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EBC Rhode Island Chapter Program:

Update on Renewable Energy in Rhode Island


Welcome
Christian F. Capizzo
Program Co-Chair

Chair Environmental Law Practice Group


Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Program Introduction & Overview

Edward Summerly
Program Co-Chair & Moderator
Principal, GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Offshore Wind Energy Block Island Wind Farm

Irina Gumennik

Manager, Performance Analytics and Resource Assessment

Deepwater Wind

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Landfill Gas to Energy
The Largest Renewable Energy Facility in RI

Glenn Lockhart

General Manager

Broadrock Renewables

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Environmental Business Council of New England
CENTRAL LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY FACILITY JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND
34MW - RENEWABLE ENERGY
May 3, 2017
COMPANY OVERVIEW

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COMPANY LOCATIONS

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CENTRAL LANDFILL GAS COLLECTION

Central Landfill consists of approximately 260 acres (184 acres have a final cap).
Approximately 25 additional years of air space remain under current permitted plans.
Bacteria decompose the waste to create a gas consisting of approximately 55 to 60% methane.
Gas is collected by 600 collectors (vertical wells and horizontal gas collectors) under vacuum.
Currently generating approximately 8,500 scfm (standard cubic feet per minute ) of landfill gas

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CENTRAL LANDFILL GAS COLLECTION

Collectors are installed as the waste filling progresses.


Vertical Wells are installed approximately every 200 feet to depths up to approximately 100 feet.
Horizontal Gas Collection Trenches are installed every 35 vertical feet and approximately 120 feet (horizontally)
Final capping of the landfill occurs once areas are filled with MSW.

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CENTRAL LANDFILL GAS COLLECTION

Vertical Extraction Well


Depths of the Wells Vary (typically 40 to 120 feet).
Drilled with a 3 foot diameter bucket auger.
Wells are monitored at least once per month for
vacuum, temperature and gas quality

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PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM
CAMERON H2S REMOVAL SYSTEM
(REGENERATION CYCLE)

CAMERON
BIOLOGICAL H2S
600 WELLS ON Dirty 4 ROTARY SCREW LFG CHILLER
REMOVAL SYSTEM
THE LANDFILL Gas BLOWERS (DEWATERING)
(ADSORPTION
CYCLE)

1ST STAGE COMPRESSION SILOXANE REMOVAL SKID Clean 2ND STAGE COMPRESSION
(135PSI) (ACTIVATED ALUMINA) Gas (260 PSI)

ONE (1) DRESSER-RAND


FOUR (4) SOLAR TAURUS STEAM Turbine
CTG Four (4) HEAT RECOVERY
60 GAS TURBINE EXHAUST
STEAM
GENERATOR
STEAM GENERATORS
GENERATORS (6.2 MW)
(10.3 MW)
QUESTIONS?

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Anaerobic Digestion Turning Food Scraps to Fuel

Beth Clark

Project Development Manager

Blue Sphere

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Blue Sphere
Turning Food Scraps into Fuel
Environmental Business Council of
New England

May 3, 2017

Beth Anne Clark


Project Development Manager

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Blue Sphere is an International Renewable Energy Power Producer

Develop, Own and Operate Power Plants utilizing


Waste-to-Energy Technologies
Anaerobic Digestion, Gasification, Pyrolysis,
Landfill Gas-to-Energy and other Waste-to-Energy technologies.

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Scope of the Problem

40% of Food Goes to Waste

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Responsible Energy Production

Blue Sphere waste-to-energy facilities help solve


three pressing global problems:
Diverting organic waste from
Reduce waste being sent to landfills. landfills to WTE facilities will
Globally almost 40% of all food produced is wasted. reduce greenhouse gas emissions and
help protect water quality.
Reduce the release of harmful methane gas
which is a powerfully destructive Green House
Gas.
LF are the third largest source of methane
emissions in the United States.
Global warming effect is 25 times greater than CO2

Produce renewable, base load energy.

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Anaerobic Digestion

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Key Elements
Blue Sphere is developing the process for providing for a continuous stream of
Feedstock waste from dependable sources.
Sources
Project Economics

The Blue Sphere model requires that long-term power purchase agreements are
in place prior to development, providing each project with a Predictive Revenue
Purchase
Agreements Source.. ..

The Blue Sphere management team utilizes its expertise to manage the site
Site & selection process and manage the relevant permitting process of such facilities.
Permits
Strategic Aspects
Blue Sphere has partnered with reliable and experienced providers that offer
technologies for all waste types. Our EPC partners have hundreds of successful
EPC &
Technology installations, thereby reducing technology risk.

EPC: Engineering, Procurement and Construction

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Supportive Policy

Renewable Portfolio Standards


A Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (REPS) requires
utility companies to source a certain amount of the
energy they generate from renewable sources.

29 States have laws in place

Rhode Island 14.5% by 2019 recent measure to increase


to 38.5% by 2035!
Hawaii declared 100% renewable goal, VT is 75% by 2032, NY 50% by 2030

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Supportive Policy

Organics Bans

Rhode Island has joined a growing


list of states that are banning
organics from landfills.

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Electrical
Drying Generators
Building

Waste Water
Receiving
Treatment
Building
System

Cold Digester

Biopulpers
Digester Tanks
Gas Storage Tank

Blue Sphere Anaerobic Digestion Facility


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Charlotte, N.C.
Johnston, Rhode Island
Nearing Completion Project Overview: Project Funding:
Combined Energy Output: 3.2MW York Capital / Entropy
Technology Process: Anaerobic Digester Construction Cost: Approx. $19m
Feedstock: Organic Waste
- Feedstock Contracts in Place Blue Sphere Project Ownership:
Production Output: Electricity & Compost 22.75%
Milestones:
Began Development in June 2012
Began Construction in Q4 2014
Completed Financial Closing in April 2015
Completed Construction of Primary Structures in Q1
2016
National Grid Sub-Station Construction in June 201
White Test Diagnostics Q1 2017
Test Waste in Digesters and Producing Gas Q1 2017
Passing Electricity to Grid April 2017
COD
Mechanical Completion

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State of the Art Technology

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Energy That Is Made in America!

Waste-to-Energy is one of the fastest


growing energy markets

Rhode Island has supportive policies

Some state regulations are more strict


than EPA standards

Leaders recognize contribution to local


investment & jobs

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THANK YOU!

Blue Sphere Corporation

Beth Anne Clark, Project Development Manager

Beth@bluespherecorporate.com
704-575-4482

www.bluespherecorporate.com

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Solar Energy
Beneficially Reusing Closed Landfills

Everett Tatelbaum

Vice President

Kearsarge Energy, LP

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
EBC Rhode Island: Solar Project Development

Everett Tatelbaum, Vice President

May 3, 2017
Agenda

Introduction to Kearsarge Energy


RI Solar Market Overview
Project Case Study: South Kingstown Solar Consortium (SKSC)
RI Solar Market Outlook
Q&A

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Kearsarge Energy: A Full Service Renewable Energy Project
Developer, Owner & Operator
Leading renewable energy project development and finance company
founded in 2009
Principal focus on the fast-growing solar energy market in the Northeast
Proven track record: +60 MW / $180 million completed solar projects
Focus on public sector for partnerships and PPAs: top credit
Strong balance sheet with our own capitalno need for external equity
financing, projects are not flipped pre-NTP like many other developers
Extensive experience in ballasted landfill solar, pile driven ground mounts,
rooftops and parking lot canopies
+150 MW currently under development

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Kearsarge Energy: Sample Projects

Concord Landfill (1.7 MW DC) Grafton Water District (1.7 MW DC) Chester (6.0 MW DC)

Chicopee (0.9 MW DC)

Kearsarge Barre II - Britton Rd (1.9 MW DC)

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Kearsarge Energy: Solar Project Track Record
Location Installation Year of Completion Size (kW DC)
South Kingstown RI Ballasted/Ground-Mount Superfund 2017 8,600
Wilmington MA Rooftop 2017 2,200
Ayer MA Ground-Mount 2017 1,210
Gill MA Ground-Mount 2017 2,771
Montague MA Ballasted Capped Landfill 2017 6,000
Athol MA Ground-Mount 2016 647
Bellingham MA Ballasted Capped Landfill 2016 4,124
Concord MA Ground-Mount EPA Superfund 2016 5,565
Duxbury MA (2) Rooftop 2016 692
Granby MA (5) Ground-Mount 2016 3,197
Norwell MA Parking Canopy 2016 576
Rehoboth MA Ground-Mount 2016 762
Shirley MA Ground-Mount 2016 1,290
Sunderland MA Ground-Mount 2016 312
Westborough MA Ground-Mount 2016 992
Southwick MA Ground-Mount 2015 4,925
Barre MA Ground-Mount 2014 2,400
Barre MA Ground-Mount 2014 1,900
Chester MA Ground-Mount 2014 6,000
Chicopee MA Ground-Mount 2014 860
Concord MA Ballasted Capped Landfill 2014 1,723
Canton MA Rooftop 2013 370
Canton MA Rooftop 2013 417
Franklin MA Ground-Mount 2013 4,800
Franklin MA Ground-Mount 2013 3,600
Grafton MA Ground-Mount 2013 1,720
Hubbardston MA Ground-Mount 2013 2,500
Lahaina HI Rooftop 2013 98
Salisbury MA Ground-Mount 2012 5,740
Lahaina HI Rooftop 2011 150
Miliani HI Rooftop 2011 140

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Rhode Island Solar Market Attributes

Great support and visibility starting with Governor


Underdeveloped market (risks/rewards)
Virtual net metering for municipal/public off-takers
Net Metering project limit tied to load (no artificial cap per project)
Eligibility for Class I RECs
Option to compete in REG program
Less DG congestion on distribution circuits and substations (in theory)
Inexpensive land
Certainty on personal property tax

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Rhode Island Solar Market Challenges

Low revenues per kWh (net metering + Class I RECs or REG tariff)
Small market size
Limited access to virtual net metering (no private off-takers)
Slow interconnection review
Expensive interconnection upgrade costs
Landowner lease expectations often set by Massachusetts SREC I

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
South Kingstown Solar Consortium Project (SKSC)
South Kingstown, Narragansett & URI Procurement Q4 2015

EPA Superfund Capped Landfill Sites in South Kingstown

Net Metering Credits purchased by URI & the Towns

8.6 MW DC across 3 parcels (majority ballasted)

EPC Partner: Conti Enterprises

Engineering & Permitting Partner: GZA

Est. Completion Q4 2017

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Critical Path & Highlights Unique to SKSC Development

Complex and slow NGRID interconnection review required close management


and experienced project team
Process to consolidate energy generated on multiple parcels behind a single
net meter
Routing of customer-side wires through URI campus to meet NGRID POI
RIDEM & EPA review of Superfund impacts to ensure proper design to
protect caps
Design & contractual review with all members of Consortium
Changing EPC costs and module options during extended Impact Study
Great support from local officials, URI and RIDEM/EPA throughout process
Exemplary public-private partnership to earn SKSC revenues to ensure
proper maintenance of the landfills for 20-25 years
Landmark project in RI solar market

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Rhode Island Solar Market Outlook

Low revenue per kWh = high bar for cost effective interconnections,
realistic landowners, great sites and efficient financing
Smaller market with lower revenues and net metering credit rate risk so
some developers are not spending any time/resources in RI
Interconnection timeline and upgrade costs will continue to be the most
critical inputs on all new projects given pace of solar financing cycle, ITC
sunset, potential tax reform
Political support and regulatory framework continue to drive interest in RI
market from Kearsarge perspective (i.e., open-ended net metering, certainty
on property taxes)
Incremental pace of growth likely to continue with increased interest in
community solar, affordable housing, smart grid initiatives

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Kearsarge Energy Strictly Private and Confidential
Thank You

Everett Tatelbaum, Vice President

Kearsarge Energy

480 Pleasant Street, Suite B110

Watertown, MA 02472

(617) 393-4222 / etatelbaum@kearsargeenergy.com

www.kearsargeenergy.com

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Networking Break
Financial Assistance Programs of the
RI Infrastructure Bank

Jeff Diehl

Executive Director

RI Infrastructure Bank

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Panel Discussion
Moderators: Ed Summerly, GZA & Christian Capizzo, SHS

Panelists:
Irina Gumennik, Deepwater Wind
Glenn Lockhart, Broadrock Renewables
Beth Clark, Blue Sphere
Everett Tatelbaum, Kearsarge Energy
Jeff Diehl, RI Infrastructure Bank

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
EBC Rhode Island Chapter Program:

Update on Renewable Energy in Rhode Island