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Rationale and Background

The purpose of this unit plan is to expand students knowledge on the moon and

introduce them to many important things associated with the moon. Students will build on what

they already know about objects that appear in the day sky, night sky, or both skies. Students will

be learning about the moons surface and its craters, moon phases, and the famous astronaut Neil

Armstrong and his trip to the moon. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in

many hands-on experiences throughout the unit.

Lesson One is about objects that appear in the day sky, the night sky, and in both skies.

Students will expand their knowledge during this lesson and learn that the moon can be seen in

both skies. They will learn that daytime turns into night and nighttime turns into day; this is

called a cycle. Students will be given objects to sort and place them on a Venn diagram under

the correct heading. This lesson is important because it will get students thinking about the

objects that can be seen in the night sky.

Lesson Two is an introduction lesson to the moon. The purpose of this lesson is to

introduce students the moon and its features. In this lesson. students will learn about the phases

of the moon and the moons surface. Students will also learn the amount of time the moon takes

to orbit the Earth and that the same side of the moon always faces the Earth. Students will learn

that the moon changes its shape each night and these shapes are called phases. This lesson is

important because it gives an overall view of what we will be learning about the moon.

Lesson Three focuses on the surface of the moon. Students will learn about craters and

how they were formed, the moons crust, maria, and highlands. During this lesson, the teacher

will use two books to show students pictures of the moons surface. At the end of this lesson,

students will be given moon dough (this is similar to play dough). Students will make craters in

the dough. During this part of the lesson, the teacher and students will discuss what craters are

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and how they form. The teacher and students will also discuss why the depth of craters vary.

This lesson is important because craters, maria, and highlands are very important parts of the

moon.

Lesson Four focuses on craters themselves. In this lesson, students will watch a video

showing the craters on the moon. Students will also make their own crater by dropping different

sized balls in to a tray of flour and cocoa. Students will then write about their crater and the

depth of their crater. This lesson is important because it helps students realized how craters were

formed. For example, the bigger and heavier the ball is, the deeper the crater.

Lesson Five introduces the famous scientist, Neil Armstrong. In this lesson, students will

learn that Neil Armstrong was the first person to ever step foot on the moon. After learning about

Armstrong, students will be given the opportunity to pretend they were an astronaut. Students

will write about what they would do if they were an astronaut. This lesson is important because it

incorporates a famous scientist into the content that the students are learning.

Lesson Six is an introduction lessons to the phases of the moon. Students will be

introduced to vocabulary words associated with the phases of the moon. Students will be given a

moon phase flip book. With support from the teacher, the students will draw the correct shape for

each phase. This lesson is important because it introduces the phases of the moon.

Lesson Seven goes further in depth about the phases of the moon. In this lesson, students

will use Oreo cookies and plastic spoons to shape the icing to represent each the eight phases of

the moon. Students will be informally assessed by their ability to match their cookie to the

correct label on the worksheet provided. This lesson is important because it gives students the

opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the phases of the moon.

Lesson Eight is the final day for the moon. For this lesson, students will take a unit test to

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demonstrate what they learned throughout the unit. The test has seven multiple choice questions

and one short answer. The teacher will read the test to the students since they are learning how to

take tests. This lesson is important because the teacher will be able to see what the students

learned as well as areas in which the students had trouble.

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This unit will address the following Pennsylvania standards:

Language Arts:
ELP.2.L.1-3.2 Sort pictures of short segments of a read aloud using a graphic organizer.
CC.1.2.2.B Ask and answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why, and how to
demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
CC.1.2.1.B Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.
CC.1.4.1.R Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and spelling, capitalize dates and names of people, use end punctuation; use commas in
dates and words in series, spell words drawing on common spelling patterns, phonemic
awareness and spelling conventions.
CC.1.4.1.M Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.

Science:
3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
ELP.4.S.1-3.1 Identify and sort parts that make up a system working with a partner

Social Studies:
8.3.1.A Identify Americans who played a significant role in American history.

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Unit Plan
The Moon
First Grade

The Moon: Science Unit


First Grade

Lesson 2 Lesson 6
Lesson 3
Lesson 5 Lesson 8
Lesson 1 What We All About Lesson 7
The Lesson 4
Know Who Was the Moon Final
Night Surface Moon
About Craters Neil Intro to Moon
and Day of the Phases
the Armstrong? Moon Day
Moon Phases
Moon

Language Arts Social Studies Science

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Key Definitions
clouds- white or gray groups of water droplets that float in the air
cycle- to repeat over and over again in the same order
day- a 24 hour period; the period between sunrise and sunset when it is light
moon- a natural satellite that moves around a planet
night- the part of the day without sunlight
star- a ball of burning gas in outer space that gives off light
Sun- the closest star to Earth
sunset- the period of the day when we lose sunlight and it grow dark
orbit- travels in a path around something
Earth- the planet that we live on
meteorites- pieces of rock or other matter that have fallen from space
craters- round holes on the moon
maria- dark spots, low flat areas
highlands- brighter spots, rugged mountains and plains
crust- the out of layer of the moon
astronaut - is a person who is trained to travel in spacecraft.
phases- the different shapes of the moon seems to have as it orbits Earth
illuminated- to light up
waxing- grows in size; the amount of sunlight shining off the moon increases as
the moon waxes
waning- shrinks in size; the amount of sunlight shining off of the moon
decreases as the moon wanes.
new moon- the moon is not visible in the sky
full moon the moon is totally visible in the sky
half moon- when the moon is half illuminated
gibbous moon the moon is more than one-half illuminated
crescent moon the moon is less than one-half illuminated

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Assessment Plan
Lesson One: Night and Day
Formal Assessment:
Students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. Students will be given a
worksheet and will place each object under its correct heading (day sky, night sky, or
both skies). The teacher will have students turn in their worksheet so that she can assess
which students need more help determining which objects are seen in each sky.

Lesson Two: What We Know About the Moon


Informal Assessment:
The teacher will informally assess the students during the My moon book activity. As a
group, the teacher and students will discuss key details from the story. The teacher will
take anecdotal records during this activity. These notes will allow the teacher to see
which students need more help in understanding details/information about the moon.

Lesson Three: The Surface of the Moon


Informal assessment:
The students will be informally assessed at the end of the lesson. As a class, the teacher
and the students will discuss what craters are and what causes them. They will also
discuss why the sizes of craters vary. The teacher will take anecdotal records during this
activity to see which students need more help in understanding what causes craters and
why the size of craters varies.

Lesson Four: Craters


Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. The students will turn in
their writing activity about craters. The teacher will be assessing the students on their ability to
write about the crater that they formed. Components that students need to include in their entries
are: the craters depth and why the crater was that deep. The teacher will also be looking for
capital letters when appropriate, finger spaces, and punctuation.

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Lesson Five: Who Was Neil Armstrong?

Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. The students will write
about what they would do if they were an astronaut. The teacher will be assessing the
students on what they choose to write about. The teacher will be looking for students to
write about something space related. For example, If I were an astronaut, I would go to
Mars because no one has ever been there before.. The teacher will also be looking for
capital letters when appropriate, finger spaces, and punctuation.

Lesson Six: All About the Moon Intro to Moon Phases


Informal Assessment:
The students will be informally assessed at the end of the lesson. Students will complete
the phases of the moon book by drawing the shape of the moon for each of the phases
given. The teacher will be looking to see that students drew the correct shape for each
phase.

Lesson Seven: Moon Phases


Informal Assessment:
The students will be informally assessed during the Oreo activity. The teacher will walk
around and look at each pairs Oreo phases. The teacher will take anecdotal records
during this part of the lesson to see if any students need more help/support with learning
and identifying the phases of the moon.

Lesson Eight: Final Moon Day


Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed during this lesson. Students will take a unit test
with seven multiple choice questions and one short answer question. The teacher will be
looking to see if students answer the multiple-choice question correctly. For the short
answer, the teacher will be looking for two things that the students learned about the
moon as well as correct capitalization, punctuation, and finger spaces.
.

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Lesson One Night and Day
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 7, 2016
Science
First Grade
30-35 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to further increase the students knowledge of the different
objects that appear in the day sky, night sky, and in both skies. Previously, students have
identified objects that can be found in the day or night sky. This lesson will get students thinking
about the things they see in the night sky. This lesson targets Pennsylvania Common Core
Standards: 3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about
objects, organisms, and events (see below); and ELP.2.L.1-3.2 Sort pictures of short segments of
a read aloud using a graphic organizer. Students will learn that the moon appear sometimes in the
day sky. Students will be given the opportunity to do an object sort and place the object in the
sky that it appears.

The students are familiar with the components of a science lesson. This lesson will
provide students with the opportunity to further expand their knowledge of day and night and the
objects that appear in the daytime sky, the night sky, or both skies. The setup of the classroom
consists of center activities, print-rich environments, and various grade level books that are
available to students at all times. The environment of the classroom encourages students to
collaborate and work together as a team. Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart
below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
ELP.2.L.1-3.2 Sort pictures of short segments of a read aloud using a graphic organizer.

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Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations
*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given a worksheet with a graphic organizer, students will place each object under its
correct heading, day sky, night sky, or both skies, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1 times.
(ELP.2.L.1-3.cognitive, individual group, informal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I got the idea for this lesson my cooperating teacher, Mrs. Gatskie. She thought it was a good
idea to do a lesson on day and night to get the students thinking about the items that appear in
the sky during those times, with a focus on things that are seen in the night sky. I also got the
idea to use the website, Epic, from my co-op. Epic is a website for teachers that different kinds
of books and videos that can be used in the classroom. The ideas for this lesson were adapted
from the resources below.
B. Resources:
a. Armentrout, P. (2014). Day and night. Melbourne Beach, FL: Blue Door Publishing.
b. Keeley, P., & Sneider, C. I. (2012). Uncovering student ideas in astronomy : 45
formative assessment probes. Arlington, Va: NSTA Press.
c. Jessa, T. (2016, January 7). Why can we see the moon during the day?. In Universe
Today. Retrieved October 27, 2016, from http://www.universetoday.com/75848/why-
can-we-see-the-moon-during-the-day/#
d. Sanchez, B. (n.d.). Day & Night Sort. In Teachers Pay Teachers. Retrieved October 20,
2016.
C. Materials:
a. Computer
b. Smart board
c. Day and night worksheet (cut and paste)

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d. Glue sticks
e. Crayons
f. Electronic copy of the book
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (5-10 Minutes)
The students will be seated crisscross, applesauce, on the carpet. The teacher will meet the
students there.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will start the lesson by seeing what the students already know about day and night.
3. The teacher will ask the following questions: Class, what do we know about day and night?
What are some things we see in the day sky and the night sky? Close your eyes for a few
minutes and think about this question. (The teacher is looking for answers similar to the
following: day sky is light, the night sky is dark; day and night happen every day; objects that
we see in the day sky (birds, clouds, the sun, etc.) and the night sky (the moon, stars, etc).
4. Next, the teacher will record the students answers on a sheet of paper in the front of the room.
(The sheet of paper is about 2.5 ft x 1.5 ft).

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to distinguish between objects we see in
the day time sky, the night time sky, or in both skies. Students will be given the opportunity to sort
objects by the sky/skies that they appear in.

B) Lesson Body (10-15 minutes)


1. The teacher will tell the students that they are going to be reading a story about day and
night. The title of our story is Day and Night.
2. The teacher will show the students the cover and ask them what they think they will learn
about in the story. (The book will be displayed on the Promethean Board since it is a
digital book).
3. The teacher will let students share their answers with the class.
4. Next, the teacher will introduce some vocabulary words that will be in the story. (The
definitions are from the book itself).
a. clouds- white or gray groups of water droplets that float in the air
b. cycle- to repeat over and over again in the same order
c. day- a 24 hour period; the period between sunrise and sunset when it is light
d. moon- a natural satellite that moves around a planet
e. night- the part of the day without sunlight
f. star- a ball of burning gas in outer space that gives off light
g. Sun- the closest star to Earth
h. sunset- the period of the day when we lose sunlight and it grow dark
5. Next, the teacher will begin reading the story to the class.
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6. As the teacher reads the story, the following questions will be asked:
a. What do we call it when the Sun is up?
b. What is the closest star to Earth?
c. What types of things do we see in the sky during the day?
d. How long does a full day last?
e. What can you see in the night sky?
f. Can you see the Moon?
g. What shape is the Moon?
7. The teacher will emphasize that the reason why we have day and night is because Earth
spins around once a day. The teacher will also emphasize that the Sun can only be see
during the day, whereas the Moon is seen at the night and sometimes during the day.
8. Once the teacher has finished reading the story. The teacher will ask students to go back
to their seats to complete an activity.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated


throughout the entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give
directions one step at a time. The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students
will also be given frequent breaks. For the students who have not been identified but
struggle with reading, they will be given extended time to complete readings and
assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks. For the students who are English
Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have pictures on them (worksheets,
vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn the words quickly. These
students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words, if need be. For the
students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (10 minutes)


1. The teacher will pass out the worksheet to the class. The teacher will ask students to look
at the worksheet as she gives directions.
2. Students are to color the pictures, then cut them out on the dotted lines. Then, students
will place the picture under its correct heading: Day Sky, Night Sky, or Both Skies.
3. When students have finished, the teacher will go over the activity with the class on the
Promethean Board. The teacher will call on students by pulling popsicle sticks from cup.
4. The teacher will then ask students to turn in their worksheets to the gray basket.

VI. EVALUATION:
Formal Assessment:
Students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. Students will be given
a worksheet and will place each object under its correct heading (day sky, night
sky, or both skies). The teacher will have students turn in their worksheet so that
she can assess which students need more help determining which objects are seen
in each sky.

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B) Self-Evaluation:

1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

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Promethean Board Activity

Answers

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Lesson Two What We Know About the Moon
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 8, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 35 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to enhance students knowledge about the Moon. Yesterday,
students learned about objects that appear in the day sky, night sky, or in both skies. Students
learned that the moon appears in both skies. This lesson will go more in depth explaining key
details about the moon. This lesson targets the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards 3.1.1.C4:
Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects, organisms, and
events (see below); CC.1.2.2.B Ask and answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why,
and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text, CC.1.2.1.B Ask and answer
questions about key details in a text, and CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations
with peers and adults in small and larger groups. In this lesson, students will be given the
opportunity to share what they already know about that moon.
The students are familiar with the components of a science lesson. This lesson will
provide students with the opportunity to further expand their knowledge on the Moon. The setup
of the classroom consists of center activities, print-rich environments, and various grade level
books that are available to students at all times. The environment of the classroom encourages
students to collaborate and work together as a team. Specific facts about learners are shown in
the chart below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence

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and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.

CC.1.2.2.B Ask and answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why, and how to
demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
CC.1.2.1.B Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.

Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations


*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given five questions from My moon book, students will answer the questions during a
group discussion, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1 times. (CC.1.2.2.B , CC.1.2.1.B,
CC.1.5.1.A, cognitive, whole group, informal assessment)

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. For this lesson, I used ideas from my cooperating teacher. She introduces the Moon to students
by asking them what they already know about the Moon and recording the students answers on
the board. I chose to read the book The Moon: Exploring Space for this lesson. It is an
informational book that tells about the moon. The activity book, My Moon Book, I got from
my cooperating teacher. The ideas for this lesson were adapted from the resources below.
B. Resources:
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a. Sexton, C. (2010). The moon. North Mankato, MN: Bellwether Media, Inc.
C. Materials:
a. Bubble map
b. Marker
c. Writing journals
d. My moon book
e. Pencils
f. Vocabulary PowerPoint
g. Stapler
h. Book: Sexton, C. (2010). The moon. North Mankato, MN: Bellwether Media, Inc.
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (5 - 10 Minutes)
The students will be seated crisscross, applesauce, on the carpet. The teacher will meet the
students there.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will ask the students to think about the Moon.
a. Class, I want you to close your eyes and think about the Moon? What does it look
like? What color is it? When does it appear? (Here, the teacher is looking for answers
similar to the following: the moon is round, shaped like a circle; the moon looks like a
toenail; the moon appears at night time; the moon is gray, etc.).
3. The teacher will then ask the students to share their answers.
4. The teacher will record students answers on the bubble map.

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the Moon. The teacher
will also introduce some words to students that are associated with the Moon. They are: orbit,
Earth, and meteorite.

B) Lesson Body (10-15 minutes)


1. The teacher will then introduce some important vocabulary words to the class. The
teacher will have these words displayed on the Promethean Board.
a. orbit- travels in a path around something
b. Earth- the planet that we live on
c. meteorite- pieces of rock or other matter that have fallen from space
2. After introducing these words, the teacher will show the students the front cover of The
Moon by Collen Sexton. (This book is a digital book from the website, Epic.)
3. The teacher will ask students to make predictions on what they think they are going to
learn about in the story.
4. The teacher will then begin reading the book.
5. As the teacher reads, the following questions will be asked:
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a. What is the largest and brightest object in the night sky?
b. How many days does it take the moon to orbit Earth?
c. What are the dark areas on the moon called?
d. How did most of the craters form on the moon?
e. What did the astronauts leave on the moon?
6. After the teacher finishes the story, the teacher will dismiss students back to their seats.
7. The teacher will pass out My moon book to students. (This is a book that tells
information about the moon).

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout


the entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (5-10 minutes)


1. The teacher and the students will read the book together.
2. Then, the teacher and the students will discuss important information from the book as a
class.
a. What is the only natural satellite on Earth?
b. What does orbit mean?
c. Does the moon make its own light?
d. Where does the moon rise?
e. Where does the moon set?
3. After the teacher and students are done discussing this information, students will color
their books.

VI. EVALUATION:
Informal Assessment:
The teacher will informally assess the students during the My moon book activity. As a
group, the teacher and students will discuss key details from the story. The teacher will
take anecdotal records during this activity. These notes will allow the teacher to see
which students need more help in understanding details/information about the moon.

B) Self-Evaluation:

1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

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3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

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Vocabulary PowerPoint

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Lesson Three The Surface of the Moon
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 9, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to increase the students knowledge about the surface of the
Moon. Yesterday, students were introduced briefly to the moons surface. This lesson will go in
greater depth to describe the surface features of the moon. This lesson targets the Pennsylvania
Common Core Standards 3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask
questions about objects, organisms, and events (see below) and CC.1.5.1.A Participate in
collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger groups. In this lesson, the
students will learn about the moons craters and its crust. Students will also learn about the
moons dark spots, maria, and the lighter spots, highlands.

The students are familiar with the components of a science lesson. This lesson will
provide students with the opportunity to learn about the surface of the Moon. The setup of the
classroom consists of center activities, print-rich environments, and various grade level books
that are available to students at all times. The environment of the classroom encourages students
to collaborate and work together as a team. Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart
below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.

27
CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.

Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations


*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given the chance to make craters using moon dough, students will discuss how craters
are formed and why the sizes of craters vary, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1 times.
(CC.1.5.1.A,cognitive, whole group, informal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I got the idea for this lesson from my cooperating teacher. She shared some ideas with me
about how she normally conducts this lesson. I adapted the lesson to make it my own by
introducing different vocabulary words and asking students to talk about craters at the end of
the lesson. The ideas for this lesson were adapted from the resources below.
B. Resources:
a. Soper, D. The Moon's Surface. In University of Oregon. Retrieved October 19, 2016,
from http://pages.uoregon.edu/soper/Moon/surface.html
b. Taylor-Butler, C. (2014). The moon. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
c. York, P. (2003). The moon. Mankato, MN: Weigl Publishers Inc.
d. The Surface of the Moon (1989). In The Universe in the Classroom. Retrieved October
19, 2016, from https://astrosociety.org/edu/publications/tnl/13/13.html
C. Materials:
a. Moon dough (made ahead of time)

28
b. Baggies
c. Vocabulary PowerPoint
d. Book 1: York, P. (2003). The moon. Mankato, MN: Weigl Publishers Inc
e. Book 2: Taylor-Butler, C. (2014). The moon. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
f. Smart board
g. Anecdotal record form
h. Vocabulary display (powerpoint/flipchart)
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (5 Minutes)
This lesson will take place on the front carpet. Students will sit crisscross applesauce.

1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will tell the students Today, we are going to take a trip to the moon! Before we
go, we must learn about what the moons surface is like.
3. The teacher will pose the question: What do you think the moons surface is like? Why do you
think that way? (Here, the teacher is looking for students to describe the service as rocky, there
are a lot of holes, etc).
4. The teacher will let students share their answers with the class.

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the moons surface.
Students will learn about its crust, maria, highlands, and craters. Students will also be
given the opportunity to make their own craters using moon dough. Dauring this activity,
the teacher and the students will discuss how craters are formed and why they vary in
size.

B) Lesson Body (10 minutes)


1. The teacher will introduce some important vocabulary words that students will need to
know. These words are:
craters- round holes on the moon
maria- dark spots, low flat areas
highlands- brighter spots, rugged mountains and plains
crust- the out of layer of the moon
2. The teacher will then use two different books to show students pictures of the moons
surface (the teacher will only use a few pages from each book). The teacher will also read
a brief paragraph from each book explaining why the moons surface is the way that it is.
Students will learn how the craters and the moons crust were formed. (Book 1: York, pg.
8. Book 2: Taylor-Butler, pgs.14-17).
3. As the teacher shows students the pictures of the moons surface, they will talk about and
identify craters, maria, and highlands.

29
4. The teacher will also use a website from the University of Oregon to shows students
other pictures of the moons surface.
5. After discussing the moons surface, the teacher will dismiss students to go back to their
desks.
6. The teacher will tell the students that they are going to make craters using moon dough.
The teacher will explain that moon dough is similar to play dough.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout


the entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (10 minutes)


1. The teacher will pass out a small chunk of moon dough to each student. The students will
create their own craters using the moon dough.
2. As a whole class, the teacher and the students will what causes craters and why they think
the size of craters vary.

VI. EVALUATION:
Informal Assessment:
The students will be informally assessed at the end of the lesson. As a class, the teacher
and the students will discuss what craters are and what causes them. They will also
discuss why the sizes of craters vary. The teacher will take anecdotal records during this
activity to see which students need more help in understanding what causes craters and
why the size of craters varies.

B) Self-Evaluation:

1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

30
Vocabulary Powerpoint

31
32
33
34
Lesson Four- Craters
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 14, 2016
Science
First Grade
45 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to expand students knowledge of craters on the moon.
Yesterday, students learned about the moons surface and briefly talked about craters on the
moon. This lesson targets the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards 3.1.1.C4: Distinguish
between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects, organisms, and events (see
below); CC.1.4.1.R Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and spelling, capitalize dates and names of people, use end punctuation; use
commas in dates and words in series, spell words drawing on common spelling patterns,
phonemic awareness and spelling conventions; CC.1.4.1.B Identify and write about one specific
topic; and CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small
and larger groups. In this lesson, students will have the opportunity to make their own crater
using the materials provided. Students will then write about the crater that they made.

This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to learn more about craters on the
Moon. The setup of the classroom consists of center activities, print-rich environments, and
various grade level books that are available to students at all times. The environment of the
classroom encourages students to collaborate and work together as a team. Specific facts about
learners are shown in the chart below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence

35
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
CC.1.4.1.R Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and spelling, capitalize dates and names of people, use end punctuation; use commas in
dates and words in series, spell words drawing on common spelling patterns, phonemic
awareness and spelling conventions.
CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.
CC.1.4.1.B Identify and write about one specific topic.

Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations


*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given a writing prompt, students will write about the crater they formed and its depth,
using capital letters when appropriate, punctuation, and finger spaces, with 100%
accuracy, 1 out of 1 times. (CC.1.4.1.R , cognitive, individual, formal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I got the idea for this lesson from my cooperating teacher. Every year, she has students make
their own craters by dropping different size balls into a tray of cocoa and flour. I added a video
at the beginning of lesson for students to get another look at the craters on the moon. The ideas
for this lesson were adapted from the resources below.

36
B. Resources:
a. Surface of the Moon (2013, February 19). In Youtube. Retrieved October 29, 2016,
from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Gi7Fzoa94
b. All About the Moon (2016). In Scholasitc . Retrieved October 26, 2016, from
http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/all-about-moon
c. Why is the moon so scarred with craters? (2016, October 6). In Nasa Space Place.
Retrieved October 19, 2016, from http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/craters/en/
C. Materials:
a. Plastic table cloth
b. Flour
c. Cocoa powder
d. Marbles
e. Pizza or cookie tray
f. Writing journals
g. Writing rubric
h. Pencils
i. Chair
j. Promethean board
k. Video
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (10 Minutes)
For this lesson, students will be seated on the front carpet.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will review the meaning of the word crater with students.
3. The teacher will then use a YouTube video to let students see what the craters on the moon
look like. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Gi7Fzoa94)

B) Lesson Body (25 minutes)


1. After viewing the craters, the teacher will tell students to imagine that flour and cocoa are
the Moons surface. What do you think will happen when items (different sized balls) hit
the tray with speed and force? (Here, the teacher is looking for answers similar to the
following: the bigger the ball, the deeper the crater; smaller balls will make smaller
craters).
2. The teacher will record the students predictions on the board.
3. Next, the teacher will ask students to make a circle in the front of the room.
4. The teacher will place the table cloth on the floor.
5. Next, the teacher will place the cookie sheet on the floor and fill it with flour and cocoa
powder.

37
6. Students will take turns picking from a collection of balls and dropping them into the
cookie tray to make a crater.
7. As students take turns, the teacher will ask discussion questions. Examples of the
questions the teacher will ask are the following:
a. What happened when we used a marble to make craters?
b. What happened when we used a playground ball to make craters?
8. After each student has taken a turn, students will return to their seats to write about the
crater they made.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated


throughout the entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give
directions one step at a time. The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students
will also be given frequent breaks. For the students who have not been identified but
struggle with reading, they will be given extended time to complete readings and
assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks. For the students who are English
Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have pictures on them (worksheets,
vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn the words quickly. These
students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words, if need be. For the
students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (15 minutes)


1. After the experiment, students will do a writing activity about craters.
2. Each student will write about the created that they made. They will describe the crater by
writing about its depth and why it was that deep.
3. The students will then turn in their writing activity to the gray basket.
.

VI. EVALUATION:
Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. The students will turn in
their writing activity about craters. The teacher will be assessing the students on their ability to
write about the crater that they formed. Components that students need to include in their entries
are: the craters depth and why the crater was that deep. The teacher will also be looking for
capital letters when appropriate, finger spaces, and punctuation.

B) Self-Evaluation:

1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

38
Lesson Five Who Was Neil Armstrong?
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 15, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to expand students knowledge about the Moon and
introduce them to the first person to step first on the Moon, Neil Armstrong. This lesson targets
the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards CC.1.4.1.M Write narratives to develop real or
imagined experiences or events; CC.1.4.1.R Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the
conventions of standard English grammar and spelling, capitalize dates and names of people, use
end punctuation; use commas in dates and words in series, spell words drawing on common
spelling patterns, phonemic awareness and spelling conventions; and 8.3.1.A Identify Americans
who played a significant role in American history. The students will learn about Neil Armstrong,
the Apollo 11, and the other astronauts that explored the moon with him. In this lesson, students
will pretend they are astronaut and write about what they would do if they were one.

This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to further expand their knowledge
of the Moon and learn about famous astronaut, Neil Armstrong. The setup of the classroom
consists of center activities, print-rich environments, and various grade level books that are
available to students at all times. The environment of the classroom encourages students to
collaborate and work together as a team. Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart
below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:

CC.1.4.1.M Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.


8.3.1.A Identify Americans who played a significant role in American history.
CC.1.4.1.R Demonstrate a grade appropriate command of the conventions of standard English
grammar and spelling, capitalize dates and names of people, use end punctuation; use commas in
dates and words in series, spell words drawing on common spelling patterns, phonemic
awareness and spelling conventions.

39
Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations
*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given a writing prompt, students will respond to the prompt using capital letters when
appropriate, punctuation, and finger spaces, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1 times
(CC.1.4.1.M, CC.1.4.1.R, individual, informal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. For this lesson, I came up with the idea of doing a lesson on Neil Armstrong from Dr. Twiest.
In her class, we learned about the importance of incorporating famous scientist into our
lessons. I created my own astronaut template and writing template sheet. The ideas for this
lesson were adapted from the resources below.
B. Resources:
a. Suen, A. (1997). Man on the moon. New York, NY: Penguin Group.
b. First Explorers on the Moon (1969, December). In National Geographic. Retrieved
October 19, 2016, from http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/1969/12/moon-
landing/astronauts-text
c. Apollo Moon Landing (209, July 29). In YouTube. Retrieved October 21, 2016, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6A72ufn3l4
C. Materials:
a. Astronaut cut out
b. Crayons
c. Pictures of students
d. Pictures of astronauts
e. Stickers
f. Apollo 11 Video

40
g. Cut out for writing prompt
h. Book
i. Picture of Neil Armstrong
j. Glue
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (10 Minutes)
The students will be seated crisscross, applesauce, on the carpet. The teacher will meet the
students there.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher show a picture of Neil Armstrong to the class.
a. The teacher will ask the following questions:
i. What do you see in the picture?
ii. Who do you think this man is?
iii. What do you think he did?
3. After students share their answers and try to guess who he is, the teacher will introduce him as
Neil Armstrong, the first person on the Moon.
4. An astronaut is a person who is trained to travel in spacecraft.

B) Lesson Body (10 minutes)


1. The teacher will then show students the front cover of Man on The Moon. The teacher
will tell the students that they are going to learn about Neil Armstrongs trip to the moon.
2. The teacher will ask the following questions before reading:
a. What do you think it was like to travel to the moon?
b. Do you think it was a long trip?
c. What do you think Neil Armstrong wouldve seen on the moon?
3. The teacher will begin reading the story to the students.
4. During the story, the teacher will not ask any questions.
5. After the story is over, the teacher will ask students questions.
6. Some questions the teacher may ask are:
a. What did Neil Armstrong see on the moon?
b. What other astronauts went into space with Armstrong?
c. What was the name the spacecraft the astronauts were on?
7. The teacher will then show a brief video from Armstrongs walk on the moon.
8. After showing the video, the teacher will ask students to go back to their seats.

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the famous astronaut,
Neil Armstrong. Armstrong was the first person to step foot on the moon. Students will also
learn about what he discovered when he was on the moon. Students will be given the

41
opportunity to pretend they are an astronaut. They will write about what they would do if
they were an astronaut and color a cutout of an astronaut to accompany their journal entry.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout the


entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc.). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (10 minutes)


1. At their seats, students will be given a writing prompt. Students will write about things
they would do if they were an astronaut.
2. After the have finished writing, the teacher will provide students with an astronaut to cut
out and color. (The teacher will show pictures of real astronauts on the board so students
can see the different patches and gadgets that are on their suit).
3. When students have finished coloring their astronaut, the teacher will surprise students
with a picture of themselves to put on the face part of the astronaut.
4. When students are finished, the teacher will display the astronauts in the hallway.

VI. EVALUATION:
Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed at the end of the lesson. The students will write
about what they would do if they were an astronaut. The teacher will be assessing the
students on what they choose to write about. The teacher will be looking for students to
write about something space related. For example, If I were an astronaut, I would go to
Mars because no one has ever been there before.. The teacher will also be looking for
capital letters when appropriate, finger spaces, and punctuation.
.

B) Self-Evaluation:
1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

42
Lesson Six All About the Moon Intro to Moon Phases

HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 16, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 - 35 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to increase the students knowledge about the moon and
introduce them to the phases of the Moon, and why the moon changes. Yesterday, students
learned about Neil Armstrong and his discoveries on the moon. This lesson targets the
Pennsylvania Common Core Standards 3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and
opinion. Ask questions about objects, organisms, and events (see below); CC.1.5.1.A Participate
in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger groups. This lesson will
allow students to explore each phase of the moon through two activities.

This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to further expand their knowledge
of the Moon and its phases. The setup of the classroom consists of center activities, print-rich
environments, and various grade level books that are available to students at all times. The
environment of the classroom encourages students to collaborate and work together as a team.
Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
CC.1.5.1.A Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.

43
Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations
*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given the phases of the moon flip book, students will draw the correct shape of the moon
for each phase with the guidance of the teacher, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1 times.
(CC.1.5.1.A, 3.1.1.C4:, whole group, informal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I got the idea for this lesson from my cooperating teacher. She provided be with the phases of
the moon flip book and the video to use for this lesson. The phases of the moon book will
provide students with the opportunity to draw each phase on their own with the guidance of the
teacher. The first video, Time to Shine, The Moon Song I found on my own. The ideas for
this lesson were adapted from the resources below.
B. Resources:
a. Storybots, Time to Shine; The Moon Song. In Youtube. Retrieved July 25, 2013, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i235Y2HRksA
b. (1999). All about the moon [Motion picture]. Schlessinger Media ; JWM Productions
C. Materials:
a. Promethean board
b. Flip book
c. Black crayon
d. All About the Moon Video
e. Youtube Video
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.

44
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (5-10 Minutes)
The students will be seated crisscross, applesauce, on the carpet. The teacher will meet the
students there.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
a. The teacher will start by showing the students a video about the moon. The video talks about
the moon in general and mentions that the moon changes shape.
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i235Y2HRksA)
2. The teacher will then show the students different pictures of the moon.
3. The teacher will ask the students what they notice in these pictures.
4. The teacher will ask the students Why does the moon change?
a. The teacher will accept all answers because she is trying to get an idea of what students
already know.

B) Lesson Body (10-15 minutes)


1. The teacher will then show the video All About the Moon to the students. (This video
is on VHS).
2. After watching the video, the teacher will introduce the phases of the moon to students.
3. Important words that the students need to know are:
a. phases- the different shapes of the moon seems to have as it orbits Earth
b. illuminated- to light up
c. waxing- grows in size; the amount of sunlight shining off the moon increases as
the moon waxes
d. waning- shrinks in size; the amount of sunlight shining off of the moon decreases
as the moon wanes.
e. new moon- the moon is not visible in the sky
f. full moon the moon is totally visible in the sky
g. half moon- when the moon is half illuminated
h. gibbous moon the moon is more than one-half illuminated
i. crescent moon the moon is less than one-half illuminated
4. Next, students and the teacher will review the word cycle. The teacher will tell students
that the phases of the moon go in a cycle. Students will look at pictures of the phases of
the moon in order and how the phases are a continuous cycle.
5. The teacher will then ask students to return to their seats.

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to introduce students to the phases of the
moon. Students will be given the opportunity to label color each moon in the phase of
the moon flip book.

45
Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout the
entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (10 minutes)


1. The teacher will then pass out a phase book to each student.
2. The teacher will tell the students that they are going to draw each phase that the moon
goes through in their book. Each tab is labeled as a phase.
3. As a class, the teacher and the students will complete the book together.

VI. EVALUATION:
Informal Assessment:
The students will be informally assessed at the end of the lesson. Students will complete
the phases of the moon book by drawing the shape of the moon for each of the phases
given. The teacher will be looking to see that students drew the correct shape for each
phase.
.

B) Self-Evaluation:
1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

46
Lesson Seven Moon Phases
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 17, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to increase students knowledge about the phases of the
moon. Yesterday, students were briefly introduced to the phases of the moon and created their
own phases of the moon flipbook. This lesson targets the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards
3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events (see below); and ELP.4.S.1-3.1 Identify and sort parts that make up a
system working with a partner. In this lesson, students will be given the opportunity to create the
eight phases of the moon using Oreo cookies.

This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to further expand their knowledge
on the phases of the Moon. The setup of the classroom consists of center activities, print-rich
environments, and various grade level books that are available to students at all times. The
environment of the classroom encourages students to collaborate and work together as a team.
Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
ELP.4.S.1-3.1 Identify and sort parts that make up a system working with a partner.

47
Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations
*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student will be incorporated in their materials when
is very bright and speaks English very well. appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student etc). If needed, these students may use an
speaks Turkish at home but English in the iPad to translate.
classroom. The student speaks moderate
English. LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
LF has not been identified but has trouble that they can stay focused during class. The
staying focused during class. teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time teacher will give directions one step at a
focusing during class. time for these students. The teacher will
AB and CB are not identified but are both in also repeat directions, if needed. These
title (reading support). Both students are on a students will also be given frequent breaks.
1st grade reading level.
AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given 8 Oreo cookies, students will work in pairs to use a plastic spoon to shape the
icing to represent each of the 8 phases of the moon, with 100% accuracy, 1 out of 1
times. (partners/pairs, informal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I got the idea for this lesson from my cooperating teacher. Every year she does the Oreo
activity with students. She provided me with an instruction sheet on how to conduct the
activity. I made this activity my own by providing a sheet for the students to match their Oreo
to the correct phase. The ideas for this lesson were adapted from the resources below.
B. Resources:
a. Byrd, D. (2016, October 4). Four keys to understanding moon phases . In Earth Sky.
Retrieved October 23, 2016, from http://earthsky.org/moon-
phases/understandingmoonphases
b. Wistisen, M. (2012). Moon Phases. Planetarian, 41(4), 14-22.
c. Williams, A. (2012). Cookie Moon Phase Activity.
C. Materials:
a. Promethean Board
b. Plastic spoons
c. Oreos
d. Napkins
e. Phases of the moon sheet
f. Activity for promethean board

48
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (5 Minutes)
The students will be seated crisscross, applesauce, on the carpet. The teacher will meet the
students there.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will display the phases of the moon that were learned yesterday in class on the
promethean board.
3. As a class, the students will match the correct phase to the correct picture of that phase.
4. The teacher will tell the student that they are going to create their own phases of the moon
using Oreo cookies.
5. The teacher will dismiss students to go back to their seats.

B) Lesson Body (20 minutes)


1. The teacher will give the students the following directions:
a. In this activity, you and your partner are going to use cookies to represent the
phases of the Moon as viewed from Earth. Using cookies you will represent the
phases of the moon and be able to explain why they occur. DO NOT eat any
cookies until I give you the okay to do so!
2. Students will take of the top cookie and place it to the side. Using a plastic spoon,
students will shape the icing to represent the eight phases of the moon.
3. Students will place the cookie on its correct phase on the worksheet provided.
4. The teacher will come around and look at each pair before she allows them to eat the
cookies.

Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for students to further expand their knowledge
on the phases of the moon. Students will use Oreos to create each phase of the moon.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout the


entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

49
C) Lesson Closure (5 minutes)
1. The teacher will ask students to orally summarize the phases of the moon.
2. The teacher will encourage students to view the moon each night and to make note how
the shape of the Moon changes.

VI. EVALUATION:
Informal Assessment:
The students will be informally assessed during the Oreo activity. The teacher will walk
around and look at each pairs Oreo phases. The teacher will take anecdotal records
during this part of the lesson to see if any students need more help/support with learning
and identifying the phases of the moon.
.

B) Self-Evaluation:
1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

50
Promethean Board Activity

51
52
53
Lesson Eight Final Moon Day
HEADING:
Miss Amy Kinneer
November 18, 2016
Science
First Grade
30 minutes

II. RATIONALE AND BACKGROUND:


The purpose of this lesson is to review the things we learned about the Moon. This lesson
targets the Pennsylvania Common Core Standards 3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact
and opinion. Ask questions about objects, organisms, and events (see below); CC.1.4.1.B
Identify and write about one specific topic. In this lesson, the students will complete a multiple-
choice exam with one short answer.

This lesson will provide students with the opportunity to show what they learned over the
course of this unit. The setup of the classroom consists of center activities, print-rich
environments, and various grade level books that are available to students at all times. The
environment of the classroom encourages students to collaborate and work together as a team.
Specific facts about learners are shown in the chart below.

This lesson addresses the following standards:


3.1.1.C4: Distinguish between scientific fact and opinion. Ask questions about objects,
organisms, and events. Understand that all scientific investigations involve asking and
answering questions and comparing the answer with what is already known. Plan and conduct a
simple investigation and understand that different questions require different kinds of
investigations. Use simple equipment (tools and other technologies) to gather data and
understand that this allows scientists to collect more information than relying only on their
senses to gather information. Use data/evidence to construct explanations and understand that
scientists develop explanations based on their evidence and compare them with their current
scientific knowledge. Communicate procedures and explanations giving priority to evidence
and understanding that scientists make their results public, describe their investigations so they
can be reproduced, and review and ask questions about the work of other scientists.
CC.1.4.1.B Identify and write about one specific topic.

Facts about the learners Specific, required adaptations


*There are 20 students in the classroom. There For the students in which English is their
are 10 girls and 10 boys. second language (AL and CD), pictures
will be incorporated in their materials when

54
ALs primary language is Chinese. The student appropriate (worksheets, vocabulary cards,
is very bright and speaks English very well. etc). If needed, these students may use an
CDs primary language is Turkish. The student iPad to translate.
speaks Turkish at home but English in the
classroom. The student speaks moderate LF and GD will sit close to the teacher so
English. that they can stay focused during class. The
LF has not been identified but has trouble teacher will speak slowly and clearly. The
staying focused during class. teacher will give directions one step at a
GD has ADHD. The student has a hard time time for these students. The teacher will
focusing during class. also repeat directions, if needed. These
AB and CB are not identified but are both in students will also be given frequent breaks.
title (reading support). Both students are on a
1st grade reading level. AB and CB and will have extended time to
read assignments and complete them. These
students will also be given frequent breaks.

III. LESSON OBJECTIVE(S):


1. Given an exam, students will answer 10 questions, with at least 80% accuracy, 1 out of 1
times. (3.1.1.C4, CC.1.4.1.B, individual, formal assessment).

IV. LIST OF MATERIALS/RESOURCES:


A. I came up with this lesson on my own. I thought it would be a good idea to formally assess
students to see what they learned throughout this unit. I created my own unit test based on the
content presented in the previous lessons. The ideas for this lesson were adapted from the
resources below.
B. Resources:
C. Materials:
a. Pencils
b. Quizzes
c. Test folders
D. SDI: The students who have trouble staying focused during class will be seated close to the
teacher.
E. See attached for all resources, handouts, and teacher-created materials.

V. PROCEDURES:
A) Motivation (10 Minutes)
The students will be at their desks for this lesson.
1. The teacher will get the attention of the students by counting down 5-4-3-2-1. The teacher
already uses this procedure in class and its effective in getting the students attention.
2. The teacher will ask the students to take out a pencil.
3. The teacher will then ask students to put everything away expect the pencil.
4. Next, the teacher will ask students to get test folders from the shelf.

55
B) Lesson Body (25 minutes)
1. The teacher will then go over the test directions with the students. Right now, students
are learning to take test. I will read each question to the students.
2. After the teacher reads all of the multiple choice questions, she will read the short answer
question and giver students time to answer it.
Lesson Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to assess the students on the content they
learned about the moon. The students will take a test with seven multiple choice questions
and a short answer.

Methods of Further Differentiating Instruction- Instruction will be differentiated throughout the


entire lesson. The teacher will speak slowly and clearly and give directions one step at a time.
The teacher will repeat directions as needed. These students will also be given frequent breaks.
For the students who have not been identified but struggle with reading, they will be given
extended time to complete readings and assignments. They also will be given frequent breaks.
For the students who are English Language Learners (ELL), all of their materials will have
pictures on them (worksheets, vocabulary cards, etc). This will help them understand and learn
the words quickly. These students will also be given and iPad that has an app to translate words,
if need be. For the students who have trouble focusing during class, they will sit close to the
teacher.

C) Lesson Closure (5 minutes)


1. When all students have finished the test, the teacher will collect the tests.
2. The teacher will then ask students to put away their pencils and their test folders.

VI. EVALUATION:
Formal Assessment:
The students will be formally assessed during this lesson. Students will take a unit test
with seven multiple choice questions and one short answer question. The teacher will be
looking to see if students answer the multiple-choice question correctly. For the short
answer, the teacher ill be looking for two things that the students learned about the moon
as well as correct capitalization, punctuation, and finger spaces.
.

B) Self-Evaluation:
1. Identify and list three (3) strengths of this lesson.

2. Identify and list three (3) elements or areas that need improvement.

3. Based on the closure and student evaluation portions of this lesson plan, identify any students
(use initials, not names) who were not successful in meeting the stated objectives. Indicate
how shortcomings will be addressed with these students to ensure success.

56
57
58
Resource List
(1999). All about the moon [Motion picture]. Schlessinger Media ; JWM Productions

All About the Moon (2016). In Scholasitc . Retrieved October 26, 2016, from
http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/all-about-moon

Apollo Moon Landing (209, July 29). In Youtube . Retrieved October 21, 2016, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6A72ufn3l4

Armentrout, P. (2014). Day and night. Melbourne Beach, FL: Blue Door Publishing.

Byrd, D. (2016, October 4). Four keys to understanding moon phases . In Earth Sky. Retrieved
October 23, 2016, from http://earthsky.org/moon-phases/understandingmoonphases

First Explorers on the Moon (1969, December). In National Geographic . Retrieved October 19, 2016,
from http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/1969/12/moon-landing/astronauts-text

French, B. (1978). What's new on the moon?. In Windows to the Universe. Retrieved October 5,
2016, from https://www.windows2universe.org/teacher_resources/new_on_moon.html

Jessa, T. (2016, January 7). Why can we see the moon during the day?. In Universe Today. Retrieved
October 27, 2016, from http://www.universetoday.com/75848/why-can-we-see-the-moon-
during-the-day/#

Keeley, P., & Sneider, C. I. (2012). Uncovering student ideas in astronomy : 45 formative
assessment probes. Arlington, Va: NSTA Press.

Sanchez, B. (n.d.). Day & Night Sort. In Teachers Pay Teachers. Retrieved October 20, 2016.

Sexton, C. (2010). The moon. North Mankato, MN: Bellwether Media, Inc.

Soper, D. The Moon's Surface. In University of Oregon. Retrieved October 19, 2016, from
http://pages.uoregon.edu/soper/Moon/surface.html

Storybots, Time to Shine; The Moon Song. In Youtube. Retrieved July 25, 2013, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i235Y2HRksA

Suen, A. (1997). Man on the moon. New York, NY: Penguin Group.

Surface of the Moon (2013, February 19). In Youtube. Retrieved October 29, 2016, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Gi7Fzoa94

Taylor-Butler, C. (2014). The moon. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

59
The Surface of the Moon (1989). In The Universe in the Classroom. Retrieved October 19, 2016, from
https://astrosociety.org/edu/publications/tnl/13/13.html

Why is the moon so scarred with craters? (2016, October 6). In Nasa Space Place . Retrieved October
19, 2016, from http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/craters/en/

Williams, A. (2012). Cookie Moon Phase Activity.

Wistisen, M. (2012). Moon Phases. Planetarian, 41(4), 14-22.

York, P. (2003). The moon. Mankato, MN: Weigl Publishers Inc.

60
Material List
Lesson One:
Computer
Smart board
Day and night worksheet (cut and paste)
Glue sticks
Crayons
Electronic copy of the book
Lesson Two:
Bubble map
Marker
Writing journals
My moon book
Pencils
Vocabulary PowerPoint
Stapler
Lesson Three:
Moon dough (made ahead of time)
Baggies
Vocabulary PowerPoint
Book 1: York, P. (2003). The moon. Mankato, MN: Weigl Publishers Inc
Book 2: Taylor-Butler, C. (2014). The moon. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.
Smart board
Anecdotal record form
Vocabulary display (powerpoint/flipchart)
Lesson Four:
Plastic table cloth
Flour
Cocoa powder
Marbles
Pizza or cookie tray
Writing journals
Writing rubric
Pencils
Chair
Promethean board
Video

61
Lesson Five:
Astronaut cut out
Crayons
Pictures of students
Pictures of astronauts
Stickers
Cut out for writing prompt
Book
Picture of Neil Armstrong
Glue
Apollo 11 Video
Lesson Six:
Promethean board
Flip book
Black crayon
All About the Moon Video
Youtube Video
Lesson Seven:
Promethean Board
Plastic spoons
Oreos
Napkins
Phases of the moon sheet
Activity for promethean board
Lesson Eight:
Pencils
Quizzes
Test folders

62