longevity and low cost perfor-


mance depend on periodic maintenance, troubleshoot-
ing and proper service and adjustment procedures.

As the operator, it is your responsibility to detect any When performing maintenance on a vehicle
unusual sounds, odors or other signs of abnormal per-
ALWAYS PLACE THE SHIFT LEVER IN THE
formance that could indicate trouble ahead.
NEUTRAL POSITION, set the parkingbrakes,
By detecting any malfunctions in their early stages, you block the vehicles wheels, and NEVER work
can save yourself unnecessary downtime and your under, in front of, or in back of a vehicle when
employer a lot of money! Therefore, it is also your the engine is running.
responsibility to use good judgement in detecting
potential problems in the early stages and repairing
them quickly. If you dont, one problem may lead to The methods used to remove assemblies, guards, cab
another. panels, etc. is left to the discretion of the customer
dependent on the type of overhaul equipment and
Before attempting to make a repair, ask yourself IF you maintenance personnel at hand.
have the RIGHT TOOLS, IF you have the PROPER
TEST EQUIPMENT and IF you can accurately DIAG- Keep parts in order when large components are disas-
NOSE the cause of the malfunction. sembled, particularly so when it has a great number of
similar parts. Loosely reassemble assemblies when-
If you cant answer YES to all three questions, rely on ever possible to prevent small parts from being lost.
your distributor serviceman. He has the tools, testing Keep subassembly parts together, but be careful not to
equipment and service knowledge to pinpoint the prob- get right and left hand parts mixed up.
lem in minutes instead of the hours consumed in hit - or
- miss methods. TIME IS MONEY! He will save it for When an assembly is removed to correct only one diffi-
you. culty, it is good practice to recondition the whole
assembly at the time thus avoiding repetition of work at
If you decide to attempt a repair yourself, follow a logi- a later date.
cal TROUBLE-SHOOTING PROCEDURE. Dont sim-
ply replace parts until the trouble is found. Bolts and nuts should be placed into their respective
holes when removing guards, cases, etc. so that
Once the cause of a problem or malfunction has been proper bolt will be on hand when reassembling these
diagnosed, take the corrective action specified in this parts.
manual. Follow the procedures given for the specific
problem. If the difficulty is not covered, consult your
Distributor Serviceman.

NOTE: A time table styled check list for periodic


maintenance requirements is given in Section
4. Maintenance check procedures are found
under each of the respective subject headings.

T300-1 Page 6 - 1 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WELDING INSTRUCTIONS

Before welding on the unit, contact the factory ser-


! vice department for approval.

When doing repair welding on your unit take precaution Always have a fire extinguisher on hand in case of fire.
attaching your ground to the component being Adequate ventilation and dry area are necessary. Pro-
repaired. This will reduce the chance of arcing through tective clothing should be used and all persons in the
a bearing, cylinder, etc., damging the component. Paint welding area should have protection for their eyes. Fol-
should be removed from the surface to be used as the low instructions for welding and cutting on paint.
ground (earth).
AWS CLASS E7018 Low hydrogenrod for normal
repairs on low alloy to medium carbon steel. All position
welding, good penetration, and crack resisting up to
80,000 yield. Also suitable for repair of previous inter-
shield welds.
Use necessary precaution when welding around fuel
tanks, oil reservoir, batteries, tubing and pressure sys- AWS CLASS E11018G Low hydrogen rod for repair on
tems. high strength alloy steel such as T-1, 80,000 to 100,000
yield. All position welding, good penetration, and high
tensile stength up to 110,000.

When welding close to glass, cylinder rods, or any pol- Note: Low hydrogen rod E7018 must be used within
ished surface, provide adequate protection from splat- four (4) hours upon removal from a freshly
ter. opened container or from a storage oven.

Low hydrogen rod E11018G must be used


within 1/2 hour upon removal from its container
or from a storage oven.

Never weld when the engine is running. Always discon-


nect the battery cables and apllicable grounds before
welding.

All welding procedures and welding operator qualifica-


tions shall be in accordance with ANSI/AWS D14.3
Do not weld on wet surfaces since this will cause when welding on load sustaining members (ANSI/
hydrogen embrittlement of the weld. ASME B30.5)

T300-1 Page 6 - 2 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WELDING & CUTTING ON


PAINTED SURFACES

When welding or cutting steel coated with a certain paint sys-


tems, the worker is exposed to decomposition products (metal
fumes, gases or vapors, particulate) which vary depending on
the type of process being used to weld or cut, the nature of the
base metal, and the type of coating system. The following con-
trol procedures should be utilized when one is welding or cut-
ting coated steel:

Use a power brush or grinding wheel to strip the coating from


the steel in the vicinity where the cut or weld is to be made.
Remove the paint far enough from the weld to prevent any
remaining paint from becoming heated and bubbling. If this
happens, continue to brush or grind the paint away.

A toxic dust respirator and eye protection should be used


while stripping the paint.

Welder should be outfitted with a fresh air supplied respirator


and other personal protective equipment required for weld-
ing.

Other employees should be removed from the area or told to


stand back a minimum of 10 feet from the welder. Do not be
in direct line with the weld fumes.

Use a local exhaust hood to remove fumes during the weld-


ing or cutting operation if one is available.

T300-1 Page 6 - 3 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

OUTRIGGERS

Hose
Disconnects

Outrigger Extend
Cylinder Dead End

Wear Pad

NOTE: The outriggers section coincides with section 3


in the parts manual. 3. Support the beam with a hoist and pull the beam out
of the outrigger box. The extend/retract cylinder will
WEAR PAD come out with the beam.
A wear pad is mounted on the back end of each outrig-
ger beam to prevent the beam from gouging the outrig- Install the outrigger beam by reversing the removal
ger box when extending or retracting the outrigger procedure.
beams. The wear pad can be reached when the outrig-
ger beam is fully retracted. The wear pad can be
replaced by removing one bolt.

BEAM REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT


The outrigger beams must be removed to service the
outrigger extend cylinder. The beams are removed by
the following procedure:

1. Disconnect the hydraulic hoses from the extend/


retract cylinder dead end.

2. Remove the extend/retract cylinder dead end pin.

T300-1 Page 6 - 4 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

OUTRIGGERS

Retaining Nut Piston Cylinder Barrel Head Gland

Rod

BEAM EXTEND CYLINDER tain all rings, seals, spacers and setscrews required in
The outrigger beam must be removed from the crane one step are in place before proceeding to the next
and the extend cylinder removed from the outrigger step. See Group 3 of the parts book for a complete list-
beam before servicing. With the beam removed, dis- ing of cylinder parts.
connect the hydraulic hoses form the jack cylinder and
remove the extend cylinder live end pin. Remove the
cylinder from the back end of the beam.

DISASSEMBLY
Disassemble the extend cylinder by means of the fol-
lowing procedure:

1. Extend the rod far enough to allow the head gland to


be completely screwed out of the cylinder barrel.

2. Screw the head gland out of the cylinder barrel.

3. Remove the head gland, rod and piston as a unit.

4. Remove the piston retaining nut and slide the piston


and head gland off the rod.

O-rings, back-up rings and seals may now be replaced.

ASSEMBLY
Reassemble the extend cylinder by reversing the dis-
assembly procedure. Torque the piston retaining nut to
100-150 ft. lbs.

As the cylinder components are reassembled, be cer-

T300-1 Page 6 - 5 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

OUTRIGGERS

JACK CYLINDERS NOTE: The hold valve cartridge does not contain any
The jack cylinders on this crane can be removed with- serviceable parts. If the hold valve cartridge is
out removing the outrigger beams. To remove the jack broken, replace the entire hold valve cartridge.
cylinders, extend the outrigger beam a few feet, dis-
connect the hydraulic hoses and remove the four bolts Replace O-rings, wear rings, seals or other compo-
retaining the jack cylinder to the outrigger beam. nents as required.

DISASSEMBLY ASSEMBLY
Disassemble the jack cylinders by means of the follow- Assemble the jack cylinder by reversing the disassem-
ing procedure: bly procedure.

1. Remove the jack cylinder from the outrigger beam. Apply Loctite to the threads of the piston retaining nut
before assembly. Torque piston retaining nut to 900 ft
2. Extend the cylinder rod far enough to allow the head lbs.
gland to be screwed out of the cylinder barrel.
As the cylinder components are reassembled, be cer-
3. Remove the head gland, piston rod and piston as a tain all rings, seals, spacers and setscrews required in
unit. Remove the lower port tube fitting before one step are in place before proceeding to the next
removing the piston from the barrel. step. See Group 3 of the parts book for a complete list-
ing of cylinder parts.
4. Remove the piston retaining nut.

5. Slide the piston and head gland off the piston rod.

6. If the hold valve is to be serviced, disassemble as


required.

T300-1 Page 6 - 6 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

OUTRIGGERS

Outrigger
Relief Valve

Test Port

Bottom This
Relief Valve

DIVERTER VALVE ADJUSTMENT NOTE: There are two relief valves shown in the
The diverter valve regulates the flow of hydraulic oil to illustration. The relief valve in the lower valve
the outrigger control and should maintain a pressure section is not used and should be deactivated
setting at 2500 psi. Check the diverter valve relief pres- by turning it in until it bottoms out. This should
sure using the following procedure: be checked prior to setting the outrigger relief
valve.
1. Operate the boom over relief to warm the oil if nec-
essary. Loosen the jam nut on the relief valve. Adjust the relief
with the adjusting screw while fully retracting and con-
2. Attach a calibrated pressure gauge in the test port. tinuing to hold an outrigger jack or beam with the
engine at full RPM. Screw in the adjustment to
NOTE: The test port is located on the outrigger diverter increase the pressure and out to decrease it. Set the
valve which is mounted on the inside of the left pressure at 2500 psi 50 psi.
frame rail just ahead of the swing bearing.
Recheck the pressure setting after tightening the jam
nut as the pressure may change due to tighten the nut.
3. Stall an outrigger function over relief by retracting
either a beam or jack and continuing to hold the
function at full engine RPM. The relief setting
should be 2500 psi 50 psi. If necessary, adjust the
relief valve.

OUTRIGGER RELIEF VALVE ADJUSTMENT


Adjust this relief using the following procedure:

T300-1 Page 6 - 7 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC CYLINDER INSPECTION

Clean the cylinder bore and all the components with


solvent and make the following inspections:

CYLINDER BORE Look for signs of scoring and deep


scratches. In the event of any defects, reassemble the
entire cylinder and contact your distributor.

CYLINDER ROD Look for dents, deep scratches, or


damaged chrome plating. File any sharp edges on
ends of shaft to protect the seals upon reassembly.
Always protect the shaft finish when clamping in a vise.

PISTON SEALS Check for signs of damage. Do not


remove unless replacement is necessary.

PISTON & HEAD GLAND It is not normally necessary


to replace the piston or head gland.

T300-1 Page 6 - 8 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

FRONT SUSPENSION

T300-1 Page 6 - 9 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

FRONT SUSPENSION

T300-1 Page 6 - 10 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

REAR SUSPENSION

The rear suspension incorporates equalizer beams,


which link front and rear driving axles, and torque rods
which locate the axles. Servicing these components
consists of replacing worn bushings.

EQUALIZER BEAM BUSHINGS Both center and end


bushings are replaceable. The beams must be
removed prior to servicing the bushings. Remove the
beams by the following procedure:

1. Remove the capscrews and saddle caps from the


beam center pin.

2. Support the beam at one end. Remove the through


bolt and shims from the same end. Remove the
support and lower the beam end to the ground.

3. Support the other beam end and repeat step #2.

BEAM ISTALLATION Reverse the beam removal pro-


cedure to reinstall the beam.

Torque the center pin saddle clamp capscrews to 225-


275 ft. lbs and beam end through bolt nuts to 210-240
ft. lbs.

T300-1 Page 6 - 11 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

FRONT AXLE

WHEEL BEARING AND ADJUSTMENT Before


adjusting the wheel bearings, be certain there is suffi-
cient clearance between the brake shoe and drum so
that shoe drag will not interfere with bearing adjust-
ment. Use a torque wrench to make the adjustment.

Torque the adjusting nut to 50 ft. lbs. while rotating the


wheel in both directions to ensure that all bearing sur-
faces are in contact. Then, back off the adjusting nut 1/
8 to 1/6 turn and cotter pin the nut.

End play must be within the limits of .001 to .010


loose.

TOE-IN ADJUSTMENT When checking or adjusting


toe-in, the weight of the vehicle must be on the axle.
The axle is initially jacked up for the purpose of chalk-
ing and scribing the center area of each front tire and
then lowered for checking. Outriggers can be used
when jacks of a capacity to raise the vehicle are
unavailable. If an adjustment is found necessary, we
recommend consulting your local distributor. Check the
toe-in using the following procedure:

1. Jack up the front axle. Use a piece of chalk to


whiten the center area of both tires around the
entire circumference.

2. Position a scribe or pointed instrument against the


whitened part of each tire and rotate tires. The 5. Position trammel bar at rear of tires and adjust
scribe must be held firmly in place so a single pointers to line up with scribe lines and lock in
straight line is scribed around the tire. place. (Repeat for front of tires.)

3. Position a full-floating turning-radius gauge plate 6. Read toe-in (or toe-out) from scale. The recom-
under each wheel. Lower vehicle and remove lock mended loaded toe-in is 1/32 - 1/16.
pins from gauge plates. (If full-floating turning- NOTE: Set radial tires from 0 to 1/32.
radius gauge plates are not available, lower vehicle
and move backward and forward approximately six
feet).

4. Set the sliding scale end of the trammel bar on 0


(zero) and lock in place.

T300-1 Page 6 - 12 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

REAR AXLE

MAINTENANCE CHECK As a part of MONTHLY As part of the SEMI-ANNUAL MAINTENANCE


MAINTENANCE CHECK, inspect the differential oil CHECK, completely drain the oil from the rear axle by
level by removing the fill-and-check plug in the rear removing the plug at the bottom of the differential and
cover of each differential housing. The oil should be the plug at the bottom of the power divider. Replace the
level with the bottom of the hole. Before checking the plugs and fill differential through rear filler hole. Add two
forward driving axle, the axle should be run first, (2) pints of oil through the forward filler hole at the right
because the power divider and forward driving axle top portion of the differential carrier. Refer to Section 9
have a common lubrication system. The five minute for the recommended lubricant.
interval allows the oil to settle to the proper levels in the
power divider case and axle housing. It is not neces- WHEEL BEARING ADJUSTMENT Remove the lock
sary to check the oil level in the power divider. If the oil nut from the hub spindle prior to adjustment. Tighten
level is up to the bottom of the rear filler hole, the power the inner nut while turning the wheel in both directions
divider is also adequately lubricated. If the oil level is to ensure that all bearing surfaces are in contact.
low, add oil as necessary. Tighten until there is a slight bind, then, back off inner
nut 1/6 turn (wheel should rotate freely). Install and
tighten lock nut. End play should be within .001 to
.005.

If the axles have been drained, fill the forward drive


axle until the oil is level with the bottom of the filler hole
in the rear cover. Next, add two (2) more pints through
the forward filler hole located slightly offset to the right
in the top portion of the differential carrier. Never use
the rear hole at the top of the differential as an oil filler
hole. Fill the rear driving axle through the rear filler hole
until oil flows from the bottom of the hole. After filling,
be sure all plugs are reinstalled.

T300-1 Page 6 - 13 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WHEEL AND RIM MOUNTING

MAINTENANCE CHECK As a part of your WEEKLY


MAINTENANCE, check the wheel retaining nuts to
insure proper tightness. Torque values and correct
torquing procedures are offered in this section.

HEAVY TRUCK STEEL DISC WHEEL


INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

1. STUD-PILOTED MOUNTING
Wheels with the stud-piloted mounting system are
called stud mount wheels. Stud mount wheels are
designed to be centered by the nuts on the studs. The
seating action of the chamfered nuts in the chamfered
bolt holes centers the wheels. (See Figure 1).

A. 10 Hole, 11.25 Bolt Circle DCN Mounting.

1. Inflate tire prior to installing on vehicle.

2. Inspect parts before installing.

Check all parts for damage, including rims/ wheels


and rings. Ensure that studs, nuts, and mounting
faces of hub drum and wheels are flat, clean,
and free from grease. Clean hub surface with
wire brush if scale is present.

Replace any damaged parts. Do not bend, weld,


heat, or braze components. Do not use tubes to
stop rim air leakage.

Not all nuts and studs can be used with all types of
wheels. The use of improper nuts and studs can
cause nut loosening, stud failure, or premature
wheel failure, which could cause an accident or
injury.

- Use correct nuts. Inspect nuts to ensure they are not


worn and function properly. The nuts listed below are
recommended for use with wheels with .875 spherical
bolt hole chamfers.

T300-1 Page 6 - 14 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WHEEL AND RIM MOUNTING

1. STUD-PILOTED MOUNTING (continued) - If air wrenches are used, they must be periodically
calibrated for proper torque output. Use a torque
a. Front Wheels wrench to check the air wrench output and adjust the
line pressure to give correct torque.
- Slide front wheel over studs, being careful not to dam-
age the stud threads. Snug up nuts in the sequence
shown in Figure 4. Do nut tighten them fully until all
have been seated. This procedure will permit the uni-
form seating of nuts and ensure the even, face-to-face
contact of wheels, hub, and drum. Tighten nuts to 450-
500 ft.-lbs. (dry) using the same criss-cross sequence. Nuts must be kept tight by retorquing nuts on a routine
basis and using the proper nut torque and tightening
b. Dual Rear Wheels sequence. Loose nuts could result in loose wheels or
premature wheel failure. This can result in an accident
- Slide the inner dual wheel over studs, being careful or injury.
not to damage the stud threads. Snug up the inner cap
nuts in sequence shown in Figure 4. Do not tighten
them fully until all have been seated. This procedure
will permit the uniform seating of nuts and ensure the
even face-to-face contact of wheels, hub, and drum.
Tighten to 450-500 ft.-lbs. (dry) using the same criss-
cross pattern.

- Align the hand holes to allow access to the air valves.

- Slide the outer dual wheel over the inner cap nuts and
repeat the entire procedure except using the nut tight-
ening sequence in Figure 5. Tighten the outer cap nut
to 450-500 ft.-lbs.

4. Torque Nuts Properly.

- Be sure to tighten wheel nuts to the recommended nut


torque. Do not overtighten. Do not lubricate the nuts or
studs.
- After the first 50 & 250 miles of operation, recheck the
torque level and retighten nuts to the proper torque
level. When inner cap nuts are retightened, be sure to
loosen the outer cap nuts first, tighten inner cap nuts
and retighten outer cap nuts to proper torque level.
- Maintain nut torque at the recommended level through
planned, periodic checks.
ALUMINUM DISC WHEEL
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

- The procedure used to install aluminum wheels on a


vehicle are identical to those used for heavy truck steel
wheels except for the nuts used. Aluminum wheels
have a thicker disc than conventional steel wheels:
therefor, special nuts and longer studs may be
required.

T300-1 Page 6 - 15 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

Not all nuts and studs can be used with all types of
wheels. The use of improper nuts and studs can cause
nut loosening, stud failure, or premature wheel failure,
which could cause an accident or injury.

1. STUD-PILOTED MOUNTING

A. 10 Hole, 11.25 Bolt Circle DCN Mounting.

1. Front Wheels:

a. For 1.125-16 studs, standard heavy truck steel disc


wheel front or outer nuts are to be used as shown in
Figure 6. If a changeover is being made from steel
wheels, longer studs may be necessary to ensure that
the stud is at least flush or extends through the nut.

b. For 3/4-16 studs, special cap nuts with a collar must


be used (See FIgure 7).

2. Rear Dual Wheels:

a. Special inner cap nuts with a collar must be used


with aluminum wheels. (See Figure 8).

b. For aluminum wheels, the recommended stud or bolt


stand-out beyond the mounting face of the hub or out-
board drum is 1 5/16 to 1 7/16 (same as for steel
wheels). With this stand-out, the mechanical properties
of the special inner cap nut must be equivalent to SAE *These inner cap nuts are grade 5 material, all others
Grade 8. are grade 8 material. These can only be used with the 1
3/4 to 1 7/8 stand-out.
c. For vehicles now in service with long studs (1 3/4 to
1 7/8 stand-out), SAE Grade 5 inner cap nuts may be
used provided they are designed for the long stud d. The outer cap nuts used on aluminum wheels are the
length. The longer stud is generally not recommended same as shown in Figure 6, (1 1/2-16 thread).
because with steel wheels the inner cap nut will bottom
out internally on the longer stud before sufficient con- e. For best service, always run two aluminum wheels
tact is made with the wheel bolt hole chamfer. as a dual combination. If a steel inner wheel is used
with an aluminum outer wheel, a special inner cap nut
must be used. A wheel guard is recommended for use
between the two discs.

3.Tighten both inner and outer cap nuts to 450 to 500 ft.
lbs. (dry) using the sequences shown in Figures 4 & 5.

T300-1 Page 6 - 16 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

TIRES

MAINTENANCE CHECK As a part of the WEEKLY will take place as soon as driving is resumed and tire
MAINTENANCE CHECK inspect the tires and rims for failure will result.
damage. Cuts, bruises, snags, punctures, and abra-
sions should be repaired before they can cause tire fail- UNDERINFLATION Too little air pressure increases
ure. Bent, cracked, or loose rims should be repaired or deflection, causes the tread to wipe and scuff over the
replaced. road, results in extra strain on the tire, and increases
the chance for bruising.
Check tire valve condition and make sure each valve
has a cap. PROPER INFLATION Maintaining the proper air pres-
sure provides maximum road contact and results in
TIRE PRESSURES Always maintain the recom- increased tire life.
mended tire inflation pressures in all tires.
OVERINFLATION Overinflation reduces tire deflection
When driving, some increase in tire pressures can be and tire contact area, causing the tire to ride on the
expected due to heat generated by friction. Over- crown, and results in rapid wear in the center of the
speeds may also produce increased pressures. In such tread.
circumstances, NEVER BLEED THE TIRES. Instead,
slow down or stop until the tires cool. TIRE MATCHING Unmatched tires on tandem drive
units will cause tire wear and scuffing and possible
damage to the drive units. Consequently, we recom-
mend the tires be matched to within 1/8 of the same
rolling radius; 3/4 of the same rolling circumference.

Tandem units-IMPORTANT: The four largest tires


should never be installed on one driving axle or the four
The explosive energy stored in a tire and rim assembly smallest tires on the other driving axle. Such tire
under pressure makes changing truck and off-road tires mounting will cause an inter-axle fight, unusually high
hazardous. Special procedures must be followed and axle lubricant breakdown, and possible costly axle ser-
special tools must be used if tires are to be changed vice.
safely. Whenever possible, let your tire service com-
pany handle this job. If you must change a tire, follow In addition to matching individual tire rolling radius or
the step-by-step instructions detailed in a tire repair rolling circumference, we recommend matching, as
manual. Should low pressures make it necessary to nearly as possible, the total tire circumference of one
add air, never stand beside the tire. Instead, use an driving axle to the total circumference of the other driv-
extension hose long enough to permit you to stand ing axle. This will usually result in satisfactory tandem
behind the tire tread. Always use a tire cage or equiva- axle lubricant temperatures that lengthen drive unit ser-
lent protection when adding air. vice with higher tire mileage.

(Refer to page 1-4 for illustration showing proper pre-


cautions to take when filling tires.)

Inflation pressure should be checked when tires are


cool, using an accurate tire pressure gauge. Check
pressures at regular intervals.

Bleeding the air from hot tires is dangerous and should


not be attempted. While the pressure will be reduced,
an increase in temperature of the tire

T300-1 Page 6 - 17 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HOW TO MATCH TIRES - TANDEM UNITS 4.Mount the two largest tires on one side of one axle
The vehicle should be on a level floor, carrying a cor- and mount the two smallest on the opposite side of the
rectly distributed rated capacity load. Be sure all tires same axle.
are the same tire size.
5.Mount the four other tires on the other axle in the
1.Inflate all tires to the same pressure. same manner.

2.Carefully measure the rolling circumference of each TIRE SWITCHING SEQUENCE Bias ply tires should
tire with a steel tape. be cross switched at regular intervals to attain maxi-
mum tire life.
3.Mark the size on each tire with chalk and arrange
them in order of size, largest to smallest. Refer to the tire inflation chart located in the operators
cab of the carrier.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOR MOUNTING


OR DEMOUNTING RIMS AND WHEELS

DOS AND DONTS

DO DONT

1.Follow mounting and demounting procedures out- 1.Dont use mis-matched parts. Mis-matched parts are
lined in the manufacturers instruction manual or other dangerous. Make sure side ring and lock ring designa-
recognized industry instruction manual. tions match those on the base.

2.Deflate tires completely prior to demounting by 2.Do not use loads or cold inflation pressures exceed-
removing the valve core. ing rim manufacturers recommendations.

3.Replace bent, cracked, worn, corroded, or damaged 3.Dont re-inflate a tire that has been run flat or seri-
parts. ously underinflated without first demounting and
inspecting the tire and rim assembly.
4.Double check to see that removable rings are prop-
erly seated before inflating. 4.Never use tire and rim combinations that are not
approved by the Tire & Rim Association.
5.Check for excessive side ring play and ring butting.
Either one of these conditions is an indication of mis-
matched rim parts.

6.Inflate tires in a safety cage.

7.After inflating the tire, be sure that between a 1/16


minimum and a 1/4 maximum gap remains in a split
side ring or lock ring.

8. Inspect wheel nuts and rim clamps periodically for


excessive wear, corrosion, proper centering, and nut
torque

T300-1 Page 6 - 18 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ENGINE RADIATOR MAIN-


TENANCE

DAILY: SEMI ANNUALLY:


COOLANT LEVEL Check the engine radiator coolant COOLING SYSTEM Clean the cooling system every
level and add coolant if necessary. A solution of 50% 2,000 hours or 2 years whichever comes first. Use a
ethylene glycol by volume is the recommended year- radiator cleaning compound, following the instructions
round coolant. Replenish the corrosion inhibitor accord- on the container. Flush the system thoroughly and refill
ing to engine manufacturers recommendation. with an ethylene glycol solution of 50% by volume.

In warm climates a coolant based on water with corro- Refer to the topic, Corrosion Inhibitor, above, when
sion inhibitors is approved for use. Water only systems cleaning the cooling system and be certain the inhibitor
need to be treated with the proper dosage of corrosion used is compatible with the coolant.
inhibitors.
Clean any foreign matter from the radiator cooling fins
and through core cooling passages by directing com-
pressed air and flushing water over the total area of the
core in the reverse direction of normal flow.

Inadequate concentration of the coolant additive can


result in major corrosive damage to cooling system
components. Over concentration can cause formation
of gel that can cause restriction, plugging of coolant
passages, and overheating.

MONTHLY:
RADIATOR EXTERIOR Clean any foreign matter from
the radiator cooling fins and through-core cooling pas-
sages by directing compressed air and flushing water
over the entire area of the core on the reverse direction
of the normal air flow.

QUARTERLY:
CORROSION INHIBITOR FILTER Replace the cooling
system corrosion inhibitor filter every 250 hours of
operation.

Never use a chromate base corrosion inhibitor when


the coolant contains ethylene glycol. Use only non-
chromate base inhibitors. Chromate base inhibitors
reacting with ethylene glycol can produce chromium
hydroxide, commonly known as green slime. This
substance reduces the heat transfer rate and can
cause serious engine overheating.

T300-1 Page 6 - 19 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ENGINE CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT

The clutch normally requires no adjustment other than


to compensate for wear to the friction disc facings. This
adjustment is made by setting the control linkage to
provide the proper pedal lash or free travel.
Never wait for a clutch to slip before making adjust-
CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT Proper clutch adjustment is ment. It is too late then to make adjustment. Facings
attained when the pedal has approximately 1 1/2 of quickly disintegrate once they become burned through
free travel (lash). Check clutch pedal free travel by slippage, and have short life thereafter.
hand to be positive that the free travel is the result of
actual release bearing clearance and not caused by
worn linkage.

To adjust the clutch lash, disconnect external linkage to


allow for free movement of release yoke. Loosen the Excessive clutch pedal lash or free travel may prevent
locknut ring and rotate sleeve with adjuster ring to gain complete clutch disengagement, while insufficient
3/4 release travel clearance. Tighten the locknut ring clutch pedal lash or free travel will cause slippage and
against the release bearing coupler, reconnect the short clutch life.
external linkage and adjust to obtain 1/8 clearance
between the yoke fingers and the bearing pads. Verify
clutch brake engagement at bottom 1 or less of clutch
pedal travel. If improper, loosen locknut ring and adjust
release travel clearance. Verify a clutch pedal free
travel of at least 1 1/2. If less readjust external linkage
to obtain 1 1/2 pedal free travel. This will slightly
increase the 1/8 yoke finger clearance.

If excessive free play is present in the clutch pedal link-


age due to worn parts, the worn parts must be
replaced. Excessive wear of the release linkage may
give a false impression of the actual amount of release
bearing clearance.

T300-1 Page 6 - 20 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SHIFT CONTROL ADJUSTMENT

Proper adjustment of the L.R.C. is necessary for NOTE: Ideally, the shift arm should be adjusted 90 to
smooth shift linkage operation. Use the procedure the selection lever as described, but in some chassis
listed below to insure correct adjustment. The steps configurations, it may be necessary to index the shift
should be followed as listed to avoid confusion and pre- arm in the vertical position. This is done to prevent a
vent mistakes. shift lever jump out complaint. This type of adjustment
will cause an unequal amount of gear shift lever travel
MOVE THE INNER SHIFT FINGER between neutral and a forward lever position as com-
TO THE NEUTRAL POSITION pared to neutral and a rearward lever position.

Move gear shift lever forward or backward to the neu- Re-install the shift arm on the splines of the inner shift
tral position. shaft. You may have to move the shift arm 4 or 5
degrees to align the splines of the two parts. Disregard
Move the gear shift lever sideways, toward reverse, any movement of the gear shift lever at this point. You
until you feel resistance from the reverse plunger will adjust the gear shift lever later.
spring. DO NOT overcome the spring tension and shift
to reverse. The shift finger must remain in this position Tighten capscrew B
while you are making all the adjustments.
Re-connect pivot link assembly ball joint to selection
lever. Secure with castle nut and cotter pin.

Loosen jam nuts C on pivot link.

Check to be sure the inner shift finger is still in place as


described above.

Rotate pivot link until curved end of selection lever is


parallel with the shift arm as viewed from the rear.

Tighten pivot link jam nuts C

ADJUST THE SLAVE UNIT

Remove the cotter pin, castle nut, and ball joint A from
the selection lever. Do not remove the ball joint from the
pivot link.

Loosen capscrew B and remove shift arm from inner


shaft. Do not disconnect the selection lever from the
shift arm.

Turn the shift arm until it is at a right angle (90) to the


selection lever as viewed from the side.

T300-1 Page 6 - 21 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SHIFT CONTROL ADJUSTMENT

ADJUST GEAR SHIFT LEVER


NEUTRAL POSITION

Loosen both capscrews on turnbuckle D

Check to be sure inner shift finger is still in place as


described above.

Rotate turnbuckle to obtain proper forward-backward


neutral position of the gear shift lever in the cab.

Tighten one turnbuckle capscrew D

Move gear shift lever to desired left-right neutral posi-


tion.

Tighten second turnbuckle capscrew D

Check for linkage obstructions in all gear positions.

T300-1 Page 6 - 22 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ENGINE MAINTENANCE

Engine productivity, longevity, and low-cost perfor-


mance depend on a regular program of periodic main-
tenance. The materials presented here are listed in
accordance with the MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST in
Section 4. Consideration of severe working conditions NEVER OPERATE THE ENGINE WHEN THE OIL
may dictate a revision in scheduling of the periodic LEVEL IS ABOVE THE FULL MARK OR BELOW THE
checks. LOW MARK.

As a part of each periodic check, refer to the engine FUEL FILTERS No drain cocks are provided on the
manufacturers manual for engine maintenance spin-on filters. Residue may be removed by turning off
requirements. When servicing the engine, the engine the filter and inverting it. Refill the filter with clean fuel
manufacturers recommendations take precedence oil before reinstalling or replacing with a new one.
over those in this manual, should any discrepancy be
noted. AIR CLEANER Inspect the air cleaner and it connec-
tions for leaks, dents, and damage.
DAILY:
FUEL LEVEL The fuel tank and filler pipe are located A clogged air filter restricts engine power output. Check
on the left side of the machine. The filler cap is found to see that the vacuator valve is working and is not
under an access hole on the edge of the lefthand deck- inverted, damaged, or plugged. Should dust accumu-
plate. Keep the tank as full as possible to minimize con- late in the dust cup, remove and empty it.
densation. This is extremely important in cold weather.
Should engine power output decline, check restriction
ENGINE OIL LEVEL The engine oil level is checked of the air cleaner at the restriction tap provided in the air
with the dipstick located on the right side of the engine. cleaner. Replace or clean the element only when the
Do not check the oil level while the engine is running restriction has reached the maximum allowed by the
nor immediately after stopping the engine. For accurate engine manufacturer.
readings, allow approximately 15 minutes for the oil to
drain into the sump before checking. Keep the oil level Maximum allowable restriction (in inches of water) at
as close to the full mark as possible. Do not overfill. maximum governed rpm is 25 in. (635 mm) H2O for all
engine options.

When the restriction exceeds the maximum allowable,


remove the primary element and clean or replace it with
a new element. Before installing a new element, inspect
the element and gasket for damage. If the element is to
be serviced for immediate re-use, reinstall the outer
cover to protect the induction system while cleaning
element and wing nut. Reinstall the dust cup, making
certain it seals 360 around the air cleaner body.

Replace the primary element after 6 cleanings or annu-


ally, whichever occurs first.

T300-1 Page 6 - 23 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ENGINE MAINTENANCE

Do not remove the plastic fin assembly; backflowing ENGINE BELTS Check all engine belts for condition
with compressed air or washing will remove dust from and proper tension. Consult the engine manufacturers
beneath the fin assembly. manual for the recommended belt tension and tension-
ing procedures.
The primary element mat be cleaned by washing or
with compressed air. Compressed air is recommended 400 HOURS:
when the element will be re-used immediately. A FUEL FILTER ELEMENTS Remove the fuel filter cas-
washed element must be dried before re-use. However, ings and replace the filter elements every 400 hours or
washing produces better results and must be used when there is evidence of plugging.
when exhaust soot has lodged in the fine pores of the
filter media. Clean via one of the following procedures: QUARTERLY:
FUEL TANK Drain accumulated water and sediment
Washing - use Donaldson D-1400 detergent which con- from the fuel tank by removing the drain plug and allow-
tains a special additive for removing soot and carbon. ing the tank to drain until all water is removed and the
fuel flowing from the tank is free of sediment.
1. Soak the element for 15 minutes or more in a deter-
gent-water solution (see carton for instructions). If a large amount of sediment has accumulated, drain
the tank completely and flush liberally with kerosene
2. Rinse until water is clear (maximum water pressure until all the sediment has been removed. Allow the tank
40 psi). to drain completely before refilling with fuel.

SEMI ANNUALLY:
3. Air-dry or use warm flowing air (maximum 160F).
CRANKCASE BREATHER Service the crankcase
Never use compressed air or light bulbs.
breather following the procedures given in the manu-
facturers manual.
Compressed air - Direct air through the element in the
direction opposite to normal air flow through the ele-
ment. Move nozzle up and down while rotating the ele-
ment. Keep the nozzle at least one inch from the
pleated paper. To prevent damage to the element, max-
imum air pressure may not exceed 100 psi.

Inspection - Place a bright light inside the element and


rotate slowly. If any rupture, holes or damaged gaskets
are detected, replace the element.

MONTHLY:
ENGINE OIL Change the engine oil and oil filter. Refer
to engine manufacturers manual for the type and
weight of oil recommended for the expected ambient
temperatures.

T300-1 Page 6 - 24 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

TRANSMISSION

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION (CEEMAT) 2. Draining Oil

LUBRICATION Drain transmission while oil is at ambient temperature


(65F + 20). To drain oil, remove the main case drain
Proper lubrication procedures are the key to a good plug and the converter housing oil pan drain plug.
Clean the drain plugs and flush the cooler circuit before
all-around maintenance program. If the oil is not doing
reinstalling.
its job, or if the oil level is ignored, all the maintenance
procedures in the world are not going to keep the trans- A complete hydraulic circuit flush should be completed
mission running or assure long transmission life. Eaton when:
Fuller Transmissions are designed so that the internal
parts operate in an oil bath circulated by the motion of - changing oil types and brands
the gears and shafts. Thus, all parts are amply lubri- - changing oil viscosity grades from or to Arctic oil.
cated if these procedures are closely followed: - a catastrophic failure has occurred.

1. Maintain oil level. Inspect regularly. 3. Refilling

2. Change oil and filters regularly. The operational level should always be within the limit
marks on the dipstick. The exact amount of oil depends
Use the correct grade and type of oil. on the transmission inclination and model. Insufficient
Buy oil from a reputable dealer. oil damages the pump and other components, and can
affect the function and reduce the life of the transmis-
Additives and friction modifiers are not recommended sion.
for use in Eaton Fuller Transmissions.
DO NOT OVERFILL! This causes overheating and loss
of fuel economy. When adding oil, types and brands of
1. Maintain Proper Oil Level oil should not be mixed because of possible incompati-
bility. When changing oil viscosity to Arctic oil or alter-
nate viscosity ranges, follow the recommended
transmission oil flush procedure. Use clean oil and
clean containers when filling transmission. Containers
that have been used for anti-freeze or water should not
be used for transmission oil.

1. Remove the dipstick and slowly add seven (7) gal-


lons of the prescribed oil through the fill tube.

Different Views of the Oil Dipstick 2. Place the transmission in the neutral position and
apply the parking brakes. Start the engine and let it
Make sure oil is within dipstick marks for the corre- idle for 5 minutes, (this allows oil to fill the converter,
sponding oil temperature. Oil should be checked at idle
main case, and cooling system), add oil as needed
speed in the neutral position using the corresponding
to obtain a level at the proper temperature range,
temperature band. Cold checks can be performed
when the oil temperature is 60-120F. The oil level (cold band under 120F, hot band between 180 and
should be within the dipstick "cold" band. Additional 220F). Total oil quantity needed at this time should
checks can be made with the transmission at operating be approximately 10 gallons this varies depending
temperature by using the "hot" band on the opposite on the cooling system.
side of the dipstick. The "hot" band temperature range
is 180-220F.

T300-1 Page 6 - 25 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

TRANSMISSION

3. Increase the engine idle slowly to 1500 RPM for two


(2) minutes. Now recheck the oil level at normal idle
speed in neutral, again adding oil to obtain a level at
the proper temperature range (cold band under
100F, hot band between 180 and 220F).

4. Replace the dipstick and tighten securely.

4. Flush Procedure
5. Maintenance Interval Chart
1. Disconnect the transmission cooler supply line
between the transmission outlet and the oil cooler,
(not between the cooler and the transmission oil
pan).

2. With clean dry air from a hose and nozzle (20 psi),
use a rubber stopper or clean rag to seal the air hose
to the converter outlet hose.

3. Apply air to the converter outlet for approximately 2


minutes to backflush oil into the transmission oil pan.

4. Connect the hose between the transmission and


cooler. Tighten to vehicle manufacturers specifica-
tions.

5. Install the transmission converter housing oil pan


drain plug, tighten to 14-20 Lb, ft of torque.
6. Recommended Lubricant Chart
6. Install the transmission main case drain plug (rear
bottom), tighten I to 45-50 Lb, ft of torque.

7. Remove the transmission dipstick and slowly pour 7


gallons of the appropriate oil into the transmission.

8. Apply the vehicle parking brakes and place the


transmission lever in neutral. Start the engine and let
it idle for 5 minutes. Check the dipstick periodically
while the engine is idling, adding oil as needed to
obtain a level that is in the Cold Band on the dipstick.
Total quantity added at this time should be approxi-
mately 10 gallons.

9. With the transmission still in neutral, increase the


engine idle speed t 1500 rpm and retain at this
speed for 5 minutes. Now recheck the oil level at
normal engine idle speed in neutral, again adding oil
as requite on the dipstick. Total oil quantity added at
this time should be 11 gallons.

T300-1 Page 6 - 26 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

TRANSMISSION

Operating Temperatures with Oil Coolers 3. Dipstick


Remove dipstick and check level of lubricant at
An external oil cooler is required on the automatic specified intervals. Check oil in neutral at engine
transmission in order to maintain proper operating tem- idle.
peratures*. Transmission oil temperature is sensed as 4. Drain Plugs
~from the torque converter outlet port before the oil Tighten the drain plugs securely. Tighten the main
enters the cooler. case drain plug to 45-50 Lbf.ft of torque. Tighten oil
Normal operating temperature, when sensed from the pan plugs to 14-20 Lbf.ft of torque.
torque converter outlet port, should be below 250F; 5. Capscrews and Gaskets
however, intermittent operating temperatures to 300F Check all capscrews, especially those on PTO cov-
do not harm the transmission. ers and rear bearing covers for looseness which
On vehicles equipped with two transmission oil temper- would cause oil leakage.
ature gauges, one gauge (required) senses torque con- Check PTO opening, oil sump/strainer, hose fit-
verter oil as mentioned above, while the other gauge tings, and rear bearing covers for oil leakage due to
(optional) reads oil temperature from the transmission faulty gaskets.
sump. The sump temperature represents oil that has
Checks with Drive Line Propped
circulated through the cooler. This temperature is nor-
mally below 225F; however, intermittent sump temper-
6. Universal Joint Companion Flange or Yoke Nut
atures to 250F do not harm the transmission.
Check for tightness. Tighten to recommended
When the average temperature of the transmission oil
torque.
exceeds the temperature limits as stated above, more
frequent oil changes may be needed.
The following conditions in any combination can cause 7. Output Shaft
the recommended transmission oil temperatures to be Pry upward against output shaft to check radial
exceeded: (1 ) operating the transmission in a "stall" clearance in mainshaft rear bearing.
condition; i.e., extended operation while in gear with the
vehicle stopped or slowly moving, (2) high density of Checks with Universal Joint Companion Flange or Yoke
starts and stops at slow operating speed, (3) minimal Removed
cooler capacity and/or restricted air flow to the trans-
8. Splines on Output Shaft
mission oil cooler, (4) exhaust system too close to the
Check for wear from movement and chucking
transmission, (5) improper oil level/incorrect oil.
action of the universal joint companion flange or
yoke.
Transmission Inspection
9. Mainshaft Rear Bearing Cover
Checks Before Transmission Removal
Check oil seal for wear.
1. Air System and Connections
Annually replace the filter/regulator element. If
excessive contamination is present, service vehicle
air/dryer system.
2. Lubricant and Filter
Change at specified service intervals. Use only the
types and grades as recommended. See LUBRI-
CANTS. Check lubrication lines and cooling circuit
for leaks.

T300-1 Page 6 - 27 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

PROPELLER SHAFT &


UNIVERSAL JOINTS

The drive train on this machine incorporates three drive the shaft to fall onto or rest on the hydraulic connec-
shafts and five universal joints: tions on the outrigger solenoid valve. If the second
shaft has been removed, remove the capscrews, lock
The front shaft extends from the transmission to a point plates, and bearing caps from the transmission end
just above and aft of the forward outrigger box. The yoke. If the second shaft is in place, remove these
shaft runs in a Hanger bearing at this point. same components from the front end yoke of the sec-
ond shaft also. Remove the front shaft with journal
The second shaft couples with the front shaft and cross(es) and remaining bearings as a unit.
extends rearward to the intermediate axle.
SLIP JOINT REMOVAL Before removing the slip joint,
The third shaft couples the two axles of the rear bogie, be certain there are arrow marks stamped on the shaft
transmitting drive from the forward driving axle to the and sleeve yoke. If the arrow marks are not readily
rear axle. seen, mark both members so that, when reassembling,
these marks can be placed in the same relative posi-
End yokes are used at all shaft ends and all couplings tion. This is extremely important because the sleeve
use bearing-cap type cross journal retainers. yoke lugs must be in the same place as the stub ball
yokes to prevent excessive vibration in operation.

DRIVE SHAFT REMOVAL Remove the drive shafts by


the following procedures:
Remove the slip joint by unscrewing the dust cap from
the sleeve yoke and sliding the joint off the drive shaft.
THIRD SHAFT (Inter-axle Shaft) - Remove the cap-
screws, lock plates, and bearing caps from the interme-
UNIVERSAL JOINT DISASSEMBLY Disassemble the
diate and rear axle end yokes. Remove the shaft with
universal joints by the following procedure:
journal crosses and remaining bearings as a unit. Axle
end yokes remain on the vehicle.
1. Bend the lock plates down with a screwdriver and
remove the capscrews.
SECOND SHAFT - Remove the capscrews and bear-
ing caps from the intermediate axle end yoke. Remove
2. Using a large pair of channel lock pliers to grip
capscrews, lock plates, and bearing caps from rear end
retaining cap edges, turn retaining cap and bearing
yoke of front shaft. Remove the second shaft with jour-
assembly while at the same time lifting the assem-
nal crosses and remaining bearings as a unit. Interme-
bly from the journal trunnion and out of the yoke
diate axle end yoke remains on machine.
hole.
FRONT - Prop up the rear of the shaft and remove the
3. Turn the yoke over and tap the exposed end of the
capscrew from hanger bearing; do not allow
journal cross until the opposite needle bearing is
free.

T300-1 Page 6 - 28 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

PROPELLER SHAFT &


UNIVERSAL JOINTS

UNIVERSAL JOINT DISASSEMBLY (Continued) LOCK STRAP AND CAPSCREWS - Assemble and
bend lugs of lockstrap up against the flat of capscrews.
If joint appears to bind, tap lugs lightly to relieve any
pressure on journal end bearings.

TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO THE BEARING, USE A DRIVE SHAFT INSTALLATION The installation of the
SOFT ROUND DRIFT WITH FLAT FACE AND DIAME- drive shaft into the carrier does not present any
TER ABOUT 1/32 SMALLER THAN YOKE HOLE. unusual mechanical difficulties. Before actual installa-
tion, the drive shaft should be checked for the following
items:

1. No damage or dents on drive shaft tubing which


could cause unbalance. If the dents are severe
enough, they can weaken the tube and a failure
might occur under torque load.

2. Splines should slide freely with slight drag from


spline seal.

3. Bearings should flex and be free from excessive


bind. A slight drag is the most desirable condition
on a new universal joint. This drag is from the ear-
ing seals. When rotating, yoke lug deflections
cause some addititonal clearance. Excessive
4. Remove the journal cross by sliding it to one side looseness is not desirable due to the resulting
of the yoke and tilting it over the top of the yoke unbalance.
lug.
4. Mounting flanges and pilots should be free from
UNIVERSAL JOINT ASSEMBLY Before reassembly, burrs, paint, and foreign substances which would
be sure to clean and inspect all parts. If necessary, not allow proper seating at assembly.
replace the four journal retainer seals. Assemble the
universal joint by means of the following procedures:

JOURNAL CROSS - With the relief valve facing the


flange yoke, insert one trunnion of the journal cross
into the bearing hole in the yoke lug from the inside
(between the lugs) and tilt until the trunnion of the jour-
nal cross will clear hole in opposite yoke lug.

NEEDLE BEARING AND


RETAINING CAP ASSEMBLY - Insert from outside of
yoke. Press into place with an arbor press or tap with a
soft round drift. Be careful not to mar or dent any sur-
faces.

T300-1 Page 6 - 29 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

PROPELLER SHAFT &


UNIVERSAL JOINTS

SLIP JOINT ASSEMBLY Lubricate the splines thor- UNIVERSAL JOINT PHASING When yokes are
oughly and assemble on the shaft. BE SURE that the assembled to their shafts in the same plane, they are in
arrows on the shaft and slip joint are in line. The sleeve phase. To obtain vibration-free operation, check the fol-
yoke must be in the same plane as the stub ball yoke lowing:
lugs to prevent excessive vibration.
1. The forward and second shafts, between the trans-
The cork washer should be replaced if necessary mission and the intermediate axle, must be assem-
before assembling with the dust cap and steel washer bled In Phase.
on the sleeve yoke.
2. The inter-axle drive shaft yokes, at the third shaft,
must be assembled In Phase.

3. When drive shafts are running at parallel angles


throughout the drive line system yokes and flanges
must be held parallel to within 1 of each other.

NOTE: In bearing cap construction joints, be sure to


torque the capscrews to 100 ft. lbs.

T300-1 Page 6 - 30 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

AIR SYSTEM SCHEMATIC

MACHINE
REAR

MACHINE
FRONT

T300-1 Page 6 - 31 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

AIR SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

Inadequate delivery pressure or defective component


operations can generally be traced to leakage, blocked
lines, or the build up of moisture and sediment in the
system. A regular program of periodic maintenance is
an essential part of air system operation. The materials
presented here are listed in accordance with the MAIN-
TENANCE CHECK LIST in Section 4. Consideration of
severe working conditions may dictate a revision in
scheduling periodic checks.

DAILY:
AIR TANKS Open the air tank drain cocks at least once
daily to blow out moisture and accumulated sediment.
There are five (5) tanks in the air system, all having
drain cocks on the bottom of the tank. The accessory
tank is located at the front of the machine, behind the
front outrigger. The wet tank is located just inside of the
fuel tank with the rear tank immediately behind it. The
front tank is located just inside of the hydraulic tank.
The park brake tank is located at the rear of the
machine in the center just ahead of the rear outriggers.

WEEKLY:
AIR SYSTEM SAFETY VALVE Manually actuate the
air system safety valve by pulling out the system. This
will ensure that the valve is not sticking. If the valve
cannot be actuated in this manner, it should be repaired
or replaced. The valve is located on the wet tank.

T300-1 Page 6 - 32 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

STEERING AND POWER


STEERING

STEERING STOP ADJUSTMENT An initial stopscrew POWER STEERING MAINTENANCE CHECK


adjustment is made on all steering axles to obtain max- On a SEMI-ANNUAL basis, remove the reservoir cover
imum turning angle. However, because a power steer- and filter element. Clean the inside of the reservoir with
ing unit has been added, the stop screw should be re- a lint-free cloth. Install a new filter element, refill with oil
examined to assure that the adjustment is such that the and replace the cover.
power steering unit will not override the axle stop.
When filling, start the engine. With the engine running,
To prevent overriding, adjust power steering systems turn the steering wheel from left to right and continue
and stopscrews so that the power is cut-off ahead of filling until proper level is maintained. Refer to Section
the axle stop. 4 for other lubrication recommendations.

a. Adjust the axle steering stops to contact when the


maximum turning angle of the specific axle is
reached, and lock with jam nut.

b. Adjust the power steering unit to stop approxi-


mately 1/16 to 1/8 before axle steering stops con-
tact (maximum turning angle).

The adjustment of both axle steering stops and power


steering unit should be periodically checked and cor-
rected if necessary.

T300-1 Page 6 - 33 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SWING BEARING BOLTING PROCEDURE

MAINTENANCE CHECK It is very important to perform SWING BEARING TORQUE PROCEDURE A number
periodic swing bearing bolt checks. The bolts MUST BE of causes can reduce tension in the bolts when torqu-
KEPT TORQUE TIGHTENED to a rating of 181 ft. lbs. ing and after use. These include rust on the threads,
dry, 137 ft. lbs. wet, using a 4 to 1 torque multiplier, or damaged or rough threads on bolts or nuts, shanks of
725 ft. lbs. dry, 550 ft. lbs. wet, without the torque multi- bolts which hang up on holes, etc. All of these causes
plier. After the first day, and again after the initial 40 have a tendency to absorb the torque when bolts are
hours of machine operation, check and tighten the being tightened.
bolts. If additional torque is required after the first 8 or
40 hours, then recheck each 8 or 40 hours until all bolts All the fasteners inside the upperstructure and the four
are found properly torqued. Thereafter, checks should outside must be checked. This includes a total of sixty-
be performed quarterly. four (64) capscrews to be checked. If ANY are found to
have loosened, ALL sixty-four (64) must be retorqued.
Bolt torques are checked by applying the stated torque
while observing to determine if the bolt breaks loose. Remember, it is important to perform periodic checks of
If it is tightened (turned) by this procedure then it has the swing bearing bolts. The bolt MUST BE KEPT
loosened and all (26) bolts must be retorqued. Refer to TORQUE TIGHTENED.
the sequence illustrated below.

RING GEAR BOLTING SEQUENCE The following equipment is required for checking swing
bearing bolt torque:

DESCRIPTION

(1) 3/4 drive ratchet head torque wrench with 200 lb.
capacity
(1) 16 extension - 3/4 drive.
(1) 8 extension - 3/4 drive.
(1) 7/8 12 pt. socket - 3/4 drive.
(1) special wrench pn. 706F8697.
(1) 4 to 1 torque multiplier.

T300-1 Page 6 - 34 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

TORQUE WRENCH EXTENSIONS

In some applications, a standard torque wrench and When using an extension, it must be remembered that
socket cannot be fitted to the bolt(s) to be tightened the wrench torque (the actual torque reading or setting
because of restricted access. In other instances, the of the wrench) and the wrench force (the force applied
torque value specified cannot be obtained because suf- to the wrench) must be adjusted to compensate for the
ficient force cannot be applied to the standard length added length and produce the desired bolt torque.
wrench. Both of these problems may be solved ny the
use of appropriate torque wrench extensions - either Refer to the illustration and formula below when calcu-
commercially made or fabricated by the user. lating the proper adjusted values for wrench torque,
wrench force, and bolt torque.

NOTE: Torque wrench setting at length B would be FORMULA


same as torque specified for capscrews not
requiring use of adapter. Torque wrench (600 ft. lb.) times (B)
setting (TWS) = (B) plus (A)

EXAMPLE
(Assuming B = 43)
(Assuming A = 10.25)

TWS = (600 ft.lb.) X 43 =


43 + 10.25

25.800
=
53.25

485 ft. lb.

T300-1 Page 6 - 35 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SWING REDUCER

MAINTENANCE CHECK On a WEEKLY basis, check REASSEMBLY


the swing reducer oil level. See section 4 for the type of
oil recommended. After shimming as required, reassemble the unit by
reversing the steps in the disassembly sequence.
DISASSEMBLY
Refer to Section 4 for quantity and type of lubricant.
1. Remove the upper cover along with the brakes and
motor. Examine the ring gear bolted to the cover BRAKE
and the seal located in brake housing.
Remove the motor and upper cover of brake housing to
2. Lift out the upper planet carrier and examine gears, inspect or replace brake discs.
roller bearings, and bronze thrust bushings for
wear. Replace if necessary.

3. Replace the thrust bushing located between the


planet carriers if necessary.

4. Examine lower planet carrier gears, roller bearings,


and bronze thrust bushings for wear. Replace if
necessary.

5. Examine thrust bushings located between input


gear and lower planet drive gear. Replace if neces-
sary.

6. The lower planet carrier is splines to the output


shaft. Remove the cap and shims to disassemble
the carrier, shaft, and lower case. Place shims
aside for use in reassembly. Examine the roller
bearings and lower seal. Replace if necessary.

7. The only adjustment necessary is to shim below


the shaft retainer cap for proper bearing adjust-
ment. Use the original shims (see step 6)

T300-1 Page 6 - 36 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

MAINTENANCE CHECKS A regular program of peri- HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS Check the cylinder mount-
odic maintenance is an essential part of continued ing brackets, bushings, and pins for wear, alignment,
hydraulic system operation. Allowing accumulations of tightness, and damage. If misalignment or excessive
moisture and sediment to build up in the system will play or wear are detected, replace the defective pin or
damage hydraulic valves, pumps, and motors. The bushing. Check the rod eye welds for cracks and
presence of leaking connections or damaged compo- breaks and have damaged welds repaired.
nents effect the efficiency of operation and are danger-
ous. The materials presented here are listed in HYDRAULIC COMPONENTS Check the hydraulic
accordance with the MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST in valves, motors, pumps, hoses, tubes, and connections
Section 4. Consideration of severe working conditions for excess dirt, oil, and grease. Clean these items if
may dictate a revision in scheduling periodic checks. necessary and check for leaks and damage. Tighten
leaky connections and repair any damaged compo-
DAILY: nents.
HYDRAULIC FLUID LEVEL The hydraulic reservoir,
fluid level indicators, and filler cap are on the right side WEEKLY:
of the machine. RETURN LINE FILTER Change the hydraulic reservoir
return line filters after the first 40 hours of the break-in
period; thereafter, follow the quarterly check recom-
mendation.

MONTHLY:
HYDRAULIC RESERVOIR Drain any accumulated
moisture from the hydraulic reservoir by parking the
machine on a slight incline and removing the plug in
the bottom of the reservoir.

HYDRAULIC OIL Visually check the condition of the


hydraulic oil once each month. Thickening of the oil or
a change in its appearance, such as darkening, may
serve as a rough indicator of when an oil change is
needed. Periodic testing of the oil is the safest, most
accurate method of determining the condition of the oil.
An oil supplier can be consulted for assistance in test-
ing the oil.

Change the oil whenever testing and/or inspection


reveals the oil to be unsuitable for safe and efficient
Retract all cylinders to return the maximum amount of
operation.
oil to the reservoir and note the oil level in the indicator
tube. The fluid level should be kept between the indica-
tor marks. The top mark indicates system capacity with
all cylinders retracted. Reservoir capacity is 91 gallons.
Total system capacity varies with equipment.

Do not overfill.

Refer to Section 4 for hydraulic oils meeting the manu-


facturers specifications. Do not use oils which have
detergent additives.

T300-1 Page 6 - 37 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

QUARTERLY: 1000 HOURS:


HYDRAULIC FILTER Remove and replace the hydrau- HYDRAULIC RESERVOIR Drain and clean the
lic reservoir return line filters. Access is gained by hydraulic reservoir. Change the hydraulic oil.
removing the cover plate on the right-hand deck plate.
A change interval cannot be established which would
When replacing the filters, clean the spring and bypass apply to all oils and all operating conditions of tempera-
valves. Inspect the O ring for damage and replace if ture and cleanliness. However, a reputable brand of
necessary. turbine grade oil can be expected to deliver 1000 hours
of service under average operating conditions.
Although conditions may necessitate shorter change
intervals, do not use hydraulic oil for more than 1000
hours, unless oil analysis is used.

Whenever a visual inspection, chemical test, or light


test indicates that an oil change is necessary, proceed
as follows:

1. Warm the oil prior to draining but avoid draining


immediately after prolonged continuous use to
reduce the danger of being burned by hot oil.

2. Retract all cylinders to return the maximum amount


of oil to the reservoir. Loosen the top covers and
remove the drain plug at the bottom of the reser-
voir. Allow sufficient time for the reservoir to drain
thoroughly.
Before discarding the old filter element, examine the
type of material trapped in it. This may indicate which, if 3. Remove the return filters, clean spring, and bypass
any, hydraulic components are deteriorating. valves and inspect cover O ring for damage and
deterioration. Replace O ring if necessary.
SEMIANNUALLY:
SUCTION FILTER Remove and clean the hydraulic
reservoir intake suction filter. This permanent screen- 4. Remove and clean the intake suction filter. This
type filter is located inside the reservoir on the intake to permanent screen-type filter is located inside the
the pump manifold. Access to the filter is accomplished reservoir on the intake to the pump manifold.
by removing the cover with filler neck and filter holding Access to this filter is gained by removing the cover
device from the top of the reservoir. with the filter holding device from the top of the res-
ervoir. Remove the O ring from the filter and
Remove the O ring from the adapter and check it for inspect the O ring for damage and deterioration. If
damage or deterioration. If the ring is at all damaged, it is damaged or deteriorated at all, replace the O
replace it. ring. Clean the filter by immersing it in a non-caus-
tic cleaning solvent. Rub the screen with a soft
Clean the filter by immersing it a non-caustic cleaning
brush to dislodge accumulated foreign matter.
solvent. Rub the scree surface with a soft brush to dis-
lodge accumulated foreign matter. Reinstall filter, filter
hold-down device, and cover.

T300-1 Page 6 - 38 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

KEEP THE COVER PLATES ON THE RESERVOIR


TO PREVENT ANY CONTAMINANTS FROM ENTER-
ING.

(Continued from previous page).

5. Clean the reservoir by either steam cleaning or


flushing with diesel fuel.

If steam is used, steam clean the reservoir thoroughly


and allow it to drain and dry completely.

If diesel fuel is used to clean the reservoir, replace the


drain plug and admit about ten gallons of fuel to the res-
ervoir, preferably under pressure. Allow the fuel to
remain in the reservoir long enough to thoroughly clean
it. The suction filter may be conveniently cleaned at this
time. Remove the drain plug, drain out the fuel and dry
out the reservoir.

6. Replace the suction screen and reinstall the cover


and filter hold down device.

7. Install a new return line filter. Reinstall the spring,


bypass filter and cover.

8. Refill the system with new hydraulic oil as recom-


mended in Section 4.

T300-1 Page 6 - 39 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

PUMPS

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS This machine is equipped


with a series P365 tandem pump to which is piggy-
backed a Series P330 single pump. Both pumps are
gear-type and use similar repair procedures.

For P330 only - plug 5 required in position A and posi-


tion B.

For P365: Plug in position B gives clockwise rotation.


Plug in position A gives counter-clockwise rotation.

START-UP PROCEDURE Before installing a new or


rebuilt pump or motor, back off the main relief valve
until the spring tension on the adjusting screw is
In the event of pump failure, we strongly recommend relieved. This will avoid the possibility of immediate
that you contact your local distributor. However, should damage to the replacement unit in the event that the
you decide to facilitate the repair of these units - CON- relief valve setting had been increased beyond the rec-
SULT THE MANUFACTURERS REPAIR MANUAL - ommended operating pressure prior to removing the
read all of the steps used in disassembly and all of the old unit.
steps used in building up the unit. It is important to air-
blast all parts and wipe them with a clean, lintless cloth Before connecting any lines to the pump or motor, fill all
before assembly. ports with clean oil to provide internal lubrication. This
is particularly important where the unit is located above
Dirt is the enemy of any hydraulic system. The first the oil reservoir.
requirement of good maintenance of hydraulic equip-
ment is cleanliness. MAKE SURE YOU DISASSEM- After connecting the lines and mounting the replace-
BLE AND ASSEMBLE YOUR HYDRAULIC ment unit, operate the pump or motor at least two min-
EQUIPMENT IN A CLEAN AREA. utes at zero pressure at lowest R.P.M. During this
break-in period, the unit should run free and not
USE CAUTION IN GRIPPING ALL PARTS IN THE develop an excessive amount of heat. If the unit oper-
VISE TO AVOID DAMAGING MACHINED SURFACES. ates properly, speed and pressure can then be
increased to normal operating settings.
A pump must be driven in the direction of rotation for
which it was built; otherwise, pressure will blow the Reset the main relief valve to its proper setting while
shaft seal. Check the plug positions below for proper the pump is running at maximum operating engine
direction of rotation. (motor) speed for the vehicle.

T300-1 Page 6 - 40 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

PUMPS

TEST PROCEDURE Be sure there is an adequate sup- Many repairmen measure the output at normal operat-
ply of oil for the pump, at least one gallon of oil for each ing speed and at zero pressure, then again at 1000 psi
GPM of pump capacity. (or the operating pressure of the equipment) and allow
a volume decrease approximating the listing below. It is
If one section of a tandem pump is being tested, make a suggested reference only which makes allowance for
sure that all other sections not being tested are ade- re-used parts.
quately supplied with oil. If any of the other sections run
dry, or if plugs are left in ports, serious and permanent
damage will result. GPM DELIVERY
at 1800 rpm

The oil should be a good quality hydraulic oil rated at


150 SSU at 100F, with the oil temperature held at GPM DROP OFF AT

120F plus or minus 5F. 100 psi 1000 psi/70 bar 2000 psi/140 bar 3000 psi/210 bar
10-30 1 1/2 - 3 2 - 3 1/2 2 1/2 - 4
30-50 2-3 2 1/2 -4 3 -4 1/2
The feed line must be of adequate size with no more 50-70 2 1/2 - 3 1/2 3-5 3 1/2 - 5 1/2
than 5 mercury vacuum adjacent to the pump inlet. As
a rule, the feed line must provide a feed flow velocity Be sure to run the pump in the direction for which it was
not in excess of 8 feet per second. designed and built. Driving pump in the wrong direction
will build up pressure behind shaft seal, damaging it
Hot oil must not be fed into a cold pump. It may seize. and necessitating replacement.
Jogging may prevent seizure.
Since it is rarely feasible to test motors on dynamome-
Operate the pump at least two minutes at zero pressure ters, the practical procedure is to test them as pumps,
and at moderate speed (not over 1500 rpm). running complete testing procedures in each direction.
If pump becomes hot to touch, it is binding and may After completing testing procedures, pump is ready for
seize. This doesnt happen very often, but if it does, installation and immediate duty operation on equip-
pump will have to be disassembled and rebuilt, with ment. Again, it must be remembered that to prevent
extra care taken to remove burrs and to assure free- seizure, hot oil must not be fed into a cold pump.
dom from binding.

Gradually increase pressure on pump, intermittently,


until the desired test pressure has been reached. This
should take about five minutes.

Delivery should run close to rated catalog performance


figures which are averaged from testing several pumps.
SOmething like a 5% lower reading may be used as a
rated minimum if new or relatively new parts have been
used. When rebuilding the pump with parts from the USE OF IMPROPER TOOLS IN SERVICING THESE
original pump, which, while worn, appear satisfactory PUMPS MAY RESULT IN DAMAGE TO PUMP COM-
for re-use, a 10% or 15% lower reading may be permit- PONENTS.
ted, depending on the performance expected from the
equipment. Ones own experience will prove the best
guide here.

T300-1 Page 6 - 41 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

VALVE ADJUSTMENTS

Setting hydraulic pressure is an extremely complex and readings will result.


intricate operation and should be performed only after
satisfying the following conditions: MAINTENANCE CHECKS All relief valve maintenance
checks are conducted on a SEMIANNUAL BASIS.
1. Warm the hydraulic oil to 130 F in normal condi- Check the relief valves and make the necessary adjust-
tons.NOTE: If the normal hydraulic reservoir oper- ments by the following procedures.
ating temperature is substantially above or below
130 F, use that value instead. The relief valves used on this hydraulic crane have
screw-type adjustment. If it is determined that a valve is
2. Be sure the correct engine speed is used, as the out of adjustment, follow this general adjustment proce-
relief valve setting will vary with the flow rate. dure. Install a good quality 5000 psi gauge in the desig-
nated test port locations and proceed with pressure
check and adjustment as follows.
3. Be certain to calibrate the pressure gauge used.
Gauge calibration can be lost if the gauge is sub-
jected to rapidly pulsating pressure for a few sec-
onds. The gauge must have a proper snubber to
read center of pump pressure ripple or erroneous

T300-1 Page 6 - 42 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

VALVE ADJUSTMENTS

adjusting screw in to increase pressure or backing it off


to lower pressure. Retighten the jam nut when the
desired pressure is obtained.
THIS MACHINE USES A PRESSURIZED HYDRAULIC
Set extend/retract by the following procedure:
RESERVOIR. THE PRESSURE MUST BE RELEASED
BEFORE ANY HYDRAULIC LINE OR CONNECTION
First, retract the boom completely and continue to
IS OPENED.
retract over relief with the engine running at full gov-
Failure to do so will result in substantial loss of oil and
erned rpm. Initially, set the retract port relief valve
may cause personal injury. The pressure is relieved by
(located on spring cap end of telescope section) to
turning the reservoir cap counterclockwise to the first
obtain a reading of 3500 psi. Then turn it an additional
stop. DO NOT turn the cap beyond the first stop until all
1/2 turn clockwise.
pressure has been released. This will cause the cap to
be blown off the reservoir with sufficient force to cause
MAIN WINCH RELIEF Check the winch relief setting
personal injury. DO NOT place any portion of your body
using the following procedure:
above the reservoir cap while relieving pressure or
removing cap.
1. Attach a pressure gauge to the test port on the
mid-section inlet port.
BOOM HOIST & MAIN RELIEFS Check the boom
relief settings as follows:
2. Disconnect and plug the brake line at the piston
1. Operate the boom over relief to warm the oil if nec- housing on the winch.
essary.
3. Restart the engine and run at high idle speed.
2. Attach a calibrated pressure gauge to test port on
the inlet pressure port at the valve bank. 4. Winch and hold the lever in the raise position
while obtaining a reading. The proper setting is
3. Lower the boom completely and continue to boom 3500 psi at idle. The winch relief is located on the
down with the engine running at full governed rpm. mid inlet section of the valve bank. It is adjusted in
The relief setting should b 3500 psi. If necessary, the same manner as the boom relief.
adjust relief valve.
AUXILIARY WINCH RELIEF Check the pressure using
BOOM RELIEF ADJUSTMENTS Adjust the boom the following procedure. The auxiliary winch pressure
hoist, retract, and telescope reliefs using the following is controlled with a relief valve in the auxiliary winch
procedures. valve.

Adjust the boom hoist relief by loosening jam lock nut 1. Attach a pressure gauge to the main winch test
on relief valve. Adjust valve with adjusting screw while port which is also used to check auxiliary winch
booming up or down over relief withe engine at maxi- pressure.
mum governed rpm. Screw in to increase pressure set-
ting; out to decrease it. Retighten lock nut when proper 2. Disconnect and plug the brake line at the piston
setting is obtained. housing of the auxiliary winch.

EXTEND/RETRACT RELIEFS The initial range has


been preset. Adjustment is accomplished by loosening
the jam nut and either turning the adjusting

T300-1 Page 6 - 43 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

VALVE ADJUSTMENTS

AUXILIARY WINCH RELIEF (continued)

3. Restart the engine and run at high idle speed.

4. Winch down and hold the lever in the lower posi-


tion while obtaining a pressure reading. The proper
setting is 3500 psi. If required, adjust the relief
valve at the auxiliary winch valve. This relief is
adjusted in the same manner at the boom relief.

SWING RELIEF Check the swing relief setting by


means of the following procedure: SETTING RELIEF VALVE PRESSURES
ON SWING VALVE Attach the pressure gauge on the
swing valve test port, and follow these steps:
1. Attach a gauge to swing test port.
Remove acorn nut and loosen jam nut, make sure sev-
2. Set the swing brake and attempt to swing against
eral threads on adjusting screw are engaged in pilot
the brake with the engine running at maximum gov- section.
erned rpm. Adjust the swing relief valve, if neces-
sary, to obtain a reading of 2000 psi. Use a screw driver and set adjusting screw as follows:

a. Run the pump at low operating speed (approxi-


SWING RELIEF ADJUSTMENT Remove acorn nut mately 1/4 of full engine rpm) but fast enough so
from relief valve and loosen lock nut. that the pump is developing the required pressure.

While stalling out the swing motor with swing brake b. Operate the control valve at its extreme position
applied at maximum rpm, adjust valve with screwdriver long enough to get a pressure reading on the
until proper pressure is obtained; screwing in adjust-
gauge.
ment screw to increase pressure setting and out to
decrease it.
c. Turn the adjusting screw clockwise to increase
Retighten lock nut and replace acorn nut. pressure or counterclockwise to decrease pressure
until desired setting is obtained.

d. Hold the adjusting screw, tighten jam nut and install


and tighten acorn nut.

e. Retest to check pressure setting.

NOTE: Results of the above settings will indicate a rel-


atively constant relief valve setting across full
engine rpm.

T300-1 Page 6 - 44 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

VALVE ADJUSTMENTS

RELIEF VALVE REPAIR RECOMMENDATIONS The cap, insert an allen wrench. adjust to the proper setting
cartridge type service port reliefs used in the swing while holding the outrigger in the retract position. Turn
valve are of the pilot poppet type with external adjust- in to increase pressure, out to decrease. After complet-
ment. Any malfunctioning is usually the result of foreign ing adjustment, replace cap on the relief valve.
matter lodging between the piston, relief valve poppet,
and check valve.

To perform service, clean the surrounding area and


remove the complete relief valve cartridge. Examine
the seat in the main valve housing for grooves or
ridges. If damaged, either replace the valve or have it
re-machined.

The design of the pilot poppet and its seat provides


positive seating and very seldom requires any mainte-
nance. The pilot section can be removed from the car-
tridge housing without disturbing the setting.

With it will come the check valve poppet and other


internal parts. These are easily disassembled and
should be examined for foreign matter. All seats and
seating surfaces should be free of nicks, scratches, or
grooves. Examine O rings and back-up washers for
any damage. If any parts are found to be faulty, replace
the relief cartridge. All moving parts should slide freely,
with only seal friction being present. After inspecting
and cleaning, immerse all parts in hydraulic oil and re-
assemble. If pressure setting was not disturbed, unit
can be tested for proper functioning under normal
working conditions. If operating difficulties indicate that
the pilot poppet is still leaking or sticking, replace the
relief.

OUTRIGGER RELIEF Use the 4000 psi test gauge and


check as follows:

1. Attach the gauge at the quick disconnect on the


diverter valve (B), located on the L.H. side of the
front outrigger box.

2. Start engine and run at full throttle.

3. Set the outrigger extend/retract switch to the retract


position and read the gauge. The correct pressure
setting is 2500 psi outrigger relief. The relief valve
is located above the outrigger diverter valve. Adjust
to proper setting as follows:

OUTRIGGER RELIEF ADJUSTMENT With the test


gauge still attached to the test port, remove the hex

T300-1 Page 6 - 45 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ROTARY MANIFOLD

Use the following procedures when disassembling, DISASSEMBLY


inspecting, repairing, and reassembling the rotary man- The rotary manifold may be disassembled by removing
ifold. the four capscrews and the top plate.

NOTE: Be sure to mark an index point on the case and


spool to insure proper reassembly.

AS SOON AS THE ROTARY MANIFOLD IS READY INSPECTION AND SEAL REPLACEMENT


TO BE PLACED INTO OPERATION, IT SHOULD BE
SLOWLY ROTATED SEVERAL MINUTES TO ALLOW 1. The case bore should be thoroughly washed with
ANY ENTRAPPED AIR TO ESCAPE AND TO FACILI- solvent or diesel fuel and inspected for signs of
TATE REFORMING OF SEALS THAT MAY HAVE scoring or deep scratches. This type of damage is
TEMPORARILY DEFORMED DURING STORAGE.
generally caused by the presence of foreign mate-
rial in the hydraulic system. No satisfactory method
All overhaul should be done in a clean, enclosed facility
with personnel familiar with hydraulic systems and of repairing this type of damage can be conducted
cleanliness procedures. in the field.

T300-1 Page 6 - 46 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ROTARY MANIFOLD

INSPECTION AND SEAL REPLACEMENT ample air space should be allowed for the
(continued) expansion of oil due to temperature changes.

2. The spool should be carefully washed in solvent


or diesel fuel. The seals and O rings should not
be removed from the spool unless they show signs
of wear or damage. NOTE: If the seal is removed
for any reason, it should be replaced since removal IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE SPOOL FLOATS
will almost always damage it beyond use. FREELY WITH THE CASE TO PREVENT WEAR AND
LEAKAGE. THE SPOOL IS HELD STATIONARY WITH
When installing a new seal and ring, it must be walked RESPECT TO THE LOWER BY A RESTRAINING
into place past other seals and oil grooves and then BRACKET DESIGNED TO ALLOW FOR SOME
into its own groove in the same manner that the bead of ECCENTRICITY. THE ROTARY MANIFOLD SHOULD
a tire is walked into the wheel rim. The spool should BE SHIMMED AT THE MOUNTING EARS AS NECES-
be well oiled to aid in this assembly. Best results can be SARY TO INSURE CONCENTRIC ROTATION.
achieved if the spool, with the seals mounted on the ROTATE THE MACHINE WHILE VISUALLY CHECK-
end, is allowed to sit overnight. This gives the seals a ING THE ALIGNMENT. THE BRACKET MUST NOT
chance to adjust to normal size. BIND DURING ROTATION.

REASSEMBLY

1. The top and bottom O rings and back-up washers


can be replaced without removing the spool.
Removing the top cover exposes the top O ring.
The spool will drop out of the case, exposing the
bottom O ring.

UPON REASSEMBLY, INSTALL THE UPPER O


RING AND BACK-UP RING AFTER THE SPOOL IS IN
THE CASE. THIS WILL PREVENT ANY DAMAGE
WHICH MIGHT RESULT FROM SLIDING PAST PORT
OPENINGS.

2. The rotary manifold should be reassembled using a


generous coat of oil on the case ID and spool OD.
Generally, reassembly is most successful by plac-
ing the case in a vertical position and inserting the
spool into the case. Each seal and wear ring
should be compressed by hand to initially enter the
case bore. With the spool fully inserted into the
case, the assembly may be up-ended to replace
the end plate.
3. Ports should be properly protected, capped, and,
preferably, oil filled without pressure.

NOTE: If the rotary manifold is oil filled and plugged,

T300-1 Page 6 - 47 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

CONTROL LINKAGE ADJUSTMENTS

The cable and mechanical controls used on this THROTTLE CONTROL The throttle control consists of
machine are designed to require little or no adjustment. cables and clevis ends. Adjustment is dependent on
The use of standardized cable-mechanical linkage cable travel and the adjusted length of the clevis rods.
means that one adjustment procedure may be applied Adjustment is not required as long as the full range of
to several control functions. Should adjustment become engine rpm is available in response to control input.
necessary, refer to Group 28 of the Parts Book when
making them. REAR AXLE DISENGAGE No adjustments are possi-
ble. In the event of malfunction, check for electrical
continuity and air supply.

THE CABLES USED ON THIS MACHINE ARE


SEALED. NEVER ADJUST A CABLE TO THE POINT
THAT THE THREADS ON THE ROD END ARE
PULLED INTO THE SEAL.

SWING LOCK The swing lock cable linkage is adjusted


at the control handle. Cable tension is increased or
decreased by turning the control handle in or out. Avoid
excessive tension to prevent cable damage. Adjust-
ment of the rod length or the clevis ends of the cable
should not be necessary unless new parts are installed.

SWING BRAKE PEDAL Adjust swing brake pedal by


loosening cable lock nuts at pedal anchor. Increase ten-
sion by shifting cable out of the "U" shaped bracket with
adjustment of the locking nuts.

SWING, WINCH, BOOM TELESCOPE, BOOM HOIST,


VALVE CONTROL The swing, winch, boom telescope,
and boom hoist valve control linkages are all clevis and
cable connections. No major adjustments should be
required unless a component is replaced or a valve fails
to function because of a defect or misadjustment in the
linkage. Minor adjustments may be required at either
the clevis end or at the control end to change to travel
engagement of the cable.

SHIFT CONTROL No adjustments are possible. In the


event of malfunction, check for electrical continuity.

T300-1 Page 6 - 48 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ANTI-TWO BLOCK SYSTEM

MAINTENANCE When conducting the SEMI-ANNUAL 1. With the engine ignition key in the "off" position,
MAINTENANCE CHECK, lubricate the anti-two block check that free action (no self-centering) occurs on
disconnects with SAE 30 engine oil. the boom lowering pedal, the boom telescope
lever- extended direction, and the winch lever (S) -
raising direction.

2. With the engine ignition key in the "on" position,


check to be sure that these controls latch (remain
in the neutral position) and provide a normal cen-
tering action. NOTE: This may require lowering the
hook block away from the trip mechanism at the
boom head to enable the "latching" of controls.

THROTTLE CONTROL The throttle control consists of


cables and clevis ends. Adjustment is dependent on
cable travel and the adjusted length of the clevis rods.
Adjustment is not required as long as the full range of
engine rpm is available in response to control input.
This crane is equipped with an anti-two block system
which sounds a horn (when in the "on" position) and
REAR AXLE DISENGAGE No adjustments are possi-
lights a light when a two-blocking condition is imminent.
ble. In the event of malfunction, check for electrical
If equipped with control disconnects, it will also disen-
continuity and air supply.
gage the hydraulic functions. Verily that the two-block-
ing system is functioning properly by performing the
following procedure.

Check anti-two block switch(es) and freedom of coun-


terweight(s). Check the plug and socket connection at
boom head and on lib, if erected and reeved, for con-
nection. The jib connector must be plugged into the
boom head receptacle. Check system indication (and
shut-off, if so equipped) by manually lifting counter-
weight(s). A warning light should come on, horn in on
position should sound, and (if so equipped) shut-off
system should disconnect controls. Check entire length
of cable and cable reel for evidence of damage. Check
spring loaded cable reel. Ensure it has spring tension
and is free to rotate. Check cab control unit. If the crane
is equipped with control linkage disconnect, perform the
following checks, also.

T300-1 Page 6 - 49 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HEATER

Refer to the illustrations below when repairing the pro- heater malfunctions. If excessive repair is required,
pane heater or tracing electrical faults. See Section 5 refer to the Hunter Manufacturing Co. manual covering
for troubleshooting related to common heater Model PH-20-15A Falconaire heater.

T300-1 Page 6 - 50 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BATTERY CHECK

MAINTENANCE CHECK Observe all instruments and connection where it is grounded to the engine and the
gauges while operating machine and carrying out your positive cable to the starter relay. If the "Visual Inspec-
DAILY MAINTENANCE CHECKS. Replace or repair tion" is satisfactory, proceed to Step 2.
any malfunctioning instruments or gauges.
Step 2 - Electrolyte Levels And State Of Charge
Check the electrolyte level in the cells if possible. The
BATTERY The maintenance-free batteries are located level can be seen through translucent plastic cases. It
under the battery cover on the left-hand side of can also be checked in batteries which are not sealed.
machine. Use maintenance-free battery charging infor- If the electrolyte level is below the tops of the plates in
mation. any cell, add water if the vents are removable. If the
battery is sealed, and water cannot be added to it,
A maintenance-free battery does not require the addi- replace the battery and check the charging system for
tion of water during its life in normal service. This is due a malfunction such as a high voltage regulator setting.
to the fact that maintenance-free batteries produce little Follow instructions of manufacturer if the battery has a
special indicating device.
gas at normal charging voltages.
If the level is O.K., unknown, or water can be added to
TESTING MAINTENANCE-FREE BATTERIES
the battery, and the stabilized open circuit voltage is
below 12.4 volts, charge the battery as described
under "Charging". The voltage is stabilized if the bat-
tery has stood overnight without being charged or dis-
charged. If the battery has been on charge, the voltage
can be stabilized by placing a 15 ampere load across
the terminals for 15 seconds. Another method of stabili-
zation is to turn on the headlamps for 15 seconds.
WHENEVER THE BATTERY IS PLACED ON Read the voltage at least three minutes after the dis-
CHARGE, WEAR SAFETY GLASSES. DO NOT charge load is removed. When a hydrometer reading
BREAK "LIVE" CIRCUITS AT THE BATTERY TERMI- can be taken, a value of 1.225 @ 80F (26.7C) can be
NALS. Maintenance-free batteries of the latest design used instead of the 12.4 voltage reading. If the battery
incorporate flame arrester vents to reduce the possibil- has a test indicator, follow the instructions of the manu-
ity of explosions caused by external sparks. Therefore, facturer. After the battery is recharged, stabilize the
during charging, the vents, if removable, should remain voltage as described above, then proceed to Step 3.
in place. A wet cloth should be placed over the vent
openings as an additional precaution. If the stabilized voltage of the battery was above 12.4
volts when it was first examined, or the test indicator
Step 1 - Visual Inspection indicated the battery is charged, proceed to Step 3
without charging the battery.
Visually inspect the outside of the battery for obvious
damage such as a cracked or broken case or cover
which would allow electrolyte loss. Check for terminal
damage. If obvious physical damage is found, replace
the battery. If possible, determine the cause of damage
and correct.

Check the condition and size of the cables. Are the


cable clamps tight? Check for corrosion on the terminal
or clamps. Clean corroded parts and/or tighten clamps
if necessary. Replace badly corroded cables or cables
with defective terminals. Make certain the negative
cable is making a good co

T300-1 Page 6 - 51 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BATTERY CHECK

Step 3 - Load Test Procedure procedures to use and the safety precautions to take.

The load test procedure is conducted to determine if It must be realized the maintenance-free batteries can-
the battery requires recharging or replacement. not be charged at ampere rates or periods of time
greater than specified in the 12 Volt Maintenance-free
A. Disconnect the battery cables (ground connection Battery Charging Guide. If the battery is charged more
first) and connect the voltmeter and load test leads than specified, it loses water which cannot be replaced
to the battery terminals, making sure the load in some constructions so the life of the battery is short-
switch on the tester is in the OFF position. ened.

B. Apply a test load equal to 1/2 the Cold Cranking Battery chargers for maintenance-free batteries should
Amperes @ 0F (-18C) Rating of the battery, for 15 include a charge duration control of some sort. The
seconds. (Example: a battery has a Cold Cranking simplest control is a timer which the operator sets. Volt-
Rating @ 0F (118C) of 350 amperes. Use a test age controls can limit the charge more consistently and
load of 175 amperes.) accurately. Such controls also may have a safety fea-
ture that prevents sparks and reverse charging when
C. Read the voltage at 15 seconds and remove the the clamps are connected in reverse, by mistake.
load. If the voltage is less than the minimum speci-
fied in the Voltage Chart (see Maintenance-Free
Battery Testing Chart, in Troubleshooting section)
replace the battery. If the voltage meets or exceeds
the specified minimum, clean and return battery to
service.

If the state of charge of a battery cannot be determined


and the battery fails the load test, it must be recharged
and retested. If it meets the specified voltage on the
second test, return it to service. If it does not meet the
specified voltage on the second test, replace the bat-
tery.

The above is a standard test procedure to determine


the ability of a battery to function properly. If a commer-
cially available tester is being used to analyze the bat-
tery, follow the instructions of the equipment Place a wet cloth over the vent opening or openings. If,
manufacturer. when charging the battery, violent gassing or spewing
of electrolyte occurs, or the battery case feels hot
CHARGING MAINTENANCE-FREE BATTERIES (125F, 52C), reduce or temporarily halt charging to
avoid damaging the battery.
Maintenance-free batteries contain sulfuric acid and
generate explosive hydrogen and oxygen gases; the Follow the manufacturers instructions on the charger. If
same as all lead acid batteries. No one should charge a they can no longer be read and a copy of them is not
battery unless they have been thoroughly instructed available, write to the manufacturer for a copy and
concerning the step by step price paste it on the charger. Never use a charger without
these instructions.

T300-1 Page 6 - 52 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BATTERY CHECK
Always turn the charger to the OFF position before NOTE:If a battery is to be charged overnight, (16
connecting the leads to the battery. If you have any hours) a timer or voltage controlled charger is
doubts that the charger is actually OFF, disconnect it recommended. If the charger does not have
from the power source. such controls, a 3 ampere rate should be used
for batteries of 80 minutes or less capacity and
The state-of-charge of maintenance-free batteries can
5 amperes for above 80 to 125 minutes
be determined with an accurate voltmeter. A voltmeter
reserve capacity batteries. Batteries over 125
should not be used unless it can be checked frequently
against one of known accuracy. If the stabilized voltage minutes should be charged at the specified
of a battery at room temperature is 12.2. volts, it should Slow Charge rate.
be charged for one half the time shown in the Slow
Charge column of the Charging Guide, at the applica- BOOST CHARGE If a battery requires a boost charge
ble rate in amperes. If the voltage is 12.4 volts, it should to get started, it should be charged at 45 amperes for
be charged for one fourth the time shown in the Slow 20 minutes. This cannot be used for a new battery
Charge column, at the applicable charging rate. Follow being prepared for installation.
manufacturers instructions on batteries equipped with
state-of-charge indicators. MODIFIED CONSTANT POTENTIAL TAPER CHARG-
ING It is recommended that maintenance-free batteries
Any battery which is known to be discharged or has a be recharged on modified constant potential taper
stabilized voltage below 12.2 volts should be charged chargers. The total charge must not exceed the
as shown below. ampere-hour equivalent of the values shown in the
Charging Guide. It is recommended that the initial
12-VOLT MAINTENANCE-FREE BATTERY CHARG- charging rate not exceed 30 amperes.
ING GUIDE

Battery Capacity
(Reserve Minutes) Slow Charge
Above 125 to 170 20Hours @ 5 Amps
Minutes 10 Hours @ 10 Amps

T300-1 Page 6 - 53 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
COLLECTOR RING
ELECTRICAL COLLECTOR RING When trouble- size, they can be broken if forced up or down.
shooting the electrical system, always check the collec- In the correctly installed position, the possibility
tor ring first to see that spring loaded brushes are of breakage is minimal.
centered in the bands. Keep free of any foreign mate-
rial.
The collector ring has a nylon bearing in the base of the
Keep the setscrews on the collector ring frame tight. assembly, eliminating the need for lubrication.
Otherwise, the wire harness may wrap up as the
machine is swung. If it should become necessary to remove the collector
ring from the machine, do so by loosening the socket
The cover should allow for free operation of the collec- screws at the base of the ring. This will allow the ring to
tor ring and the brake. If linkages bind, erratic operation be lifted off the mounting tube. When replacing it, make
may result. Check for unrestricted operation. sure these set screw, are again tightened. (Recom-
mended torque 45-55 in.-lbs.) If the set screws are not
COLLECTOR RING MAINTENANCE AND SERVICE tight, the core can turn or be held by the brushes, and
If not revolved for some time, under some conditions, twist off the core leads or center harness.
the ring will have a tendency to collect fine silt, or a salt
atmosphere will cause corrosion. If this happens, the
crane should be rotated through several revolutions, if
possible. The cleaning action of the brushes should
clean ring surfaces. If it does not, or it is not practical to
revolve the machine, it may be necessary to use a
standard non-residue solvent to clean the ring. Then
lightly sand the brushes and rings with a fine grade of
sandpaper and dust off with compressed air.

To replace a brush and arm assembly, remove the hex


nuts and washers at the top of the brush stud along
with the outboard bearing. This will allow the brush
assemblies to be removed. Carefully remove the
brushes without over stretching the brush springs and
arrange in order of removal with spacers. Replace the
damaged brush assembly and then reassemble the
brushes and spacers in reverse the removal order.
This will insure the correct spacing between electrically
live parts. Be sure that all brushes are snapped in tight
and making full contact with their corresponding brass
ring. Also check that all springs are hooked correctly
through the brush arm.

NOTE:Special care should be exercised when handling


or replacing the 7 1/2 Amp brush and arm
assemblies. Because of their small size
NOTE 1. Numbers listed in parentheses are for wire tag
markers.

NOTE 2. If options not listed are installed, optional cir-


cuits may be used for functions other than
those listed here.

T300-1 Page 6 - 54 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
VOLTMETER DIAGNOSIS

This electrical system has a voltmeter installed in it. It is used as an aid to diagnose the condition of the battery and
electrical system. The following illustrations show how the voltmeter indicates the condition of the battery, alterna-
tor, and voltage regulator and what to so to correct the condition.

ENGINE NOT RUNNING OR RUNNING ENGINE RUNNING FAST ENOUGH TO


AT SLOW IDLE MAKE ALTERNATOR PRODUCE CHARGE

Dead or disconnected battery. Discon- Disconnected voltmeter. Engine could not


nected or badly connected voltmeter. run with dead or disconnected battery unless
circuit was completed around battery.

When voltmeter pointer stays below 13.3


with the engine running fast enough to oper-
Very low battery charge. Engine might not ate the alternator, it shows that the alternator
start. is not operating or voltage regulator is out of
adjustment, or that current being drawn from
battery by lights, heater fan, or accessories
exceeds alternator output.

Low battery charge. Constant reading in


this area would indicate need for check on
alternator and voltage regulator.

Well-charged battery. This indicates a


good battery and also that alternator and When engine is started, pointer may stay in
voltage regulator are operating properly. this area temporarily but should gradually
rise above 13.3 as alternator reaches normal
output.

The pointer might remain in this position


temporarily when the engine has been
stopped after considerable use, due to a
"surface charge" in the battery. To get a
correct reading, turn on lights for a few
minutes or let machine stand for an hour or
so.

T300-1 Page 6 - 55 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
VOLTMETER DIAGNOSIS

ENGINE NOT RUNNING OR RUNNING ENGINE RUNNING FAST ENOUGH TO


AT SLOW IDLE MAKE ALTERNATOR PRODUCE CHARGE

This is the area in which the pointer should


Under normal conditions, a 12V battery is be when alternator, voltage regulator, and
fully charged at 12.8V. A slightly higher battery are all in good condition and working
reading may occur under the conditions properly.
outlined in the last step, but, generally
speaking, any reading above 12.8 when
the engine is stopped is not a true reading.

When the pointer goes above 15.2, the volt-


age regulator is set too high or is jammed
and continued operation of the engine will
burn out the battery.

T300-1 Page 6 - 56 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS

Back-Up
Wear Band T Seal Rod O Ring O Ring
Buffer Seal
U Cup
Head Gland
Wiper
Bead End

Extend Port

Buttress Nut Spacer Hold Valve

EXTEND CYLINDER

Load Rings Rod O Ring & Backup Ring

Thread Ring
Piston
U Cup
Set Screw
Wiper

Seal Ring Rod Seal Head Gland

HOIST CYLINDER

T300-1 Page 6 - 57 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC CYLINDER
MAINTENANCE
HYDRAULIC CYLINDER DISASSEMBLY BOOM LIFT CYLINDER Disassemble the boom lift cyl-
inder by the following procedure:
GENERAL Refer to pages 5-37 and 5-38 for removal of
cylinders from the boom. Do not disassemble a cylinder 1. Remove the locking socket head capscrew from
unless no other maintenance procedure can correct the the draw ring. CAUTION: Failure to remove the
problem. All overhaul or new cylinder installations
locking capscrew may result in serious thread dam-
should be done in a clean, dust-free atmosphere with
age. With an adjustable spanner wrench, remove
all ports plugged until hose connections are made.
the draw ring and head gland. N0TE: One turn off,
BOOM EXTEND CYLINDERS The outer case is the back 1/3 turn, alternately.
"moving" member of the cylinder. The hollow shaft is
"stationary". The hollow shaft ports the piston and case 2. Remove the head gland, shaft, and piston from the
end to retract the cylinder while a tube within the "shaft" case.
ports the piston and head gland to extend the cylinder.
3. Remove piston and gland by removing setscrews
Disassemble the boom extend cylinders by the follow- in retaining collar and removing retaining nut.
ing procedure: Remove piston and gland from rod. Access to all
seal units is now possible.
1. Using an adjustable spanner wrench, remove head
gland of cylinder. As head gland is loosened, it may
be necessary to begin to move rod out of cylinder HYDRAULIC CYLINDER INSPECTION
tube.
Wash the cylinder bore and all the components with
2. With head gland fully disengaged, remove as an solvent and make the following inspections:
assembly, piston rod, head gland, and piston
assembly. CYLINDER BORE For signs of scoring and deep
scratches. In the event of any defects, reassemble the
3. To remove piston, remove the setscrews which entire cylinder and contact your distributor.
secure the piston retaining ring to piston rod.
CYLINDER SHAFT For dents, deep scratches, or dam-
4. Remove piston and gland which allows access to aged chrome plating. File any sharp edges on ends of
all seal units of cylinder. shaft to protect the seals upon reassembly. Always pro-
tect the shaft finish when clamping in a vice or when
welding against weld splatter.

PISTON RINGS For cracks or other damage. Particu-


larly check the interlocking ends that they are not miss-
ing or broken.

PISTON SEALS For signs of severe damage. Do not


remove unless replacement is necessary.

PISTON & HEAD GLAND It is not normally necessary


to replace the piston, piston rings, or head gland.

T300-1 Page 6 - 58 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

HYDRAULIC CYLINDER
MAINTENANCE
HYDRAULIC CYLINDER REASSEMBLY BOOM EXTEND CYLINDERS With the piston, piston
rod, head gland, and retaining ring assembled as a
GENERAL As cylinder components are reassembled, unit, slide the piston into the cylinder bore. Next, insert
be certain all rings, seals, spacers and setscrews the head gland. It may be necessary to tap the gland
required in one step are in place before proceeding to into place using a wood block and hammer. In this
the next step. See Group 39 of the Parts Book for a event, cover the rod with rags or a rubber tube to pre-
complete listing of cylinder parts. vent damage from a glancing hammer blow. The head
gland is then spun in and tightened.
A teflon ring must be installed before the piston ring or
wear ring is installed since the teflon ring must first be NOTE: Apply Loctite Gr. 242 to piston retaining rings at
"walked" into the piston ring groove and then onto its assembly. Also apply to locking setscrews.
own groove. Warm the teflon ring until reasonably flexi-
ble and oil the piston ring or wear ring to aid in the On cylinders P/N 706 8584 and 706 8585 preset nylon
installation. plug with a 25 ft. lb. torque, using a Grade 8 capscrew,
and install setscrew and torque to 15 ft. lbs., three (3)
places.

HYDRAULIC CYLINDER OPERATION

As soon as the cylinder is ready to be placed in opera-


MOST PISTON RING BREAKAGE IS DUE TO CARE-
tion, it should be slowly cycled under no load conditions
LESS OR HASTY ASSEMBLY AT THIS POINT.
for several minutes in order to allow the entrapped air
within the cylinder to escape to the reservoir and, also
BOOM LIFT CYLINDERS With the piston, piston rod,
to facilitate the reforming of the seals which may have
head gland, retaining ring and rod eye reassemble as a
temporarily deformed during shipping, storage or reas-
unit, slide the piston into the cylinder bore. Next, insert
sembly.
and seat the head gland. It may be necessary to drive
the gland into place using a wood block and hammer.
New cylinders may show a slight "drifting" tendency
In this event, cover the rod with rags or a rubber tube to
when first used. This is natural, due to one or both of
prevent damage from a glancing hammer blow. The
the following causes.
retaining ring is then spun in and tightened to secure
the head gland. Install socket capscrews. the retaining
1. Air entrapped in the oil.
ring should be secured with Loctite Grade 242. Coat
both grooves around the thread ring as well as the bolt
2. Seals not yet fully reformed or seated.
heads with a "silastic" type silicon sealant to keep mois-
ture out.
"Drifting" should decrease with operation as piston
rings and seals "break in" to provide better sealing and
NOTE: When installing the piston ring nut on the piston
the eventual escaping of the trapped air in the oil.
rod, torque to 2500 ft. lbs. and then secure with set-
screw lock. Use Loctite Grade 242 on ring nut and set-
screws.

T300-1 Page 6 - 59 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WIRE ROPE AND REEVING

MAINTENANCE All wire ropes in active service should Replace or repair any items found to be in unsatisfac-
be inspected DAILY along with spooling, sheaves, tory condition.
wedge sockets, and any other wire rope fittings for
damage. Once WEEKLY a thorough wire rope inspec- In addition to damage such as kinking, crushing, and
tion should be made by a competent inspector. A broken wires, factors such as corrosion, abrasion, pit-
record should be kept of the inspections on page 4-5. ting, peening, and scrubbing of outside wires, reduction
of rope diameter, the condition of other components
Refer to ANSI Standard B30.5 for guidelines covering and proper lubrication are considered. Refer to Section
the inspection, maintenance, repair and replacement of 9 for wire rope lubricating procedures.
wire rope. Worn, kinked, birdcaged, fatigued or other-
wise damaged wire rope must be removed immedi- Before installing a new or replacement rope, make cer-
ately. Wire rope, when properly installed, lubricated and tain the rope to be used is the proper type and size.
employed, will give many hours of satisfactory use. The wrong rope will not function properly and may
Whereas, a new piece of wire rope can be immediately even be dangerous.
ruined if misused.

THE USE OF NON-ROTATING 18 x 7 CLASS WIRE


ROPE IS NOT RECOMMENDED IN MULTIPLE
REEVING APPLICATIONS AND, IF USED FOR
APPLICATIONS INVOLVING SINGLE PART LINE,
MUST NOT BE USED WITH LOADS EXCEEDING
ONE FIFTH (1/5) THE RATED BREAKING
STRENGTH. The inner wires are generally the first to
fail on this class of rope, making it very difficult to
inspect, as broken wires cannot be seen. Refer to
ANSI B30.5, Section 5.24 for the necessary inspection
procedure and replacement criterion.

If non-rotating or spin resistant rope is used on this


crane, the rope must be replaced if two or more wires
are found broken in one lay of the rope.

T300-1 Page 6 - 60 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

WIRE ROPE AND REEVING

CABLE REEVING When reeving the machine for any This machine incorporates a "Quick Reeving" boom
job, remember that hoisting and lowering speeds head and block which do not require removal of the
decrease as the number of parts of line increases. For wedge and socket from the rope in order to change the
the most efficient use of the machine, it is desirable to reeving. Removal of two pins in the boom head and
use the minimum number of required parts for lifting the three in the hook block will allow the wedge and socket
anticipated loads. to pass through.

NEVER USE LESS THAN THE NUMBER OF PARTS NOTE: IF A SOCKET IS CHANGED OR REPLACED,
CALLED FOR BY THE LOAD RATING CHART. THE OR IF YOU ARE CHANGING HOOK BLOCK
MINIMUM REQUIRED NUMBER OF PARTS IS WEIGHTS; IT IS IMPORTANT TO USE THE COR-
DETERMINED BY REFERRING TO THE LOAD RAT- RECT SOCKET.
ING CHART.

SPOOLING WIRE ROPE ON DRUMS

Care must be exercised when installing wire rope on If cable is wound from the storage reel onto the drum,
the winch drum. Improper spooling can result in rope the reel should be rotated in the same direction as the
damage through crushing, kinking, doglegs, abrasion hoist.
and cutting. Poorly installed wire rope will also
adversely affect the operating characteristics of the
machine by causing uneven application of force and
motion. This, in turn, can cause premature fatiguing
and failure of the rope.

Thoroughly inspect and clean the winch before pro-


ceeding with the installation. Check the lagging and
drum flanges for cracks, breaks, and excessive wear.
Deformed or outsized drum and excessive undercutting
at the base of the flange also indicate that repair or
replacement of the drum is necessary.

Check the bearings for excessive wear and play.

After correcting any defects revealed by the inspection


and determining that the winch is in good operating
condition, spool the wire rope as follows:

Mount the cable shipping reel vertically on jacks or a


suitable supporting structure, with a pipe or bar through Apply braking force to the reel flange in order to pre-
the reel center. The cable should be drawn from the top vent overrun as the rope is being drawn off. Loops
of the reel, as shown, in order to avoid reverse bending formed by overrun can cause kinks and doglegs in the
as it is spooled onto the winch drum. rope, resulting in damage and premature rope failure.
A timber or block forced against the shipping reel
flange can be used to provide the required braking
force.

T300-1 Page 6 - 61 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SPOOLING WIRE ROPE ON DRUMS

Install cable on the winch drum in accordance with the 4. Position the anchor wedge in the drum slot; pull
following procedure: firmly on the free end of the cable to secure the
wedge.
1. Position the cable over the boom nose sheave and
route back to the winch drum. 5. Slowly rotate the drum, ensuring the first layer of
cable is evenly wound onto the drum.
2. Position the winch drum with the cable anchor slot
on top. 6. Install the remainder of cable, as applicable. The
end of the cable should be even with the bottom of
3. Insert cable through slot and position around the the anchor wedge.
cable wedge. See chart below.
NOTE: If the wedge does not seat securely in the slot,
carefully tap the top of the wedge with a mallet.

CABLE SOCKETS

T300-1 Page 6 - 62 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

CABLE SOCKETS

THE WRONG CABLE WEDGE COULD PERMIT THE


WIRE ROPE TO WORK LOOSE AND DETACH
ITSELF FROM THE DRUM, POSSIBLY CAUSING
PROPERTY DAMAGE OR PERSONAL INJURY.

Tension the wire rope by braking the shipping reel and


2. Insert the wedge and allow the rope strands to
slowly operate the winch in the raise mode to wind the
cable onto the winch drum. As the spooling proceeds, adjust around it.
make sure that adjacent turns are tight against one
another. A lead or brass hammer may be used to tap
the rope over against preceding turns. Tight winding on
the drum is absolutely essential.

3. Seat the wedge and loop just tightly enough to


allow handling by attaching the socket to a strong
NEVER USE A STEEL HAMMER OR PINCH BAR TO support and engaging the winch to take a strain on
MOVE THE ROPE OVER ON THE DRUM. THESE the rope.
TOOLS CAN EASILY DAMAGE THE ROPE.
4. Final seating of the wedge is accomplished by
After the wire rope is wound onto the winch drum,
making lifts of gradually increasing loads. Avoid
reeve the cable as desired.
imposing shock loading on the rope until the wedge
is firmly in place.

USE ONLY FACTORY SUPPLIED SOCKETS,


WEDGES AND PINS OF THE PROPER SIZE; MAKE
NO SUBSTITUTIONS.

Follow the procedure below when installing wedge type


sockets on wire rope. Be certain the correct socket and
wedge are used.
5. After the wedge has been firmly seated, a short
1. Lead the rope through the socket, form a large loop length (6 inches) of the cable should be secured to
and draw the rope end back through the socket. A the free end of the wire rope to act as a stop as
length of rope equal to at least one rope lay should shown. DO NOT clamp the free end to the load
be drawn back through. supporting end as this will weaken the rope.

T300-1 Page 6 - 63 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

BOOM ADJUSTMENT

CHAIN ADJUSTMENT - 5 SECTION BOOM (138)

W X

A Y Z
B
C
1. Fully retract boom. (Both cylinders) that approximately 3 3/4 of threads are
showing at the outer end of the link.
2. Release all jam nuts for extend and
retract chains. (Locations A,B,C,D) 7. Cycle the internal boom cylinder in and
out several times (approximately 4-5
3. Remove outer proximity sensor located feet), then fully retract it.
on left side of 1st boom section.
8. The distance between plates Y & Z
should be between 5/16 and 7/16.

8A. If the distance between Y & Z is greater


than 7/16, tighten the Section 5 Retract
Chain (A) until the gap is 3/8. If you can-
not achieve this distance, you may need
to loosen the Section 5 Extend Chain
(B).

4. Adjust position of nut on Section 5 Note:Pressure can be relieved on any retract


Retract Chain (A). Position the nut so chain by extending the boom slightly.
approximately 1 of threads are showing
at the outer end of the link. Once the gap is set with the retract chain,
make sure the retract and extend nuts are
5. Extend the boom about 4 or 5 feet with snug.
the internal cylinder.
6. Adjust Section 5 Extend Chain (B) so The boom may need to be cycled several

T300-1 Page 6 - 64 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

BOOM ADJUSTMENTS

CHAIN ADJUSTMENT - 5 SECTION BOOM (138) cont.

W X

A Y Z
B
C

9. As with the fifth section, the fourth sec-


tion position is set using the extend and 8A. If the distance between Y & Z is
9. As withnuts.
retract the fifth section,
Section fourthe fourth
uses nutssec-
C The distance between
greater than plates
7/16, W& X should
tighten the Sec-be
tion position
and D. C is the is set using4the
Section extend
Retract and
chain. between 5/16
tion 4and 7/16.Chain (C) until the
Retract
retract nuts. Section four
D is the section 4 Extend Chain. uses nuts C gap is 3/8. If you cannot achieve
and D. C is the Section 4 Retract chain. 8A. If thethis
distance between
distance, you mayY & need
Z is greater
to
Adjust D position
is the section
of nut 4onExtend
SectionChain.
4 Retract than 7/16, tighten the Section
loosen the Section 4 Extend Chain 4 Retract
Chain (C). Position the nut so approximately Chain(D). until the gap is 3/8. If you cannot
Adjust
1 position
of threads ofshowing
are nut on Section 4 Retract
at the outer end of achieve this distance, you may need to
Chain (C). Position the nut so approxi-
the link. loosen thecan
Note:Pressure Section 4 Extend
be relieved on Chain (B).
any retract
mately 1 of threads are showing at the chain by extended the boom slightly.
Extend outer
theend
boom of about
the link.
4 or 5 feet with the Note:Pressure can be relieved on any retract
internal cylinder. Oncechain
the gap by extended
is set withthetheboom
retractslightly.
chain,
Extend the boom about 4 or 5 feet with make sure the retract and extend nuts are
Adjust the internal
Section 4 cylinder.
Extend Chain (D) so that Once the gap is set with the retract chain,
snug.
approximately ?? of threads are showing at make sure the retract and extend nuts are
Adjust
the outer Section
end of4 theExtend
link. Chain (D) so that snug.
The boom may need to be cycled several
approximately ?? of threads are showing at times and this step may need to be
the
Cycleouter
the end of the
internal link. cylinder in and out
boom The boomtomay
repeated need to
complete thisbe step.
cycled several
several times (approximately 4-5 feet), then times and this step may need to be
Cycleretract
fully the internal
it. boom cylinder in and out repeated
10. Whentothe complete
section 4thisgapstep.
is set, retract the
several times (approximately 4-5 feet), then boom and confirm that the section 5 gap
fully retract it.between plates W& X should be
The distance 10. is
When the section
still accurate. 4 gap is
Tighten set, retract
Section 5 the
between 5/16 and 7/16. boom and
Retract confirm
Chain (A) ifthat the section 5 gap
necessary.

T300-1 Page 6 - 65 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

BOOM CENTERING

5 SECTION BOOM (138)

On both sides of every boom


section (except 5) there are
wear pads located near the
bottom of the section, approxi-
mately 10 from the tip end.
These pads are used to adjust
each each inner boom section
left and right within its respec-
tive outer boom section.

1. Remove the pad plate on both


sides. Add shims until the pad
plate will not touch the boom
section. Then remove one
shim and tighten the inner two
bolts. Install the pad plate and
tighten the outer four bolts. To
move the boom add and
remove shims from the plates.
For every shim added to one
side, remove a shim from the

2. After the pad plates are set,


adjust the lower tip pads of
each section until they are
within 1/16 of the inner sec-

3. Repeat this process on Sec-


tions 2, 3, and 4.

T300-1 Page 6 - 66 Issued: September 2004


SERVICE AND ADJUSTMENTS

SETTING PROXIMITY SENSORS

5 SECTION BOOM (138)

Section 2 Proximity Sensor:

The Section 2 proximity sensor


determines if Section 2 is fully
extended. To install and set,
begin by fully extending the
external cylinder.

Measure the distance from the


sensor block to the outside of
the mounting plate

Set the distance from the face


of the proximity switch to the
inside of the plate to 3/8 less
than the measured distance.
(Indicator light should be lit.)

Install proximity switch plate


(Indicator light faces down.)

T300-1 Page 6 - 67 Issued: September 2004


MACHINE STORAGE

INDEX

SECTION 7

SUBJECT PAGE

SHORT TERM STORAGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 1

LONG TERM STORAGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 1

ENGINE STORAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 1

RESTORING ENGINE TO SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 4

TRANSMISSION STORAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 4

RESTORING TRANSMISSION TO SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 5

RESTORATION TO SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 5

CHROME CYLINDER ROD STORAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 - 6

Revised: May 2002


MACHINE STORAGE

Machines being placed in storage must be ade- 2. Drain and refill the swing reducer, winch(es),
quately protected from deterioration during the axle differentials, planetary hubs and the hy-
period of idleness. This will ensure that they can draulic reservoir. Refer to page 4-19 when servic-
be restored to active service with a minimum ef- ing the reservoir.
fort.
3. Distribute the new hydraulic fluid to all parts
Before removing this hydraulic crane from ser- of the system by operating all function.
vice for extended periods, it should be prepared
for storage as prescribed in the following para- 4. Clean and tape the battery cables after remov-
graphs. In general, three (3) major components ing and storing the battery.
must undergo preparation. These are the Ma-
chine Proper, the Engine and the Transmission. 5. Coat the external ring gear of the swing bearing
The specific procedure to be followed depends with oper gear lubricant.
upon the expected period of storage.
6. Fill the hydraulic reservoir to the top AFTER
THE MACHINE IS PARKED IN ITS STORAGE SPOT.

SHORT TERM STORAGE - 30 DAYS OR LESS 7. Coat wire rope with lubricant.
Short term storage requires minimal preparation.
8. Coat exposed cylinder rods with grease.
The MACHINE should be thoroughly cleaned, lu-
bricated in accordance with Section 4, and paint- The ENGINE should be prepared as prescribed
ed surfaces retouched where the paint has on page 7-2, the topic Engine Storage.
deteriorated. exposed portions of all hydraulic
cylinders should be coated with multipurpose The TRANSMISSION should be prepared as
grease. Coat unpainted metal surfaces with mul- prescribed on page 7-4, the topic Transmis-
tipurpose grease after removing any rust accu- sion Storage.
mulations.

The ENGINE should be prepared as prescribed


on page 7-2, the topic Engine Storage. ENGINE STORAGE

The TRANSMISSION should be prepared as pre-


scribed on page 7-4, the topic Transmission
Storage. PREPARING ENGINE FOR STORAGE - When an
engine is to be stored or removed from operation
for a period of time, special precautions should
be taken to protect the interior and exterior of the
LONG TERM STORAGE - 30 DAYS OR MORE engine, transmission, and other parts from rust
accumulation and corrosion. The parts requiring
Long term storage requires greater preparation attention and the recommended preparations are
than short term storage and must be undertaked given below.
with greater care.
It will be necessary to remove all rust or corrosion
The MACHINE should be prepared as follows: completely from any exposed part before applying
a rust preventive compound. Therefore, it is rec-
1. Perform the short term machine storage prep- ommended that the engine be processed for stor-
aration, making certain that All points with age as soon as possible after removal from
grease fittings are liberally lubricated. operation.

7-1 Revised: November 2000


MACHINE STORAGE

The engine should be stored in a building which EXTENDED STORAGE (30 DAYS OR MORE)
is dry and can be heated during the winter When An Engine Is To Be Removed From Opera-
months. Moisture absorbing chemicals are avail- tion For An Extended Period Of Time,prepare It
able commercially for use when excessive damp- as follows:
ness prevails in the storage area.
1. Drain and thoroughly flush the cooling sys-
temwith clean, soft water
TEMPORARY STORAGE (30 DAYS OR LESS)
To protect an engine for a temporary period of 2. Refill the cooling system with clean, soft water.
time proceed as follows:
3. Add a rust inhibitor to the cooling system (re
1. Drain the engine crankcase. fer to page 4-7, Corrsion Inhibitor).

2. Fill the crankcase to the proper level with the 4. Remove, check and reconditon the injectors, if
recommended viscosity and grade of oil. necessary, to make sure they will be readyt to op-
erate when the engine is restored to service.
3. Fill the fuel tank with the recommended grade
of fuel oil. Operate the engine for two minutes at 5. Reinstall the injectors in the engine, time
1200 rpm and no load. them, and adjust the valve clearance.

NOTE: Do not drain the fuel system or the crank- 6. Circulate the coolant through the entire sys-
case after this run. tem by operating the engine until normal operat-
ing temperature is reached (160F. to 185F).
4. Check the air cleaner and service it, if neces-
sary as outlined under Air System. 7. Stop the engine.

5. If freezing weather is expected furing the stor- 8. Remove the drain plug and completely drain
age period, add a high boiling point type anti- the engine crankcase. Reinstall and tighten the
freeze solution in accordance with the drain plug. Install new lubricating oil filter ele-
manufacturers recommendations. Drain the ments and gaskets.
raw water system and leave the drain cocks open.
9. Fill the crankcase to the proper level with a
6. Clean the entire exterior of the engine (except 30-weight preservative lubricating oil MIL-L-
the electrical system) with fuel oil and dry it with 21260, Grade 2 (P10), or equivalent.
air.
10. Drain the engine fuel tank.
7. Seal all of the engine openings. The material
used for this purpose must be waterproof, vapor- 11. Refill the fuel tank with enough rust preven-
proof and possess sufficient physical stength to tive fuel oil such as Americal Oil Diesel Run-In
resist puncture and damage fro m the expansion Fuel (LH 4089), Mobil 4Y17, or equivalent, to en-
of entrapped air. able the engine to operate 10 minutes.

An engine prepared in this manner can be re- 12. Drain the fuel filter and strainer. Remove the
turned to service in a short time by removing the retaining bolts, shells and elements. Discard the
seals at the engine openings, checking the engine used elements and gaskets. Wash the shells in
coolant, fuel oil, lubricating oil, transmission, clean fuel oil and insert new elements. Fill the
and priming the raw water pump, if used. cavity between the element and shell about two-
thirds full of the same rust preventive compound
as used in the fuel tank and reinstall the shell.

7-2 Revised: November 2000


MACHINE STORAGE

13. Operate the engine for 5 minutes to circulate 20. Remove and clean the battery and battery ca-
the rust preventive throughout the engine. bles with a baking soda solution and rinse them
with fresh water. Store the battery in a cool (nev-
14. Refer to page 4-6 and service the air cleaner. er below 32F.) dry place. Keep the battery fully
charged .
15. With an all-purpose grease such as Shell Al-
vania No. 2, or equivalent, lubricate the clutch 21. Insert heavy paper strips between the pulleys
throwout bearing, clutch pilot bearing, drive and belts to prevent sticking.
shaft main bearing, clutch release shaft, and the
outboard bearings (if so equipped). 22. Seal all of the openings in the engine, includ-
ing the exhaust outlet, with moisture resistant
16. Remove the inspection hole cover on the tape. Use cardboard, plywood or metal covers
clutch housing and lubricate the clutch release where practical.
lever and link pins with a hand oiler. Avoid get-
ting oil on the clutch facing. 23. Clean and dry the exterior painted surfaces of
the engine. Spray the surfaces with a suitable liq-
17. Apply a non-friction rust preventive com- uid automobile body wax, a synthetic resin var-
pound, to all exposed parts. If it is convenient, nish or a rust preventive compound.
apply the rust preventive compound to the engine
flywheel. If not, disengage the clutch mechanism 24. Cover the engine with a good weather-resis-
to prevent the clutch disc from sticking to the fly- tant tarpaulin or other cover if it must be stored
wheel. outdoors. A clear plastic cover is recommended
for indoor storage.

The stored engine should be inspected periodical-


ly. If there are any indications of rust or corro-
Do not apply oil, grease or any wax base com- sion, corrective steps must be taken to prevent
pound to the flywheel. The cast iron will absorb damage to the engine parts. Perform a complete
these substances which can sweat out during inspection at the end of one year and apply addi-
operation and cause the clutch to slip. tional treatment as required.

18. Drain the engine cooling system (tag cap).

19. The oil may be drained from the engine


crankcase if so desired. If the oil is drained, rein-
stall and tighten the drain plug (tag cap).

7-3 Revised: November 2000


MACHINE STORAGE

13. Remove the inspection hole cover and inspect


the clutch release lever and link pins and the
RESTORING ENGINE TO SERVICE bearing ends of the clutch reliease shaft. Apply
engine oil sparingly, if necessary to these areas.

1. Remove the valve rocker cover(s) and pour at 14. After all of the preparations have been com-
least one-half gallon of oil, of the same grade as pleted, start the engine. The small amount of
used in the crankcase, over the rocker arms and rust preventive compound which remains in the
push rods. fuel system will cause a smoky exhaust for a few
minutes.
2. Reinstall the valve rocker cover(s).
NOTE: Before subjecting the engine to a load or
3. Remove the covers and tape from all of the high speed, it is advisable to check the engine
openings of the engine, fuel tank, and electrical tune-up.
equipment. Do not overlook the exhaust outlet.

4. Wash the exterior of the engine with fuel oil to TRANSMISSION STORAGE
remove the rust preventive.

5. Remove the rust preventive from the flywheel.


PRESERVATIVE SELECTION When transmis-
6. Remove the paper strips from between the pul- sions are to be stored or remain inactive for ex-
leys and the belts. tended periods of time, specific preservative
methods are recommended to prevent rust and
7. Check the crankcase oil level. Fill the crank- corrosion damage. The length of storage will usu-
case to the proper level with the heavy-duty lubri- ally determine the preservative method to be
cating oil recommended under Lubricating Oil used. Various methods are described below.
Specifications.

8. Fill the fuel tank with the fuel specified under STORAGE NEW UNITS
Diesel Fuel Oil Specifications. New units contain preservative oil when shipped
for Funk and can be safely stored for 6 weeks
9. Close all of the drain cocks and fill the engine without further treatment. Refer to the Funk
cooling system with clean soft water and a rust Transmission manual for additional information.
inhibitor. If the engine is to be exposed to freezing
temperatures, add a high boiling point type anti-
freeze solution to the cooling system (the anti- STORAGE, 30 DAYS TO 1 YEAR - WITHOUT
freeze contains a rust inhibitor). OIL

10 Install and connect the battery. 1. Drain Oil.

11. Service the air cleaner as outlined under Air 2. Seal all openings and breathers, except oil
System. drain hole, with moisture-proof cover or tape.

12. Prepare the generator for starting. 3. Coat all exposed, unpainted surfaces with Nox
Rust X-110.

7-4 Revised: November 2000


MACHINE STORAGE

4. Atomize or spray 4 ounces of Nox Rust VCI No.


10 oil, or equivalent, into the transmission RESTORATION TO SERVICE
through the oil drain hole. Install the drain plug.

5. If additional storage time is required, (3) and Refer to page 7-4, Restoring Engine to Service,
(4) above should be repeated at yearly intervals. and page 7-5 and 7-6, Restoring Transmission
to Service, for the procedures required to restore
these components to service.
*Nox Rust is a preservative additive manufac-
tured by the Daubert Chemical Company, Chi- Remove the MACHINE from storage via the fol-
cage, Illinois. Motorstor is covered by US lowing procedure:
Military Specifications MIL-L-46002 (ORD)
and MIL-1-23310 (WEP). 1. Remove preservative lubricants from all sur-
faces.

RESTORING TRANSMISSION TO SERVICE 2. Check all fluid levels, adding or draining as re-
quired.

1. If Nox Rust, or equivalent, was used in prepar- 3. Lubricate the machine according to Section 9,
ing the transmission for storage, use the follow- making certain that all points with grease fittings
ing procedures to restore the unit to service. are lubricated.

2. Remove the tape from openings and breather. 4. Make a thorough visual inspection of the entire
machine, placing special emphasis on the condi-
3. Wash off all the external grease with solvent. tion of all hydraulic hoses.

4. Add hydraulic transmission fluid, type C3 to


proper level.

NOTE: It is not necessary to drain C3 oil and Nox


Rust mixture from the transmission.

5. If Nox Rust or equivalent, was not used in pre-


paring the transmission for storage, use the fol-
lowing procedures to restore the unit to service.

6. Remove the tape from openings and breathers.

7. Wash off all the external grease with solvent.

8. Drain oil.

9. Install a new oil filter element(s).

10. Refill transmission with hydraulic transmis-


sion fluid, type C3 to proper level.

7-5 Revised: November 2000


MACHINE STORAGE

CHROME CYLINDER ROD STORAGE 4. Inspect the cylinder rod surfaces and reapply
at three to six month intervals.

5. If the equipment is to be moved and then


Hard chrome plating is primarily applied to steel stored again for an extended period of time
cylinder rods for its wear resistant properties, al- or if the cylinder is cycled, steps 1 thru 4
though it does provide considerable corrosion re- should be repeated for all cylinder rods that
sistance as well. Once the chrome-plated rod is were exposed.
assembled into a cylinder and put into service,
the hydraulic fluid on the surface of the rod pro-
vides all the corrosion resistance required for the *Ferro-Kote 5856-BF is a product of Quaker
rod during its life cycle. As a cylinder cycles, hy- Chemical Company, Conshohocken, PA
draulic fluid is driven into any surface cracks 19428
that exist in the chrome plate. When these
cracks are filled with hydraulic fluid, moisture or For the protection of Older Equipment that is to
corrosive fluids can not penetrate the cracks. be stored, the procedure outlined above can be
However, some machining and cleaning opera- used, but greater attention to cleaning the ex-
tions can negatively impact the future corrosion posed portions of each cylinder rod is required.
resistance of chrome-plated shafting. For exam- Solvent applied with plastic or copper wool can
ple, additives such as chlorine, sulfur, and sodi- be used, but abrasives such as sandpaper
um found in Extreme Pressure (EP) coolants and should never be used to clean the exposed sur-
some washing solutions are known rust acceler- faces of the cylinder rod. If surface damage to
ates and can strip chrome plating from the base the chrome plate is discovered, the frequency of
metal. Cleaning processes, such as phosphate corrosion barrier applications should be in-
washing are also known to be detrimental to the creased.
corrosion resistance of hard chrome plated
shafting. Note: Caution must be used when cleaning
equipment in service with high pressure
If the rod is not periodically cycled and is subject washes. Soaps or chemicals containing
to a corrosive environment, moisture and oxygen chlorines or other corrosive elements
can work its way down through the chrome layer should be avoided. Cylinders should be
and begin to corrode the base metal. Brand new cleaned in a retracted position as not to
equipment may be stored outside for a consider- expose rods to the chemicals. Cylinders
able period of time at the equipment dealership should be cycled immediately following
before it is sold. During these times, a protective the wash. If rods are to be stored in the
barrier must be applied to the exposed cylinder extended position, refer to steps 1-4
rod. This protective barrier will preserve the in- above.
tegrity of the chrome plating by preventing the
elements of corrosion from getting to the metal
substrate.

Cylinders should be stored in the retracted posi-


tion, if at all possible. The steps outline below
cover the procedures to be followed for protect-
ing New Equipment from corrosion if it must be
stored in the extended position:

1. Position the equipment as it will be stored


and identify all the exposed portions of the
chrome plated cylinder rods.

2. Clean any dirt and dust from the exposed


portions of the cylinder rods using a dry
cloth or a cloth which has been dampened
with an appropriate solvent. Do not use
caustics or acids.

3. Apply a thin coating of Ferro-Kote 5856-BF


to the exposed surfaces of the chrome plated
cylinder rods. The ferro-Cote may be
thinned using a 40% Kerosene or no. 1 fuel
oil mixture.

7-6 Issued: May 2002


GENERAL INFORMATION

INDEX

SECTION 8

SUBJECT PAGE

CONVERSION TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 1

AVERAGE WEIGHT OF MATERIALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 3

SUGGESTED TORQUE RATINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 4

MACHINE SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 6

T300-1 Issued: September 2004


GENERAL INFORMATION

CONVERSION TABLES

DECIMAL AND METRIC EQUIVALENTS OF FRACTIONS OF AN INCH

Fractions of Decimals of Millimeters Fractions of Decimals of Millimeters


an inch an inch an inch an inch

1/64 .0156 0.397 33/64 .5156 13.097


1/32 .0313 0.794 17/32 .5313 13.494
3/64 .0469 1.191 35/64 .5469 13.891
1/16 .0625 1.588 9/16 .5625 14.287
5/64 .0781 1.985 37/64 .5781 14.684
3/32 .0938 2.381 19/32 .5938 15.081
7/64 .1094 2.778 39/64 .6094 15.478
1/8 .1250 3.175 5/8 .6250 15.875
9/64 .0406 3.572 41/64 .6406 16.272
5/32 .1563 3.969 21/32 .6563 16.688
11/64 .1719 4.366 43/64 .6719 17.085
3/16 .1875 4.762 11/16 .6875 17.462
13/64 .2031 5.159 45/64 .7031 17.859
7/32 .2188 5.556 23/32 .7188 18.256
15/64 .2344 5.953 47/64 .7344 18.653
1/4 .2500 6.350 3/4 .7500 19.050
17/64 .2656 6.747 49/64 .7656 19.447
9/32 .2813 7.144 25/32 .7813 19.843
19/64 .2969 7.541 51/64 .7969 20.240
5/16 .3135 7.937 13/16 .8125 20.637
21/64 .3281 8.334 53/64 .8281 21.034
11/32 .3438 8.731 27/32 .8438 21/430
23/64 .3594 9.128 55/64 .8594 21/827
3/8 .3750 9.525 7/8 .8750 22.224
25/64 .3906 9.922 57/64 .8906 22.621
13/32 .4063 10.319 29/32 .9063 23.018
27/64 .4219 10.716 59/64 .9219 23.415
7/16 .4375 11.12 15/16 .9375 23.812
29/64 .4531 11.509 61/64 .9531 24.209
15/32 .4688 11.906 31/32 .9688 24.606
31/64 .4844 12.303 63/64 .9844 25.003
1/2 .5000 12.700 1 1.0000 25.400

8-1
GENERAL INFORMATION

LIQUID WEIGHTS AND MEASURES METRIC EQUIVALENTS

LIQUID MEASURE LIQUID MEASURE


4 gills equals 1 pint 1 litre equals .0353 cu. ft.
2 pints 1 quart 1 litre .2642 gallon
4 quarts 1 gallon 1 litre 61.023 cu. in.
7.48 gallons 1 cu. ft. 1 litre 2.202 lbs. of
240 gallons of 1 Ton water(62F.)
water 1 cu. foot 28.32 litres
340 gallons of 1 Ton 1 gallon 3.785 litres
gasoline 1 cu. inch .0164 litre

MEASURES OF WEIGHTS MEASURE OF WEIGHTS


16 ounces equals 1 pound 1 gram equals .0353 ounce
2000 pounds 1 short ton 1 kilogram 2.205 lbs.
2240 pounds 1 long ton 1 ounce 28.35 grams
100 cu. feet " 1 register ton 1 pound .454 kilogram
40 cu. feet 1 U.S. shipping 1 ton .907 metric ton
ton

CIRCULAR MEASURE ELECTRICAL UNITS

60 seconds equals 1 minute 1 kilowatt equals 1.34 H.P.


60 minutes 1 degree 1 horsepower 746 watts
90 degrees 1 quadrant
360 degrees circumference

SURVEYORS MEASURE

7.92 inches equals 1 link


100 links 66 feet
or 4 rods
or 1 chain
80 chains 1 mile

8-2
GENERAL INFORMATION

AVERAGE WEIGHT OF MATERIALS


Lb. per Cu. Ft.

METALS, ALLOYS, ORES EARTH

Aluminum, Cast-Hammered 165 Clay, Dry 63


Brass, Cast-Rolled 534 Clay, Damp, Plastic 110
Bronze 509 Clay & Gravel, Dry 100
Copper, Cast-Rolled 556 Earth, Dry Loose 76
Gold, Cast-Hammered 1205- Earth, Dry Packed 95
Iron, Gray-Cast 442 Earth, Moist Loose 78
Iron Slag 172 Earth, Moist Packed 96
Lead 710 Earth, Mud Flowing 108
Manganese 475 Earth, Mud Packed 115
Mercury 847 Riprap, Limestone, Sandstone,
Nickel 537 Shale 80-105
Steel 481-489 Sand, Gravel, Dry Loose 90-105
Tin, Cast-Hammered 459 Sand, Gravel, Dry Packed 100-120
Tin, Cast-Hammered 459 Sand, Gravel, Wet 126
Tungsten 1200
Zinc, Cast-Rolled 440
EXCAVATIONS IN WATER

Sand or Gravel 60
MASONRY Sand or Gravel & Clay 65
Clayt 80
Ashlar Masonry * 143-162 River Mud 90
Rubble Masonry * 137-156 Soil 70
Dry Rubble Masonry * 110-130 Stone Riprap 65
*Granite, Syenite, Gneiss, Marble,
Limestone, Sandstone, Bluestone
Brick Masonry 103-128 STONE, QUARRIED, PILED
Concrete Masonry 100-128
Portland Cement 196 Basalt, Granite, Gneiss 96
Portland Cement, Loose 94 Limestone, Marble, Quartz 95
Lime, Gypsum, Loose 53-64 Sandstone 82
Mortar, Lime, Set 103 Shale 92
Greenstone, Hornblend 107

WOOD
MISCELLANEOUS
Cedar 22
Fir, Douglas 32 Water, 4 C. 62.4
Oak 42-54 Water, 100 C. 59.8
Pine, Oregon 32 Paper 58
Pine, Southern 38-42 Glass, Common 162
Redwood 2 Petroleum 45-54
Spruce 28 Coal, Anthracite 47-5
Black Walnut 37 Coal, Bituminous 40-54
Coal, Coke 23-32

8-3
GENERAL INFORMATION

TORQUE RATINGS

ES - 100.0
TORQUE RATINGS
FOR
DRY - UNCOATED FASTENERS

TORQUE VALUES TO BE WITHIN 5%


ALL FIGURES IN FOOT POUND

THIS TABLE DOES NOT APPLY TO HY-


DRAULIC CONNECTIONS. WHEN
TORQUING HYDRAULIC CONNEC-
TIONS REFER TO ES-100.1

NOM. DIA. IN. GRADE 2 GRADE 5 GRADE 8

1/4 6 -*4 8 12 BOLT HEAD MARKING


5/16 12 - * 7 20 25
3/8 20 - * 12 30 45
7/16 35 - * 20 50 75
1/2 50 - * 30 80 110
9/16 75 - * 45 115 160
GRADE 2
5/8 100 - * 60 160 225
3/4 180 - * 110 280 400
7/8 175 450 640
1 265 680 970
GRADE 5
1-1/8 375 840 1,380
1-1/4 530 1,200 1,930
1-3/8 700 1,570 2,540
1-1/2 930 2,080 3,380
1-3/4 1,460 2,090 5,300 GRADE 8

2 2,200 3,200 7,990


2-1/4 3,200 5,350 11,690
2-1/2 4,400 7,300 15,990
The above information was compiled for U.N.C. Threaded Fasteners.

NOTE: * = Torque Values For Bolts And Screws Longer Than 6

Fasteners as supplied by the vendor are considered not


lubricated.

8-4
GENERAL INFORMATION

TORQUE RATINGS

ES - 100.1
TORQUE RATINGS
FOR
LUBRICATED OR PLATED FASTENERS

TORQUE VALUES TO BE WITHIN 5%


ALL FIGURES IN FOOT POUND

REFER TO THIS TABLE WHEN TORQU-


ING HYDRAULIC CONNECTIONS (Piping
& Cylinders).

NOM. DIA. IN. GRADE 2 GRADE 5 GRADE 8

1/4 5 -*3 7 10 BOLT HEAD MARKING

5/16 9 -*5 14 20
3/8 16 - * 9 25 35
7/16 25 - * 15 40 55
1/2 40 - * 20 60 85
9/16 55 - * 30 85 120 GRADE 2
5/8 75 - * 45 120 170
3/4 135 - * 80 210 300
7/8 130 340 485
1 200 515 720 GRADE 5
1-1/8 280 635 1,030
1-1/4 400 890 1,450
1-3/8 520 1,175 1,900
1-1/2 695 1,560 2,530
GRADE 8
1-3/4 1,100 1,825 3,980
2 1,650 2,750 6,000
2-1/4 2,400 4,000 8,760
2-1/2 3,300 5,500 12,000
The above information was compiled for U.N.C. Threaded Fasteners.

NOTE: If threads are not lubricated prior to assembly or are not


plated use Torque Spec. ES-100.0

* = Torque Values for Bolts and Screws longer than 6

Fasteners as supplied by the vendor are considered not


lubricated.
8-5
GENERAL INFORMATION

8-6
GENERAL INFORMATION

8-7
GENERAL INFORMATION

8-8
GENERAL INFORMATION

8-9
WIRE ROPE USERS MANUAL

INDEX

SECTION 9

SUBJECT PAGE

WIRE ROPE USERS MANUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1


WIRE ROPE
USERS MANUAL

COMMITTEE OF WIRE ROPE PRODUCERS


American Iron and Steel Institute
(Edited version by Terex Cranes)
This publication is a joint effort of the
COMMITTE OF WIRE ROPE PRODUCERS/
American Iron and Steel institute
and the
WIRE ROPE TECHNICAL BOARD

The Wire Rope Technical Board (WRTB) is an association of engineers representing


companies that account for more than 90 percent of wire rope produced in the United
States; it has the following objectives:
To promote development of engineering and scientific knowledge relating to
wire rope;
To assist in establishing technological standards for military, governmental and
industrial use;
To promote development, acceptance and implementation of safety standards;
To help extend the uses of wire rope by disseminating technical and engineering
information to equipment manufacturers; and
To conduct and/or underwrite research for the benefit of both industry and user.

Data, specifications, architectural/engineering information and drawings presented in


this publication have been delineated in accordance with recognized professional prin-
ciple and practices, and are for general information only. Suggested procedures and
products should not, therefore, be used without first securing competent advice with
respect to their suitability for any given application.

The publication of the material contained herein is not intended as a warranty on the
part of American Iron and Steel Institute-or that of any person named herein-that these
data are suitable for any general or particular use, or of freedom from infringement of
any patent or patents. Any use of these data or suggested practices can only be made
with the understanding that American iron and Steel Institute makes no warranty of
any kind respecting such use and the user assumes all liability arising therefrom.

COMMITTEE OF WIRE ROPE PRODUCERS


American Iron and Steel Institute
1000 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036

Copyright 1979 by American Iron and Steel Institute


All rights reserved
Printed in the U.S.A.

Permission to reproduce or quote any portion of this book as editorial


reference is herby granted. When making such reproductions or quota-
tions, the courtesy of crediting this publication and American Iron and
Steel Institute will be appreciated.

2
CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION / 5
2. BASIC COMPONENTS / 7
3. WIRE ROPE INDENTIFICATION AND CONSTRUCTION / 9
4. HANDLING WIRE ROPE / 17

Wire Rope Installation / 18


Unreeling & Uncoiling / 19
Seizing Wire Rope / 22
Cutting Wire Rope / 24
End Attachments / 25
Efficiency of End Attachments / 27
Socketing / 28
Wire Rope Clips / 28
How to Apply Clips 28, 29, 31
Wedge Sockets / 33, 33R
Drums-Grooved / 34
Drums-Plain (Smooth) / 35R

5. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF WIRE ROPE / 37


Breaking in a New Wire Rope / 45
Wire Rope and Operations Inspection / 45

3
3 Wire Rope Identification and Construction
Wire rope is identified not only by its component parts, but also by its construction,
i.e. by the way the wires have been laid to form strands, and by the way the strands
have been laid around the core.
In Figure 3, drawings a and c show strands as normally laid into the
rope to the right-in as fashion similar to the threading in a right-hand bolt. Con-
versely, the left lay rope strands (drawings b and d) are laid in the opposite
direction.
Again in Figure 3, the first two drawings (a and b) show regular lay
ropes. Following these are the types known as lang lay ropes. Note that the wires
in regular lay ropes appear to line up with the axis of the rope; in lang lay rope the
wires form an angle with the axis of the rope. This difference in appearance is a
result of variations in manufacturing techniques: regular lay ropes are made so that
the direction of the wire lay in the strand is opposite to the direction of the strand lay
in the rope; lang lay ropes (c and d) are made with both strand lay and rope lay
in the same direction. Finally, the type e called alternate lay consists of alternat-
ing regular and lang lay strands.

Figure 3. A comparison of typical wire rope lays: a) right regular lay, b) left regular lay,
c) right lang lay, d) left lang lay, e) right alternate lay.

9
Wire rope nomenclature also defines: length, size (i.e., diam.), type, direction
of lay, grade of rope, type of core and whether it is preformed (p/f) or non-preformed
(np/f.) If the direction and type of lay are omitted from the rope description, it is pre-
sumed to be right regular lay. In addition, if no mention is made as to preforming, this
will be presumed as a requirement for preforming. On the other hand, an order of ele-
vator rope requires an explicit statement since p/f and np/f ropes are used extensively.
An example of a complete description would appear thus:

600 ft 3/4 6x25 FW Left lang lay


Improved plow IWRC

(Rope described above would be made PREFORMED.)


Table 1 WIRE ROPE CLASSIFICATIONS
Based on the Nominal Number of Wires in Each Strand

Classification Description

6x7 Containing 6 strands that are made up of 3 through 14 wires,


of which no more than 9 are outside wires.

6x19 Containing 6 strands that are made up of 15 through 26


wires, of which no more than 12 are outside wires.

6x37 Containing 6 strands that are made up of 27 through 49


wires, of which no more than 18 are outside wires.

6x61 Containing 6 strands that are made up of 50 through 74


wires, of which no more than 24 are outside wires.

6x127 Containing 6 strands that are made up of 75 through 109


wires, of which no more than 36 are outside wires.

8x19 Containing 8 strands that are made up of 15 through 26


wires, of which no more than 12 are outside wires.

19x7 Containing 19 strands, each strand is made up of 7 wires.


and It is manufactured by covering an inner rope of 7x7 left
18x7 lang lay construction with 12 strands in right regular lay.
(The rotation-resistant property that characterizes this
highly specialized construction is a result of the counter
torques developed by the two layers.) When the steel wire
core strand is replaces by a fiber core, the description
becomes 18x7.

When a center wire is replaces by a strand, it is considered as a single wire,


and the rope classification remains unchanged.
There are, of course, many other types of wire rope, but they are useful only
in a limited number of applications and, as such, are sold as specialties. Usually
designated according to their actual construction, some of these special construc-
tions are listed in Table 2 and show in Figure 8.

13
WIRE ROPE INSTALLATION
CHECKING THE DIAMETER
It is most important to check the diameter of the delivered rope before installation.
This is to make certain that the rope diameter meets the specified requirements for
the given machine or equipment. With an undersize diameter rope, stresses be
increased; an oversize diameter rope will wear out prematurely. This happens
because of abuse to the rope caused by pinching in the grooves of the sheave and
drum.
In checking, however, the true rope diameter must be measure. And this
is defined as the diameter of the circumscribing circle, i.e., its largest cross-sectional
dimension. To insure accuracy this measurement should be made with a wire rope
caliper using the correct method (b) shown in Fig. 11. For measuring ropes with an
odd number of outer strands, special techniques must be employed.
Design specifications for wire rope are such that the diameter is slightly
larger than the nominal size, according to the allowable tolerances shown in Table 3.

TABLE 3
OVERSIZE LIMITS OF WIRE ROPE DIAMETERS*
UNREELING AND UNCOILING
Wire rope is shipped in cut lengths, either in coils or on reels. Great care should be taken
when the rope is removed from the shipping package since it can be permanently damaged
by improper unreeling or uncoiling. Looping the rope over the head of the reel or pulling
the rope off a coil while it is lying on the ground, will create loops in the line. Pulling on
a loop will, at the very least, produce imbalance in the rope and may result in open or
closed kinks (Fig. 12). Once a rope is kinked, the damage is permanent. To correct this
condition, the kinks must be cut out, and the shortened pieces use for some other purpose.
Unwinding wire rope from its reel also requires careful and proper procedure.
There are three methods to perform this step correctly:
1) The reel is mounted on a shaft supported by two jacks or a roller payoff (Fig.
13). Since the reel is free to rotate, the rope is pulled from the reel by a work-
man, holding the rope end and walking away from the reel as it unwinds. A
braking device should be employed so that the rope is kept taut and the reel is
restrained from over-running the rope. This is necessary particularly with
powered de-reeling equipment.
2) Another method involves mounting the reel on an unreeling stand (Fig.14). It
is then unwound in the same manner as described above (1). In this case,
however, greater care must be exercised to keep the rope under tension suffi-
cient to prevent the accumulation of slack-a condition that will case the rope
to drop below the lower reel head.
3) In another accepted method, the end of the rope is held while the reel itself is
rolled along the ground. With this procedure the will pay off properly; how-
ever, the end being held will travel in the direction the reel is being rolled. As
the difference between the diameter of the reel head and the diameter of the
bound rope increases, the speed of travel will increase.
When re-reeling wire rope from a horizontally supported reel to a drum, it is
preferable for the rope to travel from the top of the reel to the tope of the drum;
or, from the bottom of the reel to the bottom of the drum (Fig. 15). Re-reeling
in this manner will avoid putting a reverse bend into the tope as it is being
installed. If a rope is installed so that a reverse bend is induced, it may cause
the rope to become livelier and, consequently, harder to handle.
When unwinding wire rope from a coil, there are two suggested methods for
carrying out this procedure in a proper manner:
1) One method involves placing the coil on a vertical unreeling stand. The stand
consists of a base with a fixed vertical shaft. On this shaft here is a swift,
consisting of a plate with inclined pins positioned so that the coil may be place
over them. the whole swift and coil then rotate as the rope is pulled off. This
method is particularly effective when the rope is to be wound on a drum.
2) The most common as well as the easiest uncoiling method is merely to hold one
end of the rope while rolling the coil along the ground like a hoop (Fig. 16).
Figures 17 and 18 show unreeling and uncoiling methods that are most likely
to provide kinks. Such improper procedure should be strenuously avoided in
order to prevent the occurrence of loops. These loops, when pulled taut, will
inevitably result in kinks. No matter how a kink develops, it will damage
strands and wires, and the kinked section must be cut out. Proper and careful
handling will keep the wire rope free kinks.
SEIZING WIRE ROPE
While there are numerous ways to cut wire rope, in every case, certain precautions
must be observed. For one thin, proper seizings are always applied on both sides
of the place where the cut is to be made. In a wire rope, carelessly or inade-
quately seized, ends may become distorted and flattened, and the strands may
loose. Subsequently, when the rope is put to work, there may be an uneven distri-
bution of leads to the strands; a condition that will significantly shorten the life of
the rope.
There are two widely accepted methods of applying seizing (Figure 19). The
seizing itself should be a soft, or anncaled wire or strand. The seizing wire diam-
eter and the length of the seizing should never be less than the diameter of the
rope being seized. For preformed ropes, one seizing on each side of the cut is nor-
mally sufficient. But for those that are not preformed, a minimum of two seizings
is recommended (Fig 20). Seizings should be spaced 6 rope diameters apart.
Table 4 list seizing lengths and seizing wire diameters suggested for use with
some commonly use wire ropes.
TABLE 4 SEIZING
Suggested Diameters and Lengths

23
CUTTING WIRE ROPE
Wire rope is cut after being properly seized (Fig. 20). Cutting is a reasonably
simple operation provided appropriate tools are used. There are several types of
cutters and shears commercially available. There are specifically designed to cut
wire rope.
Portable hydraulic and mechanical rope cutters are available. In remote areas,
however, it may at times be necessary to use less desirable cutting methods. For
example, using an axe or hatchet must be recognized as dangerous.
TABLE 5 TERMINAL EFFIECIENCIES (APPROXIMATE)
Efficiencies are based on nominal strengths
SOCKETING
Improperly attached wire rope terminals lead to serious-possibly unsafe- condi-
tions. To perform properly, all wire rope elements must be held securely by the
terminal. If this is not accomplished, the strands will loaf on the job and there
is every likelihood that a strand will become high. A high strand condition is
illustrated in Figure 42. In the case shown, selective abrasive wear of the loose
strand will necessitate early removal of the rope.
Poured Sockets-Spelter or Resin
When preparing a wire rope for socketing, it is of extreme importance to follow
recommended procedures. (See Appendix D: SOCKETING PROCEDURES.)
Procedures other than those stipulated here, may develop the required strength but
this cannot be pre-determined without destructive test. It is far safer-and ulti-
mately less costly-to follow well-established practices.
There are many ways to go wrong in socketing procedures. Some of the more
common pitfalls that should be guarded against include:
1) Turning back the strands-inward or outward-before the broom is inserted
into the socket;
2) Turning back the strands and seizing them to the body of the rope:
3) Turing back the strands and tucking them into the body of the rope:
4) Tying the knot in the rope:
5) Driving nails, spikes, bolts, and similar objects into the socket after the rope is
in, so as to jam it tight; this is particularly dangerous-and ruinous.
To avoid these and many other dangerous practices, play it safe by following cor-
rect procedures.

WIRE ROPE CLIPS


Wire rope clips are widely used for attaching wire rope to haulages, mine cars,
hoist, and for joining two ropes.
Clips are available in two basic designs: the U-bolt and fist grip (Fig. 23). The
efficiency of both types is the same.
When using U-bolt clips, extreme care must be exercised to make certain that
they are attached correctly, i.e., the U-bolt must be applied so the U section is in
contact with the dead end of the rope (Fig. 24). Also, the tightening and retight-
ening of the nuts must be accomplished as required.

HOW TO APPLY CLIPS


U-BOLT CLIPS (Table 6, page 30)
Recommended Method of Applying U-Bolt Clips to Get Maximum
Holding Power of the Clip
1) Turn back the specified amount of rope from the thimble. Apply the first clip
one base width from the dead end of the wire rope (U-bolt over dead end-live
end rest in clip saddle). Tighten nuts evenly to recommended torque.
2) Apply the next clip as near the loop as possible. Turn on nuts firm but do not
tighten.
3) Space additional clips is required equally between the first two. Turn on nuts-
take up rope slack-tighten all nuts evenly on all clips to recommended torque.

28
4) NOTICE! Apply the initial load and retighten nuts to the recommended
torque. Rope will stretch and shrink in diameter when loads are applied. Inspect
periodically and retighten.
A termination made in accordance with the above instructions, and using the
number of clips shown has an approximate 80% efficiency rating. This rating is
based upon the catalog breaking strength of wire rope If a pulley is using in place
of a thimble for turning back the rope, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown is based upon using right regular or lang lay wire
rope, 6 x 19 class or 6 x 37 class, fiber core or IWRC, IPS or XIPS. If Seale con-
struction or similar large outer wire type construction in the 6 x 19 class is to be
used for sizes 1 inch and larger, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown also applies to right regular lay wire rope, 8 x 19
class, fibre core, IPS, sizes 1 1/2 inch and smaller; and right regular lay wire rope,
18 x 7 class, fibre core, IPS or XIPS, sizes 1 3/4 and smaller.
For other classes of wire rope not mentioned above, it may be necessary to
add additional clips to the number shown.
If a greater number of clips are used than shown in the table, the amount of
rope turnback should be increased proportionally. ABOVE BASED ON USE OF
CLIPS ON NEW ROPE

IMPORTANT: Failure to make a termination in accordance with aforemen-


tioned instructions, or failure to periodically check and retighten to the recom-
mended torque, will cause a reduction in efficiency rating.

29
FIST GRIP CLIPS (Table 7, on the following page)

RECOMMENDED METHOD OF APPLYING FIST GRIP CLIPS


1) Turn back the specified amount of rope from the thimble. Apply the first clip
one base width from the dead end of the wire rope. Tighten nuts evenly to rec-
ommended torque.
2) Apply the next clip as near the loop as possible. Turn on nuts firmly but do not
tighten.
3) Space additional clips if required equally between the first two. Turn on nuts-
take up rope slack-tighten all nuts evenly on all clips to recommended torque.
4) NOTICE! Apply the initial load and retighten nuts to the recommended torque.
Rope will stretch and shrink in diameter when loads are applied. Inspect
periodically and retighten.
A termination made in accordance with the above instructions, and using the
number of clips shown has an approximate 80% efficiency rating. This rating is
based upon the catalog breaking strength of wire rope. If a pulley is used in place
of a thimble for turning back the rope, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown is based upon using right regular or lang lay wire
rope, 6 x 19 class or 6 x 37 class, fibre core or IWRC, IPS or EIPS. If Seale con-
struction or similarly large outer wire type construction in the 6 x 19 class is to be
used for sizes 1 inch and larger, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown also applies to right regular lay wire rope, 8x 19
class, fibre core, IPS, sizes 11/2 inch and smaller; and right regular lay wire rope,
18 x 7 class, fibre core, IPS or EIPS, sizes 1 1/2 and smaller.
For other classes of wire rope not mentioned above, it may be necessary to
add additional clips to the number shown.
If a greater number of clips are used than shown in the table, the amount of
rope turnback should be increased proportionately. AVORED BASED ON USE
OF FIST GRIP CLIPS ON NEW WIRE ROPE.

IMPORTANT: Failure to make a termination in accordance with aforemen-


tioned instructions, or failure to periodically check and retighten to the recom-
mended torque, will cause a reduction in efficiency rating.

31
32
WEDGE SOCKETS
One of the more popular end attachments for wire rope is the wedge socket. For
field, or on the job attachment, it is easily installed and quickly dismantled. The
procedure is simple:
1) Inspect the wedge and socket; all rough edges or burrs, that might damage the
rope, should be removed.
2) If the end of the rope is welded, the welded end should be cut off. This will
allow the distortions of the rope strands, caused by the sharp bend around the
wedge, to adjust themselves at the end of the line. If the weld is not cut off,
the distortions will be forced up the working line. This may result in the
development of high strands and wavy rope.
3) Place the socket in an upright position and bring the rope around in a large,
easy to handle, loop. Care must be taken to make certain hat the live-loaded-
side of the rope is in line with the ears (Fig. 25).
4) The dead end of the rope should extend from the socket for a distance approx-
imately nine times the rope diameter. The wedge is now place in the socket,
and a wire rope clip is placed around the dead end by clamping a short, extra
piece of rope to the tail. (Do not clamp to the live part.) The U-bolt should
bear against the tail; the saddle of the clip should bear against the sort extra
piece.
5) Secure the ears of the socket to a sturdy support and carefully take a strain on
the live side of the rope. Pull the wedge and rope into position with tension
sufficiently right to hold them in place.
6) After final pin connections ar mad, increase the loads gradually until the
wedge is properly seated. Avoid sudden shock loads.
The foregoing is the recommended procedure. If variations are made to suit
special conditions, they should be carefully evaluated beforehand.
Paragraph 4, page 33, cites one method used to clamp the rope dead end. Two
other acceptable methods are shown below. Method 3 can be used if the length of
the thread on the U bolt legs will allow the saddle to firmly clamp one diameter of
rope.

The purpose of clamping the dead end close to the socket is to prevent the rope
and wedge from disengaging from the socket.

33R
DRUMS-GROOVED
Drums are the means by which power is transmitted to the rope and thence to the
object to be moved For the wire rope to pick up this power efficiently and to
transmit it properly to the working end, installation must be carefully controlled.
If the drum is grooved, the winding conditions should be closely supervised
to assure adherence to the following recommended procedures;
1) The end of the rope must be secured to the drum by such means as will give
the end attachment at least as much strength as is specified by the equipment
manufacturer.
2) Adequate tension must be maintained on the rope while it is being wound so
that the winding proceeds under continuous tension.
3) The rope must follow the groove.
4) There should be at least three dead turns remaining on the drum when the rope
is unwound during normal operation Two dead turns are a mandatory require-
ment in many codes and standards.
If the wire rope is carelessly wound and, as a result, jumps the grooves, it
will be crushed and cut where it crosses from one groove to the other. Another,
almost unavoidable problem is created at the drum flange; as the rope climbs to a
second layer there is further crushing and the wires receive excessive abrasion.
Riser and filler strips may help remedy this condition.

34
DRUMS-PLAIN (SMOOTH)
Installation of a wire rope on a plain (smooth) face drum requires a great deal
of care. The starting position should be at the drum end so that each turn of the
rope will wind tightly against the preceding turn (Fig.26). Here too, close
supervision should be maintained all during installation. This will help make
certain that:
1) the rope is properly attached to the drum,
2) appropriate tension on the rope is maintained as it is wound on the drum,
3) each turn is guided as close to the preceding turn as possible, so that there
are no gaps between turns,
4) and that there are at least two dead turns on the drum when the rope is fully
unwound during normal operating cycles.
The term flexibility is frequently thought of as being synonymous with resis-
tance to bending fatigue. This is not true. Flexibility refers to the capability of
flexing or bending. While a high degree of fatigue resistance may sometimes
accompany the flexibility characteristic, it does not necessarily follow that this is
so. A fiber core rope, for example, is more flexible than an IWRC rope. Yet,
when the IWRC rope is bent around undersize sheaves at relatively high loads, it
will usually perform better than the more flexible fiver core rope. The reason for
lies in the ability of IWRC rope to retain its roundness nd freedom of internal
movement. Under the same conditions, a fiber ore rope will flatten and inhibit
free internal adjustment, thereby leading to early failure.
As note earlier, a design choice is almost invariably the result of compromise.
Ultimately, what is sought is an efficient, economical solution, hence whatever the
compromise, it must help achieve this goal.

BREAKING IN A NEW WIRE ROPE


A new wire rope requires carefully installation and close adherence to following
all the appropriate procedures previously noted. After the rope has been installed
and the ends secured in the correct manner, the mechanism should be started care-
fully and then permitted to run through a cycle of operation at a very slow speed.
During this trial operation, a very close watch should be kept on all working parts-
sheaves, drums, rollers-to make certain that the rope runs freely, and without any
possible obstructions as it makes its way through the system. If no problems
appear in running the rope, the next step should include several run-throughs of
the normal operational cycle under light load and at reduced speed. This proce-
dure allows the component parts of the new rope to make a gradual adjustment to
the actual operating conditions.

WIRE ROPE AND OPERATIONS INSPECTION


To assume a high level of safety while keeping the annual cost of wire rope at a
reasonably low level, it is essential to maintain a well-planned program of peri-
odic inspection. Frequently, there are statutory and/or regulatory agencies whose
requirements must be adhered to, but whether or not these exist in a given locale,
the wire rope user can be guided by the suggested procedures that follow.
Abrasion, bending and crushing represent the ABCs of wire rope abuse, and
it is the primary goal of good inspection practice to discover such conditions early
enough so that corrections can be made or ropes replaced safely and with mini-
mum effort. When any degradation indicates a loss of original rope strength, a
decision must made quickly as to allowing the rope to remain in service. But such
a decision can only be made by an experienced inspector. And his determination
will be based on:
1) Details of the equipments operation: Will the rope break?
2) Frequency of inspection: Will it be safe until the next scheduled inspection?
3) Maintenance history: How rapid is the degradation?
4) Consequences of failure: Will it present hazards to humans?
5) Historical records of similar equipment
To make certain that sufficient information is obtained, following are guide-
lines that should be adhered to:

45
If the fleet angle (Fig. 34) is large, it may be necessary to accept a smaller arc
of contact at the throat; 130 for example instead of 150. This is done to avoid
scrubbing the rope on the flange of the sheave.
As previously noted, the groove size is evaluated on the basis of how the gage
leaf fits the groove. Daylight under the gage is not tolerable when using the worn
groove gage. If a full over-size gage is used, some daylight may be acceptable,
but really must be judged by relating the measurement to the actual size of the
rope.
For new rope, extra caution should be observed as to its fit in the groove.
Characteristically, ropes become smaller in diameter immediately after being
placed in service. As a result, they would operated satisfactorily in a worn
groove; one that was gage OK by the worn groove gage. Nonetheless, in some
cases, a rope may not pull down, and it this happens, abnormal wear may occur.
It is important to remember that a tight groove not only pinches and damages
the rope but that the inching prevents the necessary adjustment of the wires ann
strands. On the other hand, a groove that is too large will not provide sufficient
support; in this case, the rope will flatten and thereby restrict the free sliding
action of the wires and strands.
The size of the groove is not only critical item to be examined closely. The
condition of the groove is also an important factor of concern. Is it smooth or
imprinted? If the groove is imprinted then it must be re-machined or, if it is
imprinted too deeply, it means that sheave, roller or drum must be replaced. If
replacement is indicated, a larger sheave or drum should be installed if possible,
or a harder material should be specified for the replacement.
Groove examination should also concern itself with how the groove is wear-
ing. If it is worn off-center, thereby forcing the rope to undercut or to rub against
the flange, it then becomes necessary to correct the alignment of the reeving sys-
tem, and to specify a harder material.
When checking the grooves, the bearings of the sheaves and rollers should
also be examined. They should turn easily. If not, each bearing must be properly
lubricated. Wobble in the sheave-from broken or worn bearings-is not accept-
able. Bad bearings will set up vibrations in the wire rope that can cause rapid
deterioration unless the condition is remedied. Bad bearings also increase the
force on the rope that is needed to move a given load, since friction forces will e
greatly increase.
Sheaves with broken flanges may allow the rope to jump from the sheave and
become fouled in the machinery. When this happens, the rope is cut, curled, and
the crowns of the wires in the strands are burred. There is ample evidence to sup-
port the rule that sheaves with broken flanges must be replaced immediately.
A sheave or drum with a flat spot can induce a whip into the line. This
whip, or wave, travels until is stopped by the end terminal, at which point the rope
may bend severely. This condition helps to accelerate the fatigue breakage of
wires. Sometimes the reeving is such that the whip or wave is arrested by a
sheave, or the drum itself. In these circumstances, the whipping will cause wire
breaks along the crowns of the strands. Obviously sheaves or drums that excite
vibrations of this sort, must be repaired or replaced.

46
GUIDELINE TO INSPECTIONS AND REPORTS FOR EQUIPMENT,
WIRE ROPE AND WIRE ROPE SLINGS
1) Maintain all inspection records and reports for the length of time deemed
appropriate.
2) Prior to each daily use, the following procedure should be followed.
a. Check all equipment functions.
b. Lower load blocks and check hooks for deformation or cracks.
c. During lowering procedure and the following raising cycle, observe the
rope and the reeving. Particular notice should be paid to kinking twisting
or other deformities. Drumwinding conditions should also be noted.
d. Check wire rope and slings for visual signs of anything that can cause them
to be unsafe to use, i.e., broken wires, excessive wear, kinking or twisting,
and marked corrosion. Particular attention should be give to any new dam-
age during operation.
3) Monthly inspections are recommended with a signed report by an authorized
competent inspector. The Monthly Reports should include inspection of the
following:
a. All functional operating mechanisms for excessive wear of components,
brake system parts and lubrication.
b. Limit switches.
c. Crane hooks for excess throat opening or twisting along with a visual for
cracks.
d. Wire rope and reeving for conditions causing possible removal.
e. Wire rope slings for excessive wear, broken wings, kinking, twisting and
mechanical abuse.
f. All end connections such as hooks, shackles, turnbuckles, plate clamps,
sockets, etc. for excessive wear, and distortion.
4) An Annual Inspection with signed report must be made for the following:
a. Crane hook for cracks.
b. Hoist drum for wear or cracks.
c. Structural members for cracks, corrosion and distortion.
d. For loose structural connections such as bolts, rivets, and weldments.

WIRE ROPE INSPECTION


The following is fairly comprehensive listing of critical inspection factors. It is
not, however, presented as a substitute for an experienced inspector. It is rather a
users guide to the accepted standards by which ropes must be judged.
1) Abrasion
Rope abrades when it moves through an abrading medium or over drums and
sheaves. Most standards require that rope is to be removed if the outer wire
wear exceeds 1/3 of the original outer wire diameter. This is not easy to deter-
mine and discovery relies upon the experience gained by the inspector in mea-
suring wire diameters of discarded ropes.

52
2) Rope Stretch
All ropes will stretch when loads are initially applied. For an extended discus-
sion of stretch, see pp. 73 and following:
As rope deteriorates from wear, fatigue, etc. (excluding accidental dam-
age), continued application of a load of constant magnitude will produce vary-
ing amounts of rope stretch. A stretch curve plotted for stretch vs. time (Fig.
35) displays three discrete phases:
Phase 1. Initial stretch, during the early (beginning) period of rope service,
caused by the rope adjustments to operating conditions (constructional stretch).
Phase 2. Following break-in, there is long period-the greatest part of the ropes
service life-during which a slight increase in stretch takes place over an
extended time. This results from normal wear, fatigue, etc. On the plotted
curve-stretch vs. time-this portion would almost be horizontal straight line
inclined slightly upward from its initial level.
Phase 3. Thereafter, the stretch begins to increase at a quicker rate. This
means that the rope is reaching the point of rapid deterioration; as result of pro-
longed subjection to abrasive wear, fatigue, etc. This second upturn of the
curve is a warning indicating that the rope should soon be removed.

53
3) Reduction in rope diameter
Any marked reduction in rope diameter indicates degradation. Such reduction
may be attributed to:
excessive external abrasion
internal or external corrosion
loosening or tightening of rope lay
inner wire breakage
rope stretch
ironing or milking of strands
In the past, whether or not a rope was allowed to remain in service
depended to a great extent on the ropes diameter at the time of inspection.
Currently this practice has undergone significant modification.
Previously, a decrease in the ropes diameter was compared with pub-
lished standards of minimum diameters. The amount of change in diameter is,
of course, useful in assessing a ropes condition. But, comparing this figure
with a fixed set of values is for the most part useless. These long-accepted
minima are not, in themselves, of any serious significance wince they do not
take into account such factors as: 1) variations in compressibility between
IWRC and Fiber Core: 2) differences in the amount of reduction in diameter
from abrasive wear, or from core compression, or combination of both; and 3)
the actual original diameter of the rope rather than its nominal value.
As a matter of fact, all ropes will show a significant reduction in diame-
ter when a load is applied. Therefore, a rope manufactured close to tis nomi-
nal size may, when it is subjected to loading, undergo a greater reduction in
diameter than that stipulated in the minimum diameter table. Yet, understand
these circumstances, the rope would be declared unsafe although it may, in
actuality, be safe.
As an example of the possible error at the other extreme, we can take
the case of a rope manufactured near the upper limits of allowable size. If the
diameter has reached a reduction to nominal or slightly below that, the tables
would show this rope to be safe. But it should, perhaps, be removed.
Today, evaluations of the rope diameter are first predicated on a com-
parison of the original diameter-when new and subjected to a known load-
with the current reading under like circumstances. Periodically, throughout
the life of the rope, the actual diameter should be recorded when the rope is
under equivalent loading and in the same operating section. This procedure, if
followed carefully, reveals a common rope characteristic: after an initial
reduction, the diameter soon stabilizes. Later, there will be a continuous,
albeit small, decrease in diameter throughout its life.
Core deterioration, when it occurs, is revealed by a more rapid reduction
in diameter and when observed it is time for removal.
Deciding whether or not a rope is safe is not always a simple matter. A
number of different but interrelated conditions must be evaluated. It would be

54
dangerously unwise for an inspector to declare a rope safe for continued ser-
vice simply because its diameter had not reached the minimum arbitrarily
established in a table if, at the same time, other observations lead to an oppo-
site conclusion.
Because criteria for removal are varied, and because diameter, in itself, is
a vague criterion, the table of minimum diameters has been deliberately omit-
ted from this manual.
4) Corrosion
Corrosion, while difficult to evaluate, is a more serious cause of degradation
than abrasion. Usually, it signifies a lack of lubrication. Corrosion will often
occur internally before there is any visible external evidence on the rope sur-
face. Pitting of wires is a cause for immediate rope removal. Not only does it
attack the metal wires, but it also prevents the ropes component parts from
moving smoothly as it is flexed. Usually, a slight discoloration because of
rusting merely indicates a need for lubrication.
Severe rusting, on the other hand, leads to premature fatigue failures in the
wires necessitating the ropes immediate rope removal from service. When a
rope shows more than one wire failure adjacent to a terminal fitting, it should
be removed immediately. To retard corrosive deterioration, the rope should be
kept well lubricated. In situations where extreme corrosion action can occur,
it may be necessary to use galvanized wire rope.
5) Kinks
Kinks are permanent distortions cause by loops drawn too tightly. Ropes with
kinks must be removed from service.
6) Bird Caging
Bird caging results from torsional imbalance that comes about because of
mistreatments such as sudden stops, the rope being pulled through tight
sheaves, or wound on too small a drum. This is cause for rope replacement
unless the affected portion can be removed.
7) Localized Conditions
Particular attention must be paid to wear at the equalizing sheaves. During
normal operations this wear is not visible. Excessive vibration, or whip can
cause abrasion and/or fatigue. Drum cross-over and flange point areas must
be carefully evaluated. All end fittings, including splices, should e examined
for worn or broken wires, loose or damaged strands, cracked fittings, worn or
distorted thimbles and tucks of strands.
8) Heated Damage
After a fire, or the presence of elevated temperatures, there may be metal dis-
coloration, or an apparent loss of internal lubrication; fiber core ropes are par-
ticularly vulnerable. Under these circumstances the rope should be replaced.
9) Protruding Core
If, for any cause, the rope core protrudes from an opening between the strands
the rope is unfit for service.

55
10) Damaged End Attachments
Cracked, bent, or broken end fittings must be eliminated. The cause should
be sought out and corrected. In the case of bent hooks, the throat openings-
measured at the narrowest point-should not exceed 15% over normal not
should twisting be greater than 10.
11) Peening
Continuous pounding is one of the causes of peening. The rope strikes
against an object such as some structural part of the machine, or it beats
between the rope and the object it is striking. Another common cause of
peening is continuous passage-under high tension-over a sheave or drum.
Where peening action cannot be controlled, it is necessary to have more fre-
quent inspections and to be ready for earlier rope replacement.
Figure 36 shows the external appearance of two ropes, one of which has
been abraded and the other peened. Also shown are the cross-section of both
wires in these conditions.
12 Scrubbing
Scrubbing refers to the displacement of wires and strands as a result of rub-
bing around or against an object. This, in turn, causes wear and displacement
of wires and strands along one side of the rope. Corrective measures should
be taken as soon as this condition is observed.
13) Fatigue Failure
Wires that break with square ends and show little surface wear, have usually
failed as a result of fatigue. Such failures can occur on the crown of the
strands, or in the valleys between the strands where adjacent strand contact
exists. In almost all cases, these failures are related to bending stresses or
vibration.
If the diameter of the sheaves, rollers or drum cannot be increased, a more
flexible rope should be used. But, if the rope in use is already of maximum
flexibility, the only remaining course that will help prolong its service life is
to move the rope through the system, the fatigued sections are moved to less
fatiguing areas of the reeving. This technique is most frequently used in
rotary drilling.
14) Broken Wings
The number of broken wires on the outside of a wire rope are 1) an index of its
general condition, and 2) whether or not it must be considered for replace-
ment. Frequent inspection will help determine the elapsed time between
breaks. Ropes should be replaced as soon as the wire breakage reaches the
numbers give in Table 13. Such action must be taken without regard to the
type of fracture.
On occasion, a single wire will break shortly after installation. However, if no
other wires break at that time, there is no need for concern. On the other hand,
should more wires break, the cause should be carefully investigated.
On any installation, valley breaks-i.e., where the wire ruptures between
strands-should be given serious attention. When two or more such conditions are
found, the rope should be replaced immediately.
It is well to remember that once broken wires appear-in normal rope operating
under normal conditions-a good many more will show up within a relatively short
period. Attempting to squeeze the last measure of service from a rope beyond the
allowable number of broken wires (Table 13), will create an intolerably hazardous
situation.
A diagnostic guide to some of the most prevalent rope abuses is given in Table
14. On the following pages these abuses are illustrated and described.

57
TABLE 14 DIAGNOSTIC GUIDE TO COMMON WIRE ROPE ABUSES

Abuse Symptoms Possible Causes

Fatigue Wire break is transverse-either straight across Check for rope bent around too small a radius;
or Z shape. Broken ends will appear grainy. vibration or whipping; wobbly sheaves; rollers too
small; reverse bends; bent shafts; tight grooves;
corrosion; small drums & sheaves; incorrect rope
construction; improper installation; poor end
attachments. All running rope if left in service
long enough will eventually fail by fatigue.

Tension Wire break reveals predominantly cup and Check for overloads; sticky, grabby clutches;
cone fracture with some 45 shear breaks. jerky conditions; loose bearing on drum; fast
starts, fast stops, broken sheave flange; wrong
rope size & grade; poor end attachments.
Check for too great a strain on rope after factors
of deterioration have weakened it.

Abrasion Wire break mainly displays outer wires Check for change in rope or sheave size; change
worn smooth to knife edge thinness. Wire in load; overburden change; frozen or stuck
broken by abrasion in combination with sheaves; soft rollers, sheaves or drums; excessive
another factor will show a combination break. fleet angle; misalignment of sheaves; kinks;
improperly attached fittings; grit & sand; objects
imbedded in rope; improper grooving.

Cut or Gouged Wire ends are pinched down, mashed and/or Check on all the above conditions for mechanical
or Rough Wire cut in a rough diagonal shear-like manner. abuse, or either abnormal or accidental forces
during installation.

Torsion or Wire ends show evidence of Check on all the above conditions for mechanical
Twisting twist and/or cork-screw effect. abuse, or either abnormal or accidental forces
during installation.

Mashing Wires are flattened and spread at broken ends. Check on all the above conditions for mechanical
abuse, or either abnormal or accidental forces
during installation.

Corrosion Wire surfaces are pitted with break showing Indicates improper lubrication or storage.
evidence either of fatigue tension or abrasion.

Abrasion Reduced cross-section is broken off A long term condition normal


plug Fatigue square thereby producing a chisel shape. to the operating process.

Abrasion Reduced cross-section is necked down A long term condition normal


plus Tension as in a cup and cone configuration. Tensile to the operating process.
break produces a chisel shape.

59
61
ROPE INSPECTION SUMMARY
Any wire rope that has broken wires, deformed strands, variations in diameter, or
any change from its normal appearance, must be considered for e replacement. It
is always better to replace a rope when there is any doubt concerning its condition
or its ability to perform the required task. The cost of wire rope replacement is
quite insignificant when considered in terms of human injuries, the cost of down
time, or the cost of replacing broken structures.
Wire rope inspection includes examination of basic items such as:
1) Rope diameter reduction
2) Rope lay
3) External wear
4) Internal wear
5) Peening
6) Scrubbing
7) Corrosion
8) Broken Wires
Some sections of rope can break up without any prior warning. Already
discussed in some detail as to cause and effect, sections where this occurs are
ordinarily found at the end fittings, and at the point where the rope enters or
leaves the sheave groove of boom hoist, suspension systems, or other semi-opera-
tional systems. Because of the working that takes place at these sections, no
appreciable wear or crown breaks will appear. Under such an operation, the core
fails thereby allowing the strands to notch adjacent strands. However, when this
happens, valley breaks will appear. As soon as the first valley break is detected,
the rope should be removed immediately.
If preventative maintenance, previously described, is diligently performed,
the rope life will be prolonged and the operation will be safer. Cutting off a given
length of rope at the end attachment before the core deteriorates and valley breaks
appear, effectively eliminates these sections as a source of danger.

EQUIPMENT INSPECTION
Any undetected fault on a sheave, roller, or drum-be it of relatively major or
minor significance-can cause a rope to wear out many times faster than the wear
resulting from normal operations. As a positive means of minimizing abuses and
other-than-normal wear, the procedures here set forth should be adhered to.
Every observation and measurement should be carefully recorded and kept in
some suitable and accessible file.
1) Give close examination to the method by which the rope is attached both to the
drum and to the load. Make certain that the proper means of attachment is
applied correctly, and that any safety devices in use are in satisfactory work-
ing order.

67
2) Carefully check the groove and working surface of every sheave, roller, and
drum, to determine whether each (groove and surface) is as near to the correct
diameter and contour as circumstances will permit, and whether all surfaces
that are in contact with the rope are smooth and free of corrugations or other
abrasive defects.
3) Check sheaves and rollers to determine whether each turns freely, and whether
they are properly aligned with the travel of the rope. All bearings must be in
good operating condition and furnish adequate support to the sheaves and
rollers. Sheaves that are permitted to wobble will create additional forces that
accelerate the deterioration rate of the rope.
4) If starter, filler, and riser strips on drums are used, check their condition and
location. Should these be worn, improperly located or badly designed, they
will cause poor winding, dog legs, and other line damage.
5) Wherever possible, follow the path that the rope will follow through a com-
plete operating cycle. Be on the lookout for spots on the equipment that have
been worn bright or cut into by the rope as it moves through the system.
Ordinarily, excessive abrasive wear on the rope can be eliminated at these
points by means of some type of protector or roller.

FIELD LUBRICATION
During fabrication, ropes receive lubrication; the kind and amount depending on
the ropes size, type, and anticipated use. This in-process treatment will provide
the finished rope with ample protection for a reasonable time if it is stored under
proper conditions. But, when the rope is put into service, the initial lubrication
may be less than needed for the full useful life of the rope. Because of this possi-
bility, periodic applications of a suitable rope lubricant are necessary.
Following, are the important characteristics of a good wire rope lubricant:
1) It should be free from acids and alkalis,
2) It should have sufficient adhesive strength to remain on the ropes,
3) It should be of a viscosity capable of penetrating the interstices between wires
and strands,
4) It should not be soluble in the medium surrounding it under the actual operat-
ing conditions,
5) It should have a high film strength, and
6) It should resist oxidation.

67
Before applying lubrication, accumulations of dirt or other abrasive mate-
rial should be removed from the rope. Cleaning is accomplished with a stiff wire
brush and solvent, and compressed air or live steam. Immediately after it is
cleaned, the rope should be lubricated. When it is normal for the rope to operate
in dirt, rock or other abrasive material, the lubricant should be selected with great
care to make certain that it will penetrate and, at the same time, will not pick up
any of the material through which the rope must be dragged.
As a general rule, the most efficient and most economical means to do field
lubrication/protection is by using some method or system that continuously
applies the lubricant while the rope is in operation. Many techniques are used;
these include the continuous bath, dripping, pouring, swabbing, painting, or
where circumstances dictate, automatic systems can be used to apply lubricants
either by a drip or pressure spray method (Fig. 56).
MINIMUM
SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
FOR
WORK PLATFORMS USED
ON TEREX LIFT CRANES

WORK PLATFORM SUSPENDED ON A LOAD LINE PAGE ii


WORK PLATFORM RIGIDLY MOUNTED ON THE BOOM PAGE vi

12261-80
MINIMUM SAFETY REQUIREMENTS and with automatic braking which is applied when
FOR WORK PLATFORMS SUSPENDED ON the applicable control is in neutral;
LOAD LINE OF A TEREX LIFT CRANE
(2)A control or device which will deactivate any free fall
Scope load line function during the hoisting of personnel;

When it is determined that use of a work platform sus- (3)An operable anti-two block warning device which
pended from the load line of a lift crane manufactured by automatically deactivates the control function bring-
Terex Cranes (hereinafter Terex) creates the least hazard ing about the two-blocking condition;
to personnel and is the only practical means of accom-
plishing a task, the following procedures and minimum (4)Crane controls which return to neutral when released
requirements shall apply: (unless a second operator is in the cab at all times);

Terex Lift Cranes and Their Equipment (5)A boom angle indicator having high and low set
points, a maximum boom angle kickout, and an
1.The requirements and procedures set forth herein are ap- audio/visual alarm;
plicable to hydraulic lift cranes, with or without a tele-
scopic boom, and mechanical/friction operated lattice (6)Appropriate load charts for the lift crane;
boom lift cranes manufactured by Terex.
(7) A winch drum rotation indicator.
2.Hydraulic lift cranes shall comply with PCSA Std. No. 2
and No. 4, and ANSI B30.5-1983 and mechanical/friction 4. Such cranes shall not be equipped with a free fall (live
operated lattice boom lift cranes shall comply with PCSA boom) boom hoist.
Std. No. 1 and No. 4, and ANSI B30.5-1983, as applicable.
Work Platform Minimum Requirements
3.The lift cranes referred to in A.1 shall include the follow-
ing equipment and/or controls when used to suspend Work platform manufacturers shall comply with the follow-
work platforms from the load line. ing minimum requirements. Users of work platforms shall
ensure that the following minimum requirements have
a)Hydraulic Lift Cranes been met before personnel are hoisted.

(1)A boom and load line with power lowering and raising 1.Work platforms suspended from the load line of a lift
and with automatic braking which is applied when crane shall comply with all applicable governmental
the applicable control is in neutral; and/or industry standards relating to design and manu-
facture including, but not limited to, ANSI A92.2-1979.
(2)A control or device which will deactivate any free fall Design considerations shall include,but not be limited to:
load line function during the hoisting of personnel;
a) the material and design safety factors;
(3)Crane controls which return to neutral when released
(unless a second operator is in the cab at all times); b) construction, including fasteners and welding;

(4)An operable anti-two block warning device which c) flooring;


automatically deactivates the control function bring-
ing about the two-blocking condition; d) hand rails;

(5)A boom angle indicator having high and low set e) toe boards;
points and having an audio/visual alarm;
f) safety lanyard attachment;
(6)Appropriate load charts for the lift crane;
g) gates;
(7)A boom extension indicator (when crane is equipped
with a telescopic boom); h) hoisting and tag line attachments; and

(8) A winch drum rotation indicator. i) load limit, occupant limit, and work platform weight
instructions, labels and warnings.
b)Mechanical/Friction Operated Lattice Boom Lift
Cranes 2.The specifications for the work platform shall be in writ-
ing and shall describe the platform weight, load and
(1)A boom and load line with power lowering and raising occupancy limit, platform inspection and maintenance

ii
procedures; procedures for attachment of the platform hydraulic or mechanical/friction lift crane.
to the loadline, and any appropriate precautionary infor-
mation applicable to the platform itself, and shall be g) With the boom at maximum elevation, the hoist drum
permanetly placed in the lift crane and in or on the work shall have at least three wraps of wire rope remaining
platform. on it when the work platform is resting on the ground,
or at its lowest operational level if working below the
Inspection and Rigging, Testing and Operation supporting surface of the crane.

The inspection, operation and safety requirements of PCSA h)The wire rope safety factor for the combined weight of
Standard No. 2 and ANSI B30.5-1983 for hydraulic lift the lifting attachments, plus platform, personnel and
cranes, PCSA Standard No. 1 and ANSI B30.5-1983 for tools shall be no less than 7:1 for manufacturers spec-
mechanical/friction lift cranes and PCSA Standard No. 4, ified construction wire rope and no less than 10:1 for
as applicable, shall be complied with at all times. Applica- rotation resistant wire rope.
ble governmental requlations shall also be adhered to. In
addition, the following limitations and minimum require- i) Boom hoist wire ropes, load line wire ropes, reeving,
ments shall apply: and boom support pendants shall be inspected daily.

1. Inspection and Rigging j) Wire rope ends shall be seized and ancored (attached)
to boom, fall balls, hook blocks, and drums as
a) The lift crane and work platform shall be inspected im- described in the Wire rope Users Manual published by
mediately prior to commencement of operation. In- the Wire Rope Producers, American Iron and Steel
spection shall include, but not be limited to, wire rope, Institute.
hook, brakes, boom and other mechanical and rigging
equipment vital to the safety of the operation. 2. Crane Test Procedures

b)The inspection shall be performed at least once daily The test procedures listed below shall be conducted at
when the machine is being used in work platform ser- the following intervals:
vice or each time the machine is converted from mate-
rial handling to personnel operation. In the event the (1) daily,
operator is replaced, a new inspection is required.
(2) when an operator is replaced, and
c) Any structural or functional defect which adversely af-
fects the safe operation of the lift crane shall be correct- (3) when, in the judgement of responsible jobsite man-
ed before any operation utilizing a work platform begins agemant, there has been a significant change in the
or continues. conditions of the personnel lifting operation.

d)The anti-two block device shall be calibrated to sound No personnel shall ride the work platform during any of
a warning and to deactivate the control function bring- the tests recommended in this Standard.
ing about the two-blocking condition whenever the ook
block assembly, platform, radius, fall ball assembly, or a) The work platform shall be loaded with ballast at two
other assembly is at the following minimum distance times the intended load.
from the boom tip:
b)This test load shall be raised and lowered at maximum
(1) Not less than three (3) feet for boom lengths of 100 power controlled line speed (NOT FREE FALL). The ac-
feet or less; celeration must be smooth and the deceleration capa-
bility of the control/braking system shall be confirmed
(2) Not less than six (6) feet for boom lengths between by bringing the work platform to a smooth stop. The
100 feet and 200 feet; and specific operation to be undertaken shall then be sim-
ulated in its entirety. The work platform shall then be
(3)Not less than ten (10) feet for boom lengths exceed- inspected for any evident sign of damage or defect.
ing 200 feet.
c) The boom shall be raised to test the set point limits of
e)Hooks on fall ball assemblies, sheave block assemblies the boom angle indicator and the audio/visual warning
or other assemblies shall be of a type that can be alarms. All limiting and warning devices shall be acti-
closed and locked, eliminating the hook throat open- vated by each control function which may create a two-
ing, and shall be full load-bearing, and contain a man- blocking condition.
ual trigger release. Alternatively, a shackle with bolt,
nut and retaining pin may be used. d)The operator shall have demonstrated his ability to op-
erate the lift crane prior to hoisting personnel in a work
f)No work platform shall be suspended from a load line platform suspended from a load line.
passing over the pendant supported jib of any Terex

iii
3. Operation and Safety telephone communication with the machine operator
and signal person at all times. In the event of failure of
a)Mobile lift cranes shall be erected to obtain maximum the communication system, personnel will immediately
machine stability and must be level and on firm be returned to ground level using hand signals until
ground. Rubber tired lift cranes shall have outriggers the communications system is operational.
fully extended and the tires clear of the ground before
beginning any operation utilizing a work platform sus- l) If other cranes or equipment may interfere with the lift-
pended from the load line. No operations utilizing a ing of personnel, signals or other means of communica-
work platform shall be conducted while any rubber tion between all crane or equipment operators shall be
tired lift crane is on rubber. maintained to avoid interference by other operations.

b)The operators experience and physical condition shall m)No lifts shall be made on another of the cranes load
meet all applicable industry standards and/or govern- lines while personnel are suspended in a work plat-
mental regulations. form.

c) The operator shall not leave the operators station when n)After position ing of the work platform, all brakes and
the work platform is occupied. He shall remain at his locks in the lift crane shall be set before personnel per-
work station with the engine running and the master form any work.
clutch engaged whenever the work platform is occu-
pied. o) Work platforms shall not be used in winds in excess of
10 m.p.h., electrical storms, snow, ice, sleet, or other
d)Unauthorized personnel shall not be in the operators adverse weather conditions which could affect the safe-
cab, on the lift crane, or near the lift crane while a work ty of personnel.
platform is suspended from the load line.
p)Movement of the work platform with personnel shall be
e) Any operation in which the work platform is to be sus- done in a slow, controlled, cautious manner with no
pended from the load line shall be carefully planned by sudden movements of the crane or work platform.
the operator, signal person, supervisory personnel, and
personnel to be lifted prior to commencement of such q) At no time shall personnel stand on or work from the
operation. top rail, midrail, or toe board of the work platform.

f) The operator shall make no sudden movements of the r) Personnel shall keep all parts of the body, tools, and
crane or the work platform while suspended from the equipment inside the work platform during raising,
load line and shall engage in no reckless operation or lowering, and positioning.
horseplay at any time.
s) If not resting on the ground, the work platform shall be
g) A distance no less than twice the minimum distance to secured to the structure by rope or other means before
power lines as specified in OSHA 29CFR, Part 1910 personnel enter or leave.
shall be maintained when a work platform is attached
to the load line of a Terex lift crane. Further, work on t) When working from a work platform, belting off or oth-
any energized power line or any other energized device erwise attaching a work platform to an adjacent pole,
used for electric power generation or transmission is structure, or other equipment shall not be permitted,
prohibited. except as specified in subsection s above.

h)The combined weight of the work platform plus any at- u)Employees on the work platform shall wear safety belts
tachment device, personnel, tools and other equipment with lanyards attached, preferably above the hook or
shall not exceed 50% of the lifting capacity specified by shackle.
the applicable lift crane load chart.
v) When welding is done by an employee on the platform,
i) A work platform stabilizing tag line shall be attached the electrode holders shall be protected from contact
when practical to a work platform corner and con- with metal components of the platform. If electrically
trolled so as to prevent rotation of the work platform connected electrode holders contact work platform,
and to minimize any swaying motion of the work plat- work platform could be dropped due to burning/melt-
form. ing of wire ropes suspending the work platform.

j) When lifting personnel in a work platform, no more w)Work platform lifts shall be a single crane operation. A
than one crane funtion shall be utilized at any time. work platform shall not be lifted using two cranes.
The lift crane shall not be travelled while the work plat-
form is occupied. x) Before positioning or repositioning the work platform,
the lift crane operator shall locate soa s toavoid all ob-
k)Personnel in the work platform shall have radio or structions and high voltage conductors in the area.

iv
y) Prior to any movement of the work platform, care shall
be taken to prevent ropes, electric cords, hoses, etc.
from becoming entangled in the work platform while
the work platform is being elevated, lowered, or moved.

z) No external load shall be lifted by attaching to the load


platform.

NOTE:
The criteria and procedures set forth herein are mini-
mum requirements only to be used in the absence of
any more stringent applicable standard and/or regula-
tion. Applicable government and/or industry stan-
dards (e.g., federal or state OSHA, MESA, Industrial
OSHA, etc.) must be reviewed and adhered to in con-
junction with the contents hereof.

v
MINIMUM SAFETY REQUIREMENTS b) construction, including fasteners and welding;
FOR WORK PLATFORMS RIGIDLY MOUNTED ON THE
BOOM OF TEREX HYDRAULIC LIFT CRANE c) flooring;

Scope d) hand rails;

When it is determined that use of a work platform rigidly e) toe boards;


mounted on the boom of a hydraulic lift crane manufac-
tured by Terex Cranes (hereinafter Terex) creates the f) safety lanyard attachment;
least hazard to personnel and is the only practical means
of accomplishing a task, the following procedures and min- g) gates;
imum requirements shall apply:
h) a means of adjusting and locking the work platform
Terex Hydraulic Lift Cranes and Their Equipment level; and

1.The requirements and procedures set forth herein are ap- i) load limit, occupant limit, and work platform weight
plicable to all Terex hydraulic lift cranes with or without instructions, labels and warnings.
a telescopic boom.
2.The specifications for the work platform shall be in writ-
2.Hydraulic lift cranes shall comply with PCSA Std. No. 2 ing and shall describe the platform weight, load and
and No. 4 as applicable, and ANSI B30.5-1983. occupancy limit, platform inspection and maintenance
procedures; procedures for attachment of the platform
3.Such hydraulic lift cranes shall include the following to the boom, and any appropriate precautionary infor-
equipment and/or controls when used with rigidly mation applicable to the platform itself, and shall be
mounted work platforms on the boom. permanetly placed in the lift crane and in or on the work
platform.
(a)A boom with power lowering and raising and with
automatic braking which is applied when the applica- 3)Such cranes shall not be equipped with a free fall (live
ble control is in neutral; boom) boom hoist.

(b)Crane controls which return to neutral when released Inspection and Rigging, Testing and Operation
(unless a second operator is in the cab at all times);
The inspection, operation and safety requirements of PCSA
(c)A boom angle indicator having high and low set Standard No. 2 and No. 4, as applicable, and ANSI B30.5-
points and having an audio/visual alarm; 1983 for lift cranes shall be complied with at all times.
Applicable governmental requlations shall also be adhered
(d)Appropriate load charts for the lift crane; to. In addition, the following limitations and minimum
requirements shall apply:
(e)A boom extension indicator (when crane is equipped
with a telescopic boom); and 1. Inspection and Rigging

(f) A means to rigidly attach the basket to the boom tip a) The lift crane and work platform shall be inspected im-
which is supplied by or approved by Terex; mediately prior to commencement of operation. In-
spection shall include, but not be limited to, brakes,
Work Platform Minimum Requirements boom and other mechanical and rigging equipment vi-
tal to the safety of the operation.
Work platform manufacturers shall comply with the follow-
ing minimum requirements. Users of work platforms shall b)The inspection shall be performed at least once daily
ensure that the following minimum requirements have when the machine is being used in work platform ser-
been met before personnel are hoisted. vice or each time the machine is converted from mate-
rial handling to personnel operation. In the event the
1.Work platforms rigidly mounted on the boom of a Terex operator is replaced, a new inspection is required.
hydraulic lift crane shall comply with all applicable gov-
ernmental and/or industry standards relating to design c) Any structural or functional defect which adversely af-
and manufacture including, but not limited to, ANSI fects the safe operation of the lift crane shall be correct-
A92.2-1979. Design considerations shall include,but not ed before any operation utilizing a work platform begins
be limited to: or continues.

a) the material and design safety factors; d) No work platform shall be mounted to the jib of any hy-
draulic lift cranes.

vi
2. Crane Test Procedures mounted on the boom of a hydraulic lift crane shall be
carefully planned by the operator, signal person, super-
The test procedures listed below shall be conducted at visory personnel, and personnel to be lifted prior to
the following intervals: commencement of such operation.

(1) daily, f) The operator shall make no sudden movements of the


lift crane or the work platform and shall engage in no
(2) when an operator is replaced, and reckless operation or horseplay at any time.

(3) when, in the judgement of responsible jobsite man- g) A distance no less than twice the minimum distance to
agemant, there has been a significant change in the power lines as specified in OSHA 29CFR, Part 1910
conditions of the personnel lifting operation. shall be maintained when a work platform is mounted
on the boom of a Terex lift crane. Further, work on any
No personnel shall ride the work platform during any of energized power line or any other energized device used
the tests recommended in this Standard. for electric power generation or transmission is prohib-
ited.
a) The work platform shall be loaded with ballast at two
times the intended load. h)The combined weight of the work platform plus any at-
tachment device, personnel, tools and other equipment
b)The boom shall be raised to test the set point limits of shall not exceed 50% of the lifting capacity specified by
the boom angle indicator and the audio/visual warning the applicable lift crane load chart.
alarms.
i) When lifting personnel in a work platform, no more
c) This test load shall be raised and lowered between than one crane funtion shall be utilized at any time.
boom angle set points at maximum controlled hoist The lift crane shall not be travelled while the work plat-
speed. The acceleration must be smooth and con- form is occupied.
trolled. The specific operation to be undertaken shall
then be simulated in its entirety. The work platform j) Personnel in the work platform shall have radio or
shall then be inspected for any evident sign of damage telephone communication with the machine operator
or defect. and signal person at all times. In the event of failure of
the communication system, personnel will immediately
d)The operator shall have demonstrated his ability to op- be returned to ground level using hand signals until
erate the lift crane prior to hoisting personnel in a work the communications system is operational.
platform mounted on the boom.
k)If other cranes or equipment may interfere with the lift-
3. Operation and Safety ing of personnel, signals or other means of communica-
tion between all crane or equipment operators shall be
a)Mobile hydraulic lift cranes shall be expected to obtain maintained to avoid interference by other operations.
maximum machine stability and must be on firm
ground with the outriggers fully extended and the tires l) A hydraulic lift crane on which a work platform is
clear of the ground before beginning any operation uti- mounted shall not be used for any other function or op-
lizing a work platform. No operations utilizing a work eration during lifting of personnel.
platform shall be conducted while any rubber tired lift
crane is on rubber. m)After positioning of the work platform, all brakes and
locks in the lift crane shall be set before personnel per-
b)The operators experience and physical condition shall form any work.
meet all applicable industry standards and/or govern-
mental regulations. n)Work platforms shall not be used in winds in excess of
10 m.p.h., electrical storms, snow, ice, sleet, or other
c) The operator shall not leave the operators station when adverse weather conditions which could affect the safe-
the work platform is occupied. He shall remain at his ty of personnel.
work station with the engine running and the master
clutch engaged whenever the work platform is occu- o) Movement of the work platform with personnel shall be
pied. done in a slow, controlled, cautious manner with no
sudden movements of the crane or work platform.
d)Unauthorized personnel shall not be in the operators
cab, on the lift crane, or near the lift crane while a work p)At no time shall personnel stand on or work from the
platform is mounted on the boom. top rail, midrail, or toe board of the work platform.

e) Any operation in which the work platform is to be

vii
q) Personnel shall keep all parts of the body, tools, and
equipment inside the work platform during raising,
lowering, and positioning.

r) If not resting on the ground, the work platform shall be


secured to the structure by rope or other means before
personnel enter or leave.

s) When working from a work platform, belting off or oth-


erwise attaching a work platform to an adjacent pole,
structure, or other equipment shall not be permitted,
except as specified in subsection r above.

t) Employees on the work platform shall wear safety belts


with lanyards attached, preferably above the hook or
shackle.

u)When welding is done by an employee on the platform,


the electrode holders shall be protected from contact
with metal components of the platform. If electrically
connected electrode holders contact work platform,
work platform could be dropped due to burning/melt-
ing of wire ropes suspending the work platform.

v) Before positioning or repositioning the work platform,


the lift crane operator shall locate soa s toavoid all ob-
structions and high voltage conductors in the area.

w)Prior to any movement of the work platform, care shall


be taken to prevent ropes, electric cords, hoses, etc.
from becoming entangled in the work platform while
the work platform is being elevated, lowered, or moved.

x) No external load shall be lifted by attaching to the load


platform.

NOTE:
The criteria and procedures set forth herein are mini-
mum requirements only to be used in the absence of
any more stringent applicable standard and/or regula-
tion. Applicable government and/or industry stan-
dards (e.g., federal or state OSHA, MESA, Industrial
OSHA, etc.) must be reviewed and adhered to in con-
junction with the contents hereof.

viii





  
 
TELESCOPIC BOOM CRANES

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

   


  

 
    
TEST
     
 

 


GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
1 of 35





 


Introduction

Outline of Operation..................................................................................................................... 4

What Does It Tell You?

The Pictograph............................................................................................................................. 5

Information Screen....................................................................................................................... 6

Parts-of-Line Indicator ................................................................................................................. 6

Operator Alarms Indicator............................................................................................................ 6

Pre-Alarm Indicator ...................................................................................................................... 6

Overload Indicator........................................................................................................................ 6

Anti Two-Block Indicator .............................................................................................................. 6


Bar Graph for Percentage of Rated Load.................................................................................... 7

Actual Load .................................................................................................................................. 7

Rated Capacity ............................................................................................................................ 7

Radius, Length, Angle ................................................................................................................. 7

What Must You Tell It?

Parts-of-Line ................................................................................................................................ 8
Point of Lift ................................................................................................................................... 8

Auxiliary Head On or Off.............................................................................................................. 8

Stowed and/or Erected Attachments ........................................................................................... 8

Manual Section or Boom Mode ................................................................................................... 8

Jib Stowed on Boom .................................................................................................................... 8

Winch ........................................................................................................................................... 8

Counterweight.............................................................................................................................. 8

Tires ............................................................................................................................................. 8

Outriggers .................................................................................................................................... 8
Power Up Self-Test ................................................................................................................................. 9

Start-Up Screen..................................................................................................................................... 10

Brightness and Contrast Controls ...................................................................................................... 11

System Setup

Counterweight............................................................................................................................ 12

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
2 of 35




Outriggers .................................................................................................................................. 13

Tires/Rigging Travel Mode......................................................................................................... 14

Stowed Jibs................................................................................................................................ 15

Erected Jibs ............................................................................................................................... 16

Auxiliary Head............................................................................................................................ 17

Choosing the Winch................................................................................................................... 18


Choosing the Point of Lift........................................................................................................... 19

Setting the Parts-of-Line ............................................................................................................ 20

Notes.......................................................................................................................................... 21
Cancel Alarm

Push Button to Cancel Audible Alarm ....................................................................................... 22

Reset Function Kick-Out............................................................................................................ 23


Operator Settable Alarms

Accessing the Operator Alarms ................................................................................................. 24

Setting Minimum and/or Maximum Boom Angle ....................................................................... 25


Setting Maximum Length, Maximum Height.............................................................................. 26

Accessing Swing and Work Area Alarms .................................................................................. 27

Swing Alarms ............................................................................................................................. 28

Setting the Left and Right Swing Alarms ................................................................................... 29

Work Area Selection Mode ................................................................................................... 30-31

Glossary............................................................................................................................................ 32-35

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
3 of 35




 
  

 
 






 



 



 

 MicroGuard Display Unit The extension sensor provides an increasing voltage

 MicroGuard Computer Unit proportional to the extension of the boom. A cable
 Pressure Transducers attached to the boom head provides a low current
electrical path for the A2B signal
 Extension Reel with length and angle sensors
 Anti 2-Block (ATB) switches 
 

 

 Cables Two pressure transducers measure the pressure in
 Installation/Operator Manuals the boom hoist cylinder. The resultant Total Moment
signal is processed to provide a continuous display of
The MicroGuard TEREX RCI 510 System is intended
the load suspended below the point of lift.
to aid the crane operator by continuously monitoring
the load and warning of an approach to an overload 


 
   

or Two-Block condition. Crane functions are
A switch monitors the approach of the hookblock or
monitored by means of high accuracy sensors. The
overhaul ball to the boom head. The switch is held in
system continuously compares the load suspended
the normal position until the hookblock or overhaul
below the boom head with the crane capacity chart
ball raises a weight that is mounted around the hoist
stored in the computer memory. At approach to
rope. When the weight is raised, it causes the switch
overload, the system warns by means of audible and
to operate. The resultant signal is sent to the
visual alarms. The system can be configured to cause
computer via the extension reel causing the A2B
function kick-out by sending a signal to function
alarm to operate and function kick-out to occur.
disconnect solenoids.




 
 


 
The operator is provided with a continuous display of: Electrically operated solenoids disconnect the control
lever functions for boom hoist lower, telescope out,
 Rated Load
and winch up whenever an overload or an A2B
 Actual Load condition occurs.
 Bar Graph showing Percentage of Rated Load
 
  
 
  
 
 Radius of the Load
These alarms, when properly set by the operator,
 Boom Angle
define the operating range. This is achieved by
 Main Boom Length means of minimum and maximum angle, maximum
 Working Area height, and/or maximum length. These alarms can be
 Crane Configuration programmed for each job site and allow the operator
to work in a defined area.
On-screen messages provide the operator with visual
warnings of conditions that occur during operation of 
  
the system. When set, this alarm permits the operator to define
 


  


  the operating zone by only two set points. The use


Boom angle is measured by means of a high- of this method of setting results in a greatly enhanced
accuracy potentiometer/pendulum assembly that is working area, and also clearly defines the
damped to prevent overswing. It provides a voltage operating zone.
proportional to boom angle. The boom angle sensor is
mounted inside the cable extension reel assembly.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
4 of 35





  

MANUAL SECTION
/ BOOM MODE STOWED JIB WINCH

JIBS

COUNTERWEIGHT
AUX HEAD

POINT OF LIFT TIRES

OUTRIGGERS

The PICTOGRAPH gives a pictorial representation of the current setup of the system. It does this by means of light
emitting diodes (LEDs). Each shaded area contains a group of one or more LEDs and a push button that is pressed
to change the setup selection. In the groups with more than one choice or option, LEDs illuminate one at a time to
indicate the selection. The groups are shown below.

OUTRIGGERS - contain 3 LEDs. These indicate the STOWED JIB - contains 1 LED. This will be
selection of either full outriggers, intermediate, or illuminated when the jib is stowed on the boom.
retracted outriggers.
MANUAL SECTION - contains 1 LED. It is
TIRES - contain 1 LED. When operation on tires is active on cranes that have pinned extensions or
selected, the outrigger LED will turn off and the tire active tip boom options.
LED will illuminate.
JIBS - contain 6 LEDs. These indicate the length
COUNTERWEIGHT - contains 1 LED. It is only active and offset of the jib in use.
on cranes that have counterweight options.
AUX HEAD - contains 1 LED that illuminates
WINCH - contains 2 LEDs. These indicate the when the AUX HEAD is fitted.
selection of FRONT or REAR winch.
POINT OF LIFT - contains 3 LEDs. One will
illuminate to show the point of lift.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
5 of 35





    

4 5 6

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

   


  

 
    
TEST
     
 

2 3
1

1. The INFORMATION SCREEN contains 5. The OVERLOAD INDICATOR (RED)


details of the currently selected illuminates at a preset value of 100% of
configuration. Rated Capacity and provides a visual
indication of Maximum Allowed Load.
2. PARTS-OF-LINE displays the parts of line
currently selected. 6. The ANTI TWO-BLOCK lamp illuminates
when the A2B limit switch detects approach
3. The OPERATOR ALARM lamp illuminates
to a Two-Block condition.
when operator alarms have been set.
4. The PRE-ALARM (AMBER) indicator
illuminates at a preset value of 90% of
Rated Capacity and provides a visual
indication of approach to overload.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
6 of 35





    

7 9 11 12

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


   #$ 
$
 


 !!!" 
TEST

8 10
7. The BAR GRAPH indicates the ACTUAL 11. The LENGTH display shows the length of
LOAD as a PERCENTAGE OF RATED the main boom from the boom foot pin to the
CAPACITY. sheave pin of the main boom head
machinery.
8. The ACTUAL LOAD display shows total
load, including load, slings, etc. suspended 12. The ANGLE display indicates, in degrees,
below the lifting point. the angle of the main boom relative to
horizontal.
9. The RATED CAPACITY display shows the
RATED CAPACITY of the crane in the
current configuration.

10. The RADIUS display shows radius of the


load. Radius is the horizontal distance from
the centerline of rotation to the centerline of
the lifting point.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
7 of 35





     

13 15 16 17 18 19

 23,500 44.8


20
6 62.7
i2,300 26.4
21
   
  

 
    
TEST
     
 

14 22

13. The number of PARTS-OF-LINE. 19. Indicates which WINCH will be used for the
pick.
14. POINT OF LIFT, e.g. main boom, auxiliary
head or jib. 20. Indicates which COUNTERWEIGHT is fitted
(if applicable).
15. AUXILIARY HEAD ON or OFF the crane.
21. TIRES creep, static, 2 1/2 MPH, and
16. Indicates JIB configuration in use.
RIGGING/TRAVEL mode.
17. MANUAL SECTION or ACTIVE TIP
22. OUTRIGGERS full extension, mid
extended (if applicable).
extension, or retracted.
18. JIB STOWED ON BOOM.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
8 of 35





 

 888;800 I88.8


I8 I88.8
888;800 I88.8

    
  
 
TEST
  

26
Immediately following electrical power up or following operation of the TEST switch (item 26), the system
executes a self-test that last for 8 seconds. During this time, the numerical display segments and
bar graph segments are all turned on, the audible alarm will sound, and alarm indicator lights are
illuminated.
The information display shows the crane model and rating chart number.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
9 of 35





  


--- - -- -
- -- -
--- - -- -

   
   
  
 
 

  
  

TEST


  

27

Immediately following power up self-test, the display indications will show as above. During this time,
crane motions are disabled by the system function kickout. Operation of the bottom right information
display push button (item 27) will acknowledge the information display message and allow the system to
start normal operation.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
10 of 35




 


 


 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

 
  

 

TEST
 
  



25 27

Immediately following self-test and the start up screen, the information display will display a 2 second
reminder of the brightness and contrast control functions.
Push buttons to the left of the information display (item 25) allow the brightness of all LEDs on the display
panel to be adjusted up or down at any time during operation of the system unless operator alarms are
being set.
Push buttons to the right of the information display (item 27) allow the contrast of the information display
to be adjusted up or down at any time during operation of the system unless operator alarms
are being set.

During adjustment of the contrast or brightness, the information window will automatically display the
reminder window shown.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
11 of 35




  

 23,500 44.8 20


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


   !"#$%&$'()#
TEST *+   !"#$%&$'()#

1

 
IF THE COUNTERWEIGHT PUSH BUTTON IS  The available counterweight options will be
PRESSED ON A CRANE THAT DOES NOT displayed in the information screen (1). There
HAVE COUNTERWEIGHT OPTIONS, THE can be four options displayed at a time, one next
MESSAGE NO OTHER COUNTERWEIGHT to each selection key.
OPTIONS WILL APPEAR IN THE
 If the required option is visible,
INFORMATION DISPLAY. REFER TO YOUR
select the option by pressing the
CRANE RATING MANUAL FOR DETAILS OF
button next to it.
THE OPTIONS ON YOUR CRANE
 If more than 4 options are available,
 On cranes that have counterweight options the
a second selection screen can be
operator must tell the MicroGuard System
viewed by pressing the button next
which counterweight is currently fitted. If there
to the "next" label.
are no options, continue on to selection of
outriggers.  If only a single option is available, it
will automatically be selected.
 Start the choice by pressing the counterweight
push button (item 20).

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
12 of 35





  

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

   


  

 
    
TEST
     
 

1 22
  

 The operator must tell the system which  The outrigger selection will automatically
outrigger position is in use. move on to the next selection.
EXAMPLE:
 Start the choice by pressing the outrigger
From fully extended to half extended, or
push button (item 22).
from half-extended to fully retracted and
then back to fully extended with each push
of the button. If no other selections are
available, the message "No other chassis
options" will appear on the information
screen (item 1).

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
13 of 35




  

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


      
TEST    

1 21
  
 
There can be four options displayed at a
IF THE TIRE PUSH BUTTON IS PRESSED ON
time, one next to each selection key.
A CRANE THAT DOES NOT HAVE TIRE
OPTIONS THE MESSAGE NO OTHER TIRE  If the required option is visible,
OPTIONS WILL APPEAR IN THE select the option by pressing the
INFORMATION DISPLAY. REFER TO YOUR button next to it.
CRANE RATING MANUAL FOR DETAILS OF
 If more than 4 options are available,
THE OPTIONS ON YOUR CRANE.
a second selection screen can be
 On cranes that have more than one tire viewed by pressing the button next
option, e.g. static, creep etc., the operator to the "next" label.
must select the tire configuration that
 If only a single option is available, it
corresponds to the tire chart to be used.
will automatically be selected.
 Start the choice by pressing the tire push
 RIGGING/TRAVEL MODE is selected when
button (item 21).
the crane is in the rigging process or is a
 The available tire selection options will be rough terrain crane traveling between jobs.
displayed in the information screen (item 1).

DO NOT PERFORM CRANE LIFTING OPERATIONS WHILE

 WARNING THE RIGGING/TRAVEL MODE IS SELECTED.

ALL CRANE CONTROLS REMAIN ACTIVE WHILE THE


RIGGING/TRAVEL MODE IS SELECTED.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
14 of 35





  

18

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


  
TEST    

1
 

IF THE STOWED JIB PUSH BUTTON IS  The available stowed jib options will be
PRESSED ON A CRANE THAT DOES NOT displayed in the information screen (1).
HAVE JIB OPTIONS, THE MESSAGE NO There can be four options displayed at a
OTHER STOWED OPTIONS WILL APPEAR time, one next to each selection key.
IN THE INFORMATION DISPLAY. REFER TO
 If the required option is visible,
YOUR CRANE RATING MANUAL FOR
select the option by pressing the
DETAILS OF THE OPTIONS ON YOUR
button next to it.
CRANE.
 If more than 4 options are available,
 On cranes that have more than one jib
a second selection screen can be
option (fixed, offset, or telejib etc.), the
viewed by pressing the button next
operator must select the jib to be used.
to the "next" label.
 Start the choice by pressing the stowed jib
 If only a single option is available, it
push button (item 18).
will automatically be selected.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
15 of 35





  

16

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


#%&'()* #%&
()*
TEST #%&#()* !+

1
 
IF THE ERECTED JIB PUSH BUTTON IS There can be four options displayed at a time,
PRESSED ON A CRANE THAT DOES NOT one next to each selection key.
HAVE JIB OPTIONS, THE MESSAGE NO  If the required option is visible,
OTHER JIB OPTIONS WILL APPEAR IN THE select the option by pressing the
INFORMATION DISPLAY. REFER TO YOUR button next to it.
CRANE RATING MANUAL FOR DETAILS OF
 If more than 4 options are available,
THE OPTIONS ON YOUR CRANE.
a second selection screen can be
 To erect a JIB, it must first have been viewed by pressing the button next
selected and stowed as detailed on the to the "next" label.
previous page.  If only a single option is available, it
 Start the choice by pressing the erected jib will automatically be selected.
push button (item 16).

 The available erected jib options will be


displayed in the information screen (item 1).

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
16 of 35





  

15

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

 !" #$# #$ 


$
 


 !!!" 
TEST

1
    

IF THE AUXILIARY HEAD PUSH BUTTON IS An auxiliary head fitted on a crane must be
PRESSED ON A CRANE THAT DOES NOT included in the crane setup.
HAVE AN AUXILIARY HEAD, THE MESSAGE
To set up the crane with an auxiliary head, press
NO OTHER AUXILIARY HEAD OPTIONS
the auxiliary head push button, (item 15).
WILL APPEAR IN THE INFORMATION
This will toggle the auxiliary head on and off
SCREEN (ITEM 1).
each time the button is pressed.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
17 of 35





  

19

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

  
#$ 
$
 


TEST
 !!!" 

1




For cranes with two winches, always select the winch to be used for the lift before selecting the point of lift
and parts of line. The system stores point of lift and parts of line selections for each winch.

 Choose the winch to be used by pressing This toggles between the two available
the winch push button (item 19). winches each time the button is pressed.
If no other winch is available, the message
"No other winch options" will appear for
three seconds on the information screen
(item 1).

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
18 of 35





  

14

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

 
#$ 
$
 


 !!!" 
TEST

1


 
Before choosing the point of lift, check that the correct winch has been selected.
Always check the point of lift selection following selection of the winch.

 Choose the point of lift to be either from the  If an option is not available, it will be
main boom, auxiliary head, or jib by pressing skipped over.
the point of lift push button (item 14).
 If no other pick point options are
This action moves the selected lifting point
available, the message "No other pick
to the next available lifting point, i.e. from jib
point options" will be displayed on the
to aux head, from aux head to main boom,
information screen (item 1).
and from main boom back to jib again.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
19 of 35





  

13

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

   


  

 
    
TEST
     
 


 


Always check and select parts-of-line following selection of the winch and point of lift.

 Set the PARTS-OF-LINE for the currently  When another winch is selected, it may be
selected winch by pressing the UP or necessary to reset the parts-of-line for the
DOWN arrow, as appropriate. (item 13). other winch.
 The number of parts-of-line will appear in  When the number of parts in the parts-of-
the parts-of-line display (item 13). line on the crane is changed, it will be
necessary to reset the parts-of-line on the
display.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
20 of 35





  

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

   


  

 
    
TEST
     
 




The system has the capability of remembering all of the configuration data
previously set. After removing power to the system and then powering up again,
the settings remain intact until reset by the operator.

 After the configuration has been set, the operation of the System
depends only upon setting which winch is in use. Changing the winch
will automatically change the lifting point and the parts-of-line to the
values previously set for the selected winch. Always check the point of
lift and parts-of-line following selection of the winch.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
21 of 35






    

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

  !" #$# %& 


    ! " & #

$   
!  
 

TEST

23
  

    
The cancel alarm push button (item 23) is (such as overload) is removed and then
used to silence the audible alarm. Pressing this recurs, the new alarm condition will cause
button once will cancel an audible alarm that the audible alarm to sound again.
has occurred as a result of an:
The CANCEL ALARM push button is also used
Overload
to reset the function kick-out relay when it is
A2B Alarm necessary to bypass the function disconnects.
Operator Settable Alarm Examples of when it may be necessary to
override a function disconnect condition are:
The audible alarm remains canceled until the
condition that caused the alarm has been If the boom hoist cylinder is fully extended, the
removed. See page 23. pressure in it will rise. This will be seen by the
system as an overload and will not allow the
EXAMPLES:
operator to boom down. Using the bypass is
AFTER CANCELING AN AUDIBLE ALARM: necessary in this situation to move away from
 If the audible alarm sounded because of an the fully extended boom hoist cylinder position.
overload condition, the alarm will remain
canceled until the condition is corrected.
 If another alarm condition occurs that
normally causes an alarm to sound (such
as A2B) or if a previous condition

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
22 of 35






    

  23,500 44.8
6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

          
  
  
 
         
       
   
TEST

23


 
   

When the crane is to be rigged, it is often


necessary to put the boom in a position that
could cause function kick-out. Using the bypass
is necessary in this situation.
 WARNING

Press and release and then press and hold WHEN THE FUNCTION DISCONNECT RELAY
the CANCEL ALARM push button (item 23)
IS RESET BY MEANS OF THE CANCEL
for approximately 5 seconds to reset the
ALARM PUSH BUTTON, THERE IS NO
relay. At this time a second beep is heard
confirming the bypass. When the condition LONGER PROTECTION AGAINST THE
that caused the alarm is no longer present, CONDITION THAT CAUSED THE FUNCTION
the function disconnect relay will reset to the KICK-OUT.
normal condition. Should a different alarm
condition occur while the relay is over-
ridden, the new alarm condition will cause
the controls to disconnect again.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
23 of 35





    

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

        

TEST   
  


28 29 24
25 27

   

To access the Operator Alarms from the main Each push button operates as a toggle switch
working screen, press the operator alarms push turning the alarm "ON" or "OFF."
button (item 24). The Information Screen will
To activate or deactivate an alarm:
then show the current status of the alarms.
 If the alarm is OFF, press the
The four operator alarms are shown below appropriate push button to turn the
followed by the number identity of the push alarm ON.
button that controls each alarm. These buttons  If the alarm is ON, press the
are called out in the illustration above. appropriate push button to turn the
alarm OFF.
Minimum Boom Angle (item 28)
Maximum Boom Angle (item 29) Refer to page 25 for a discussion on minimum
Maximum Boom Length (item 25) and maximum boom angles and page 26 for
maximum boom length and maximum tip height.
Maximum Tip Height (item 27)

Return to the main screen by pressing the


operator alarm push button (item 24) two
times.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
24 of 35





    


23,500 44.8
6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

  + ,  - 

TEST ,    ,   

28 29 24


 


  
  
  

 
   
  
 
 Move the boom to the desired minimum angle
(in this example 32).  Move the boom to the desired maximum
Press the operator alarm push button (item 24) angle (in this example 67).
to access the operator alarm screen.  Press the operator alarm push button (item
 Press the push button (item 28) pointing to Min 24) to access the operator alarm screen.
Angle. In this example the display will read  Press the push button (item 29) pointing to
MIN ANGLE 32. Max Angle. In this example the display will
 The red warning light (item 5) will flash and the read MAX ANGLE 67.
audible alarm will sound whenever the boom  The red warning light (item 5) will flash and
angle is below 32. the audible alarm will sound whenever the
Pressing the MIN ANGLE push button again will boom angle is above 67.
cancel the alarm and the display will read Pressing the MAX ANGLE push button
MIN ANGLE OFF again will cancel the alarm and the display
will read MAX ANGLE OFF.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
25 of 35





    


5

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

       

TEST     !     !

24
25 27


 
   



 
  

 
  
    
 Move the boom to the desired maximum  Move the boom to the desired maximum
length, in this example 58 ft. height, in this example 78 ft.
 Press the operator alarm push button (item  Press the operator alarm push button (item
24) to access the operator alarm screen. 24) to access the operator alarm screen.
 Press the push button (item 25) pointing to  Press the push button (item 27) pointing to
Max Length. In this example the display will Max Height. In this example the display will
read MAX LENGTH 58 FT. read MAX HEIGHT 78 FT.
 The red warning light (item 5) will flash and  The red warning light (item 5) will flash and
the audible alarm will sound whenever the the audible alarm will sound whenever the
boom length exceeds 58 ft. boom tip height exceeds 78 ft.
Pressing the MAX LENGTH push button again
Pressing the MAX HEIGHT push button again
will cancel the alarm and the display will read
will cancel the alarm and the display will read
MAX LENGTH OFF.
MAX HEIGHT OFF.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
26 of 35





     


5

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4


%&  &
%&  

TEST 

 &



29
28 24
25 27




 

 


  
  Each push button operates as a toggle switch. If
To access the SWING AND WORK AREA the alarm to be set is OFF, pressing the push
ALARMS from the main working screen, press button will turn the alarm ON. If the alarm to be
the OPERATOR ALARM push button (item 24) set is ON pressing the push button will turn the
2 times. alarm OFF.

The Information Screen will show the current When Operator Alarms are set, the light in the
status of the Swing and Work Area Alarms. push button (item 24) will be illuminated.

There are 4 separate operator alarms, all Return to the main screen by pressing the
controlled by push buttons (items 25, 27, 28, OPERATOR ALARM push button (24).
and 29). Each one of these push buttons relates
to the alarm to which it points.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
27 of 35





    



  
These alarms, when set, permit the operator to define a Working Arc and an Exclusion Zone by two set
points. The following diagram illustrates the Working Arc and Exclusion Zone.

WORKING ARC AND EXCLUSION ZONE

Right Swing

A left swing alarm is activated when


WORKING ARC
swinging to the left.
Left Swing
A right swing alarm is activated when
swinging to the right
EXCLUSION ZONE
In this example, the working arc is the
smaller piece of the pie.

WORKING ARC AND EXCLUSION ZONE


A left swing alarm is activated when
Left Swing
swinging to the left.
EXCLUSION ZONE

A right swing alarm is activated when


Right Swing swinging to the right

In this example, the working arc is the larger


WORKING ARC
piece of the pie.

 WARNING

THE OPERATOR DEFINED SWING ALARM IS A WARNING DEVICE. ALL FUNCTIONS REMAIN OPERA-
TIONAL WHEN ENTERING THE OPERATOR DEFINED EXCLUSION ZONE. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
THE OPERATOR TO SET SWING ALARMS THAT ENSURE THAT THE CRANES BOOM, ATTACHMENT,
LOAD, AND RIGGING ETC. MAINTAINS A SAFE WORKING DISTANCE FROM THE OBSTACLE. AVOID POSI-
TIONING THE BOOM, ATTACHMENT, LOAD, AND RIGGING ETC. IN THE EXCLUSION ZONE WHEN MOVING
TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT SWING POINTS. WHEN SELECTING LEFT AND RIGHT SWING POINTS ENSURE
THAT THE LOAD WILL MAINTAIN A SAFE DISTANCE FROM THE OBSTACLE. IF THE CRANE OR OBSTACLE
IS MOVED OR IF A DIFFERENT SIZE LOAD IS LIFTED THE SWING ALARMS MUST BE RESET.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
28 of 35




    

 23,500 44.8


6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

          

TEST        

1 24
28 29




   

 


 
 
 
 Swing the boom to the desired Left Swing  Move the boom to the desired Right Swing
Limit, e.g. 325. Limit, e.g. 35.
Press the operator alarm push button (item
 Press the Right Swing push button (item
24) 2 times to access the swing alarm
29). The information screen (item 1) will
screen.
read RIGHT SWING 35.
 Press the push button (item 28) pointing to
The red warning light (item 5) will flash and the
Left Swing. The information screen (item 1)
audible alarm will sound whenever the boom
will read LEFT SWING 325.
swings past the preset limits.
Both Left and Right Swing Alarms must be set
Pressing the LEFT SWING and RIGHT SWING
for the system to operate correctly. The red
push buttons again will cancel the alarm and the
warning light (item 5) will flash and the audible
information screen (item 1) will read:
alarm will sound whenever only one of the
LEFT SWING OFF RIGHT SWING OFF.
left/right swing limits is set.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
29 of 35





    

   
 

This alarm, when set, permits the operator to define an Operating Zone by only two set points. The use of
this method results in a greatly enhanced work area and also clearly and simply defines the Exclusion
Zone area. The following diagram illustrates the Operating Zone and the Exclusion Zone.

Operator Area Alarm and Operating Zones

Operating Zone Operating Zone


Set Point 2

Operating Zone
Safe
Working Set Point 1
Distance
EXCLUSION ZONE
OBSTACLE
Obstacle
EXCLUSION ZONE

The operator defined work area alarm, when set, will define an imaginary vertical plane between two set
points to optimize the working area. When passing the plane, the red warning lamp will illuminate, the
audio alarm will sound, and the message EXCLUSION ZONE will flash on the display.

 WARNING

THE OPERATOR DEFINED WORK AREA ALARM IS A WARNING DEVICE. ALL FUNCTIONS REMAIN OPERATIONAL WHEN
ENTERING THE OPERATOR DEFINED EXCLUSION ZONE. SAFE WORKING DISTANCE IS THE TIME IT WOULD TAKE AN
OPERATOR TO REACT TO AN ALARM AND FOR THE CRANE MOTION TO BE HALTED BEFORE ENTERING THE EXCLU-
SION ZONE. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE OPERATOR TO SET POINTS THAT ENSURE THAT THE CRANE BOOM,
ATTACHMENT, LOAD, RIGGING, ETC. MAINTAINS A SAFE WORKING DISTANCE FROM THE OBSTACLE. AVOID
POSITIONING THE BOOM, ATTACHMENT, LOAD, RIGGING, ETC. IN THE EXCLUSION ZONE WHEN MOVING TO SET
POINTS 1 AND 2. WHEN SELECTING SET POINTS 1 AND 2, ENSURE THAT THE LOAD WILL MAINTAIN A SAFE DISTANCE
FROM THE OBSTACLE. IF THE CRANE OR OBSTACLE IS MOVED, OR IF A DIFFERENT SIZE LOAD IS LIFTED, THE WORK
AREA ALARM MUST BE RESET.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
30 of 35




    

  23,500 44.8
6 62.7
i2,300 26.4

 
 
 
  

TES T      


    

25 1 27 24

   
 

 Press the operator alarm push button (item  Move the boom, attachment, load, rigging
24) two times to access the Work Area etc. to the desired RIGHT SET POINT.
alarm screen.
 Press the push button (27) pointing to Right
SETTING POINTS 1 AND 2 Point. The information screen (item 1) will
read RIGHT POINT SET.
 Move the boom, attachment, load, rigging
etc. to the desired LEFT SET POINT. The red warning light (item 5) will flash and the
audible alarm will sound whenever the boom tip
 Press the push button (item 25) pointing to
penetrates the exclusion zone.
Left Point. The information screen (item 1)
will read LEFT POINT SET. Pressing the LEFT POINT and RIGHT POINT
push buttons (25 & 27) again will cancel the
Both Left and Right Points must be set for the
alarm and the information screen (item 1)
system to operate correctly. The red warning
will read
light (item 5) will flash and the audible alarm will
sound whenever only one of the left/right swing LEFT POINT OFF RIGHT POINT OFF
limits is set.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
31 of 35





  

ACTUAL LOAD The load suspended below the lifting point.

ALARM A signal that warns or alerts, such as a flashing light or loud noise.

ANGLE SENSOR A device that measures the inclination of a boom.

ANTI TWO-BLOCK A device that, when activated, prevents movement that causes two-
blocking.

AUDIBLE ALARM A signal that alerts by means of noise.

AUXILIARY HEAD A short jib fitted at the main boom head that is used to provide
(AUXHD) separation of the main and auxiliary ropes when both are reeved over the
main boom head.

AUXILIARY HOIST A separate hoist rope system other than the main hoist.
(AUX HOIST)

BARGRAPH A pictorial device used to illustrate quantitative relationships.

BOOM A member hinged to the upperstructure that supports the hoisting tackle.

BOOM ANGLE The angle of the longitudinal axis of the boom relative to horizontal.

BOOM HOIST A device for controlling the boom angle.

BOOM LENGTH The length of the boom along its longitudinal axis from the foot pin to the
axle of the head machinery.

BOOM MOMENT The turning moment around the boom pivot caused by the moment of the
unladen boom.

CAPACITY CHART A table showing the rating of a crane.

CENTER LINE OF The vertical axis around which the crane upperstructure rotates.
ROTATION

CENTER OF GRAVITY The point at which the entire weight of a body may be considered as con-
centrated so that if supported at this point the body would remain in equilib-
rium in any position.

COMMISSIONING Preparing to be put into service.

CONFIGURATION An arrangement of the lifting elements of a crane.


GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
32 of 35




COUNTERWEIGHT A weight used to supplement the weight of the crane to provide
(CTWT) stability for lifting.

CURSOR A pointer on a display that indicates the position where data is to be


entered.

DEDUCT A reduction in rated capacity for an unused stowed or erected


attachment.

DIRECTION The direction of rotation of the superstructure.

DUTY A working configuration on a crane usually contained in a single column of a


capacity chart.

ERECTED ATTACH- An attachment on the main boom fitted in its working position.
MENT

EXTENSION SENSOR A device that measures the extension of the telescoping sections of a boom.

FUNCTION KICK-OUT A device that disengages certain crane functions whose movement could
cause overload or two-blocking.

HEIGHT The vertical distance from the ground to the tip of the boom or attachment.

HORIZONTAL Parallel to the horizon.

INFORMATION SCREEN A display that gives information supplemental to the information on the
pictograph.

INTEGRATED CIRCUITS A tiny complex of electronic components and connections on a small slice of
material (such as silicon).

JIB Something attached such as a lattice fly or jib on a crane boom.

MANUAL SECTION The tip section of the main boom that can be telescoped independently of
the other sections.

MICROPROCESSOR A computer processor contained on an integrated chip.

MOMENT The product of force and distance to a particular axis or point.

OPERATOR ALARMS Alarms that can be set by the operator, which provide working limits
additional to the chart limits.

OUT OF DUTY A point which is either longer than the longest permitted radius or lower than
the lowest permitted angle on a capacity chart

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
33 of 35




OUTRIGGER (ORs) A support projecting from a main structure used to provide additional
stability.

OVERLOAD The point at which the actual load exceeds the rated capacity of the crane.

PARTS OF LINE The number of parts of hoist rope between the upper and lower blocks.

PICTOGRAPH A pictorial representation of the crane.

POINT OF LIFT The location of the hoist rope for the current lift e.g. main boom, auxiliary
head or jib.

PRE-ALARM The point at which the actual load is 90% of the rated capacity of the crane.

PRESSURE Hydraulic pressure in the boom hoist cylinder

RADIUS The horizontal distance from the centerline of rotation to the center of the
hook.

RATED CAPACITY The lifting capacity of a crane, as determined by the published capacity
chart.

RATED CAPACITY The load that a crane can safely handle based on factors such as strength,
stability, and rating.

RATING A factor determined by legislation that limits the proportion of the


capability of the cranes that may be utilized in a lifting operation.
Usually expressed as a percentage of strength or stability.

REEVING A rope system in which the rope travels around drums and sheaves.

ROPE LIMIT The maximum permitted single line pull determined by the construction and
diameter of a wire rope.

ROPE LIMIT A condition that occurs when the type of rope and the parts-of- line in use
restrict the capacity of the crane.

SENSOR A device that responds to physical stimulus and transmits a resulting


impulse.

SHEAVE A grooved wheel or pulley.

SLEW OFFSET The horizontal distance from the boom pivot to the center of rotation

STOWED ATTACHMENT An attachment usually stowed on the main boom when not in use.

UPPERSTRUCTURE The structural part of a crane above the carrier, usually rotating.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
34 of 35




SWING The rotation of a crane upper around its center line.

SWING ALARMS Audible alarms occurring when the upper structure swings into areas
defined by the operator with the use of Operator Alarms.

SWL (%SWL) Percentage of safe working load. The proportion of the crane capacity which
is being utilized at any one time expressed as a percentage of rated
capacity

TRANSDUCER A device that is actuated by energy from one system and converts this to
another form for use by a different system (as a loudspeaker, that is,
actuated by electrical signals and supplies acoustic power).

TWO-BLOCKING The condition when the lower load block or hook assembly comes in contact
with the upper load block or boom point.

UNLADEN A boom that has no additional stowed or erected attachments and that is not
supporting a load.

WINCH A hoist drum used in conjunction with a rope for raising and lowering loads.

WORK AREA ALARM Permits the operator to define an operating zone by the means of only two
set points.

GREER COMPANY 1918 EAST GLENWOOD PLACE, SANTA ANA, CA 92705 PN W450250 Rev A 06/01/00
TEREX RCI 510 RATED CAPACITY INDICATOR OPERATOR'S MANUAL TEL:(714) 259-9702 FAX:(714) 259-7626
35 of 35
CALIFORNIA
Proposition 65 Warning
Diesel engine exhaust and some of its
constituents are known to the state of
California to cause cancer, birth defects,
and other reproductive harm.

WARNING: Battery posts, terminals, and


related accesories contain lead and lead
compounds, chemicals known to the
State of California to cause cancer and
reproductive harm. Wash hands after
handling.