You are on page 1of 33

Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 1

Collaborative Technology Plan


Yasmine Bell Flemons, Harrison Boltin, Marcus Bradley, Roger Gray,
Amy Griggs, and Ruth Joiner
EDUC 638
Liberty University
Dr. David Holder
April 23, 2017
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 2

Collaborative Technology Plan

Mission Statement

Fairview School District utilizes current technology to enhance the educational

experience for students at all grade levels by developing critical thinking and problem solving

skills through project-based learning. We will ensure students learning and communication by

promoting innovative, creative, and collaborative lessons through up-to-date technology.

Vision Statement

Fairview School District holds fast to the traditional goals of education, but strives to

enhance the students learning experiences through the use of state-of-the-art technology. It will

not only enhance their learning experience, but will also improve communication, help make

instruction more efficient and effective, and help develop life skills that are critical to their

success. For teachers and administrators, they too will become more efficient with the use of

technology and have more time to focus on the education and success of the students.

Value Statement

We will provide a learning environment that allows our students to learn the skills they need for

the 21st Century by utilizing state-of-the-art technology.


We believe that utilizing technology in the classroom leads to greater student achievement and

better communication with parents and families.


We believe that the use of technology enables teachers and staff to reach more students

educationally.
We believe that the use of technology enables the teachers to become greater facilitators of

learning.
We believe that technology will increase student active participation independently and in groups

Smart Goal #1

For Fairview School District, Goal 1 in the upcoming 2017-18 school year is to begin
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 3

the implementation of 1:1 chromebook availability and use for all students. Providing school

devices for all students will ensure equity in technology for all and will enable the district to

maintain control of software being used as well as content access through district filters. This

implementation will be rolled out in three phases over a three year period. Phase 1 will first

focus on upgrading the districts broadband and WiFi capabilities while providing shared access

of chromebooks for all grade levels and subject areas in the districts elementary schools, middle

schools, and high school. Phase 2 will increase the availability of systems to students as well as

continuing to enhance the districts broadband and Wifi capacity. In Phase 3, 1:1 chromebook

access for all students will be completed as well as final upgrades to the districts broadband and

Wifi systems.

Implementation of the Fairview Technology Planning Committees program rollout will

begin in August, 2017 and final phase rollout will be completed by August, 2020.

Strategies to Support Smart Goal #1

Year 1

A chrome cart with a class set of chromebooks for each elementary grade level to share in

each school. Middle schools receive 2 chrome carts to share and all incoming 6th graders

receive individual devices in middle schools. The high school receives 3 chrome carts to share.

All incoming 9th graders and new 10th graders receive individual devices. During this phase of

implementation, teachers will have access to shared devices in all grade levels and content areas

throughout the district. Utilizing this access, they will begin to collaborate together to use the

technology to create collaborative learning opportunities for students using resources such as

Storia for primary grades and Google Docs within the Google suite for intermediate grades,

middle schools and high schools. They will also utilize the features designed in the program to

communicate with students within their documents and become familiar with the tools available
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 4

in Google classroom to distribute information and make resource material available.

Libraries and common areas in all schools will be upgraded with paint for all and new

new furnishings as needed. Design layouts will be modified to begin transition to more flexible

seating options.

Phase 1 of Wifi upgrades and fiber optic installations will be completed.

Year 2

A second chrome cart with a class set of chromebooks for each elementary grade level to

share. All incoming 6th graders receive individual devices in middle schools. All incoming 9th

graders receive individual devices in the high school. During this phase, availability of devices

will increase as the need for access increases. Teachers in all grade levels and content areas will

continue to develop curriculum that is based on the new technology available and will continue

to collaborate to build on the successes from year one. Training will begin for the coming of full

implementation of the use of the classroom management system, Google Classroom in year

three.

Phase 2 of WiFi upgrades and fiber optic installation will be completed.

Year 3 - final phase

Additional chromebooks so that all elementary classes have a class set. All incoming 6th

graders receive individual devices at the middle schools. All incoming 9th graders receive

individual devices at the high school. In this final phase of implementation, all students will

have access to a district provided chromebook. Using the Google suite of programs and Google

classroom, teachers will utilize the technology on a larger scale to communicate with students

regarding assignments, feedback, and collaborative work. Teachers will have experience in

curriculum development and use of the technology resources available and will use the devices
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 5

in daily classroom work on an ongoing basis as appropriate in all grade levels. For instance, all

grade levels will utilize reading programs such as i-Ready and Reading Plus to supplement

language arts instruction. Primary grades will continue to utilize programs such as Storia and

websites such as StoryWorks in addition to math and science sites. Intermediate grades through

high school will continue to utilize collaborative assignments and independent project

development through higher level use of the Google suite of programs and their tools.

Final phase of WiFi upgrades and fiber optic installations.

Ongoing after implementation, all schools will have personal devices for each student

and devices replaced after four years of use.

Media Specialists will house and manage chrome carts for shared use.

Completion of district server upgrades for sufficient capacity to handle volume of devices

online in each phase. WiFi with sufficient bandwidth for all schools. WiFi router in each

classroom with sufficient bandwidth from the district through fiber optic installation.

Use of Google suite of programs for all district applications and correspondence.

21st Century Learning Skills Addressed

Collaboration - This allows to teachers to collaborate with students, students with students, and

teachers with other teachers/administration through the sharing of information via the Google

suite. This fosters a close knit distance learning environments by allowing participants to

instantaneously communicate in an easy to access setting. With this part of the implementation

also, media specialist will need to be in constant communication and collaboration with other

schools and the faculty at their school.

Communication - The students will now be enabled to communicate more efficiently with
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 6

teachers and classmates through the use of the Chromebook. This will also allow teachers to

place more responsibility on the students when it comes to communicating and gaining

information (i.e. emailing teachers for missing work, sharing work with other student, etc)..

Creativity - This allows the teachers to jump out of the norms of the classroom by using the

Chromebooks to take virtual field trips, complete assignments such as creating virtual comic

strips, creating videos, etc about topics in class.

Critical Thinking - This implementation plan allows teachers to give students more ability to

research their own answers to questions they may have.

Rationale Including Research to Support Goal #1 and Strategies

The availability of one-to-one technology devices within Fairview School District will

enable students to begin learning to effectively use the technology available and how to interact

collaboratively online beginning in the primary grades. Students in intermediate grades and

beyond will be able to effectively learn to work on collaborative projects that utilize problem

solving pedagogies in order to develop higher order thinking (Lindsay, 2016). Using this

technology, they will be empowered in collaborating both inside and outside of the classroom as

well as communicating and receiving feedback from instructors and peers (Lindsay, 2016).

When implementing one-to-one or other technology within a school, using the school

media specials (librarian) can have many advantages. They can be a direct support for teachers

and students in developing and working in a blended learning environment. Also, in their role,

they are exposed to the curriculum throughout the building and district and can help to facilitate

the alignment of technology and curriculum in many ways that will assist both teachers and

students (Kuzo, 2015).

Expected Outcomes in Terms of Student Learning / Achievement


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 7

The expected outcome from this goal is that the district will transition smoothly to a 1:1

Chromebook environment throughout 3 years. This is specifically done by providing every

elementary classroom with an in class set of Chromebooks and all middle and high school

students with personal devices that are used inside and outside of the classroom. This will allow

teachers to extend their classroom beyond the four walls via virtual field trips, distance learning

projects, etc. This will also strengthen the communication throughout the district from students,

teachers, other faculty, and administration.

Evaluation Measures (Include Job Titles of Persons Responsible)

The Designated Media Specialist will provide a layout of expectations for the schools use of the

Google Chromebook, and the Google Chromecarts. Each of the ten School Principals will set up

an evaluative tool that assesses how the Google Chromebooks are handled once they arrive at

the schools. The DMT will ask the Principal to see assessment, and report the initial assessment

back to the Educational Technology Committee. This assessment will entail the following:

How many Google Chromebooks have been issued


What maintenance system for the Google Chromebook has been put in place by the school
Technological issues with Chromebooks
Number of students who have not received Chromebooks

Once every quarter, the DMT will inspect each schools continuity and compliance of their own

policy for the care and use of the Google Chromebooks. The Community Business Leader and

the District Financial Officer will be responsible for assessing the variable costs associated with

operating the Google Chromebooks within each school. A quarterly budget assessment will be

reported to the committee, and any adjustments will be made at this time. Additional expenses,

defective devices, and potential replacements should be reported to the District Financial Officer.

At which time, the DFO will take immediate action to send a replacement, pending the approval

of the committee. The Principal and the Teacher Representative will write a Justification
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 8

Memo to the DFO that provides details of the defective device, and if it was damaged

intentional or unintentional.

SMART Goal #2

Goal two will include the initiation of staff/teacher training on the use of the Google

Chromebooks. The goal will be to ensure that everyone who has authorization to use these

devices will know how to maintain them, ensure total competency of the devices functionality,

and understand the intended uses for the both inside and outside of the classroom.

For Educators:

Educators will learn to how to operate the Google Chromebooks, ensuring they understand

varying methods to use this device in the classroom. Instructors will be trained on the

educational features of the device, and how to monitor student comprehension and progression

using the devices.

For Students:

Students will be trained by their teachers to use the Google Chromebooks in the classroom. The

teacher will be required to instruct the students on which applications, education programs, and

research methods will be used in the classroom.

The intention of using these devices in the classroom is to increase the education comprehension

of course materials while using the Google Chromebooks. Our goal is to enhance the student

learning environment, increasing accountability of student technological awareness, improving

student intrinsic motivation to use technological devices to improve learning, and to ensure

100% User Training and Compliance all students & staff using Google Chromebooks.

Classroom Uses for the Google Chromebook:


Elementary school students will use the device to play interactive games that promote specific
content for specific lessons
Educators may rent books for their classroom using the Play for Education Store
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 9

Pending school approval, educators may use the classroom learning management system
This will allow teachers to grade papers quickly, view current progress on student essays and
class projects,
Teachers may plan lessons using the Google Chromebooks to promote a collaborative learning
environment
Students will be able to use the Google Chromebooks to create study groups using Google
Hangouts
Educators can monitor group progress and cooperation
Educators may invite guest speakers to speak on subject matter
The Google Chromebook may only be used to incorporate interactive programs that enhance

student learning

The intention of using these devices in the classroom is to increase the education

comprehension of course materials while using the Google Chromebooks. Our goal is to enhance

the student learning environment, increasing accountability of student technological awareness,

improving student intrinsic motivation to use technological devices to improve learning, and to

ensure 100% User Training and Compliance all students & staff using Google Chromebooks.

Strategies to Support Goal #2

Year 1 Designate Media Trainer Specialists (DMT) for oversight of initial teacher/staff

training on devices for all ten schools. Once the Designated Media Trainers have been selected,

the trainers would then meet to discuss an appropriate unified training module for the school

district. After this module is approved by the Committee Members, the DMT will provide

appropriate training to pre-selected members in the schools. One for Elementary School, Middle

School, and one for High School.

- Training Process:
- DMTs train the Teacher Representatives on how to use the Chromebooks and Chromecarts.
- DMTs will provide training that shows the many ways the Google Chromebooks can enhance

the classroom settings, which show instructors how their students may benefit from using the

Chromebooks.
- Teacher Representatives train the staff members.
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 10

- Staff trains the students.


- Students show competency through assessment given by DMT Specialist:
- DMT Specialist will make a simple, yet easy compliance assessment for all devices for staff and

students.
- Teacher Representative will assess staff members every quarter.
- Staff will use daily measures to assess student competency on an as needed basis.
- Students will learn to use the Google Chromebook through operational illustration given by

teachers, basic functionality of the device, and expected outcomes per lesson which utilizes the

Google Chromebooks.
- Students will learn the expectations of the school district when using the device and care for the

product.
- Using the Chromebook, Students will learn to:
- Operate the Chromebooks hardware.
- Operate the Chromebooks software.
- Basic research.
- Create presentations.
- Proper maintenance.
- Run applications that will be used in the classroom.

Year 2/3 The DMT will ensure that follow-up training is given to all students and staff

members that are Google Chromebook users. Schools should be familiarized with using the

devices, and will now implement processes to assess the effectiveness of the Google

Chromebook in the classroom. Assessments will be ongoing to assess the improvements made

from utilizing the Chromebooks in the classroom. Both student and staff competency and

compliance assessments will be forwarded to the Technology Committee to review the

effectiveness of the Google Chromebook within the schools.

21st Century Learning Skills Addressed

Collaboration - This allows to teachers to collaborate with students, students with students, and

teachers with other teachers/administration through the sharing of information via the Google

suite. This fosters a close knit distance learning environments by allowing participants to

instantaneously communicate in an easy to access setting. With this part of the implementation
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 11

also, media specialist will need to be in constant communication and collaboration with other

schools and the faculty at their school.

Communication - The students will now be enabled to communicate more efficiently with

teachers and classmates through the use of the Chromebook. This will also allow teachers to

place more responsibility on the students when it comes to communicating and gaining

information (i.e. emailing teachers for missing work, sharing work with other student, etc)..

Creativity - This allows the teachers to jump out of the norms of the classroom by using the

Chromebooks to take virtual field trips, complete assignments such as creating virtual comic

strips, creating videos, etc about topics in class.

Critical Thinking - This implementation plan allows teachers to give students more ability to

research their own answers to questions they may have.

Rationale Including Research to Support Goal #2 and Strategies

Planning is essential to integrating the Google Chromebooks within the school environment.

Scalise (2016) states that Poor technology integration planning can center on including too

much technology in the classroom as well as too little. (Scalise, 2016, p. 55). We must ensure

that our school district has a proper plan in place. Inadvertently, good planning will help yield the

best results whilst assessing how students have benefited from using the intended technological

devices.

Therefore, we must establish goals that are reasonable and progressive in nature. Using the

Google Chromebooks may inspire students to learn more, but we have to assess the plausibility

of potential disinterest, as well. It is imperative that the guidelines of the use of these devices are

set in place before the students and staff use them. Jackson (2012) admits that there are many

advantages and disadvantages of using technological devices in the classroom, and when
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 12

effectual guidelines have been set that they ... will contribute to a more thoughtful and

functional learning environment. (Jackson, 2012, p. 138). Our goal is to ensure every student

knows how to use the device, that this device effectively increases their educational quality, and

that it helps students learn more effectively.

Expected Outcomes in Terms of Student Learning / Achievement

The main expected outcome from this goal are that teachers will be appropriately trained on

Chromebook usage and the Google suite, thus passing this training down to students in their

classroom. By the end of this time period, it is expected that all staff and students will be able to

operate the software and hardware with high proficiency.

It is also expected that students will be using these devices to enhance their learning, as guided

by their teachers. These devices should be utilized in every classroom at least 3 times a week.

Evaluation Measures (Include Job Titles of Persons Responsible)- Marcus

DMT will initiate current trend analysis of computer competency


Scaled from 1 to 5 per school
1 - Does not understands Google Chromebook
2 - Slightly understands Google Chromebook
3 - General knowledge of Google Chromebook
4 - Knowledge beyond general comprehension of Google Chromebook
5 - 100% efficient in using Google Chromebook

The DMT will assess/justify the rating using the following criteria

Student

Comprehension of Google Chromebooks operating system


Comprehension of Google Chromebooks hardware
Student can open applications and run them proficiently

Staff/Instructors

Members of staff understand how to configure Google Chromecarts


Instructors provide evidence of Google Chromebooks usefulness in the classroom
Which features of the Google Chromebook is used in their lesson plans
Map of the projected lessons that utilize Google Chromebook, and how they will be used
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 13

SMART Goal #3

Goal 3 for the Fairview School District in the implementation of 1:1 chromebook access

for all students is to design and create connectedness and interaction among various stakeholders

in each school as well as develop support networks for ongoing professional development for

staff and support for all users. This will be accomplished through the use of social media, staff

and student mentors, and ongoing training and support classes. This will be an ongoing

development process throughout the three-year rollout of technology and beyond. The schools

themselves, district and school administration, and educational staff will utilize and model

connectedness in their own communications and training as they implement these strategies with

students and the community. The schools and district will utilize new and updated facebook

accounts and Twitter accounts to communicate with the community and students on an ongoing

basis. These accounts will be in use by August of 2017 with training for teachers, students, and

community members available during the first two weeks of school. Google Classroom will be

implemented for the beginning of the new school year in August with parent access training

available during the first two weeks of school as well. Google Docs will be utilized for student

work as well as to promote collaborative student projects that can be accessed online. Teachers

will interact with students and groups through these documents on an ongoing basis.

Strategies to Support Goal #3

Beginning the start of Year 1 and ongoing;

- Google classroom to get all teachers started on a classroom management system (CMS) with

future expansion to Schoology or similar products available.


- Professional Learning Networks of educators utilizing twitter (and other social media?) to share

technology links, training ideas, and successful project ideas.


- District and School facebook accounts for community communication.
- District and School Twitter accounts for community communication and ongoing updates.
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 14

- Use of PLNs on Twitter and facebook for ongoing discourse and sharing of ideas among all

district staff.
- With the beginning of year one implementation, administrators and teachers will be trained in the

use of basic Google suite products such as Google Docs. District and school communications

will utilize this product as a primary resource to expose and support teachers in its use and

features. School administration will utilize collaborative document creation to communicate and

gather information when working with the district, other administrators and teachers in order to

model the use and potentials of the resource.


- Use of Google suite resources such as Google Docs, Google Slides, and Google Sheets will

enable students to work together collaboratively on shared documents as well as share individual

work with others in order to peer edit and communicate within the documents. Final products

can also easily be made available for publication to a broad audience by sharing the link.
- Students will have direct communication available to teachers through shared documents as well

as email.

21st Century Learning Skills Addressed

Collaboration - This allows teachers to collaborate with students, students with students, and

teachers with other teachers/administration through the sharing of information via the Google

suite. For this goal, specifically Google Docs will be utilized. This fosters a close knit distance

learning environments by allowing participants to instantaneously communicate in an easy to

access setting. With this part of the implementation also, media specialist will need to be in

constant communication and collaboration with other schools and the faculty at their school.

Communication - The students will now be enabled to communicate more efficiently with

teachers and classmates through the use of the Chromebook. This will also allow teachers to

place more responsibility on the students when it comes to communicating and gaining

information (i.e. emailing teachers for missing work, sharing work with other student, etc).
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 15

Creativity - This allows the teachers to jump out of the norms of the classroom by using the

Chromebooks to take virtual field trips, complete assignments such as creating virtual comic

strips, creating videos, etc about topics in class.

Critical Thinking - This implementation plan allows teachers to give students more ability to

research their own answers to questions they may have.

Rationale Including Research to Support Goal #3 and Strategies

Communication within the schools and from teachers to parents is imperative. Numerous

studies have shown more parent involvement with their childs school and schoolwork when

there is active communication, particularly through technology (Goodall, 2016).

Communication is the heart of parent-teacher interaction and is imperative now more than ever

with peoples lives growing increasingly busier (Goodall, 2016). Students are also more

involved and tend to openly communicate more with teachers and other students, as well and

more actively participate in school with the use of technology.

Technology use can reach students and parents faster now than ever before. Through the use

of communication from the schools such as emails, phone or text alerts, or through social media

such as a school Facebook page, Twitter, or a teacher app that allows them to send messages to

parents directly, communication has become much easier and quicker (Carter, 2015). Schools at

one time had to communicate via paper letters and correspondence sent home, but are now able

to send the information electronically and instantly. Reminders are easier through an email or

text alert, regardless of the communication. Students are also able to communicate easier with

teachers through apps that allow them to message the teacher in lieu of emails. This also

encourages students to communicate more and work better together because technology makes it

easier.
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 16

Expected Outcomes in Terms of Student Learning / Achievement

The expected outcome for this goal is for more connectedness throughout every aspect of the

school. Students should have ease of access to school information, including but not limited to,

sports games/practices, performances, state testing, and school holidays through social media

that is already in everyday use. Students should also find collaboration to be simpler through the

use of Google Classroom and the Google Suite.

Evaluation Measures (Include Job Titles of Persons Responsible) - Marcus

District Ed. Tech Department Member:

Creates standardized evaluation for implementation of the Google Chromebook in the classroom
This includes:
Ways the Google Chromebook can be used to teach assignments
Ways Parents, Students, Teachers and Staff can benefits from this device
Create a contingency plan to improve the overall quality of the Google Chromebook

implementation initiative
Assesses how the technology affects the learning environment
How effective are the following relationships:
Student-To-Student; Student-To-Expert; Student-To-Teacher; Teacher-To-Teacher; Teacher-To-

Expert

The School Board Member will create a district-wide social media account that will employ

positive aspects of utilizing Google Chromebooks in the ten schools. There will be a

professional Twitter and Facebook account that gives the community updates on the schools

progress, expectations of take-home devices, and forums for discussion for all matters

concerning Google Chromebooks.

Professional Development Plan for Each Goal / Strategy

GOAL 1: Objective 1: Integrate 1:1 computing in all classrooms in the Fairview School District.

Training for staff to develop skills, knowledge, and strategies to effectively implement 1:1

technology in the curriculum and for best instructional practices.


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 17

Training will be rolled out in multiple phases during each year of implementation.

Objective 2: Promote the use of technology in the classroom by providing models and

opportunities for staff to develop technology rich classrooms.

Training will be rolled out in multiple phases during each year of implementation.

GOAL 2: Objective 1: Provide training for staff that includes the use of chromebooks in the

classroom to positively affect teacher instruction and use of technology.

This training will be a mandatory orientation in year 1 for all teachers and ongoing in the

following years for new teachers.

Objective 2: Provide training on the use of chrome suite software to meet student needs.

This training will be mandatory in year 1 for all teachers and ongoing in the following years for

new teachers.

GOAL 3: Objective 1: Provide training on new environments and devices for staff to understand

how 1 to 1 computing and numerous environments will affect teacher instruction in the

classroom and student assignments.

Training will be mandatory in year 1 and ongoing in the following years for new teachers.

Objective 2: Provide support mechanisms and resources for the utilization of

technology in the the classroom. Training will be mandatory in year 1 and ongoing in the

following years for new teachers.

Timeline for Implementation of Each Goal / Strategy Amy

Phase 1 (Year 1) of Technology Plan Implementation

July 2017
Purchase required number of Chromebooks for students and teachers and Chromecarts for

classroom use
Phase 1 of new WiFi and LAN upgrades begins in all schools, including new wiring and access
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 18

to greater broadband capability


Selection and training of all technology representatives (DMT) for each school begins and is

completed by the end of July


August 2017 Staff development training for teachers on new equipment

and software programs (Acceptable Use) by school DMT as well as access and training

for parents
September 2017 Student training on new equipment and Acceptable Use

by school DMT
September 2017 June 2018 Ongoing training for students and

faculty/staff on Acceptable Use and new equipment by school DMTs and teachers.

Phase 2 (Year 2)

Purchase additional Chromebooks and Chromecarts for greater availability to students and

teachers in July of 2018


Continuation of/finishing any upgrades and/or wiring that still needs completion for all schools

for WiFi and internet access


Continue teacher, parent, and student training, particularly for new teachers, staff, and students in

August for teachers and September for students, as well as ongoing training for all throughout

the school year.

Phase 3 (Year 3)

Purchase additional Chromebooks and Chromecarts for greater availability to students, parents,

and teachers in July of 2019


Final upgrades/wiring for all schools for WiFi and internet access will be completed
Continue teacher and student training, particularly for new teachers, staff, and students in August

for teachers and September for students, as well as ongoing training for all throughout the school

year.

*All subsequent years will require maintenance on all hardware and software, upgrades as

needed, and additional Chromebooks as they are worn or as new students come into the schools,
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 19

as well as ongoing training for faculty/staff and students.

Itemized Budget for Each Goal / Strategy

Appendix B

Goal #1 Budget Request

Wi-Fi Transmitters by Cisco Technologies (A Meraki System)

MR52-Access Point High Performance 802.11ac 2.5 Gbps radio rate

Retail price per unit: $1,115.00 Condition(New) School Rate: $779.00 per unit

Savings Per Unit Retail Cost: $366.00 ea.

Licenses for each unit 3-year plan (included in cost) Retail Cost:$0.00

MR34 HW High Performance Dual-Band, 802.11802.ac 1.75Gbps radio rate

Retail price per unit: $792.99 (New) School Rate: $585.00 per unit

Savings Per Unit Retail Cost: $207.87 ea.

Licenses & Warranties 3-year plan Retail Cost: $695.00

Negotiated Cost: $425.00

Fiber Optic Cable (Contractor: Verizon)


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 20

Fiber optic cable and installation. Installed on I-85. 288 Count Fiber Cost = 5,000 ft. at

$5.87 per foot; , 144 Count Fiber = 5000 ft. at $2.98 per foot; 24 Count Fiber = 70,000 ft. at

$0.68 per foot. Fiber optic cable (Single Mode, 12 Strand Fiber) (Furnish & Install

Inclusive).

Appendix C

Goal #1 Budget Request

Paint/Supplies 10 Schools Common Area & Libraries Only

Cost Per 5-gallon Bucket Retail: $105.98 Negotiated Cost: $50 per 5-Gallon Bucket

(Brushes, Rollers, Drop Cloths, Pans Donated by Home Depot)

Estimated Cost Per School:

7 Elementary Schools 30 Gallons @ $50 per 5 gallon = $1,500.00

2 Middle Schools 10 Gallons @ $50 per 5 gallon = $500.00

1 High School 3 Gallons @ $50 per 5 gallon = $150.00

Labor Cost FREE Use Volunteers and Staff Members

TOTAL COST FOR PAINT, SUPPLIES, LABOR $2,150.00

Fixtures/Lighting Common Areas & Library Only


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 21

Lighting 10 Schools x $258 per fixture = $2580.00

Common Areas Fixtures Charge And Go Stations with Chairs

Regular Retail Cost: $1,895.99 (Like at Airport waiting areas)

Negotiated Cost Per Station: $650.00 ea.

7 Elementary Schools (2 per school) 14 x $650 = $9,100

2 Middle Schools (3 per school) 6 x $650 = $3,900

1 High School (3 per school) 3 x $650 = $1,950

TOTAL COST FOR FIXTURES: $14, 950.00

FINAL COST: $2580 + $14,950 = $17, 530.00


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 22

Appendix D

Goal #2 Budget Request

Chromebook/Lenovo N22 (Google) 100GB of Google Drive free for 2 years

Lenovo N22 (100 GB) Retail $239.99 School Price: $179.00

11.6'' HD Display 2.7 lbs. Up to 12 hours battery life

Elementary: 625 x 7 = 4,375 x $179 = $783, 125.00

Middle: 825 x 2 = 1,650 x $179 = $295,350.00

High School: 1375 x 1 = 1,375 x $179 = $246, 125.00

TOTAL COST FOR CHROMEBOOKS = $ 1,324,600.00

Premium Extended War w/ Accidental Damages 7,400x $44.99 = $332,926.00

**Students will be charged per ChromeBook to Cover Damages per year $50 Fairview

Total School Population = 7,400 Students

Minus Students from Low-Income Families 7,400 x 45% -/= 3,330 Title I Remaining

Cost to Cover Warranty Student 4,070 x $44.99 = $183,109.30


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 23

TOTAL COST TO FAIRVIEW FOR WARRANTY/DAMAGE

$332,926.00-$183,109.30 = $149,186.70

** 4,070 Students Non- Title I

X $50 Student Fee (each student pays this fee

per school calendar year)

$203,500.00 School Collects Per Student Not Covered

Under Title I

-$183,109.30 Cost Charged to School to Cover Down 2- year

Warranty

$20,390.70 Surplus Amount (To Cover Chromebook

Carrying Cases) / 6.00 per carrying case

**4,070 Students Non-Title I

Hiring of Additional Workforce: Media Trainer Specialist (On Call)

-Training of Staff on Google ChromeBooks

-Train Students on how to use and handle ChromeBooks

-Technology Night to Train Family Members on Technology in Classroom

Salary Contracted every 3 years $140 - $150 per hour

Estimated amount of Contracted Hours School Year Part-Time

180 days @ 900 - 1000 hours per School Year (90 days x 2hrs dy = $25,200 yr)
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 24

Childrens Internet Protection Act (CIPA) and E-Rate

The Childrens Internet Protection Act (CIPA) is a federal law concerning the use of

instructional digital media. CIPA was enacted by congress in 2000 to address issues concerning

childrens access to obscene and harmful content from the internet. In 2011, the Federal

Communications Commission (FCC) updated the CIPA rules by adding the Protecting Children

in the 21st Century Act which ensures the education of minors on the safe use of the internet

(Federal Communications Commission, n.d.). CIPA requires schools and libraries to block or

filter internet access, have internet safety policies in place, monitor online activities of minors,

and educate minors about appropriate online behavior. In addition, schools and libraries must

meet the Neighborhood Childrens Internet Protection Act (NCIPA) which covers the issues of

electronic messaging, disclosure of personal information of minors, and unlawful online

activities.

The schools and libraries E-Rate program makes telecommunication and information

services affordable for schools and libraries in the United States by providing discounts for these
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 25

services. The E-Rate program was mandated by congress in 1996 and implemented by the FCC

in 1997 (Federal Communications Commission, n.d.). Schools and libraries receive 20-90%

discounts on telecommunications, internet access, and internet connections. High poverty and

rural schools and libraries receive the higher discounts. The E-Rate program has insured internet

access for virtually all schools and libraries.

Compliance with CIPA is required for any school or library receiving E-Rate funds.

CIPA requires any school that receives E-Rate funding to filter or block obscene pictures, any

type of child pornography, and any material harmful to minors. In addition, schools must certify

that they are educating students on internet safety to be eligible for E-Rate discounts. CIPA also

requires schools to have in place an Internet Safety Policy with technology safety measures to

qualify for E-Rate discounts.

Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act

The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), was a law generated by Congress

in 1998 which enforces explicit internet regulations to protect and safeguard the privacy of

adolescents under the age of 13. This Act which did not take effect until April of 2000, serves as

a safety measure against any persons, establishment, conglomerate, or organizations in control of

any website and online service directed specifically for this age group. COPPA is manned by the

government Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The FTC updated the ACT with minimal ordeal

in July of 2013 to amend the privacy protection for educational technology locations. Congress

enacted COPPA in 1998 to limit the collection of personally identifiable information from

youngsters without their parents consent.

The Commissions Rule implementing COPPA, effective since April 2000, requires

websites to post a complete privacy policy, notify parents directly about their information
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 26

collection practices, and get verifiable parental consent before collecting personal information

from their children or sharing it with others (Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998,

15 U.S.C. 6501-6506, 2001). When used effectively, the appropriate technology and context

combined can transform learning through creativity, critical thinking and problem solving

(Caputo, 2013) This will help to strike a balance in engaging students while taking standardized

tests on their ChromeBooks.

Acceptable / Responsible Use Policies (AUPs / RUPs)

Explanation of Acceptable/Responsible Use Policy to clarify that the document will define the

parameters and procedures under which district resources will be used by staff, students, and

volunteers (Education World).

1. District responsibilities - what the district will provide to schools and students.
2. Internet Use - clarification that internet services will only be used for educational purposes and

that the district will ensure safety and security with all forms of internet use (Consortium for

School Networking).
3. Monitoring and Privacy - Users are expected to act in a responsible and legal manner. The

district has the right to monitor systems to ensure safety and educational intention of

use(Consortium for School Networking).


4. User Conduct - rules and procedures regarding legitimate educational purpose use of system with

user agreements (Education World).


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 27

Infographic Demonstrating the Connection Between Each Goal and the ISTE Standards

for Students, Teachers, & Administrators


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 28
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 29
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 30
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 31

Resources:

Adams, Helen R., Robert F. Bocher, Carol A. Gordon, and Elizabeth Barry-Kessler.
Privacy in the 21st Century: Issues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries. Westport,
Connecticut: Libraries Unlimited, 2005.

Carter, M. (2015, August 31). Startup aims to improve school communication. Arkansas

Business, 32(35), 24. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu/login?

url=http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu/ps/i.do?

p=GRGM&sw=w&u=vic_liberty&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE

%7CA430940764&sid=summon&asid=e3d82f7d4daea37a38843fda96e5e247

Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, 15 U.S.C. 6501-6506 (2001).


Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act. Retrieved April 14 2017 from:
http://searchcrm.techtarget.com/definition/COPPA

Edutopia, George Lucas Foundation, (2015) Blog: What the research says about 1:1
Classrooms by Nick Sutton. Retrieved on April 18, 2017 from:
https://www.edutopia.org/discussion/hat-research-says-about-1:1-Clssrooms

Finch, K. (2014). International Association of Privacy Protection. Westin Research


Center. Retrieved on April 15 2017 from: https://iapp.org/news/a/coppa-in-the-classroom/

Goodall, J. S. (2016). Technology and school-home communication. International Journal of

Pedagogies & Learning, 11(2), 118-131.

doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.liberty.edu/10.1080/22040552.2016.1227252

Jackson, L. D. (2012). Is Mobile Technology in the Classroom a Helpful Tool or a

Distraction?: A Report of University Students Attitudes, Usage Practices, and

Suggestions for Policies. International Journal of Technology, Knowledge & Society,

8(5), 129-140. Retrieved from https://ezproxy.liberty.edu/login?


Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 32

url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?

direct=true&db=a9h&AN=91544655&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Kennedy, A., Deuel, A., Nelson, T.H., & Slavit, D. (2011). Requiring collaboration or
distributing leadership? Phi Delta Kappan, 92(8), 20-24

Kuzo, J. (2015). School librarians: Key to technology integration. Knowledge Quest,


44(1), 74-76. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu/login?
url=http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu/docview/1712288542?
accountid=12085

Lindsay, L. (2016), Transformation of teacher practice using mobile technology with one-
to-one classes: M-learning pedagogical approaches. British Journal Educational
Technology, 47(5), 883892. doi:10.1111/bjet.12265

Lytle, J. H. (2012). Where is leadership heading? Phi Delta Kappan, 93(8), 54-57.

Scalise, K. (2016). Student Collaboration and School Educational Technology: Technology

Integration Practices in the Classroom. i-Manager's Journal on School Educational

Technology, 11(4), 53-63. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu/login?

url=https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.liberty.edu/docview/1809061066?

accountid=12085

Sheninger, E. (2014). Digital leadership: Changing paradigms for changing times.


Thousand Oaks: Corwin.

State of Delaware Department of Education (2015) Career & Technical Education Core
Values. Retrieved from: http://www.doe.k12.de.us/Page/2533

Task Force on Developing Research in Educational Leadership. (2003). What we know


about successful school leadership. Washington, DC: American Educational Research
Association. (Retrieved April 5 2017 from
http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107042/chapters/developing-a-vision-and-a-
mission.aspx)
Running head: COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY PLAN 33

Whitehead, B., Jensen, D., & Boschee, F. (2013) Planning for technology: A guide for
school administrators, technology coordinators, and curriculum leaders. (2nd ed.).
Thousand Oaks: Corwin.