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Metallogeny and Petrogenesis

of Lamprophyres in the
Mid-European Variscides
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Metallogeny and Petrogenesis
of Lamprophyres in the
Mid-European Variscides
Post-Collisional Magmatism and Its Relationship
to Late-Variscan Ore Forming Processes in the
Erzgebirge (Bohemian Massif)

Thomas Seifert
Technische Universitt Bergakademie Freiberg
Institute of Mineralogy, Division of Economic Geology and Petrology
Brennhausgasse 14, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany
(e-mail, thomas.seifert@mineral.tu-freiberg.de)
Description of the pictures on the front cover:

large picture in the centre:


Mining area of a Sn-polymetallic vein with spatial association to a NW-SE lamprophyre dike (left: altered gneiss,
right: mica-lamprophyre). Arme Leute Bergfreude mine, Marienberg district.
small picture top right:
Stringer zone W-As-Sn ore-type. Ober Neuhaus Sachsen mine, Pobershau district.
small picture on the bottom left:
Zoned phlogopite-phenocryst surrounded by ne-grained groundmass with phlogopite/biotite-, feldspar-,
amphibole-, and apatite-microlites and carbonates. Mica-lamprophyre, Freiberg southern subdistrict.

Description of the pictures on the backcover:

small picture left:


ENE-WSW mica-lamprophyre dike crosscuts type Eibenstock granite.
Tannenberg adit, Mhlleithen tin deposit.
small picture right:
NNW-SSE kersantite dike is crosscutted by ENE-WSW quartz-cassiterite-sulde veinlets of the stringer zone
type, both are crosscutted by N-S uorine-rich aplite. Sn(-W) deposit Ehrenfriedersdorf, Sauberg mining eld.

Photographs not otherwise credited were taken by the author.

2008 The author and IOS Press BV.

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CONTENTS
Abstract 11

1. Introduction 13

2. Geological Setting and Magmatic Events 17

3. Study Areas and Selection Criteria 19

4. Mineral Deposits 21
4.1. W-Mo Mineralization 21
4.2. Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F Greisen and Vein-Type Mineralization 22
4.2.1. Mineralization stages 22
4.2.2. Age of mineralization 22
4.3. Silver-Base Metal Vein-Type Mineralization 23
4.3.1. Mineralization stages 23
4.3.2. Age of mineralization 23
4.4. Uranium Vein-Type Mineralization 23

5. Methods 29
5.1. Whole Rock and Mineral Geochemistry 29
5.2. Radiogenic Isotopes 29
5.3. Geochronology 30
5.3.1. K-Ar and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology 30
5.3.2. Zircon dating 31

6. Field Geology and Petrographic Characteristic of Lamprophyres 35


6.1. Field Geology 35
6.2. Petrographic Types and Relatively Ages 35
6.2.1. LD1a-type lamprophyres 36
6.2.2. LD1b-type lamprophyres 36
6.2.3. LD2a-type lamprophyres 36
6.2.4. LD2b-type lamprophyres 36
6.2.5. LD2c-type lamprophyres 36
6.2.6. LD2d-type lamprophyres 37
6.2.7. LD2e-type lamprophyres 37
6.2.8. LD2f-type lamprophyres 37
6.2.9. LD3-type lamprophyres 37
6.3. Composition and Paragenesis of Magmatic Mica and Apatite 37
6.3.1. Early magmatic trioctahedral micas 37
6.3.2. Early magmatic uor-apatite 38
7. Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and Mac
Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin 59
7.1. Whole Rock and Trace Element Characteristics 59
7.2. Isotope Geochemistry 86
7.2.1. Sr and Nd isotopes 86
7.2.2. Pb isotopes 89

8. Ar-Ar, K-Ar, Pb-Pb, and U-Pb Geochronology 99


40 39
8.1. Ar- Ar and K-Ar Analyses 99
8.2. U-Pb Single Zircon Shrimp, Vapor-Transfer (VTM) and Pb-Pb Single Zircon
Evaporation Analyses 100

9. Indications for the Magmatic-(Mantle-)Related Sources of Late-Variscan


Mineralization in the Erzgebirge 105
9.1. Mineralogical and geochemical data 106
9.1.1. Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F Mineralization 106
9.1.2. Silver-base metal mineralization 107
9.1.3. Uranium vein-type mineralization 107
9.2. Pb Isotopes 107
9.3. Stable Isotopes and Fluid Inclusions 108
9.3.1. Sulfur isotopes 108
9.3.2. Oxygen and carbon isotopes, and uid inclusions 108
9.4. Structural Relationships to Magmatic Rocks 111
9.5. Relatively and Absolutely Age Relationships to Magmatic Rocks 112
9.5.1. W-Mo and Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F Mineralization 112
9.5.2. Ag-base metal and U mineralization 112

10. Discussion 115

11. Conclusions 127

12. References 129

13. Appendix 155


13.1. Plates I VI 155
13.2. Tables A1 A27 175
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First of all I am very grateful to S. Petersen M. Magnus and Team, C.A. Martinez Sim-
for many fruitful discussions and the review kins, R. Mathur, E. Nmet, A. Obst, A. Otto,
of this paper and D. Sandmann for excellent R. Romer, P. Seifert, L.W. Snee, I. Straburg-
and perfect technical support and constructive er, H. Stein, M. Tichomirowa and Team,
comments. M. Wagner, and I. Wichmann for analyti-
cal, technical and organizational support.
I would like to acknowledge I wish to thank L. Baumann, P. Beuge,
G. Beaudoin, E. Bradshaw, C. Buley, U. Josiger, G.G. Pavlova, I. Plimer, B. Schulz,
M. Drechsel, M. Finke, F. Fischer, C. Franz, J. Schneider, M. temprok, and M. Vavelidis
A. Freier, M. Frenzel, St. Gerisch and his for stimulation discussion and interaction.
Team, C. Heine, A. Hiller, J. Hutschenreu-
ther, M. Kreibich and his Team, T. Kroll, I am especially grateful to M.R. Roekiman,
R. Ladendorf, G. Lehmann, V. Leinweber, R. Woensdregt and G. Guijs of the Millpress
T. Maruschke, H. Meyer, K. Rank and Team, Science Publishers, Rotterdam, Netherlands
L. Riedel, C. Rhr, D. Sandmann, G. Scheuer- for their friendly and helpful support during
mann and his team, W. Schilka, W. Schuppan, the publication of this book.
and I. Straburger for helpful and friendly as-
sistance during the underground and surface This study was undertaken at the Technische
mapping and sampling. Universitt Bergakademic Freiberg with sup-
port from the Bergbau-Berufsgenossenschaft
Special thanks to R.A. Armstrong, (BBG) Gera and Schsisches Landesamt fr
K.-P. Becker, B. Belyatsky, K. Breiter, Umwelt und Geologie (LfUG) Freiberg through
M. Drechsel, F. Fiedler, C. Franz, A. Freier, grants to TS, by the NATO International Scien-
J. Gtze, K.-U. Hantsch, P. Herzig, E. Hoffman tic Exchange Programs through a grant to G.
and Team (Activation Laboratories Ltd.), A. Beaudoin and TS and the Leibniz program by
Hofstra, K. Irmer and the Team of the TUBAF the German Research Foundation (DFG) to
Medienzentrum, U. Kempe, R. Kleeberg and a grant to P. Herzig and working group at the
Team, W. Klemm and Team, F. Lehmann and TUBAF.
Team (BBG Gera), V. Leinweber, S. Littmann,
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11

ABSTRACT

The main goal of this contribution is to docu- zones which also act as conduits for post-col-
ment the possible importance of post-colli- lisional rhyolitic intrusions and host postmag-
sional lamprophyre intrusions for late-Var- matic Sn-W-Mo, Ag-base metal, and U depos-
iscan ore mineralization in the Erzgebirge its. The lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge have
(Germany and Czech Republic). Located at been divided into three main groups (LD1
the northwestern border of the Bohemian mas- - LD3) using criteria of petrography and geo-
sif in the Internal Variscides, the Erzgebirge is chemistry, and relatively age relationships to
one of the most important silver, tin, tungsten, late-Variscan volcano-plutonic activity and
uranium, lead, zinc, copper, indium, bismuth, mineralization phases:
cobalt, and uorite ore deposit provinces in s ,$ LATE COLLISIONAL PRE @TYPE %IBEN
Europe with a mining history of more than 800 stock granite age) transitional type
years. Because of the close spatial association kersantitic/spessartitic lamprophyres;
between late-Variscan ore mineralization and they predate all epigenetic minerali-
Permo-Carboniferous lamprophyric and rhy- zations in the Erzgebirge (or they are
olitic intrusions the Erzgebirge is one of the unrelated to polymetallic mineralization
key localities to study the genetic relationship events in the Erzgebirge);
of epigenetic Sn-W-Mo, Ag-base metal, and U s ,$POST COLLISIONALPOST TYPE%IBEN
deposits with post-collisional, mantle derived stock granite age) mica-lamprophy-
magmatic pulses. res, that predate Sn-polymetallic and
Ag-base metal ore bodies;
Lamprophyres and granitic/rhyolitic rocks s ,$ POST COLLISIONAL FELDSPAR PHYRIC
from various ore districts of the Erzgebirge kersantitic lamprophyres, that postdate
were collected from underground and surface Sn-polymetallic mineralizations and
outcrops, and drill cores. Shoshonitic/ultrapo- predate Ag-base metal ores.
tassic mac volcanics were collected in surface
outcrops of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin. Data The signicant petrographical, geochemi-
were obtained for petrographic-mineralogical cal, and structural similarities between some
studies (n = 117), major, trace and rare earth el- lamprophyres (especially subtypes LD2a and
ement analyses (n = 115), Nd-Nd (n = 42), Sr-Sr LD2c) as well as (sub)volcanic rhyolitic intru-
(n = 42), and Pb-Pb isotope analyses (n = 65). sions in the Erzgebirge and the Stephanian-
Representative samples were dated using K/Ar Lower Rotliegend potassium-rich mac and
(n = 8), Ar/Ar (n = 7), Pb-Pb single zircon evap- rhyolitic series in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin in-
oration (n = 4), and U-Pb SHRIMP methods dicate a genetic link of the lamprophyres with
(n = 2). Additionally, felsic (sub)volcanic rocks bimodal magmatism in both areas with an age
of the Erzgebirge and the Sub-Erzgebirge ba- range from 315 to 290 Ma. Regional extension
sin were analyzed by geochemical (n = 21), and leading to lithospheric thinning, the develop-
radiogenic isotope methods (n = 17). ment of shear zones, the formation of fault-
controlled basins, and decompression melting
Most lamprophyric dikes (thickness from 0.5 - of updoming asthenosphere probably was an
30 m) occur in areas of crosscutting deep fault important factor for the Permo-Carbonifer-
12 Th. Seifert

ous bimodal magmatism in the Erzgebirge and High volatile contents (CO2 up to 7.3 wt.%,
Sub-Erzgebirge basin. H 2O+ up to 7.92 wt.%, F up to 4,600 ppm, Cl
The high concentration of LILE (Cs, Rb, K, up to 1,700 ppm, S up to 3,160 ppm, P 2O5 up to
Ba, Sr) and HFSE (Sc, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Ti, P, Th, 1.33 wt.%) in whole rock samples and high
Y, LREE) and the enriched Nd and Sr isotope H 2O+, F, and Cl contents of early magmatic
composition of the lamprophyre intrusions and phlogopites and apatites are typical for post-
associated volcanics in the Erzgebirge indicate collisional lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge
melting of a metasomatically enriched mantle. (especially LD2) and shoshonitic/ultrapotassic
The higher abundances of LILE, HFSE and mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
LREE of some lamprophyres (LD2-type) and This, the frequent occurrence in ore deposit
shoshonitic/ultrapotassic volcanics in the Sub- districts and the signicant spatial and time
Erzgebirge basin in comparison to the average relationship to the emplacement of post-col-
contents of calc-alkaline lamprophyres world- lisional granitic/rhyolitic rocks and late-Var-
wide (Rock, 1991) may be a function of smaller iscan Sn-W-Mo, polymetallic Ag-base metal,
degrees of partial melting, derivation from a and U mineralizations show the metallogenetic
more extensively metasomatized mantle, or a importance of post-collisional lamprophyres
function of different uid compositions. High in the Erzgebirge. It seems therefore, that the
concentrations of LILE and HFSE, and the emplacement of volatile-rich lamprophyric
@PRIMITIVE BULK GEOCHEMISTRY HIGH MG #R and rhyolitic intrusions in times of intraconti-
Ni, Co, and Sc contents) exclude signicant nental rifting and related fast extension was an
crustal contamination as the cause of this en- important factor for the ore deposition in the
richment in lamprophyres of the Erzgebirge Erzgebirge.
and shoshonitic/ultrapotassic volcanics of the
Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
13

1. INTRODUCTION

The main goal of this paper is to show the tions and Permo-Carboniferous lamprophyric
metallogenic importance of post-collisional dikes is common for old mining districts of
lamprophyre intrusions in relationship to late- the Saxonian Erzgebirge in the south-eastern
Variscan ore mineralization in the Erzgebirge part of East-Germany (this study) and the Bo-
metallogenic province. Based on a worldwide hemian Krun hory located in the northern
database of lamprophyres, N.M.S. Rock (1991, most Czech Republic (Novk et al., 2001; this
p. 155) noted that ...lamprophyres are a miss- study). This world-class metallogenetic prov-
ing element in the traditional granites + min- ince is characterized by abundant small- to
eralization maxim which should no longer large-scale tin, uranium, silver-rich base metal,
be ignored; it may be at least as reasonable to and Ag- and U-rich Bi-Co-Ni deposits, as well
attribute certain components of mineralizing as small- to medium-scale tungsten, molybde-
uids to deep, mantle-derived, lamprophyric num, lithium, uorite, barite, and iron deposits
melts as to shallower granitic magmatism .... (cf. Baumann et al., 2000). Because of a min-
ing history that spans almost 800 years and be-
4HE TERM @,AMPROPHYR WAS INTRODUCED BY cause of the occurrence of thousands of old Sn-,
Gmbel (1874, 1879; from the Greek lampros = Ag-, Cu-, Fe-, and Co-mines and some large
glistening) to characterize certain mica-rich U-, Sn-, Pb-Zn-Ag-, W-, uorite-, and barite-
dike rocks from NE Bavaria. The lampro- mines, the Erzgebirge-Vogtland area is one of
phyres are a complex group of rocks that have the key localities to study the genesis and the
mineralogical similarities to some kimberlites genetic relationships of different epigenetic
and lamproites (cf. Woolley et al., 1996). After mineralization types and late-Variscan mag-
the new IUGS classication of igneous rocks matic events in the Internal Variscides. The
from Le Maitre et al. (2002) lamprophyres are close spatial association between late-Variscan
a distinctive group of rocks which are strongly ore deposits and lamprophyres in the Erzge-
porphyritic in mac minerals, typically biotite/ birge and other deposit districts of the Varis-
phlogopite, amphiboles and pyroxenes, with cides has led few workers to suggest that the
any feldspars being conned to the ground- ore uids were mantle-derived (Losert, 1962;
mass. They commonly occur as dikes or small Kramer and Rsler, 1976; Beuge and Kramer,
intrusions and often show signs of hydrother- 1977; Seifert 1997, 1999).
mal alteration.
The Erzgebirge is a classic area for post-
In the European Variscides and other orogenic magmatic Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F greisen- and
belts several tin, base metal, and uranium oc- vein-type deposits. Tin mining started in the
currences are reported in the literature, where 13th and 14th centuries AD, rst from placers
lamprophyric magmatism is commonly in- at Graupen, Ehrenfriedersdorf, Eibenstock,
terposed in time between granitoid magma- Seiffen, and from 1440 also around the large
tism and later ore deposition (e.g., Leroy and Altenberg Sn-greisen deposit. The Erzgebirge
Sonet, 1976; Rock, 1991; Floyd et al., 1993; developed into one of Europes largest tin
Seifert, 1994a; temprok, 1995). The spatial district where about 350,000 tons of tin metal
relationship between late-Variscan mineraliza- was produced from the 13th century to 1990
14 Th. Seifert

(Bolduan, 1972; Seifert, 1985; Baumann et al., well as germanium, indium, bismuth, gold, and
2000; Th. Seifert and W. Schilka, unpublished pyrite were produced as byproducts (unpub-
data, 2002). Since 1990 all tin mining activi- LISHEDDATAOFTHE@6%"!LBERT&UNKCOMPANY
ties were closed down although there are still Freiberg). Uranium exploration from the Rus-
about 140 million tons of ore reserve with 0.16 SIAN 'ERMAN MINING COMPANY @7ISMUT WAS
to 0.25 % Sn (cf. Seifert, 1985; Th. Seifert and active from 1945 to 1950, and about 10 t U-met-
W. Schilka, unpublished data 2002). For the al were mined in the southern part of the dis-
past decades there was a controversy discus- trict (Seifert et al., 1996a). Since 1969 all base
sion about the genesis of granite-related Sn metal and silver mining activities were closed
deposits. The traditional model favored syn- down although there are still reserves of about
to late-collision granite magmatism caused by 4,868,500 tons of the polymetallic sulde ore-
orogene-related melting of the upper(?) crust type in the central and southern part of the
(e.g., Tischendorf, 1969, 1988; Lehmann, 1990). Freiberg district with 3.2 wt.% Pb, 4.5 wt.%
In contrast the other model indicates mantle- Zn, 1.7 wt.% As, and 72 g/t Ag (unpublished
derived magmatism and associated high-tem- DATAOFTHE@6%"!LBERT&UNKCOMPANY&REI
perature uids as source for Sn-mineraliza- berg). The Marienberg Sn-Ag-Cu-U district
tions with high F-, Li-, Rb-, Cs-, Nb-, Ta-, In-, located in the central Erzgebirge shows similar
Sc-, and Th-contents (e.g., temprok, 1977; Ag-rich base metal veins with important sil-
Seifert and Kempe, 1994; Seifert, 1997). Based ver, and copper and lesser Sn, Zn, Pb, and As
on eld work, geochemical data, and age dat- production from the Middle Ages to the end
ing a genetic link between Sn-mineralization, of the 19th century (cf. Seifert, 1994a). About
and A-type granitic and lamprophyric magma- 700 tons silver, 5000 tons copper, and 3500 tons
tism is favored by Seifert (2004). New data (pe- tin were mined in the Marienberg district (cf.
trology, geochemistry, ages, spatial and time Seifert, 1988; 1994a). In the last mining period
relationship to mineralization) about the gene- from 1946 to the end of the 1950s about 120
sis and metallogenetic importance of lampro- tons U-metal, and 41,500 tons uorite were
phyre dikes in Sn(-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li)-deposits produced.
of the Erzgebirge are presented in this study.
A structural relationship between hydrother-
The late Variscan silver-base metal (polyme- mal uranium veins and lamprophyre dikes is
tallic sulde) vein-type deposits were mined typical for the Erzgebirge (e.g., Marienberg dis-
in different districts of the eastern Erzgebirge trict in the central Erzgebirge; Seifert, 1994a;
(Freiberg), central Erzgebirge (Marienberg, Niederschlema-Alberoda district in the west-
Annaberg, Hora Sv. Kateiny), and western ern Erzgebirge; Bder and Schuppan, 1992;
Erzgebirge (Johanngeorgenstadt, Schneeberg) Seifert et al., 1996a). From 1946 to 1990 in
from the early Middle Ages to the 20th cen- the whole Erzgebirge about 100,000 t U-metal
tury (Figure 2). One of the largest base metal were mined (Seifert et al., 1996a). The worlds
districts of Europe was located at Freiberg in largest hydrothermal uranium vein-type de-
the eastern Erzgebirge with a production of posit district is located in the Schlema-Schnee-
more than 5000 metric tons silver from the berg U-Ag-district (western Erzgebirge). In
end of the 12th century to the end of the 19th the Middle Ages this was one of the most im-
century and small-scale copper, tin, and gold portant silver and cobalt districts in Europe.
mining (cf. Mller, 1850, 1901). From 1950 to From 1946 to 1990 in the Schlema-Schneeberg
1969 about 95,000 metric tons lead, 59,000 district about 80.600 t U-metal were mined
metric tons zinc, and 251 metric tons silver as (Seifert et al., 1996a). The initial uranium in-
Introduction 15

put is associated with the late-Variscan ura- districts of the Erzgebirge were obtained dur-
nium-quartz-calcite vein-type mineralization ing this study and allows for a reinterpretation
which is controlled by the intersection of the of the genesis of these districts and suggests a
NW-SE Gera-Jchymov deep fault zone and metallogenic importance of lamprophyre dikes
the ENE-WSW Saxonian lineament, similar to in the development of polymetallic Ag-rich
lamprophyric dike-intrusions (Schuppan et al., base metal vein mineralization as well as tin
1994; Seifert et al., 1996a; this study). New geo- and uranium deposits.
chemical, isotope, and age data from various
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17

2. GEOLOGICAL SETTING AND MAGMATIC EVENTS

The Erzgebirge is part of the metamorphic to note that the Erzgebirge was affected by the
basement of the internal Mid-European Var- late early Carboniferous stacking, whereas the
iscides (Saxo-Thuringian zone) on the North- exhumation geometry of the Saxonian granu-
western border of the Bohemian Massif lites remained more or less intact. This fact
(Fig. 1). The deepest structural level of the is probably an important factor for the high
Saxo-Thuringian zone is exposed in the Saxo- metallogenetic potential of the Erzgebirge (cf.
nian Granulite Antiform and in the Erzgebirge Baumann et al., 2000). Two conceptual models
(Franke et al., 2000). These areas expose high of granulite emplacement (subduction erosion
pressure metamorphic rocks, which are proba- model and injection model) are in agreement
bly derived from the orogenic root to the south- with geophysical data (cf. Krawczyk et al.,
east and were included into the lower crust of 2000). The subduction erosion model is prob-
the northwestern foreland (cf. Franke, 2000). ably consistent only with interpretation that
The Erzgebirge constitutes a large antiformal suggests large volumes of HP granulites in
megastructure with a core of para- and orthog- the crust down to the Moho (Krawczyk et al.,
neisses and mica schists. The metamorphic 2000). Ultramac bodies, identied as derived
core complex is tectonically overlain and sur- from a hot mantle (Werner, 1981), are consist-
rounded by phyllitic units containing very low- ently associated with HP granulites in the eld
grade metamorphic rocks (Fig. 2). The age of and are suggested to continue towards depth
the peak metamorphism of the Gneiss-Eclog- from the interpreted high densities and high
ite Unit in the Erzgebirge metamorphic core velocities in the crust. This would support a
complex was dated between 340 and 350 Ma mantle contact of the granulites on their path
(Schmdicke et al., 1995; Willner et al., 1997). which agrees with the interpretation of Krawc-
A fast tectonic exhumation of the Erzgebirge zyk et al. (2000) and a subduction erosion ori-
metamorphic core complex at about 340 to gin. After these authors the injection model
325 Ma is postulated by Willner et al. (1997) is compatible with both interpretations of the
and Werner et al. (1997, 1998) based on min- geophysical constraints.
eralogical work and age dating. In contrast to
this extensional core complex model, Franke Post-convergent extension was probably ac-
and Stein (2000) propose that the Erzgebirge companied by the removal of dense lithospher-
Antiform is a late compressive feature. How- ic mantle through successive detachment(s) of
ever, the assemblage of high pressure rocks subducted oceanic crust, and/or the removal of
in the Erzgebirge is much more complex than an orogenic root by thermal erosion or break-
that of the Saxonian Granulitgebirge (Fig. 2). off (cf. Timmermann, 2004, and references
The rocks in both areas have registered an im- therein). During these processes, part of the
portant metamorphic event at ca. 340 Ma (cf. lithospheric mantle may have been (partially)
Franke and Stein, 2000). According to these replaced with asthenospheric material, result-
authors the main difference between the two ing in a thinned lithosphere of lower average
areas lies in the much more complex tectonic density, uplift and exhumation. Slab break-off
evolution of the Erzgebirge, which is probably or removal of a crustal root could account for
due to its more internal position in the Saxo- the very rapid uplift and preservation of the ul-
Thuringian Belt. In this context it is important tra-high pressure granulites in the Erzgebirge
18 Th. Seifert

and Saxon Granulitgebirge (e.g., OBrien, (Seifert, 1994a; Seifert and Kempe, 1994; this
2000; Werner and Lippolt, 2000; Arnold et al., study). Extrusive and explosive F- and Sn-en-
2001). riched rhyolitic and shoshonitic/ultrapotassic
volcanism in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (SEB)
The late-Variscan ore deposits of the Erzge- at the northern margin of the Erzgebirge An-
birge are spatially associated with Permo- tiform was also related to the intersection
Carboniferous post-collisional felsic to mac of deep-rooted fault zones (Fig. 2; Rank and
(sub)volcanic intrusions, especially in areas of Plchen, 1989; Fischer, 1991; Seifert, 1994a,
crosscutting deep-rooted orthogonal structures Seifert and Baumann, 1994).
19

3. STUDY AREAS AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Four criteria were utilized to select the ore (eastern Thuringia, Germany) were investi-
districts of the Erzgebirge and the adjacent gated (Figures 1, 2; Tab. A1). For comparison
Sub-Erzgebirge basin for this study: (1) the lamprophyric dikes in the silver-lead-zinc and
relative timing of late-Variscan magmatic and uranium vein-type deposits in the Pbram dis-
hydrothermal events had already been estab- trict (Czech Republic) and the gold-antimony
lished by eld relationships, and radiometric deposit Krsn Hora (located in the central
or lithostratigraphic dating; (2) the complete Bohemian Pluton/Czech Republic; see Fig.
range in composition and petrography of late- 1B) as well as the silver-lead-zinc-copper dis-
Variscan lamprophyric and granitic rocks is trict Kokanee range (British Columbia), and
represented; (3) lamprophyric intrusions most the gold-polymetallic district Rossland (Brit-
closely spatially related to tin-greisen and vein- ish Columbia) were included. The new results
type, silver-base metal vein-type, and uranium are combined with other modern analyses of
vein-type deposits were selected; (4) lampro- lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge (e.g., Seifert,
phyre samples that are least affected by hydro- 1994a; Kramer and Just, 1995; Kramer and
thermal alteration were obtained. Seifert, 1994; Novk et al., 2001) and data of
lamprophyres with different geotectonic set-
Using these criteria, lamprophyric dikes in the TING SEE CHAPTER @'%/#(%-)3429 !.$
most important ore districts of the Erzgebirge, MAGMATIC EVOLUTION) and spatial-
shoshonitic to ultrapotassic mac volcanics in time relationships to post-magmatic deposits
the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (MVSEB), and lam- WORLDWIDESEECHAPTER@$)3#533)/. 
prophyres in the uranium district Ronneburg
This page intentionally left blank
21

4. MINERAL DEPOSITS

Several types of late-Variscan (Permo-Car- 4.1. W-Mo Mineralization


boniferous) mineralization occur in the Erzge-
birge area (W-Mo, Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li, sil- The W-Mo vein-type mineralization occurs
ver-base metal, and uranium deposits; Fig. 3). only in the Western Erzgebirge and Vogtland
Tungsten-vein-type, Sn-greisen-, and Sn- region (Oelsner, 1952a; Kurdjukov and Feirer,
vein-type deposits in this region are located 1963; Baumann et al., 1964; Bolduan, 1964;
adjacent to postkinematic granite intrusions Bolduan et al., 1964; Schust, 1972). Typically
(Oelsner, 1952a; temprok, 1967; Tischendorf, mineralizations consist of wolframite, molyb-
1969). Seifert and Kempe (1994) postulated denite, and pyrite bearing quartz vein zones
a genetic association between the Sn-W-Mo- (thickness of single vein: 0.3 - 1.8 m) associ-
Bi-Cu-Li-F mineralization and F-enriched ated with vein-like greisen zones (thickness of
FELSIC SUBVOLCANIC @SMALL INTRUSIONS 4HESE mined area: up to 8 m). In contrast to the tin
volatile-enriched granitic melts intruded into ores the tungsten veins are characterized by
high- (e.g., Krupka, Seiffen, Annaberg, Ehren- the absence of topaz, uorite, Li-mica, and cas-
friedersdorf), and low-grade metamorphic siterite.
rocks (e.g., Mhlleithen) or into older postkin- The following deposits were mined from 1907
ematic granites and rhyolites (e.g., Gottesberg; to 1960:
Fig. 2). According to Baumann et al. (2000) (1) The tungsten deposits of Pechtelsgrn in
the hydrothermal Ag-base metal vein-type the Kirchberg granite (location see Fig. 2), and
mineralization is hosted by gneisses (e.g., the Rotava tungsten deposit (Bohemia) at the
Freiberg, Marienberg, and Annaberg districts), SW borderline of the Nejdek-Eibenstock gran-
mica schists (e.g., Johanngeorgenstadt, and ite massif are hosted by late-Variscan granites;
Schwarzenberg districts), and subordinately (2) Small tungsten deposits in the Vogtland
by postkinematic granites (e. g., Schneeberg and western Erzgebirge area occur in contact-
district). Hydrothermal uranium-pitchblende metamorphosed phyllites and metacarbonates
veins of the late-Variscan uranium-quartz-car- at the exocontact of postkinematic granites.
BONATE @UQK ORE TYPE ARE HOSTED BY DIFFER- Examples include the tungsten (wolframite)
ent metamorphic units with intercalations, e.g. vein-type deposits of Tirpersdorf and Eich,
meta-blackshales and meta-carbonates (e.g., and the tungsten (scheelite) skarn deposit at
Marienberg, Annaberg, Johanngeorgenstadt, Zobes that are all located at the exocontact
Schlema-Schneeberg, and Zobes districts), of the Bergen granite. In the Schneeberg-Aue
and minor by postkinematic granites (e.g., area the tungsten deposit of Zschorlau is devel-
Bergen deposit). These metamorphic and gra- oped at the exocontact of the Gleesberg-Schle-
nitic host rocks were intruded by late-Variscan ma granite, whereas the Aue-Lauter tungsten
lamprophyre dikes (Fig. 2, Tab. A1). The post- deposit is located at the exocontact of the Aue
Variscan (200 - 100 Ma?) vein-type mineraliza- granite.
tion in the Erzgebirge (see Fig. 3) shows no in-
dications for an age relationship to the known Sm-Nd dating of wolframites from the tungsten
lamprophyre intrusions (cf. Seifert, 1994a; cf. deposit Pechtelsgrn (287 24 Ma; Kempe
Baumann et al., 2000). and Belyatsky, 1994) as well as K-Ar dating
22 Th. Seifert

of muscovite from wolframite-quartz-sulde berg-Gehringswalde-Wolkenstein, Rhrenbohr-


VEINS AND ASSOCIATED @SALBANDGREISEN  er vein-eld near Geyer).
290 Ma, n = 3; Rsler and Pilot, 1967) indicate The classication from Bolduan (1972), inu-
that the mineralization is signicant younger enced by the Russian schools of ore deposit ge-
than the intrusion age of the Kirchberg gran- ology, distinguished the following late-Variscan
ite (330 5 Ma; Kempe, 2003) that hosts the tin mineralizations in the Erzgebirge (classica-
mineralization. This is in contrast to earlier tion and deposits are modied by the author):
work (e.g., Baumann et al., 1964; Herrmann,
1967; Tischendorf, 1989), but indicates that the I. Sn-pegmatites (Vernov near A/Bohemia)
main intrusion stage of the Kirchberg granite is
not genetically related to the tungsten deposit II. Cassiterite-quartz group
formation. In comparison with other W and Sn II.1 Cassiterite-quartz-topaz type
deposits in the Erzgebirge (Seifert and Kempe, II.1.1 Cassiterite(-sulde)-quartz-topaz-Li-
1994) it is more likely that the W-Mo minerali- mica sequence (Altenberg, Zinnwald,
zation stage is associated with a younger gra- Krupka, Zinnwald, Sadisdorf, Ehren-
NITICINTRUSIONEG THESOCALLED@0ECHTELSGRN friedersdorf, Geyer, Pobershau-south-
granite), which was discovered by under- western Marienberg)
ground drilling in the centre of the deposit (cf. II.1.2 Cassiterite(-sulde)-quartz-topaz-mus-
Baumann et al., 1964). covite sequence (Gottesberg-Mhl-
leithen)
II.2 Cassiterite-quartz type
4.2. Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F Greisen and
Vein-Type Mineralization III. Cassiterite-silicate-sulde group
III.1 Cassiterite-tourmaline type (Auersberg,
4.2.1. Mineralization stages Wiesa)
Three metasomatic substages of the Sn-W as- III.2 Cassiterite-chlorite-sulde type (Sadis-
sociation can be distinguished (Bolduan, 1972; dorf, Seiffen-Hora Sv. Kate iny,
Khne et al., 1972; Seltmann, 1984; Seifert, Marienberg-Gehringswalde-Wolken-
1994a; Seifert and Kempe, 1994; Jung and Seif- stein, Briccius mine in the Annaberg
ert, 1996): district).
(1) Li-mica-bearing Sn-greisen with quartz,
topaz, zinnwaldite or protolithionite, uorite, 4.2.2. Age of mineralization
apatite, cassiterite, wolframite, arsenopyrite, The age of tin deposition in the Erzgebirge was
molybdenite, hematite, and lesser contents of rst determined by Rsler and Pilot (1967) us-
native bismuth, and bismuthinite (Altenberg, ing the K-Ar method on greisen and stock-
Cnovec, Krupka, Pobershau-southwestern scheider micas. Greisen and greisenized stock-
Marienberg, Ehrenfriedersdorf, Geyer); scheider samples showed mean ages between
(2) Muscovite-bearing Sn-greisen with 304 and 290 Ma. (Sn-Mo deposit Altenberg,
quartz, muscovite, topaz, uorite, tourmaline, 290 Ma, n = 2; Sn-Cu-Mo deposit Sadisdorf,
cassiterite, wolframite, arsenopyrite (Gottes- 304 and 290 Ma; Sn-W deposit Ehrenfried-
berg-Mhlleithen); ersdorf, mean age of 296 Ma, 318 - 274 Ma,
(3) Chlorite- and sulde-bearing Sn-greisen n = 10). Preliminary Re-Os dating of molybden-
with chlorite, uorite, topaz, quartz, cassiter- ite from the Sn-Mo greisen deposit at Altenberg
ite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite shows an age of about 307 Ma (Th. Seifert and R.
(Sadisdorf, Seiffen-Hora Sv. Kateiny, Marien- Mathur, unpublished data, 2003).
Mineral Deposits 23

4.3. Silver-Base Metal Vein-Type Freiberg district show very low Re and Os con-
Mineralization centrations with the consequence of restriction
to date this mineralization stage (H. Stein and
4.3.1. Mineralization stages Th. Seifert, unpublished data, 2002).
The W-Mo and Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F miner-
alization stages in the metal districts of Frei-
berg, Marienberg, Annaberg, Hora Sv. Kate- 4.4. Uranium Vein-Type Mineralization
iny, Jchymov, Schneeberg, and Schwarzen-
berg (Fig. 2) are followed by several stages of The rst hydrothermal event with the deposi-
late Variscan Ag-base metal vein-type miner- tion of uranium in the Erzgebirge is the urani-
alization (Fig. 4; Mller, 1901; Oelsner, 1930; UM QUARTZ CALCITE MINERALIZATION STAGE @UQK
Baumann, 1965; Baumann et al., 2000; Seifert ore-type) consisting of pitchblende, quartz,
and Sandmann, 2006). uorite, calcite, hematite, chalcopyrite, and
kb ore-type: The quartz(-carbonate)-bearing galena (Harlass and Schtzel, 1965; Schuppan
Fe-As(-Au)-Zn-Cu-Sn-Pb-Ag sulde vein- et al., 1994; Komnek et al., 1994; Seifert et al.,
TYPE MINERALIZATION @KB ORE TYPE IS CHAR- 1996a; Baumann et al., 2000). Recent U-Pb
acterized by arsenopyrite, pyrite/marcasite DATING ON THE @UQK PITCHBLENDE OF THE SUPER
(with minor native Au), pyrrhotite, sphalerite large uranium vein-type deposit Schlema-
(Fe-rich), stannite, chalcopyrite, cassiterite, Alberoda (about 80,000 t U-metal; cf. Seifert
tetrahedrite, bornite, and galena. Quartz is et al., 1996a) and other important uranium
the main gangue mineral, with rare carbonate. vein-type deposits in the western (Johanngeor-
High Ag contents in the suldic veins are as- genstadt, Jchymov, Schneeberg), and central
sociated with submicroscopic silver minerals Erzgebirge (Marienberg, Annaberg) shows
(e.g., argentite) in galena and sphalerite (Frei- THAT THE @INITIAL STAGE OF 5 DEPOSITION IN THIS
berg district), and in chalcopyrite and sphaler- area may be dated at 300 - 250 Ma (Velikin
ite (Marienberg district). et al., 1983; Tretjakov et al., 1988; Eikenberg,
eb/eq ore-type 4HE CARBONATE @EB ORE 1991; Shukolyukov et al., 1992; Frster and
TYPE ANDQUARTZ BEARING@EQORE TYPE !G 3B Haack, 1993; Komnek et al., 1994; Schuppan
vein-type mineralization consists of arsenopy- et al., 1994; Frster, 1996; Frster and Haack,
rite, pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, 1996; Golubev et al., 2000). This age range is
freibergite, jamesonite, boulangerite, anti- similar to previously published chemical and
monite, freieslebenite, miargyrite, pyrargyrite, ISOTOPIC AGE DETERMINATIONS OF @UQK ORE TYPE
stephanite, polybasite, argentite, and native pitchblendes from the whole Erzgebirge, in-
silver. Carbonate (rhodochrosite, siderite, cal- cluding the Freiberg district (Ivanova et al.,
CITE ISTHEMAINGANGUEMINERALOFTHE@EBORE 1956; Leutwein, 1957; Tugarinov et al., 1967).
type, with a minor occurrence of quartz. Similar late-Variscan ages were found for
uraninite from U vein-type deposits in the
4.3.2. Age of mineralization southern P bram district (e.g., Brod, Jeru-
The age of silver-base metal veins is difcult zalm, Hje, and Bytz), which are located at
to establish because of the scarcity of suit- THE NORTHERN CONTACT OF @#ENTRAL "OHEMIAN
able material. K-Ar dating of sericites from Pluton (intrusion age: 331 4 Ma, cf. k and
hydrothermally altered host rocks (gneisses) Dobe, 1991). The following U-Pb ages are
gives ages that range from 288 to 251 Ma reported in the literature: 285 - 235 Ma (Ber-
(n = 4; Rsler and Pilot, 1967). Re-Os analyses nard and Legierski, 1975), 310 - 265 Ma (Carl
OF REPRESENTATIVE @KB ORE TYPE SAMPLES OF THE et al., 1983; Anderson, 1987), and 278 - 265 Ma
24 Th. Seifert

(cf. Vlamsk et al., 1995). rite, galena, bornite, tennantite), uorite, an-
hydrite, and gypsum (Schuppan et al., 1994;
A second stage of uranium mineralization in Kuschka, 1994; Seifert et al., 1996a; Baumann
the Erzgebirge is represented by dolomite-se- ETAL  5 0BAGEDATAFORTHIS@MGUORE
LENIDE 5 PITCHBLENDE VEINS @MGU  MAGNE- type pitchblende gives an age of 190 4 Ma
SIAN URANIUM AND @DSE  DOLOMITE SELENIDE (Frster, 1996), which indicates a relationship
ore-type, respectively) with dolomite, ura- TOTHE@POST 6ARISCANMINERALIZATIONCYCLECF
nium-pitchblende, Pb-, Cu-, and Ag-selenides Baumann et al., 2000).
(clausthalite is common), suldes (chalcopy-

Figure 1B. Regional position of the Erzgebirge at the northwestern border of the Bohemian Massif, internal Mid-
European Variscides (compiled by Seifert, 1999). 1 / 2 = Very large deep-rooted / regional fault zones with
metallogenetic signicance. S.G. = Saxonian Granulitgebirge; A = Annaberg.
Figures 1 - 4 25

FIGURES TO CHAPTERS 2 - 4

Figure 1A. Location of the main Variscan basement blocks in Europe with the high-grade Saxo-Thuringian and
Moldanubian Zones highlighted; red oval = Location of the Erzgebirge. Compiled by OBrien (2000),
modied.
26 Th. Seifert

Figure 2. Schematic geological map of the Erzgebirge with locations of the studied lamprophyres and (sub)volcanic
rocks for comparison. 1 = Erzgebirge Central Zone (core complex dominated by gneisses); 2 = Erzgebirge
Northern Border Zone (epizonal metamorphic rocks to non-metamorphic Devonian rocks); 3 = Geological
structures outside the Erzgebirge Anticlinorium; 4 = Large late-collisional granite intrusion; 5 = Granite
Porphyry (from Altenberg and Flje-Frauenstein); 6 = Rhyolite (type Teplice and Tharandt Forest); 7 = A-type
small intrusion partly associated with explosive breccia pipes (certain / probable): 7a = Outcrop, 7b = In
underground mines and boreholes; 8 = Post-collisional rhyolitic high-F magmatites: dike (violet dash), stock/
ow (violet circle), ignimbrite (violet oval with thin dashes); 9 = Lamprophyre dike/stock (green dash/circle),
shoshonitic/ultrapotassic ow (green oval); 10 = Tin and tungsten mineralization: 10a = Sn, 10b = Sn-W,
10c = W; 11 = Deep-rooted thrust fault zone. Arabic number = lamprophyre dikes located in an ore district/
deposit (see Table A1); Roman number = felsic (sub)volcanic magmatites with post-collisional tectonic
setting (see Table A8). CSL = Central Saxonian Lineament; subparallel to the CSL: Central Erzgebirge Fault
Zone (between Marienberg and Gottesberg), South Erzgebirge Fault Zone (between Krupka, Seiffen, and
Jchymov).
Figures 1 - 4 27

Major group of Ore-type (mining products) Typical example


mineralization
pre-Variscan syngenetic sulfide ore layers (Cu, Ag?, Au?) Schwarzenberg, Geyer
submarin-hydrothermal
syngenetic magnetite ore layers (Fe) Mdnec
(600 500? Ma)
syngenetic cassiterite-sulfide ore layers (Cu, Sn?) Johanngeorgenstadt

late-Variscan W-Mo association (W) Pechtelsgrn/Vogtland, Zschorlau


magmatic-hydrothermal
Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Li-F association (Sn, W, Mo, Li, Bi) Altenberg, Zinnwald, Krupka, Sadisdorf,
(310 260 Ma) Pobershau, Geyer, Ehrenfriedersdorf,
Eibenstock, Gottesberg-Mhlleithen

Sn-Cu-Ag association (Sn, Cu, (Ag)) Seiffen, Hora Svat Kateiny

quartz-polymetallic sulfide association (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sn, Au) Freiberg

carbonate Ag-Sb association (Ag, Pb, Zn, Au, Sn?) Brand-Erbisdorf

uranium-pitchblende-quartz-carbonate association (U) Schlema-Schneeberg, Johanngeorgenstadt

fluorite-quartz association (fluorite) Schnbrunn/Vogtland

dolomite-U-pitchblende-selenide association (U) Niederschlema, Phla-Tellerhuser

post-Variscan hematite-barite association (Fe, barite) Pobershau, Bsenbrunn/Vogtland


(magmatic?)
hydrothermal barite-fluorite-sulfide association (fluorite, barite, Pb, Ag) Schnbrunn, Zschopau

(200 100? Ma)


Bi-Co-Ni-As-Ag-U association (Ag, U, Co, Ni) Schneeberg-Oberschlema, Marienberg,
Annaberg, Johanngeorgenstadt, Jchymov

associated with Tertiary hematite-Mn-hydroxide association (Fe) Auersberg, Eibenstock, Pobershau


basalt volcanism
active hydrothermal springs Wiesenbad, Warmbad, Oberschlema

Figure 3. Genetic types of ore mineralization in the Erzgebirge-Krun hory metallogenetic province.
28
Th. Seifert
Figure 4. Mineral associations of the Freiberg, Marienberg and Annaberg districts, Erzgebirge (compiled from data of Mller, 1901; Baumann,
1965; Seifert, 1994a, 1999; Baumann et al., 2000).
29

5. METHODS

Lamprophyre dikes in the Erzgebirge were ionic-sensitive electrode, and FIMS methods.
collected from underground and surface out- Representative analyses are listed in Tables A7
crops, and drill cores (Tab. A2). Mac volcan- and A8.
ics (MVSEB) were collected in surface out-
crops of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin. Data were
obtained for petrographic-mineralogical stud- 5.2. Radiogenic Isotopes
ies (n = 117), major, trace and rare earth ele-
ment analyses (n = 115), Nd-Nd (n = 42), Sr-Sr Strontium, neodymium, and lead isotopic
(n = 42), and Pb-Pb isotope analyses (n = 65). composition was analyzed at the GeoFor-
Representative samples were dated by K/Ar schungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam (Germany)
(n = 8), Ar/Ar (n = 7), Pb-Pb single zircon evap- and the Institute of Precambrian Geology and
oration (n = 4), and U-Pb SHRIMP methods Geochronology, Russian Academy of Sciences
(n = 2). Additionally, felsic (sub)volcanic rocks (IPGG), St. Petersburg (Russia). At the GFZ
of the Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge basin Potsdam the Sr, Nd, and Pb were measured on
(SEB) were analyzed by geochemical (n = 21), whole-rock powders that are dissolved using 5:1
and radiogenic isotope methods (n = 17). HF-HNO3 in Teon vessels on the heating plate
for three days. After drying the residue was
dissolved in 6N HCl and splitted in one sample
5.1. Whole Rock and Mineral Geo- for Pb and the other one for Sr and Nd isotopic
chemistry determinations. Lead and uranium were sepa-
rated using cation exchange resin Biorad AG
Mineral analyses of selected lamprophyres 1-X8. Pb and U were loaded on separate single
were performed at the Technical University of Re laments using silicate gel as an emitter of
Freiberg using a JEOL JXA-8900R electron Gerstenberger and Haase (1997) and analyzed
microprobe with ve spectrometers. Major and with a Finnigan MAT 262 mass spectrometer.
minor elements were determined at 15 kV ac- Mass fractionation of 0.1 % amu (atomic mass
celeration voltage and a beam current of 20 nA unit) was detected from repeated measurement
with counting times 20-30 s depending on the of Pb reference material SRM 981. Initial Pb
element. The standard sets of the Smithsonian isotopic ratios were calculated using Pb and
Institute (cf. Jarosewich et al., 1980) were used U values by isotope dilution and Th contents
for reference. Selected microprobe analyses of determined by ICP-MS. Rubidium, strontium,
representative lamprophyre micas and apatites and REE fractions were separated using cation
are listed in Tables A3 to A6. The entire da- exchange resin Biorad AG50W. Neodymium
taset will be available in a further publication. and samarium were separated from the REE
Major, trace, and rare earth elements were fraction with HDEHP-coated Teon powder.
commercially analyzed at the Actlabs Ltd. Strontium and rubidium were analyzed on sin-
(Canada) and at the Schsisches Landesamt gle Ta lament using a VG Sector 54-30 mass
fr Umwelt und Geologie (Germany) using spectrometer operated in the dynamic mode
a combination of XRF, ICP-OES, ICP-MS, for Sr and in static mode for Rb. All Strontium
INAA, gravimetric, infrared-spectroscopic, ratios were normalized to 86Sr/88Sr = 0.1194.
30 Th. Seifert

The SRM 987 standard yielded an average Nd isotopes and element separation were done
87
Sr/86Sr value of 0.710246 5 (n = 20). Repeat- using standard ion exchange and reverse chro-
ed measurement of natural Rb gave a mass frac- matograph procedures similar to Richard et al.
tionation of 0.995 for 85Rb/87Rb. The Nd and (1976). Error estimations on 147Sm/144Nd and
143
Sm isotopic composition was measured using Nd/144Nd are 0.1% and 0.003%, respec-
a Re double-lament procedure on a Finnigan tively, and 0.5% and 0.005% for 87Rb/86Sr
MAT 262 mass spectrometer operated in dy- and 87Sr/86Sr, respectively. During the analyti-
namic mode for Nd of unspiked samples and in cal work the weighted mean of 10 La Jolla Nd
the static mode for Nd and Sm from spiked sam- standard runs yielded 143Nd/144Nd = 0.511883 4
ples. Nd was normalized using 146Nd/144Nd ratio (2), using 0.241570 for 148Nd/144Nd to nor-
of 0.7219; Sm was normalized using 147Sm/152Sm malize, and for NBS-987 Sr standard yielded
ratio of 0.5608. Repeated analysis of La Jolla 0.710255 15 (2), using 8.375210 for 88Sr/86Sr
Nd standard gave 143Nd/144Nd = 0.511855 4 to normalize. Total procedural blanks for Nd,
(n = 20). Initial Sr and Nd isotopic ratios were Sm, Rb and Sr are 0.05 ng, 0.01 ng, 0.01 ng and
calculated with Rb/Sr and Sm/Nd ratios deter- 0.1 ng, respectively. All isotopic analyses were
mined by isotope dilution. The measurement carried out on the Finnigan MAT-261 solid
of laboratory procedure blank samples gave source machine under multicollector static
values of 30 pg for lead of whole rock samples mode. The radiogenic isotope data are listed in
respectively of 15 pg for lead of mineral sam- Tables A10 and A11.
ples, 1 pg for uranium, 50 pg for strontium and
50 pg for neodymium.
5.3. Geochronology
Additional isotopic compositions of lampro-
phyres were measured at the IPGG, St. Peters- 5.3.1. K-Ar and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology
burg (Russia) on a Finnigan MAT 261 mass For this geochronological study, K-Ar and
40
spectrometer. Separation of Pb and U was Ar-39Ar analyses were carried out on phlogo-
achieved using an anion exchange resin in HBr pites separates from various lamprophyres
following the chemical procedure from Manton (Tab. A2). The micas were separated by con-
(1988). Blank levels during the analytical work ventional heavy-liquid, magnetic and hand
were under 0.5 ng for Pb and under 0.05 ng for separation techniques to greater than 99 %
U. The isotope analyses of lead were carried purity. K-Ar analyses have been performed at
out with a silicate emitter. All data has been the IPGG, St. Petersburg (Russia). Phlogopite
corrected using the mass discrimination of FROM LAMPROPHYRE ,$"% WAS MEASURED
0.0013 0.0003 % per amu (atomic mass unit) at the Bundesanstalt fr Geowissenschaften
determined by measurements of the standard und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany).
NBS SRM 982. The mean values of the NBS Potassium was determined by ame photom-
982 were 206Pb/204Pb = 36.643, 207Pb/204Pb = etry using Li as an internal standard. The
17.092, and 208Pb/204Pb = 36.551. The internal 40
Ar isotope concentration was measured by
reproduction of the standard was 0.03 %, total-fusion isotope-dilution techniques on
within-run precision was 0.006 - 0.008 %. a MAT CH4 mass spectrometer. Mean-stan-
The determination of the BCR-1 standard dard deviation (2 sigma) of radiogenic argon is
gave the following results: 206Pb/204Pb = 18.815, about 0.3 %, of potassium about 0.7 %. IUGS-
207
Pb/204Pb = 15.638, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.732, recommended constants (Steiger and Jger,
[Pb] = 13.396 ppm, [U] = 1.703 ppm (means of 1977) were used for age calculations ( = 0.581
eight runs). Chemical preparation for Sr and 10 -10/year; = 4.962 10 -10/year; 40K = 0.01167
Methods 31

atomic %). Representative K-Ar mica lampro- ble, magnetic separation, and heavy liquids.
phyre ages are listed in Table A15. Phlogopite Zircons were hand-picked from the heavy
fractions for 40Ar-39Ar analyses were placed in mineral fraction. The procedure and results
the core of the US Geological Survey TRIGA of SHRIMP II U-Pb zircon dating of lampro-
reactor in Denver, Colorado. After a 1-month PHYRE ,$4A ARE PUBLISHED IN 3EIFERT AND
decay period, the samples and standards were !RMSTRONGSUBMITTED &ROMSAMPLE' #
heated in an internal resistance furnace, and a zircon concentrate of 13 grains was received
released argon was processed through an ultra- for SHRIMP II analyses at the Research
high vacuum extraction system, analyzed on an School of Earth Sciences (RSES) at the Aus-
MAP215 rare-gas mass spectrometer. Details tralian National University, Canberra. Ad-
of the procedure are available in Snee (2002). ditionally, three representative zircon grains
Samples were heated in progressively higher were measured by vapor-transfer method (see
temperature increments for 20 min, each up to below). The zircons were mounted in epoxy to-
a temperature of 1,350 C. Standards (MMhb-1 gether with grains and chips of the RSES ref-
hornblende: Samson and Alexander 1987, with erence zircons FC1 and SL13. Mounted grains
an age and error, including decay constant er- were polished to approximately half their thick-
ror, of 523.1 4.6 Ma, Renne et al., 1998) were ness and photographed in both reected and
degassed in a single heating step at 1,300 C or transmitted light. Cathodoluminescence (CL)
1,400 C. Masses 40, 39, 38, 37 and 36 were ana- SEM images were prepared for all zircons and
lyzed and the data were collected and reduced were used to decipher the internal structures of
online. Mass discrimination and atmospheric the sectioned grains and to target specic areas
argon corrections were made by measuring the within the zircons for spot analysis. All U-Pb
40
Ar/36Ar ratio of atmospheric argon which was analyses were done using SHRIMP II, with
admitted to the system via an air pipette. each analysis consisting of 6 scans through the
mass range. The data has been reduced follow-
5.3.2. Zircon dating ing the method described by Williams (1998,
:IRCONCRYSTALSFROMSELECTEDSAMPLES' # and references therein), using the SQUID Ex-
(  ,$%$  ,$:/ ! WERE VERI- cel Macro of Ludwig (2000). The Pb/U ratios
ed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) have been normalized relative to a value of
with detectors for secondary electron (SE) and 0.1859 for the 206Pb/238U ratio of the FC1 refer-
backscattered electron (BSE) imaging (JSM ence zircons, equivalent to an age of 1099 Ma
6400 Jeol at the TU Bergakademie Freiberg). (Paces and Miller, 1993). Uncertainties given
!DDITIONALLY THE GRAINS OF LAMPROPHYRE ' for individual analyses (ratios and ages) are at
1C were sectioned approximately in half pol- the 1-level, however uncertainties in the cal-
ished sections, photographed in transmitted culated weighted mean ages are reported as
and reected light and examined by cathodo- 95 % condence limits. Concordia plots and
luminescence (CL) imaging on a SEM at the weighted mean age calculations were carried
Research School of Earth Sciences (RSES) at out using Isoplot/Ex (Ludwig, 1999).
the Australian National University, Canberra.
The U-Pb data are plotted on Tera-Wasser-
SHRIMP II geochronology: Representative burg concordia plots, with the measured data
lamprophyre samples weighing about 5 kg plotted (i.e. uncorrected for common Pb), as
' # AND  KG ,$4A WERE CRUSHED is the convention for SHRIMP U-Pb analy-
and heavy minerals extracted (250 150 m ses on zircons of this age. In these plots, the
and 125 63 m fraction) using a Wiley ta- data from a single age population will lie on a
32 Th. Seifert

mixing line with the radiogenic Pb and the com- -63%" ,$:/ ! WERE MEASURED ON A
mon Pb compositions as end-members. Those FINNIGAN MAT 262 mass spectrometer with
analyses with the lowest common Pb content a Philips 6665 ion counter at the Laboratory
will lie closest to the concordia curve. Radio- for Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology
genic Pb-loss is indicated by the data spread- of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg. Individual
ing to the right of the radiogenic composition, zircons are embedded into a rhenium lament
and inheritance would plot to the left. Ages are for evaporation and heated up to 1450 C in
calculated using the 206Pb/238U data, and where order to release lead from metamict zones and
possible a concordia age (Ludwig, 1998) is cal- other impurities. After this cleaning process
culated, but for zircons of this age this is essen- the zircon is heated up to 1600 C. Lead iso-
tially a 206Pb/238U age, given the imprecision of topes are evaporated and collected on a second
the 207Pb/206Pb measurement. rhenium lament (ionization lament). This
lead is ionized at 1180 - 1260 C. Data acquisi-
Vapor-transfer method (VTM): Measurements tion takes place by magnetic peak switching of
according to vapor-transfer-method (VTM) or the mass sequence 206Pb (4s), 207Pb (4s), 204Pb
vapor-digestion technique (VDT) were carried (8s) with 4s delay time using an ion counter.
out at the Max-Planck-Institut fr Chemie in Data acquisition comprises up to 10 blocks of
Mainz, Germany. This method is described 10 mass scans, depending mostly on the du-
in detail by Krogh (1978). Fifteen morpho- rability of the ion beam. The 207Pb/206Pb ages
LOGICALLY SIMILAR ZIRCONS FROM SAMPLE ' # are calculated from the determined 207Pb/206Pb
spiked with a 205Pb/233U-spike were dissolved and 207Pb/206Pb ratios with the following cor-
(digested) by heating to about 200 C in HF rections: (1) common lead correction after Sta-
vapor up to 5 days - depending on U content. cey and Kramers (1975) and (2) a specic mass
This method requires no chemical separa- spectrometer calibration factor (mass bias)
tion of Pb and U which reduces the blank for calculated from measurements with two zircon
U and Pb. The interpretation of the resulting standards. This mass bias (0.36 0.22 % amu)
ages is more convincing because of better se- includes the thermal fractionation of Pb and
lection of the zircons. Isotopic ratios from U the mass bias of ion counter. For correction
were measured at higher temperatures (around of fractionation effects, the obtained values
1500 C) after collecting Pb isotopic ratios (at were checked by determining the 207Pb/206Pb
around 1300 C) from the same Re-lament. ages of standard zircons. Repeated analysis of
Pb blank was below 60 pg. The measured ratios two zircon standards (zircon 91500 with 1065
were corrected for fractionation, Pb blank and 0.4 Ma age reported by Wiedenbeck et al.,
common Pb, using the ratios of common Pb of 1995; zircon S-2-87 from the Zircon Standard
Stacey and Kramers (1975) for an age of 350 of the U.S. Geological Survey with a 381.5
Ma. Reproducibility and precision are assured 4 Ma age) yields mean ages in agreement with
by repeated measurements of NBS and inter- reported data (Tichomirowa et al., 2001). The
nal lab-standards. evaporation method generally produces ages
that are in good agreement with independently
Pb-Pb single zircon evaporation method: determined ages - even from highly discor-
Ages of the lamprophyric dikes were also de- dant zircons (e.g., Karabinos, 1997; Krner and
termined by Pb-Pb single zircon evaporation Willner, 1998). However, as no information
method, based on the studies of Kober (1986, about the degree of discordance is available
1987). The geochronological Pb-Pb data of uncertainties about the 207Pb/206Pb ages still
LAMPROPHYRES(  AND,$%$  AND exist. If consistent 207Pb/206Pb ages are valid
Methods 33

unless each zircon lost exactly the same frac- a younger rim in one single step will result in a
tion of radiogenic lead (e.g., Sderlund, 1996). meaningless mixed age.
Evaporation of zircons with an older core and
This page intentionally left blank
35

6. FIELD GEOLOGY AND PETROGRAPHIC


CHARACTERISTIC OF LAMPROPHYRES

6.1. Field Geology lamprophyre dikes and host rocks is always


sharp and c. 2 20 mm chilled margins are of-
During this work lamprophyre dikes were sys- ten present. The most lamprophyres are charac-
tematically mapped in old mining areas of the terized by early-magmatic (micro)phenocrysts
Erzgebirge. Various sample collections and of Mg-biotites and phlogopites with typical
archive material was also included. The most ZONATIONSEECHAPTER@#OMPOSITIONAND0ARA-
common late-Variscan basic to intermediate genesis of Magmatic Mica and Apatite) and/or
igneous rocks in the Erzgebirge are dark-grey amphibole (micro)phenocrysts. They mostly
to black and greenish dark-grey lamprophyric contain clinopyroxene (diopside, augite) and,
dikes, respectively. A few are exposed at the locally, olivine. Olivine may enclose Cr-spinel,
surface and in drill holes, but most samples but is often pseudomorphosed of secondary
are known from underground mapping (Table carbonate, chlorite, amphibole, and talc. Chro-
A1, Plate I). Generally, steep-dipping lampro- mite in a spessartite from Krupka shows a
phyric dike-swarms are controlled by deep ZnO content of ~5 wt.% (cf. Pivec et al., 2002).
NW-SE to N-S and NE-SW to ENE-WSW Mica-minettes (LD2a) have higher modal
fault zones, and occur in the entire Erzgebirge- abundances of alkali feldspar, phlogopite and
Fichtelgebirge anticlinorium (Kramer 1974, apatite than the other lamprophyre types. This
1976a, b; Seifert 1994a, 1999). Dikes and sills characterization is similar to mac volcanics
are typically 0.5 5 m wide, rarely exceeding of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (MVSEB). Fluor-
30 m. Most lamprophyric dikes occur in areas apatite is the most common accessory mineral
of crosscutting deep fault zones, which is coin- in the Erzgebirge lamprophyres and MVSEB
cident with the location of the most important SEE CHAPTER @#OMPOSITION AND 0ARAGENESIS OF
tin, Ag-base metal, and uranium deposits (Fig- Magmatic Mica and Apatite; cf. Pivec et al.,
ures 1, 2). 2002). Sphen is also a common accessory.

High amounts of ore minerals (pyrite, arse-


6.2. Petrographic Types and Relatively nopyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, cas-
Ages siterite, scheelite, molybdenite) as well as to-
paz, Li-mica and partly uorite and carbonates
The lamprophyric intrusions in the Erzgebirge are products of post-magmatic greisenization
have been divided into three main groups us- and hydrothermal alteration (this study; Th.
ing criteria of petrography and geochemistry, Seifert and C. Franz, unpublished material,
and relatively age relationships to late-Varis- 2001; Novk et al., 2001).
can (Permo-Carboniferous) volcano-plutonic
activity and mineralization phases (see Fig. 2; Carbonates are abundant in the most studied
Tables A1, A2). lampropyhres, reecting high whole rock CO2.
They may occur: (a) in the groundmass, (b)
The characteristic texture of the lamprophyres in globular structures, (c) as pseudomorphs
is richly porphyric, with a ne-grained grey- after olivine and other minerals, (d) late mi-
black groundmass. The contact between the croveinlets. Possible origins of carbonates are
36 Th. Seifert

primary cristallization and carbonatization of -39, -40; Plate III-B to -E).


primary silicates (e.g., Rock, 1991; this study). occurrence:
Zircons are abundant accecory minerals in Freiberg, Krupka, Sachsenhhe, Gehringswal-
some lamprophyres. They represent primary de-Wolkenstein, Schneeberg, Mhlleithen-
magmatic forms and zircon xenocrysts from Gottesberg.
DIFFERENT CRUST SEGMENTS SEE CHAPTER @!R !R relatively age relationship:
K-Ar, Pb-Pb, AND U-Pb GEOCHRONOL- late-Variscan magmatism: possibly pre-A-type
OGY). Some lamprophyres show a relatively rhyolitic age in the Freiberg-south subdistrict;
high abundance of quartz xenocrysts. POST @.IEDERBOBRITZSCHGRANITEAGEPOST @0REI
SELBERG )GRANITEANDPRE @0REISELBERG ))GRAN-
6.2.1. LD1a-type lamprophyres ite age (Fig. 8); pre-A-type felsic subvolcanic
petrographic type: intrusion and explosive breccia age (Gottes-
mica-, amphibole-, and feldspar-microphyric berg-Mhlleithen; cf. Seifert and Armstrong,
transitional type kersantite/spessartite (Plate SUBMITTED  POST @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE
II-24 to -30; Plate III-A; Plate IV-F to -K). age (Figures 24, 25; Plate I-1, I-31, I-32); pre-
occurrence%HRENFRIEDERSDORF@3AUBERG  @3CHNEEBERGGRANITEAGE0LATE)  )  
relatively age relationship: late-Variscan mineralization: pre-Sn-minerali-
LATE 6ARISCAN MAGMATISM PRE @TYPE %IBEN- ZATION PRE @KB @EQ @EB AND @UQKORE TYPE
stock granite age (Fig. 16, Plate I-14); cross- age (Figures 5, 6, 9 to 11; Plate I-3 to I-8).
CUTTED BY & APLITES WITH POST @QUARTZ CASSITE
rite-sulde-stringer zone type age (Plate I-15, 6.2.4. LD2b-type lamprophyres
I-16); late-Variscan mineralization: pre-tour- petrographic type:
maline veinlets (Plate I-19), pre-Sn-minerali- low-phyric minette (carbonate-rich) (Plate II-
zation age (Plate I-15 to I-17), the main stage of 10, -11).
3N GREISEN MINERALIZATION SHOWS A POST @TYPE occurrence:
%IBENSTOCK GRANITE AGE 0LATE )   PRE @KB Freiberg-south, Marienberg-Lauta.
ore-type age. relatively age relationship:
LATE 6ARISCAN MAGMATISM POST @HIDDEN &REI
6.2.2. LD1b-type lamprophyres BERGGRANITEAGEPOST @TYPE%IBENSTOCKGRAN-
petrographic type: ITEAGELATE 6ARISCANMINERALIZATIONPRE @3N
feldspar- and mica-phyric kersantite. POLYMETALLIC PRE @KB ANDPRE @EBORE TYPEAGE
occurrence:
%HRENFRIEDERSDORF @6IERUNG 0HLA 'LOBEN- 6.2.5. LD2c-type lamprophyres
stein (Plate I-23, I-24). petrographic type:
relatively age relationship: late-Variscan mag- mica-phyric transitional type kersantite/mi-
MATISM PRE @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE AGE nette (Plate II-16 to -19, -21 to -23; Plate III-F,
CROSSCUTTED BY THE APLITIC FACIES OF THE @TOPAZ -G; Plate IV-C to -E).
albite granite type in the Vierung Sn-deposit occurrence: Freiberg-south, Marienberg-Lau-
(Plate I-13); ta, Niederschlema-Alberoda.
LATE 6ARISCAN MINERALIZATION PRE @3N POLYME- relatively age relationship:
TALLIC PRE @KB ANDPRE @UQKORE TYPEAGE late-Variscan magmatism: pre-F-rhyolitic dike
INTRUSIONAGE7OLKENSTEIN POST @TYPE%IBEN-
6.2.3. LD2a-type lamprophyres stock granite age, post-rhyolitic dike intrusion
petrographic type: AGE *CHYMOV POST @TYPE !UE GRANITE AGE
mica-minette (Plate II-1 to -9, -13 to -15, -20, POST @TYPE BIOTITE KERSANTITE AGE &IGURES 
Field Geology and Petrographic Characteristic of Lamprophyres 37

22, 23; Plate I-21, I-22, I-27, I-28); late-Variscan AND @UQKORE TYPEAGE
MINERALIZATIONPRE @3N POLYMETALLIC PRE @KB
AND PRE @UQK ORE TYPE AGE &IGURES    6.2.8. LD2f-type lamprophyres
17, 22, 23; Plate I-9 to I-12). petrographic type:
carbonate-rich amphibole-lamprophyre with
6.2.6. LD2d-type lamprophyres cocitic geochemical signature.
petrographic type: occurrence:
mica-kersantite (Plate II-36 to -38; Plate III- Freiberg-south, Jchymov.
H, -I). relatively age relationship:
occurrence: late-Variscan magmatism: probably post-hid-
Niederschlema-Alberoda, Bergen, Freiberg- DEN &REIBERG GRANITE AGE POST @TYPE %IBEN-
CENTRAL &REIBERG SOUTH ,$"%  TRAN- stock granite age (Fig. 17); late-Variscan mine-
sitional type mica-kersantite/alkali lampro- RALIZATIONPRE @KB PRE @EB ANDPRE @UQKORE
phyre). type age.
relatively age relationship:
LATE 6ARISCANMAGMATISMPRE @TYPE!UEGRAN- 6.2.9. LD3-type lamprophyres
NITE AGE PRE @TYPE CHLORITE KERSANTITE AGE petrographic type:
POST @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE AND POST @TYPE feldspar-phyric kersantite (low-phyric kersant-
Bergen granite age, post-aplitic dike* age ITE ALSO TYPICALLY SAMPLE 5 ! 0LATE ))

CROSSCUT THE "ERGEN GRANITE POST @.IEDER- 12, -31; Plate IV-A, -B, -G).
bobritzsch granite age, crosscutted by rhyolitic occurrence:
dikes in the Halsbrcke ore eld (Figures 22, Pobershau, Marienberg-Lauta, Wolkenstein,
23; Plate I-34, I-35); late-Variscan mineraliza- Jchymov.
TION PRE @KB PRE @EQ AND PRE @UQK ORE TYPE relatively age relationship:
age. LATE 6ARISCAN MAGMATISM POST @TYPE %IBEN-
STOCK GRANITE AGE POST @RHYOLITIC DIKE INTRU-
6.2.7. LD2e-type lamprophyres sion age (Jchymov) (Figures 10, 12; Plate
petrographic type: )   LATE 6ARISCAN MINERALIZATION POST @3N
mica- and feldspar-microphyric kersantite and POLYMETALLIC ANDPRE @KBORE TYPEAGE
transitional type kersantite / minette (Plate II-
32 to -35; Plate III-K).
occurrence: 6.3. Composition and Paragenesis of
Freiberg-central, Breitenbrunn (bore hole Magmatic Mica and Apatite
Z206), Phla-Tellerhuser.
relatively age relationship: 6.3.1. Early magmatic trioctahedral micas
late-Variscan magmatism: age relationships to Phlogopite- (X Mg = 0.75) and Mg-biotite- (X Mg =
rhyolitic dikes of Halsbrcke are not clear; the 0.50 0.74) (micro)phenocrysts and micro-
AGERELATIONSHIPTOTHE@TYPE.IEDERBOBRITZSCH lites are the main mac component of differ-
granite intrusion near Freiberg is not clear; for ent mica-lamprophyres (LD2a-, LD2c-, and
samples PHLA-3A, PHLA-3C and PH- LD2d-type) and are also characteristic for
,!THEAGERELATIONSHIPTO@TYPE%IBENSTOCK other lamprophyre types (Tab. A2; Plates II,
granite intrusions is not clear; lamprophyres III). Representative microprobe analyses (ave-
OF BORE HOLE : POSTDATE @TYPE %IBEN- rages) of magmatic micas are compiled in Ta-
stock granites. ble A3. The X Mg- (0.54 0.89), TiO2- (0.96
LATE 6ARISCAN MINERALIZATION PRE @KB @EQ 5.27 wt.%), Cr2O3 - (0.01 2.50 wt.%), BaO-
38 Th. Seifert

(0.03 1.54 wt.%), Cl- (0.01 0.33 wt.%), and biotite from LD1a-type lamprophyres show
F-ranges (0.01 2.36 wt.%) of the micas are the highest measured F concentration (up to
summarized in Table A4. 2.36 wt.%), which is interpreted as a second-
ary enrichment by high-F greisen uids (see
Trioctaheadral mica from LD2a-type lampro- below).
phyres is phlogopite and minor Mg-biotite (Tab.
A3). Phlogopite (micro)phenocrysts (X Mg= 6.3.2. Early magmatic uor-apatite
0.77 - 0.89) from LD2a-type lamprophyres Fluor-Apatite is an ubiquitous groundmass
,$"%  ,$"%  ,$"%  ' ! mineral with abundances ranging from trace
,$1    SHOW ELEVATED & CONCENTRATIONS amounts (<1 vol.%) to 5 vol.%. It occurs prima-
from 0.70 wt.% up to 1.33 wt.%. LD2c-, LD2d-, rily as euhedral hexagonal prisms ranging from
and LD2e-type lamprophyres are character- 0.05 - 0.3 mm in length (Plates II, III). Crys-
ized by Mg-biotite and minor phlogopite, which tals of 0.05 - 0.1 mm in length are common.
yield low to medium amounts of Cr2O3 and LD2a-type lamprophyres and MVSEB con-
uorine. A representative zoned micropheno- tain signicantly more apatite than the other
cryst (Plate III-E; Tab. 5) shows a phlogopite lamprophyre types. Fluor-apatite crystallizes
core (X Mg = 0.79 - 0.82) rimmed by Mg-biotite after phenocrystal phlogopite as euhedral mi-
(X Mg = 0.51 - 0.66). The core is characterized crophenocrysts or is poikilitically enclosed by
by signicant Cr2O3 (up to 2.43 wt.%) and F groundmass plagioclase, K-feldspar, and car-
contents (up to 1.2 wt. %), and slightly lower bonate.
TiO2-, CaO-, and MnO-values. In contrast
the biotitic rim shows relatively low Cr2O3 and The lamprophyre apatites are uor-apatites
F contents, and slightly higher concentrations (1.2 - 3.8 wt.% F, Table A6). In contrast to lam-
of Ti, Ca, and Mn. The positive correlation of proite apatites (Mitchell and Bergman, 1991),
Cr2O3 and MgO with uorine is an important the lamprophyre apatites in this study are char-
indicator for a mantle source of the F content acterized by relatively low Ba contents (<0.01
of lamprophyric melts. - 0.06 wt.% BaO). A notable feature of uor-
apatites in LD2a-, LD2c-, and LD2d-type lam-
The highest Cl content (up to 0.33 wt.%) was prophyres are there relatively high Cl contents
MEASUREDFROMA-G BIOTITEOFSAMPLE' ! (0.2 - 0.6 wt.%) in comparison to lamproites.
The high uid potential of LD1- and LD2-type
lamprophyres is documented by signicant
H 2O -values of phlogopites with a range from
3.65 up to 4.20 wt.% (Tab. A3). The Mg-biotite
microphenocrysts from LD1a-type kersantites
are unzoned, and yield relatively low X Mg-,
TiO2-, Cr2O3 -, and BaO-values (Tab. A4). Mg-
Field Geology and Petrographic Characteristic of Lamprophyres 39

FIGURES TO CHAPTER 6

Figure 5. General geology (without Cretaceous and Tertiary covers) and mining subdistricts of the
Freiberg district (compiled from data of Mller, 1901; Lorenz and Schirn, 1987; Kroner
and Sebastian, 1997; unpublished material of the former mining company Albert Funk
Freiberg; Seifert, 1999; this study). 1 = Freiberg orthogneiss dome; 2 = Micaschist (partly
garnet-bearing); 3 = Paragneisses of the Annaberg-Wegefarth, Pressnitz, and
Niederschlag unit; 4 = Red gneisses of the gneiss-eclogite unite; 5 = Micaschist-
eclogite unit with intercalations of meta-blackshales; 6 = Phyllites of the Erzgebirge
Northern Border zone; 7 = Gabbro; 8 = Late-collisional granite; 9 = Permo-
Carboniferous rhyolitic dikes and ows; 10 = Lamprophyric dikes (schematic,
unmodied); 11 = Central shear fault zone (mineralized); 12 = Ore veins (unmodied);
13 = Subdistrict (former economic late-Variscan ore-type: south: eb and kb,
central: kb, north: eq).
40 Th. Seifert

Figure 6. Schematic map of the crosscutting area of a kb ore-type vein with an E-W lamprophyric dike, Himmels-
frst mine, Friedrich Stehender vein, level 15, subdistrict Freiberg-south (modied according to Kraft
and Seifert, 1959). 1 = Gneisses and micaschists (unmodied); 2 = Lamprophyric dike; 3 = kb ore-type
vein; 4 = Fault.
Figures 5 - 26 41

Figure 7. Geology of the tin deposit Sachsenhhe (modied according to W. Schilka, pers. comm., 2000,
and archive material Lafo report no. 131 406/OBA-LF 472). 1 = Biotite gneiss (lower Osterzge-
birge unit); 2 = Muscovite-biotite gneiss; 3 = Muscovite gneiss; 4 = Explosive breccia; 5 =
Syenogranite; 6 = Monzogranite; 7 = Albite granite; 8 = Lamprophyre; 9 = Greisenization; 10 =
Sn(-W-Bi-) vein-like greisen zones; 11 = kb ore-type veins; 12 = Vein with post-Variscan
mineralization; 13 = Fault; 14 = Adit Tiefer Hiob Stolln.
42 Th. Seifert

Figure 8. Schematic cross-section through the Preiselberg Sn(-Mo) deposit, Krupka district (modied according to Eisenreich
and Breiter, 1993 in Breiter and Frda, 1995). 1 = Gneiss; 2 = Teplice rhyolite; 3 = Felsitic granite porphyry; 4 / 5 =
Preiselberg I granite, marginal / main type; 6 = Lamprophyre dike; 7 / 8 = Albite-zinnwaldite granite (Preiselberg II
granite), main-type / aplite-type facies; 9 = Marginal pegmatite; 10 = Quartz-molybdenite vein; 11 = Greisenized
granite; 12 = Sn-greisen; 13 / 14 = Quartz-cassiterite / quartz-cassiterite-sulde vein; 15 = Fluorite vein; 16 = Basaltic
dike; 17 = Fault.
Figures 5 - 26
Figure 9. General geology and ore deposits of the Marienberg district (cf. Seifert, 1994a; this study). 1 = Borderline between Erzgebirge Northern Border
zone (ENZ) and Central Erzgebirge Anticlinal area; 2 / 3 = Probable / proofed borderline of lithologic units; 4 to 8 = Two-mica paragneisses (with
intercalations) of the Pressnitz (Pr1-Pr3; Pm), and Niederschlag group (N); 9 = Gneiss-eclogite unit; 10 / 11 = Orthogneiss / meta-aplitic gneiss; 12 =
Microgranite; 13 = Topaz-rhyolite; 14 = Lamprophyric dike (not modied); 15 = Deep-rooted fault zone; 16 / 17 = Late-Variscan / post-Variscan
vein-type mineralization; 18 = Veins with late- and post-Variscan ore-types; 19 = Important old mine (production): #1 (Ag, Cu, Bi, Co, U), #2A
to 2C (Ag, Bi, Co, Sn, U, uorite), #3 (Sn, Cu, Ag), #4, #5 (Ag, U, Cu, Sn), #6, #7 (Cu, Ag, Sn), #8 (Ag, barite), #9 to #15 (Ag, Cu, Sn, U, Bi, Co, As,
uorite, barite), #16 (Sn, Ag), # 17, #18 (Cu, Ag), # 19, #20 (Cu, Ag, As, Sn), #21 to #26 (Sn, Ag, Cu).

43
44 Th. Seifert

Figure 10. Schematic cross-section through the mining eld shaft #139, Lauta-subdistrict (compiled by Seifert 1994a,
modied). 1 = Lamprophyric dike (schematic); 2 = Important kb ore-type vein (with minor Sn-sulde
mineralization); 3 = Veins with post-Variscan mineralization; blind shaft #139 with underground bore hole
#Wis 51.
Figures 5 - 26 45

Figure 11. Simplied geological map of the Himmelreich ore eld, Gehringswalde-Wolkenstein (compiled by
Seifert, 1994a, modied). 1 = Synkinematic, carbon-bearing at dipping shear zone; 2 = Lamprophyric
dike (unmodied); 3 = Important kb ore-type vein (with minor Sn-sulde mineralization); 4 / 5 =
Late-Variscan uranium-quartz-calcite and post-Variscan Bi-Co-Ni-Ag-U / hematite vein-type mineralization;
6 = Thrust fault; 7 = Mylonite.
46 Th. Seifert

Figure 12. Schematic cross-section through the Pobershau mining eld (compiled by Seifert, 1994a, modied). Pob
1/78, Pob 2/79 = Tin exploration bore holes.

Figure 13. Schematic map showing an E-W quartz-cassiterite vein crosscutted by a NNW-SSE lamprophyric dike
(Flssgang-Flacher structure), about 110 m south of the Zinnerne Flasche shaft, Schiesswecken-
Spat vein, level of Wildemann adit, Pobershau district (modied according to Mller, 1848; Seifert,
1988). 1 = Paragneisses of the Rusov unit; 2 = Quartz-cassiterite vein (main type of the tin veins in the
Pobershau district; Sn-Li-F association according to Seifert, 1994a); 3 = Lamprophyric dike; 4 = Brecciated
quartz vein with Fe- and Mn-oxihydroxides; 5 = Gneiss-, Sn-vein-, and lamprophyre-fragments cemented
by quartz; 6 = Gallery of the Wildemann adit.
Figures 5 - 26 47

Figure 14. General geology and ore deposits of the Annaberg district (compiled from data of Mller, 1894; Hoth et
al., 1980; Seifert et al., 1996a, 1996b; S. Kunze, pers. comm., 2000; this study). 1 / 2 = Two-mica paragneisses
(with intercalations) of the Annaberg-Wegefarth (Oa) and Pressnitz group (Pr); 3 = Orthogneiss; 4 / 5 =
Microgranitic stock / dike; 6 = Lamprophyric dike (unmodied); 7 = Basaltic ow (Tertiary); 8 / 9 = Late-
Variscan / post-Variscan vein-type mineralization; 10 = Veins with late- and post-Variscan ore-types; 11 =
Cassiterite placer; 12 = Important old mine (production): #1, #2 (Ag, Co, Ni, Cu), #3 to #15, #18 (Ag, Co, Ni,
U, Bi, Cu, Sn), #16A, #16B (Sn, Cu, Ag); #17 (Sn, Cu, U, Ag), #19 (Cu, Ag), #20 (Co, Ag, U), #21 (Sn placer),
#22 to #25 (Cu, Ag, Sn), #26 (Cu, Sn, Zn, Ag).
48
Th. Seifert
Figure 15. General geology and ore deposits of the Ehrenfriedersdorf-Geyer district (cf. Jung and Seifert, 1996; modied). 1 = Gneiss; 2 = Quartz-
micaschist; 3 = Phyllite; 4 = Lamprophyric dike (unmodied); 5 = Type Eibenstock granite; 6 = Microgranitic and rhyolitic dikes (not
modied); 7 = Large fault zone; 8 = Fault (certain, probable); 9 = Sn-veins and stringer zones (schematic); 10 = Study area.
Figures 5 - 26 49

Figure 16. Schematic cross-section through the central part of the tin district Ehrenfriedersdorf (modied according to
Seifert and Kempe, 1994). 1 = Quartz-micaschist; 2 = Skarn horizon; 3 = Type Eibenstock granite; 4 =
Sn-greisen; 5 = Aplite and Sn-bearing meta-aplitegreisen; 6 = Lamprophyric dike (LD1-type).

Figure 17. Schematic cross-section through the southeastern part of the Jchymov district, Plavno vein cluster
(modied according to Vesel, 1985 in Komnek et al., 1994). 1 = Biotite-micaschist of the Jchymov
formation; 2 = Two-mica micaschist (partly garnet-bearing); 3 = Type Eibenstock granite; 4 = Lamprophy-
ric dike (unmodied); 5 = Plavno fault; 6 = Ore vein (schematic); 7 = Galleries.
50 Th. Seifert

Figure 18. Schematic map of the southeastern contact of the Eibenstock granite massif showing the sample
location bore hole Z206-76 and shaft #24 (modied according to Seifert et al., 1996b). m.f. / shaft with
number = mining eld / shaft of the former uranium company SAG/SDAG Wismut.
Figures 5 - 26 51

Figure 19. Schematic cross-section through the eastern part of the uranium deposit September, shaft #98 (modi-
ed according to M. Koroshkina and E. Alexewa, second half of the 1950s, unpublished material of the
SDAG Wismut). 1 = Gneiss-micaschist and gneiss; 2 = Granite (probably type Eibenstock granite); 3 =
Lamprophyric intrusion; 4 / 5 = kb / Bi-Co-Ni-U-Ag ore-type vein (schematic).
52 Th. Seifert

Figure 20. Schematic geological map from the +120 m level of the U-Sn deposit Tellerhuser (modied according to
Hiller, 1995; this study). 1 = (Garnet-bearing) micaschists and gneisses with different intercalations (e.g.,
carbon-bearing schists); 2 = Skarn layer with subeconomic tin-polymetallic ore bodies; 3 = Postkinematic
granite type Eibenstock; 4 = Lamprophyric dike (sample location: +85 m level); 5 = Large fault (partly
mineralized); 6 = Uranium vein (previously economic); 7 = Galleries for exploration.
Figures 5 - 26 53

Figure 21. Schematic geological map of the Phla-Globenstein mining eld (modi-
ed according to D. Leonhardt, 1999 in Hsel et al., 2003). 1 = Gneisses and
micaschists (unmodied) with intercalations; 2 / 3 = Lamprophyric / rhyolitic dike;
4 = Fault (partly mineralized).

Figure 22. Schematic cross-section through the giant uranium deposit Niederschlema-
Alberoda (modied according to Bder and Schuppan, 1992; unpublished
material of the SDAG Wismut company; this study). 1 = Phyllites and related meta-
morphic schists of the Frauenbach and Phycoden series (Lower and Middle Ordovi-
cian); 2 = Productive unit: phyllites with different intercalations (e.g., meta-
blackshales, and metacarbonates of Upper Ordovician to Middle Devonian) and
discordant diabase intrusions (Middle Devonian); 3 = Postkinematic granite (type
Schlema-Gleesberg granite); 4 = Border of contact metamorphism; 5 / 6 = Pre- /
post-granitic lamprophyre dike (mica-kersantite / mica-phyric transitional type
kersantite/minette); 7 = Deep rooted large fault; 8 = Uranium-bearing vein
(schematic, unmodied).
54 Th. Seifert

Figure 23. Schematic geological map from the northern part of the -540 m level of the uranium deposit Nieder-
schlema-Alberoda (modied according to unpublished material from the SDAG Wismut company, this study).
1 = Lower Ordovician to Middle Devonian host rocks (not differentiated, see also Fig. 22); 2 / 3 = Mica-
kersantite which represent the LD2d-type (2) is crosscutted or faulted by mica-phyric transitional type ker-
santite/minette of the LD 2c-type (3); 4 = (Deep-rooted) thrust fault; 5 = Uranium-bearing vein (dominated
by mgu ore-type); 6 = Galleries.
Figures 5 - 26 55

Figure 24a. General geology and ore deposits of the Gottesberg-Mhlleithen district (modied according to
Wasternack, 1978; E. Kuschka, pers. comm., 1994; Wasternack et al., 1995; this study). 1 / 2 =
Phyllites of the Cambrian / Ordovician unit, at the granite contact mica-andalusite schist
(hornfels); 3 = Eibenstock granite massif (unmodied); 4 = Borderline of contactmetamor-
phism; 5 = Lamprophyre dike (unmodied); 6 = Microgranites and rhyolitic dikes (unmodied);
7 = Large fault; 8 = Uranium vein; 9 = Barite vein-zone; 10 / 11 = Sn-vein / -greisen; 12 =
Disseminated Zn-Sn polymetallic sulde ore-type; 13 = Explosive breccia pipe (high-uorine); 14 =
Shaft of the former uranium company SAG/SDAG Wismut; 1 to 6 = Previously important mining
elds and deposits: 1 Mining eld Gottesberg (Sn-greisen bodies, wolframite and uranium
veins); 2 Sn-greisen deposit Mhlleithen-Tannenberg; 3 Sn-greisen deposit Himmelfahrt
mine; 4 Luise mine (disseminated Zn-Sn polymetallic sulde vein-like ore body crosscuts a
subparallel microgranite-hosted wolframite-arsenopyrite-quartz vein; cf. Donath, 1964);
5 Uranium deposit Schneckenstein; 6 Barite deposit Brunndbra.
56 Th. Seifert

Figure 24b. Schematic map of the Mhlleithen tin deposit in the main level of the Tannenberg adit
(+835 m above sea level) illustrating the location of representative post-type Eibenstock
granite age lamprophyre dikes. 1 = Contact-metamorphosed slates and phyllites
(hornfels zone); 2 = Main intrusive stage of the Eibenstock granite massif; 3 = Post-
granitic lamprophyre dikes; 4 = Post-granitic granite porphyry dike; 5 = Mined out Sn-
greisen bodies; 6 = Contact between granite and hornfels zone in different levels, +835 m
level (thick line), +775 m level (dashed thin line); 7 = Old Sn mining areas (collapsed
mined out greisen bodies); 8 = Tannenberg adit (+835 m level); Dashed medium lines =
local faults.
Figures 5 - 26 57

Figure 25. Schematic model of magmatic evolution and associated Sn mineralization in the
Mhlleithen-Gottesberg district. Compiled by data from Wasternack (1978), Waster-
nack et al. (1995), Seifert and Armstrong (submitted), this study. The evolution of late-
Variscan magmatism and Sn(-W) mineralization in the Mhlleithen-Gottesberg district
started with the main stage of the Eibenstock granite intrusion (325/322 Ma). The
Eibenstock granite was intruded by mica-minette dikes (320/316 Ma). The emplace-
ment of the lamprophyres were followed by an extreme volatile-enriched (sub)volcanic
felsic intrusion associated with explosive breccias pipes (e.g., Schneckenstein locality).
Associated with the explosive brecciation are pre- to early syn-greisen (sub)volcanic
microgranitic/rhyolitic dikes (312 Ma) with A-type afnity. The main stage of Sn(-W)
mineralization is younger than the lamprophyres, explosive breccia pipes, and
microgranitic/rhyolitic dikes.
58 Th. Seifert

Figure 26. Schematic prole of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (SEB) Lower Permian (Rotliegend) volcanism and sedimentation (compiled
according to Siegert, 1882; Dalmer, 1884; Fischer, 1991; this study). 1 = Sandy and gravelly Rotliegend sediments;
2 = Silty and clayish Rotliegend sediments; 3 = Rhyolite and rhyodacite volcanic to volcano-clastic rocks of the Lower
Rotliegend; 4 = Basic to intermediate shoshonitic to ultra-potassic volcanic rocks; 5 = High-F rhyolitic ignimbrites and
tuffs; 6 = Lithostratigraphic position of SEB samples. Age data of the time scale are compiled by Schneider (2001).
59

7. GEOCHEMISTRY AND MAGMATIC EVOLUTION


OF CA-LAMPROPHYRES AND MAFIC VOLCANICS
IN THE SUB-ERZGEBIRGE BASIN

7.1. Whole Rock and Trace Element as well as LD1- and LD2c-type lamprophyres.
Characteristics Geochemically the LD2a-type lamprophyres
(mica-minettes) show a typically ultrapotassic
Whole-rock major and trace element compo- composition similar to the majority of MVSEB
sitions for selected lamprophyre dikes in the and the highlighted LD2c-type lamprophyres
Erzgebirge and areas selected for comparison of the U-deposit Niederschlema (Fig. 28). It is
(Ronneburg district, selected districts in the important to note, that ultrapotassic signatures
central Bohemian massif and in Canada), and ARETYPICALLYFORSOCALLEDCOCITES@TRANSITIONAL
for mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin lamproites (cf. Rock, 1991). The LD1-, LD2e-,
(MVSEB) are presented in Table A7. Addition- LD3-, and the majority of LD2c-type lampro-
ally, representative silicic (sub)volcanic rocks phyres show signicant lower K 2O concentra-
from the Erzgebirge and the Sub-Erzgebirge tions and lie within the shoshonite, high-K ba-
basin were included (Tab. A8). In the TAS dia- salt, banakite, and andesite elds. Because of
gram (Fig. 27) LD2a-type lamprophyres (mi- high contents of quartz-xenocrysts some of the
ca-minettes) cover a wide range of Na2O+K 2O LD1- and LD2c-type lamprophyres represent
(2.1 - 10.5 wt.%), and SiO2 compositions (46.5 - in the TAS diagram (Fig. 27) not the prima-
56.9 wt.%) within the Erzgebirge lamprophyres ry composition. In agreement with data from
from potassic trachybasalts, shoshonites and Rock (1991) Figure 28 shows that CAL (espe-
phonotephrites to latites and overlap the eld cially minettes) reach far higher K 2O contents
of mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge ba- than shoshonitic rocks.
sin. The majority of LD2a-type lamprophyres
plot in the eld of alkaline magma series. Scatter diagrams show moderate to clear trends
LD2c-type lamprophyres show a wide range for lamprophyres and MVSEB (Fig. 29). SiO2
of composition from basaltic andesites to la- and Al 2O3 display a negative correlation with
tites but no clear distinction between subalka- MgO, whereas Fe2O3 and CaO increase with
line and alkaline magma series (Fig. 27). Most increasing MgO. In the K 2O and P 2O5 versus
LD2c-type lamprophyres from the U deposit MgO diagrams the majority of LD2a-type lam-
.IEDERSCHLEMA SHAFT  SHOW SIGNIlCANT prophyres lie close to the cocite average from
enrichments of SiO2 (52.5 - 57.5 wt.%) similar Rock (1991) (Fig. 29 F, H). The MVSEB are
to LD1-type lamprophyres in the Sn district characterized by very high P 2O5 and relatively
Ehrenfriedersdorf (54.2 - 58.4 wt.%). Both low Mg concentrations, which is in agreement
suites are characterized by the assimilation with high apatite and low phlogopite contents.
of quartz from metamorphic and granitic host The Erzgebirge lamprophyres and MVSEB
rocks, respectively. The composition of LD2e- are typically characterized by low to mode-
type lamprophyres plot in the TAS diagram bet- rate TiO2 and moderate to extremely high K 2O
ween LD2a-type lamprophyres and MVSEB contents (Fig. 30). Non-micaceous kimberlites
60 Th. Seifert

(Smith et al., 1985) exhibit the inverse relation- primary CAL magmas. Chromium correlates
ship (Fig. 30). However, the K 2O versus TiO2 positively with Ni (r = 0.84, n = 88) and Mg
ratios of the majority of Erzgebirge lampro- (r = 0.82). This is in agreement with observations
phyres and MVSEB show signicant similari- of intergrowths of olivine (micro)phenocrysts
ties to orangeites. Feldspar-phyric kersantites and Cr-spinel in CAL (cf. Rock, 1991) and
(LD3-type lamprophyres) are typically charac- groundmass magnesio-chromites in orangeites
terized by moderate to high K 2O and relatively (cf. Mitchell, 1995). Phlogopite-bearing lam-
high TiO2 contents. Selected high-Ti, low-K proites cannot be distinguished from minettes
LD2d- and LD2f-type lamprophyres suggest worldwide (cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991),
similar TiO2 and K 2O compositions relative averages of CAL, UML, and cocites (cf. Rock,
to non-micaceous kimberlites (Fig. 30). Sig- 1991), and the majority of studied lampro-
nicant high Ti concentrations are related to phyres on the basis of their Cr and Ni concen-
Ti-bearing phlogopites and high-Ti amphi- trations (Fig. 32). Very high Ni and Cr concen-
boles (cf. Rock, 1991; this study). In general, the trations in several LD2-type lamprophyres (up
Erzgebirge lamprophyres and MVSEB show a to 470 ppm Ni, up to 690 ppm Cr; Tables A7,
remarkably wide range in their major element A9) suggest an afnity to olivine lamproites.
composition (Tab. A9, Figures 27 to 30) as a Orangeites, which represent strongly mantle
consequence of differentiation and modal vari- metasomatized magmas (cf. Mitchell 1995),
ations in their macrocrystal and primary mi- have signicant higher Cr and Ni contents than
neral contents (cf. Rock, 1991; this study). lamprophyres and phlogopite lamproites, and
overlap the highest values found in olivine lam-
The majority of lamprophyres differ sig- proites. Subduction-related Roman province
nicantly in Nb contents relative to those of type (RPT) lavas, as represented by Vulsini
alkaline lamprophyres and ultramac lam- (Holm et al., 1982) and Sabatini (Cundrai,
prophyres averages as well as orangeites and 1979), show signicantly lower Cr and Ni con-
non-micaceous kimberlites (Fig. 31). The Nb tents relative to primary CAL magmas. The
versus TiO2 composition of LD3-type lampro- Co concentration of Erzgebirge lamprophyres
phyres and MVSEB overlap the cocite average. and MVSEB has a wide range from 5 ppm up
4HE,$F TYPELAMPROPHYRE36  ,SHOWAN to 139 ppm (Tab. A9). Co in LD2c-type lam-
extremely high Nb (194 ppm) and Ti concen- prophyres show a signicant correlation to Cr
tration (3.9 wt.% TiO2) suggesting an afnity (r = 0.79, n = 23), Ni (r = 0.81), V (r = 0.84),
to the non-micaceous kimberlite composition and Sc (r = 0.88). Cobalt and V in LD2d-type
(see also Fig. 30). The LD2a-type lamprophyre lamprophyres behave strongly coherently (r =
7(  HAS A SIGNIlCANT HIGH .B  PPM 0.96, n = 7), however, Co often resides in oli-
and a moderate Ti content (1.39 wt.%) which is vine and chromite (cf. Rock, 1991; cf. Mitchell
typically for orangeites. and Bergman, 1991). Olivine lamproites (31 -
97 ppm) and orangeites (54 - 112 ppm) are rela-
First-period transitional elements may be con- tively enriched in Co, whereas phlogopite lam-
sidered compatible trace elements in lampro- proites (10 - 61 ppm), minettes (Navajo: 26 - 76
phyres as they substitute for Fe and Mg in the ppm, Colima: 18 - 28 ppm, France: 14 - 36 ppm,
early crystallizing primary phases: olivine (Ni, Northern England: 25 - 50 ppm), and RPT la-
Co, Sc), phlogopite (Sc, Cr), spinel (Cr, V, Sc, vas (5 - 62 ppm) are low (typically <50 ppm)
Co, Zn), and pyroxene (Sc, Cr) (cf. Rock, 1991; (cf. Rock, 1991; Mitchell and Bergman, 1991;
Mitchell 1995). Figure 32 shows that the Erzge- Mitchell, 1995). A suite of lamprophyres is
birge lamprophyres and MVSEB represent characterized by Ni concentrations (<90 ppm)
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 61
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

below the primary CAL magma composition Carmichael, 1981). Extremely high Ba abun-
and a wide range of Cr contents from 26 up to dances (up to 5,000 ppm) are described from
580 ppm (Fig. 32). Similar to this study, olivine peralkaline minettes in the central Bohemian
in many previously described lamprophyres massif by N mec (1987). Roman Province type
(cf. Rock, 1991) exists only as relicts, suggest- (RPT) lavas show a wide range of Ba and Sr
ing that the Ni and Co values (Tables A7 and abundances with moderate to extremely high Sr
A9) are minimum values. and lower Ba concentrations relative to the ma-
jority of LD2-type lamprophyres and minettes
In common mantle-derived magmas the LILE worldwide (Fig. 33). However, the composition
(Cs, Rb, Ba) and HFSE (Th, Nb, LREE, Hf, of Linhaisai and Amiata minettes (Van Bergen
Zr) may behave as incompatible elements et al., 1983; cf. Bergman et al., 1988), which are
throughout most of their crystallization his- discussed in relationship to subduction proc-
tory. In the case of magmas of extreme com- esses, overlap the eld of RPT lavas. In gen-
position (e.g., lamprophyres, lamproites, and eral, average Ba and Sr concentrations are
kimberlites) early-forming liquidus phases in- lower in minettes and kersantites than those
clude many minerals, which have trace element found in lamproites (Ba: 1,000 - 41,000 ppm,
solid/liquid distribution coefcients greater Sr: 380 - 4,900 ppm) and orangeites (Ba: 300
than zero, e.g., REE, F, and Sr in apatite or Rb, - 16,300 ppm, Sr: 410 - 6,590 ppm) (cf. Rock,
Ba, F, and Cs in phlogopite (cf. Rock, 1991; cf. 1991; Mitchell and Bergman, 1991; Mitchell,
Mitchell, 1995). In this instance the LILE and 1995; this study).
HFSE are compatible and their abundances
may be signicantly affected by crystal-liquid The Zr (127 - 1,070 ppm) and Nb concentra-
fractionation and/or crystal accumulation. tions (8 - 194 ppm) in Erzgebirge lamprophyres
and MVSEB vary widely (Tab. A9). There is a
The Ba (290 - 5,020 ppm) and Sr contents (18 - moderate correlation (r = 0.47, n = 88) between
2,030 ppm) of Erzgebirge lamprophyres and Nb and Zr. Niobium and Ta behave mod-
MVESB vary widely (Tab. A9) and are mode- erately coherently (r = 0.79), which suggests
rately correlated (r = 0.66, n = 88). Barium is similarities to the composition of orangeites
hosted primarily by phlogopite and apatite, and lamproites. Niobium and Ta are concen-
and to a lesser extent by K-feldspar, late-stage trated in the groundmass of orangeites where
carbonates, and amphibole (cf. Rock, 1991; they substitute for Ti in late-stage rutile, Mn-
this study). Strontium is hosted primarily by ilmenite, and hollandite (cf. Mitchell, 1995).
apatite, K-feldspar, and late-stage carbon- Niobium in lamproites is mainly hosted by
ates (cf. Rock, 1991; this study). Typically perovskite and to a lesser degree by priderite
for LD2a- and LD2c-type lamprophyres are and titanosilicates (cf. Mitchell and Bergman,
signicant high Ba and moderate to high Sr 1991). However, transitional metal silicates
concentrations relative to LD1-, LD2e-, and such as baotite (Ba4Ti7 NbSi4O28Cl), have been
LD3-type lamprophyres which suggest an af- REPORTED IN SOME @HYPERPOTASSIC MINETTES
nity to the composition of cocite average (Fig. (Nmec, 1988), which appear to be transitional
33). The majority of LD2-type lamprophyres to lamproites (cf. Rock, 1991). The majority of
overlap the composition of minettes and the Erzgebirge lamprophyres and MVSEB show
low-Ba suite in the lamproite eld. Similar Ba high to extremely high Zr (up to 1,070 ppm)
and extremely high Sr concentrations (up to and moderate to extremely high (up to 194
3,080 ppm) relative to the LD2-type rocks are ppm) Nb concentrations (Tables A7, A9) rela-
reported from the Colima minettes (Luhr and tive to the CAL average (Fig. 34). Most LD2a-
62 Th. Seifert

type lamprophyre dikes show high Zr and Nb used for a clear identication of geotectonic
concentrations comparable to concentrations settings. However, the coherent behavior of Zr
reported for cocites and Linhaisai minettes, and Hf abundances in Figure 35 indicates that
orangeites, and lamproites. LD2c-type lampro- these elements are highly incompatible in lam-
phyres are characterized by lower averages Zr prophyres (cf. Rock, 1991; this study) and or-
and Nb concentrations with a wide range of Zr angeites (cf. Mitchell, 1995) and their ratios are
contents (Tab. A9). LD1-, LD2d-, and LD2e- unaffected by fractional crystallization or hy-
type lamprophyres have moderate to low Zr bridization. In consequence, Zr/Hf ratios may
and Nb concentrations relative to LD2a-type reect those of the magma sources. Similar
lamprophyres and show similarities to the ratios (Zr/Hf 30 - 50) in all lamprophyres im-
composition of Amiata and Northern England plicate that these elements are hosted by only
minettes (Fig. 34). The majority of LD3-type one phase in the mantle sources of parental
lamprophyres (up to 46 ppm Nb) and MVSEB magmas. In this context it is important to note
(up to 52 ppm Nb) is characterized by elevated that Zr/Hf ratios of lamprophyres (Fig. 35) are
Nb contents relative to the above mentioned similar to those of orangeites (22-55), kimber-
rock types and suggests similarities to the lites (36), alkali basalts (38), and the primitive
composition of orangeites and low-Nb-Zr lam- mantle (35) (cf. Bergman, 1987).
proites. Lamprophyres from the Rossland and
Kokanee districts (British Columbia) show Nb/Th ratios of Erzgebirge lamprophyres and
high Nb and relatively low Zr contents (Fig. 34; MVSEB lie between 0.2 and 10 (Fig. 36). The
see also Tab. A7). majority of LD2-type lamprophyres have low
Nb/Th ratios (0.2 - 1) and show high (LD2c-
Zirconium and Hf are positively correlated type lamprophyres up to 58 ppm) to very high
in Erzgebirge lamprophyres and MVSEB Th concentrations (mica-minettes up to 94
(r = 0.94, n = 88), indicating that both elements ppm; Tab. A9). Extremely high Th contents
are mainly hosted by zircon. Additionally, Zr were measured in carbonate-rich lamprophyres
and Hf show also a moderate correlation with IN THE &REIBERG ,$"%  WITH  PPM
P 2O5 (P 2O5-Zr, r = 0.7; P 2O5-Hf, r = 0.64), Th 4H AND 2ONNEBURG DISTRICTS 2/.  
(Th-Zr, r = 0.67; Th-Hf, r = 0.65), and the with 135 ppm Th). Figure 36 indicates that the
light rare earth elements (LREE-Zr, r = 0.5 high-Th lamprophyres are similar in composi-
to 0.68; LREE-Hf, r = 0.57 to 0.66) indicat- tion to subduction-related lamproites (Murcia-
ing Zr- and Hf-enriched Th-P-LREE minerals Almeria) and RPT lavas, respectively. On the
in the groundmass. Furthermore, Zr is prob- other hand they show an afnity to the cocite
ably also occurs in Zr-silicates in the ground- average. LD2c- and LD2d-type lamprophyres
mass (e.g., wadeite; cf. Rock, 1991), apatite (cf. have moderate to high Th contents relative
Mitchell, 1995), and Zr-bearing titanite (Sei- to the CAL average and plot into the elds of
fert and Kramer, 2003). Elevated Hf concen- Navajo and Northern England minettes, which
trations, similar to the cocite average, are typi- are overlapped by the composition of RPT la-
cal for LD2a- and LD2c-type lamprophyres vas. The majority of LD1-type lamprophyres
and MVSEB (Fig. 35). The majority of samples is characterized by Nb/Th ratios between 0.5
analyzed in this study and the averages of dif- and 1, and signicantly lower Th contents (<20
ferent lamprophyre types (cf. Rock, 1991) fall ppm) relative to the LD2a-type composition.
into the eld of orangeite composition, which LD2e- and LD3-type lamprophyres show the
overlaps RPT lavas and Colima minettes. This lowest Th concentrations of Erzgebirge lam-
suggests that the Zr versus Hf ratios cannot be prophyres (Tab. A9). The LD2e-type samples
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 63
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

have moderate Nb/Th ratios (1 - 3) and a com- this study, excluding LD1-type lamprophyres,
position between the Linhaisai and Colima overlap the elds of non-micaceous kimber-
minettes (Fig. 36). The majority of LD3-type lites and orangeites (cf. Mitchell, 1995). The
lamprophyres is characterized by high Nb/Th MVSEB show moderate Ce and very high P 2O5
ratios (5 - 9), which are similar to those of oran- concentrations, which indicate a similar com-
geites and lamproites. Their low Th and high position relative to the non-micaceous kimber-
Nb contents indicate similarities to the compo- lites. Figure 38A illustrates the anomalously
sition of MVSEB and Canadian mica-lampro- high Ce (623 ppm) and P 2O5 contents (2.28
phyres. wt.%) of a carbonate-rich mica-lamprophyre
Signicant U-Th correlation (r = 0.86, n = 88) 2/.   RELATIVETOTHEORANGEITElELD
exists for Erzgebirge lamprophyres and Moderate to extremely high Ce abundances
MVSEB which are characterized by U/Th ra- are reported from lamproites (270 - 1,700 ppm,
tios between 7 and 2. They are similar to that of cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991).
different minettes as well as RPT lavas and or-
angeites (Fig. 37). However, the different lam- Lamprophyres typically have high total rare
prophyre types can be distinguished by their earth element (REE) abundances (Tab. A9)
U and Th abundances (Tab. A9). Figure 37 in- and are characterized by signicant fractiona-
dicates that the majority of LD2a- and LD2c- tion of light REE (HREE) relative to the
type lamprophyres, which have signicant to heavy REE (HREE) (Fig. 39). The REE are
high U and Th concentrations relative to the concentrated in apatite, phlogopite/biotite,
CAL average, overlaps the elds of RPT lavas, zircon, and REE-bearing carbonates during
and Navajo and France minettes, respectively. the later stages of crystallization of lampro-
High-U, high-Th LD2a-type and extremely phyres and associated volcanics (cf. Rock,
enriched lamprophyres from different locali- 1991; Mitchell and Bergmann, 1991; Mitchell,
TIES ,$"%  2/.   +2! 1995; this study). Mica-minettes, mica-phyric
LD-1-7) show signicant afnities to the cocite transitional type kersantites/minettes (LD2a,
average. The majority of low-U, low-Th LD2e- LD2c), and carbonate-rich amphibole lampro-
and LD3-type lamprophyres are overlapped phyres (LD2f) from this study are also strongly
by the composition of Colima minettes. Most enriched in the LREE with abundances being
LD1-type and MVSEB samples, and several 200 - 700 times those of chondrites average.
other lamprophyres are slightly enriched in U Figure 40 shows that in these lamprophyres the
and/or Th relative to the CAL, AL, and UML LREE behave moderately coherently to Ba
averages and are overlapped by the eld of Lin- (r = 0.52 - 0.72), Th (r = 0.42 - 0.86), P 2O5 (r =
haisai minettes, and partly by France minettes 0.52 - 0.75), and Zr (r = 0.36 - 0.67). Relative
and RPT lavas. Additionally, the U-Th compo- to the CAL average the HREE are signicant
sition of these samples indicates an afnity to enriched in LD2b-, LD2f-, and LD3-type lam-
the CAL and UML averages. prophyres (Fig. 39). Consequently these sam-
Cerium and P 2O5 in the LDE and MVSEB are ples have low La/Yb ratios (10 - 20), whereas
not strongly correlated (r = 0.5), whereas Zr- the majority of LD2a- and LD2c-type lampro-
P 2O5 behave moderately coherently (r = 0.7). phyres is characterized by signicantly higher
LD2a- and LD2c-type lamprophyres, which La/Yb ratios (40 - 90). Two groups of LD2a /
are characterized by enrichments in Ce, Zr, LD2c-type lamprophyres can be distinguished
and P 2O5 PLOTWITHINTHE@ORANGEITElELDAND in the Sm-La/Yb diagram (Fig. 41). The low-
implicates a tendency to the cocite average Sm, low-La/Yb suite plot close to the CAL and
(Fig. 38). However, the majority of samples in AL averages and overlap the elds of low-Sm
64 Th. Seifert

France and Colima minettes. The high-Sm, similar to that described in lamproites (cf.
high-La/Yb lamprophyres overlap the elds of Mitchell and Bergman, 1991) and island arc
Linhaisai and Navajo minettes, and the elds lavas (Green, 1980; Arculus and Johnson,
of non-micaceous kimberlites and lamproites. 1981). It has been inferred by Rock (1991) and
These lamprophyres show a clear tendency Nelson et al. (1986, 1988), that the presence of
to the eld of lamproites as well as UML and this geochemical feature in lamprophyres and
cocite averages (Fig. 42, 43A). The HREE dis- lamproites indicates that subduction processes
tribution patterns of LD2-type lamprophyres have played some role in generation of these
show similarities to the Ocean Island Ba- magma types. Signicant depletion in Nb and
salts (OIB) signatures (Fig. 43A) whereas the Ti in RPT lavas, which are associated with
LREE concentrations are signicant higher. plate convergence magmatism, reinforces this
4HECARBONATE RICHMICA LAMPROPHYRE2/. interpretation (Peccerillo et al., 1988; Pecceril-
4215-76 has an extraordinarily high REE con- lo and Manetti, 1985).
centration (1,400 ppm) similar to the REE en-
riched occurrences of lamproites (Figs. 41, 42). The common observation of negative Ta-Nb-
&IGURE " SHOWS THAT SAMPLE 2/.   Ti anomalies in lamprophyres, lamproites, and
has high LREE concentrations relative to the RPT lavas indicates that their mantle sources
cocite average. Importantly, MVSEB have have very different mineralogical character-
moderate to high LREE concentrations (Tab. istics from those of orangeites (cf. Mitchell,
A9) relative to the CAL average REE distri- 1995). An alternative explanation for the Ta,
bution patterns, similar to those of LD2-type Nb, and Ti anomalies requires that a Ti-rich
lamprophyres (Fig. 43B). phase, not formed by subduction processes,
remains in the mantle source regions of the
Average abundances of hygromagmatophile magmas (cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991). K-
elements in lamprophyres normalized to deplet- Ba-REE-rich titanates, which may be metaso-
ed mantle abundances are compared in Figure matically introduced components of the source
44. The distribution patterns of LD2a-, LD2c-, rocks, could upon breakdown during partial
and LD2f-type lamprophyres are in general melting give rutile as a residual phase. Reten-
similar being characterized by signicant high tion of Ta and Nb in this phase would result
Ba, Th, U, La, Ce, Nd, Hf, and Zr anomalies. in depletion of these elements and Ti in the
The extremely high Cs and Rb content of LD1- derivative magmas. This hypothesis is more at-
(Fig. 44A) and LD2-type lamprophyres in tin tractive for provinces, which cannot easily be
deposits of the Erzgebirge (Figs. 44C to 44G) related to either ancient or modern subduction
does not represent a primary geochemical sig- (cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991).
nature (cf. Fig. 47C, D). However, the majority
of LD2-type lamprophyres, which are not lo- The trace element averages of LD2-type lam-
cated in tin deposits, show signicant elevated prophyres dene a trend of depleted mantle-
Cs and Rb contents relative to the CAL aver- normalized signatures between the CAL and
age (cf. Figs. 44B to G). In Figure 44B samples cocite averages (Fig. 45A). This Figure sug-
with indications for the inuence of greiseniza- gests that Colima and NW Colorado minettes
tion processes are excluded. have signicant lower Cs, Th, and U concen-
trations and higher Sr contents relative to the
The depletion of Ta, Nb, and Ti of selected LD2-type average. Figure 45B shows that the
lamprophyre types in this study (Tables A7, averages of MVSEB have similar distribution
A9) and CAL worldwide (cf. Rock, 1991) is patterns relative to the CAL average. Com-
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 65
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

parable to the LD2-type lamprophyres (Fig. primarily the sum of H 2O and CO2 (Fig. 46B,
45A) the distribution patterns of MVSEB plot Tab. A7, A9). Increasing CO2 commonly cor-
between the CAL and cocite averages. In sum- relates positively with increasing CaO, reect-
mary, Figure 45 indicates a genetic relationship ing the modal calcite and/or dolomite contents
between LD2-type lamprophyres and MVSEB. OFSOMELAMPROPHYREDIKESEG 2/. 
The distribution pattern of the carbonate-rich 75). Figures 46C to E show the EPR-nor-
MICA LAMPROPHYRE 2/.   EXCLUDING malized distribution patterns of Erzgebirge
Rb, Ba, K, Hf, and Zr, shows similarities to lamprophyres in comparison to different lam-
the cocite average (Fig. 45B). The low K 2O prophyres (CAL, AL, UML), kimberlites,
and extremely high CaO and REE contents of and lamproites. These diagrams indicate that
LAMPROPHYRE 2/.   INDICATE AN AU- the LD2-type lamprophyres have high volatile
tometasomatically replacement of K-feldspars contents relative to the CAL average.
by REE-rich carbonates.
The high F content of lamprophyre micas and Figure 47 suggests that lamprophyres in tin and
apatites, and the minor occurrence of uorite base metal districts are partly overprinted by
(cf. Rock, 1991; this study) results in whole post-magmatic mineralization. The inuence
rocks having high F contents (Tab. A9, Fig. of Sn-W-Mo mineralization is indicated by high
46A). These F contents are in general higher Sn (up to 1,350 ppm), F (up to 2 wt.%), Li (up to
than those found in continental and oceanic 350 ppm), Rb (up to 1,100 ppm), Cs (up to 100
basalts (typically less than 1,000 ppm; Aoki ppm), and As concentrations (up to 330 ppm)
et al., 1981; Sun and McDonough, 1989), al- and their positive correlation in the majority
though the absence of phlogopite in the latter of LD1- and several LD2-type lamprophyres
makes direct comparison difcult. The high to located in tin deposits (Krupka, Sachsenhhe,
extremely high F concentrations of MVSEB Phla, Mhlleithen). Additionally, LD1-type
are mainly associated with the occurrence of lamprophyres with high Sn concentrations also
magmatic uorite and F-apatite. The extremly show high Zn contents (Fig. 47G). Sn-Zn grei-
high F contents of LD1-type lamprophyres sen with high indium contents are reported
and selected LD2a-type lamprophyre samples from the Ehrenfriedersdorf district (Jung and
from Sn deposits reect the inuence of Sn-W- Seifert, 1996). Importantly, Zn and In exhibit
Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mineralization (see Fig. 47). a strong correlation in LD1-type lamprophyres
However, the presence of F-phlogopite must (r = 0.97, n = 15).
signify a real enrichment of uorine in lampro-
phyre (cf. Rock, 1991; this study), lamproite (cf. Several LD2-type dikes in base metal deposits
Mitchell and Bergman, 1991), and orangeite are inuenced by Ag-base metal mineralization
magmas (cf. Mitchell, 1995). The majority of (Freiberg, Marienberg, Annaberg). Important-
Erzgebirge lamprophyres has signicant high ly, the majority of overprinted lamprophyres
Cl concentrations relative to the CAL average show signicant high Sn, Zn, and As (excluded
(Fig. 46A). Chlorine is hosted by phlogopite/ ,$&'  CONCENTRATIONS 4AB ! WHEREAS
BIOTITE AND & APATITE SEE CHAPTER @#OMPOSI- F, Li, Rb, and Cs abundances are moderate to
tion and Paragenesis of Magmatic Mica and low (Fig. 47). In summary, the distribution pat-
Apatite). terns of these elements in lamprophyres could
be important for the exploration of Sn and Ag-
All lamprophyres of this study show moderate base metal ores.
to extremely high and extremely wide-ranging
values of loss on ignition (LOI), representing
66 Th. Seifert

FIGURES TO CHAPTER 7.1.

Figure 27. Total alkali-silica (TAS) diagram (according to Le Bas et al., 1986; modied by Le Maitre
et al., 2002) showing lamprophyres, mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin
(MVSEB), and A-type acidic magmatites of the Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge basin
(this study). Subdivision between alkaline and subalkaline magma series from Irvine and
Baragar (1971). Based on raw data without recalculation to 100 % free of H 2O and
CO2. Because many lamprophyres violate the criteria of <0.5 wt.% CO2 and <2 wt.%
H2O suggested for use of the diagram, comparison with the IUGS-dened elds should
be made with great caution (cf. Rock, 1991).
Figures 27 - 47 67

Figure 28. K 2O versus SiO2 plot (according to Peccerillo and Taylor, 1976; modied by Rock,
1991) showing the potassic or ultrapotassic chemistry of lamprophyres and mac
volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (MVSEB) (this study), and lamprophyres for
comparison. Replenishment of the legend: cocites = transitional lamproites;
*ultrapotassic, as dened by Foley et al. (1987).
68 Th. Seifert

Figure 29. Major element compositional variation of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in compari-
son to averages of different lamprophyres and cocites (cf. Rock, 1991). Legend see
Figure 28.
Figures 27 - 47 69

Figure 30. K 2O versus TiO2 diagram showing similar ratios of the majority of lampro-
phyres and MVSEB (this study) relative to kimberlites and orangeites (accord-
ing to Smith et al., 1985; Mitchell, 1995). Lower line = trend line for orangeites;
left line = border line to non-micaceous kimberlites. Legend see Figure 28.

Figure 31. TiO2 versus Nb diagram showing signicant lower contents of lamprophyres
and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to kimberlites and orangeites (compiled
by Mitchell, 1995). Legend see Figure 28.
70 Th. Seifert

Figure 32. Cr versus Ni content of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to
different mantle-derived magmatites. Ranges of primary calc-alkaline lamprophyric
magmas compiled according to Rock (1991), Mitchell and Bergman (1991), and this
study: Cr 150 - 700 ppm, Ni 90 - 500 ppm. Fields for comparison compiled by
Mitchell and Bergman (1991): minettes worldwide, PL-LH = phlogopite lamproite
Leucite Hills, PL-WK / OL-WK = phlogopite / olivine lamproite West Kimberley
(Australia), PL-MA = phlogopite lamproite Murcia-Almeria (Spain), RPT lavas =
Roman province type lavas. Legend see Figure 28.

Figure 33. Ba versus Sr content of lamprophyres and MVSEB in comparison to minettes, lam-
proites, and Roman province type (RPT) lavas (compiled by Mitchell and Bergman,
1991). Legend see Figure 28.
Figures 27 - 47 71

Figure 34. Nb versus Zr for lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to minettes,
lamproites, orangeites, and RPT lavas (compiled by Mitchell and Bergman, 1991;
Mitchell, 1995). Legend see Figure 28.

Figure 35. Hf versus Zr for lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to different
minettes, cocites, orangeites, and RPT (Vulsini) lavas (compiled by Mitchell, 1995).
Legend see Figure 28.
72 Th. Seifert

Figure 36. Th versus Nb content of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to minettes,
lamproites, and RPT-type lavas (Vulsini) (compiled by Mitchell and Bergman, 1991; Mitchell,
1995). Legend see Figure 28.

Figure 37.
U versus Th ratios of lamprophyres
and MVSEB (this study) in compari-
son to minettes, orangeites, and RPT
lavas (compiled by Mitchell and Berg-
man, 1991; Mitchell, 1995). Legend
see Figure 28.
Figures 27 - 47 73

Figure 38. Ce-P2O5 (38A) and Zr-P2O5 diagrams (38B) of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this
study) in comparison to non-micaceous kimberlites and orangeites (cf. Mitchell,
1995), and different lamprophyre and cocite averages (cf. Rock, 1991). Legend
see Figure 28.
74 Th. Seifert

Figure 39. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns (averages and ranges) of selected lamprophyres in the
Erzgebirge (normalization values for C1-chondrite in Sun and McDonough, 1989). Blue triangles =
Average of calc-alkaline lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991).
Figures 27 - 47 75

Figure 40. LREE versus LILE and HFSE (Ba, Th, Nb, P, Hf, Zr), and HREE versus Nb and LREE for lamprophyres
and MVSEB (this study). Red cross = Average of calc-alkaline lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991).
76 Th. Seifert

Figure 41. La/Yb versus Sm diagram of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to minettes,
orangeites, non-micaceous kimberlites, and lamproites (compiled by Mitchell and Bergman,
1991; Mitchell, 1995). Legend see Figure 28.

Figure 42. Sm versus Ce/Yb ratios of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) plotting between
the elds of calc-alkaline lamprophyres, lamproites, and kimberlites (compiled by
Rock, 1991). Legend see Figure 28.
Figures 27 - 47 77

Figure 43. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns (averages and ranges) of LD2-type lamprophyres
(43A), and MVSEB and mica-lamprophyres in the Ronneburg district (43B). For compari-
son calc-alkaline lamprophyre (CAL) and cocite averages compiled by Rock (1991); normal-
type Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (N-MORB) and Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) averages, and
normalization values (C1-chondrite) in Sun and McDonough (1989).
78 Th. Seifert

Figure 44. Depleted mantle-normalized trace-element abundance diagrams (normalization values from Sun and
McDonough, 1989) of lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge; Figure B excluded lamprophyres #KRUPKA-626,
#LDSA-4, #LDT1-1. Blue triangles = Average of calc-alkaline lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991).
Figures 27 - 47 79

Figure 45. Depleted mantle-normalized trace-element abundance diagrams (normalization values


from Sun and McDonough, 1989) of LD2-type lamprophyres in comparison to Younger
Colima Rift minettes (Luhr et al., 1989) and NW Colorado (Elkhead Mountains) minettes
(Thompson et al., 1989) (45A), mac volcanics Sub-Erzgebirge basin (MVSEB) and
carbonate-rich mica-lamprophyre #RON-4215-76 (45B). For comparison calc-alkaline
lamprophyre (CAL) and cocite averages compiled by Rock (1991); normal-type Mid-
Ocean Ridge Basalts (N-MORB) and Ocean Island Basalts (OIB) averages. Normalization
values (C1-chondrite) compiled by Sun and McDonough (1989). *In Figure 45A:
LD2-type lamprophyres excluded samples KRUPKA-626, LDSA-4, and LDT1-1.
80 Th. Seifert

Figure 46. Volatile data for lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison to aver-
ages of calc-alkaline (CAL), alkaline (AL), and ultramac lamprophyres (UML),
kimberlites (KIL), lamproites (LL) (not differentiated), and cocites (compiled by
Rock, 1991). Fig. 46A Field of lamproites compiled by Mitchell and Bergman
(1991); Fig. 46B Field of lamprophyres compiled by Rock (1991); Figs. 46C - 46E
East Pacic Rise (EPR) normalized diagrams (normalization values in Saunders
and Tarney, 1991); *Fig. 46D LD2-type lamprophyres excluded samples
KRUPKA-626, LDSA-4, and LDT1-1 (slightly inuenced by Sn mineralization).
The relative strongly enrichment of H2O, Cl, F, CO2, and S in LD2-type lampro-
phyres is clearly illustrated. Legend see Figure 28.
Figures 27 - 47 81

Figure 46. Continued


82 Th. Seifert

Figure 47. Signicant element ratios (F, Li, Cs, As, Sn, Zn) of lamprophyres and MVSEB for
the evaluation of slightly overprinting by mineralization processes. For compari-
son averages of calc-alkaline lamprophyres, kimberlites, and lamproites (cf. Rock,
1991) and normal-type Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (N-MORB) and Ocean Island Ba-
salts (OIB) (cf. Sun and McDonough, 1989). Figures 47B, C, and D: Field of lampro-
phyre dikes in the tin district Krupka (Czech Republic) according to Novk et al.
(2001).
Figures 27 - 47 83

Figure 47. Continued


84 Th. Seifert

Figure 47. Continued


Figures 27 - 47 85

Figure 47. Continued


86 Th. Seifert

7.2. Isotope Geochemistry contaminated by upper crustal-derived and/or


mineralization-related radiogenic 87Sr than the
7.2.1. Sr and Nd isotopes lamprophyric magmas (100 - 2,000 ppm Sr; see
Tables A10 and A11 list the Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic Tab. A7). For instance, the para- and ortho-
compositions measured in Erzgebirge lampro- gneisses in the Erzgebirge have Sr concentra-
phyres and mac volcanics of the Sub-Erzge- tions of up to 250 ppm and 140 ppm, respec-
birge basin (MVSEB). For comparison lam- tively and initial 87Sr/86Sr (330 Ma) ratios of up
prophyres from the Ronneburg U district and to 0.77 (cf. Tichomirowa, 2001).
different deposits in the central Bohemian mas-
sif (Tables A10, A11), and felsic (sub)volcanic Four LD2-type lamprophyres have high initial
143
rocks from the Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge Nd/144Nd ratios (Nd(T) = +3.3 to +7.3) in-
basin were analyzed (Tables A12, A13). Val- dicating a depleted mantle source relative to
ues of 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd (Tab. A10) vary the bulk earth (Fig. 48). Similar Nd values
widely in the Erzgebirge lamprophyres and are reported from eclogites in the Erzgebirge
reach strongly enriched compositions (Fig. 48). (Schmdicke et al., 1995). Three LD2-type
Among the ve Saxo-Thuringian groups (LD1-, samples show a similar depleted Nd isotopic
LD2-, and LD-3-type, lamprophyres of the signature (+3.3, +4.6, +7.3), and have mode-
Ronneburg district, MVSEB; Tab. A14) the rate to highly enriched 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios
LD2-type lamprophyres show the largest vari- (0.70708 - 0.71079). These ratios are very dif-
ation (87Sr/86Sr(T) = 0.704 to 0.718, Nd(T) = ferent from the Sr-Nd average of calc-alkaline
+7.2 to -6.4). The primary Sr-Nd signatures lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991), and are not re-
of all studied lamprophyres suggest a large ported from any lamprophyre in the literature
87
Sr/86Sr(T) (0.704 to 0.711) and a moderate (cf. Rock, 1991; cf. Mitchell, 1995). In contrast
Nd(T) variation (-0.2 to -6.4). The unusual to the Sr-Nd isotopic averages of AL and UML
high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios in lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991; Tab. A14), there is no correla-
from the Sn districts Gottesberg-Mhlleithen tion between Nd and Sr isotope composition.
,$4   AND+RUPKA+250+! In this context it is important to note, that
626, 0.71833) correlate with high 87Rb/86Sr ra- the four high-Nd samples show negative
tios (25.3, 227.5), and high Rb (1,100 ppm, 787 4#(52 VALUES @#HONDRITIC 5NIFORM 2ES-
ppm) and Sn contents (1,350 ppm, 48 ppm). ervoir (CHUR), Tab. A10) indicating an open
This indicates that the primary 87Sr/86Sr ratios Sm-Nd isotopic system. In this case the high
143
were changed by high-temperature greisen- Nd/144Nd ratios of the analyzed lamprophyres
uids. The Nd(T) values (-0.2, -3.4) show no would not represent the primary signature.
correlation to these strongly enriched Sr iso-
topes. This fact shows that the primary Nd The primary 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr ratios of
isotope composition is contained in slightly LD2-type lamprophyres are slightly to strong-
greisenized lamprophyres. A similar Sr-Nd ly enriched and show similar characteristics to
isotopic composition is observed for greisen- lamprophyres in the Ronneburg district and the
ized or autometasomatic overprinted late- MVSEB (Tab. A10; Fig. 48). They overlap the
Variscan granites (Tab. A12). In contrast to main eld of West European Variscan (WEV)
the Nd(T) values (n = 17), only the 87Sr/86Sr(T) minettes and the cluster of WEV kersantites
VALUESIN '3%)&  AND-/. ARE (Fig. 48; Turpin et al., 1988). In comparison to
suitable for comparison (Fig. 48). The low Sr the average of CAL (Nd = -1.2, 87Sr/86Srinitial =
contents of late-Variscan felsic rocks (10 - 130 0.7068; cf. Rock 1991) most of the LD2-type
ppm Sr; Tab. A8) make them much more easily lamprophyres show slightly to moderate en-
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 87
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

riched Sr and Nd isotope signatures (Fig. 48; geotectonic position (Alibert et al., 1986; Luhr
Tab. A14). The Nd ranges of the lampro- et al., 1989; Thompson et al., 1989) relative
phyres are overlapped by post-collisional gran- TO THOSE OF @#HONDRITIC 5NIFORM 2ESERVOIR
ites of the Erzgebirge and MVSEB (Nd(T) = #(52 @5NDIFFERENTIATED 2ESERVOIR 52
-2.1 to -3.4; Tab. A12) as well as late-Variscan non-micaceous kimberlites (former group I
monzonites (Nd(330Ma) = +1.9 to -1.9) and kimberlites), MORB, and the main part of the
granites (Nd(330Ma) = -2.6 to -6.2) of the OIB eld. Large differences between non-mi-
Elbe Valley Zone / Meissen massif (Wenzel et caceous kimberlite, orangeite, and lamproite
al., 1997; see Fig. 48). Late-collisional (S-type) magma types must originate from composition-
granites in the Erzgebirge show a tendency to ally district sources (cf. Mitchell and Bergman,
a lower Nd(T) composition of up to -7.4 (cf. 1991; Mitchell, 1995). These authors suggest
Frster, 1998; Fig. 48; Tab. A12). The lowest that orangeites, non-micaceous kimberlites,
Nd(T) value (-15.7) was measured from a and lamproites represent distinct magma types
slightly greisenized, F-rich microgranitic dike derived from lithospheric and asthenospheric
in the Marienberg district. sources, respectively. Mitchell (1995) places
The LD1-type lamprophyres fall close to the the source of all non-micaceous kimberlites in
CAL average (Fig. 48). LD3-type lampro- the asthenosphere and considers lithospheric
phyres (n = 4) show a signicant Nd isotope metasomatism as a consequence of the inter-
cluster (Nd(T) = -1.8 to -2.7) and a moderate action of kimberlites (and other magmas) with
variation of 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (0.70424 to the lithosphere. Smith (1983) has noted that
0.70946). Two slightly Nd-enriched and low- non-micaceous kimberlites have Sr, Nd, Pb,
87
Sr/86Sr LD3-type lamprophyres of the Pobers- and 13C isotopic compositions closely resem-
hau district plot close to the average of dio- bling those of carbonatites. Both show isotopic
rites in the Meissen massif (cf. Wenzel et al., similarities to oceanic island basalts. World-
1997) and have a depleted 87Sr/86Sr composi- wide carbonatites fall within a restricted range
tion relative to the CAL average (Tab. A14). A of initial 87Sr/86Sr between 0.7025 and 0.7054
lamprophyre dike from the Au deposit Krsn and have initial Nd between 0 and +4 (cf. Nel-
(ORAINTHE-OLDANUBIANZONE+RA ,$  son et al., 1988).
Tab. A2) show an enriched Nd(T) (-6.3) and Non-micaceous kimberlites show a world-wide
87
Sr/86Sr(T) composition (0.71714) which plot similarity in the mineralogy and geochemistry,
close to paragneisses in the Erzgebirge. How- which indicates that their parental magmas are
ever, the Saxothuringian lamprophyres and produced by the same process occurring re-
MVSEB (this study), and the WEV minettes peatedly in space and time (cf. Mitchell, 1995).
and kersantites (Turpin et al., 1988) show sig- This observation applies also to other astheno-
nicant lower 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios and higher spheric magmas (MORB, tholeiitic basalt), but
Nd values relative to Nd-Sr signatures of para-, is in marked contrast to the unique character of
ortho-, and granulitic gneisses in the Erzge- the sources of orangeites and some other ultra-
birge (Fig. 48). potassic magmas. Asthenospheric processes,
which result in kimberlite or basaltoid magma
Figure 49 illustrates the highly enriched and generation, may passively affect the lithospher-
variable Sr and Nd isotopic composition of ic sources of orangeites and induce partial melt-
orangeites (former micaceous kimberlites or ing. Orangeites are restricted to the Kaapvaal
group II kimberlites) and lamproites (cf. Nel- craton and considered to be derived from a
son et al., 1986; Mitchell and Bergman, 1991; lithospheric source located near the deepest
Mitchell, 1995), and minettes with different parts of the cratonic root (cf. Mitchell, 1995).
88 Th. Seifert

A deep origin of kimberlites was considered by from old sources enriched in Rb with low Sm/
Haggerty and Sautter (1990) and Sautter et al. Nd ratios (cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991). In
(1991), who reported the occurrence of garnets contrast, the Smoky Butte and Leucite Hills
from the Jagersfontein kimberlite, which crys- lamproites were derived from sources with rela-
tallized at 300 to 400 km depth. Kimberlites tively low Rb/Sr and Sm/Nd ratios. Mitchell
appear to be relatively oxidized (wustite-mag- and Bergman (1991) postulated that the source
netite buffer), CO2-dominated asthenospheric region of Smoky Butte lamproites was more
melts (cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991). enriched in LREE than those of any other
In contrast, the lamproite clan is believed to be province.
the result from partial melting, under reduced Orangeites exhibit limited 87Sr/86Sr (0.707 to
(carbon-water buffer) H 2O-rich volatile condi- 0.710) and Nd (-6.2 to -13.4) compared to
tions, of ancient enriched harzburgite sources may other mantle-derived potassic volcanic
(cf. Mitchell and Bergman, 1991). Lamproites rocks (Fig. 49). The majority of orangeite iso-
are melts derived from subcontinental mantle topic composition plots on the West Kimberley
lithospheric sources. The presence of paleo- trend, close to the compositions of West Kim-
"ENIOFF ZONES AND MULTIPLE ANCIENT @MANTLE berley olivine lamproites. The conventional in-
metasomatic events are prerequisites for the terpretation of the isotopic data (Smith, 1983)
long-term development of this source. These is that the orangeite sources were isolated for
conditions restrict the occurrence of lam- 1 to 2 Ga prior to the partial melting events,
proites to mobile belts surrounding conti- which led to the formation of orangeite mag-
nental cratons. The Nd values of world-wide mas. These sources are considered to be locat-
lamproites range from -7.4 to -25.9 (Tab. A14), ed in the non-convecting lithospheric mantle.
indicating that these magmas are derived from, In contrast, non-micaceous kimberlites are be-
or contain a contribution from, an old source lieved to be derived from convecting astheno-
enriched in light REE (low Sm/Nd ratios) spheric mantle (cf. Mitchell, 1995).
relative to CHUR (cf. Mitchell and Bergman,
1991). The lowest 143Nd/144Nd initial ratios of The majority of Saxothuringian lamprophyre
potassic rocks are represent by phlogopite lam- dikes have Sr-Nd isotope signatures, which
proites in the Leucite Hills, Wyoming (Nd are intermediate between those of kimberl-
= -13.7 to -17.9) and lamproites in the Smoky ites, orangeites, and West Kimberley olivine
Butte area, Montana (Nd = -21.6 to -25.9), lamproites (Fig. 49). The lamprophyres show
which show, in contrast to West-Kimberley and an afnity to the eld of Navajo minettes
Spanish lamproites, and orangeites, moderate (Alibert et al., 1986), which plot close to the
87
Sr/86Sr initial ratios (0.70530 to 0.70779; cf. CHUR composition (Nd = -2.6 to +2.2) and
Mitchell and Bergman, 1991). Both lamproite have a relative small range of 87Sr/86Sr compo-
intrusion centers are underlain by the Archean sition (0.7052 to 0.7075). The intrusion of the
Wyoming craton with crystallization ages of Navajo minettes is associated with the rst
>2.6-3.2 Ga. High REE and Sr contents of lam- phase of extension in the Rio Grande rift (cf.
proites indicate that they are unlikely to have Thompson et al., 1989). In contrast, the Coli-
been subjected to signicant crustal contami- ma rift-related minettes which are linked with
nation, and the isotopic variations reect those the eastward ridge jump of East Pacic Rise
of their mantle sources (McCulloch et al., 1983; (Luhr et al., 1985) are overlapped by the elds
Vollmer et al., 1984; Fraser et al., 1985; Nelson of non-micaceous kimberlites and OIB. Both,
et al., 1986; Bergman, 1987). Figure 49 suggests the Colima and Navajo minettes are grouped
that the West-Kimberley lamproites originated as continental rifting remote from a mantle
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 89
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

plume (cf. Thompson et al., 1989). The NW ratios. The Pb isotope compositions of the LD2-
Colorado minettes (Elkhead mountains) show type lamprophyres are 206Pb/204Pb (T) = 17.448
a combination of relatively low values of both to 22.487 (avg. = 18.913), 207Pb/204Pb (T) =
87
Sr/86Sr (0.70387 to 0.70413) and Nd (-13.5 to 15.316 to 15.835 (avg. = 15.614), and 208Pb/204Pb
-8) which is far outside the range of all oceanic (T) = 37.432 to 43.925 (avg. = 39.388) show-
magmas therefore rules out an exclusively as- ing similar ratios to lamprophyric dikes in the
thenospheric source for this rocks (Thompson Ronneburg district (206Pb/204Pb (T) = 18.985,
207
et al., 1989). According to these authors, the Pb/204Pb (T) = 15.674, and 208Pb/204Pb (T) =
thermotectonic regime of this lamprophyric 39.673). The average values of the Pb isotope
magmatism is associated with extension during COMPOSITION IN ,$ EXCLUDED %  AND
propagating of the Rio Grande rift system in LD3-type lamprophyres are 206Pb/204Pb (T) =
combination with heated asthenosphere from 23.944 and 18.316, 207Pb/204Pb (T) = 15.955 and
the Yellowstone plume. In consequence, Nd- 15.585, and 208Pb/204Pb (T) = 40.595 and 38.058,
87
Sr/86Sr ratios have not a clear meaning in rela- respectively (Tab. A14).
tionship to the tectonic setting of lamprophyric
magmatism. Doe and Zartmann (1979) point out that el-
evated 207Pb/204Pb values are indicative of re-
In summary, the Nd and Sr isotopic signatures gions of the crust where radiogenic Pb evolved
of lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge, Ronne- in Archean rocks because of the relative abun-
burg district and Moldanubian zone, as well dance of 235U in the Archean. Conversely,
as MVSEB indicate a metasomatized mantle lower 207Pb/204Pb values indicate a lack of old
source for these magmas. The existence of radiogenic Pb. This could mean evolution of
recycled old continental crust is shown by the that Pb in an environment such as the mantle
Nd model ages T(DM) varying from 0.9 to 1.4 that was isolated from old radiogenic crust
Ga (Tab. A10; excluding samples with negative (cf. Tosdal et al., 1999). The low uranogenic
T(CHUR) values). These model ages are simi- isotopic compositions (Fig. 50A) of most lam-
lar to dioritic and monzonitic post-collisional prophyre samples from the Erzgebirge and the
shoshonitic intrusions (330 Ma) in the Elbe Ronneburg district, and MVSEB show a dis-
Valley Zone (Meissen massif) which show tinct cluster (206Pb/204Pb (T) = 17.448 - 18.896,
207
T(DM) between 0.8 and 1.5 Ga (Wenzel and Pb/204Pb (T) = 15.514 - 15.665) between the
Von Quadt, 1993; Wenzel et al., 1997). The @UPPERCRUSTAND@MANTLELINEFROM:ARTMANN
shoshonitic magmas intruded during strike- and Doe (1981), below the average for calc-
slip tectonism along the Elbe Valley Zone and alkaline lamprophyres (cf. Rock, 1991). This
show space-time and geochemical relationships CLUSTERPLOTSCLOSETOTHE@OROGENELINEANDTHE
to calc-alkaline lamprophyre dikes (Kurze et Stacey and Kramers (1975) evolution curve be-
al., 1998). tween 0 and 0.75 Ga, and is overlapped by West
European Variscan (WEV) minettes and ker-
7.2.2. Pb isotopes santites (Turpin et al., 1988). Most of the low
208
Representative Erzgebirge lamprophyres and Pb/204Pb values (Fig. 50B), plot just above the
MVSEB, and lamprophyres for comparison :ARTMANNAND$OE @OROGENEAND@MAN-
(Tab. A11), selected late-Variscan granites tle lines (208Pb/204Pb = 37.432 - 38.622). Three
(Tab. A13), and (Sn-)polymetallic ore samples LD3-type lamprophyres plot on and slightly
from the Erzgebirge (Seifert 1994a, 1999; Th. BELOWTHE@UPPERCRUSTLINE RESPECTIVELY4HE
Seifert and B. Belyatsky, unpublished data, thorogenic compositions of most analyzed
2002) have been analyzed for their Pb isotopic samples are slightly more enriched relative to
90 Th. Seifert

the elds of WEV minettes and kersantites ore-type) for this lamprophyre. It can be not
(Turpin et al., 1988). excluded, that other lamprophyres with similar
Several LD1-, LD2a-, and LD2c-type lampro- or slightly higher Pb concentrations relative
phyres show strongly enriched 207Pb, 208Pb, and to the CAL averages were also inuenced by
206
Pb isotopic compositions far from the major these hydrothermal uids (e.g., Freiberg and
eld of Saxothuringian lamprophyres (Figs. Marienberg districts).
50A, B). The ratios of the high-radiogenic
,$ TYPELAMPROPHYRE% PLOTOUTSIDETHE The calculated (T = 330 Ma) uranogenic and
207
Pb and 208Pb diagrams. High U concentra- thorogenic values of paragneisses in the Erzge-
tion (24.6 ppm) indicates the inuence of U- birge (Pb concentration from <1 - 292 ppm, avg.
bearing uids. Slightly greisenized LD1-type 35.3 ppm; Tichomirowa, 2001) plot close to the
LAMPROPHYRES  %    ,$6' main eld of lamprophyres with low 207Pb/204Pb
2A) with common U contents in the range of vs. 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb
4.8 to 6.6 ppm have also enriched 207Pb and signatures, whereas the orthogneisses (Pb con-
208
Pb compositions (Tab. A11). Additionally, centration from 7 - 37 ppm, avg. 19 ppm; Ti-
the group of strongly enriched compositions chomirowa, 2001) and late-Variscan granites
INCLUDE ,$A ,$"%  +250+!  (Pb concentration from 5 - 26 ppm, avg. 19
(  ,$4  ,$C '  '  ppm; Tab. A13) show a large range. The unu-
,$  - AND,$D TYPELAMPROPHYRES sually compositions of late-Variscan granites
,$"%2'  AND SAMPLE 2/.   show no signicant cluster and are probably in-
from the Ronneburg district. These samples uenced by greisenization processes. Magmas
are overprinted by greisenization processes derived from the mantle have intrinsically low
and/or hydrothermal uids. The lamprophyre Pb concentrations (1 - 2 ppm, or less) relative to
DIKE+RA ,$ 4AB! HASALSOASTRONGLY feldspar-rich crustal rocks that typically have
enriched Pb isotopic signature. Some of the 10 - 30 ppm Pb (cf. Tosdal et al., 1999). Because
MICA LAMPROPHYRE DIKES ,$"%  ,$"% of the strong contrast in Pb concentration, in-
 ,$+6"  ' ! !  !  corporation of minor amounts of crustal Pb
2/.   2/.   SHOW 208Pb can signicantly modify the Pb isotope com-
signatures (38.892 - 39.340) between the low position of a mantle-derived basaltic magma.
and strongly enriched ratios (Fig. 50B). The Tosdal et al. (1999) argue that, if the magma
majority of lamprophyres with enriched 208Pb contains normal crustal concentration of Pb,
values (excluding LD1-type lamprophyres) is it is more difcult to change the Pb isotope
characterized by moderate to high Th concen- composition signicantly through magma as-
trations (28 - 135 ppm; Tab. A11). A few lam- similation or uid-rock interaction. In this con-
PROPHYRE DIKES FROM THE &REIBERG ,$"% text it is important to note, that averages of Pb
 ,$"%  AND -ARIENBERG DISTRICTS concentration in lamprophyres and lamproites
(   ' ! ' # !"&  SHOW (see above) and the Pb concentrations of lam-
high Pb concentrations (85 - 186 ppm; Tab. prophyres from this study (Tables A7, A11) are
A11), relative to the average Pb concentration similar to Pb contents of crustal units.
of minettes and kersantites (24 ppm), lam- The use of Pb isotopes to determine source(s)
proites (50 ppm), and spessartites (10 ppm, cf. of Pb in ore deposits involves direct measure-
Rock 1991). The strongly altered lamprophyre ment of Pb isotope compositions of a Pb-bear-
,$&'  HAS 0B CONCENTRATIONS OF  PPM ing mineral. Their utility for determining the
indicating an overprinting by galena-bearing source of associated metals Au, Ag, Cu, Zn,
!G BASE METAL MINERALIZATION @KB AND @EB and other metals is limited by the assumption
Geochemistry and Magmatic Evolution of CA-Lamprophyres and 91
Mafic Volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge Basin

that Pb was derived from the same source, the late-Variscan Pb isotopic cluster. The po-
transported, and deposited from the same hy- sition of the majority of lamprophyres within
drothermal uid. This assumption is for the the sulde data eld indicates that the isotopic
most part true because of the comparable geo- cluster seen in the primary signature of (Sn-)
chemical behavior of Pb, Cu, and Zn in hydro- polymetallic sulde mineralization could be
thermal uids, particularly in base metal-rich associated with mantle (e.g., lamprophyre)-
magmatic hydrothermal systems or Pb-rich de- derived Pb. If the calculated Pb isotope ratios
posits in sedimentary environments (cf. Tosdal of the paragneisses (Tichomirowa, 2001) rep-
et al., 1999). The Pb isotope compositions of resent the primary (T = 330 Ma) composition,
late-Variscan mineralization were measured in paragneisses could be also the Pb source for
representative galena-bearing ores and galena- the late-Variscan hydrothermal systems. In this
separates from the Ag-base metal deposits context it is important to note that the meta-
Freiberg (n = 34), Marienberg-Wolkenstein (n = morphic host rocks of Sn and Ag-base metal
54), Annaberg (n = 1), and Schneeberg (n = deposits in the Erzgebirge show no indication
1) and the Sn deposits Ehrenfriedersdorf (n = for large-scale alteration processes (cf. Seifert,
1), and Zinnwald (n = 1) (Seifert, 1994a, 1999; 1994a). Orthogneisses (cf. Tichomirowa, 2001)
Th. Seifert and B. Belyatsky, unpublished data, and post-kinematic granites in the Erzgebirge
2002). The major group of these isotope ratios (Tab. A13) have a wide range of Pb isotope val-
form a distinct cluster (206Pb/204Pb = 17.890 - ues. In this case, the homogeneous Pb isotope
18.586, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.490 - 15.590, and 208Pb/ compositions of late-Variscan mineralization
204
0B  SIMILARTOTHE@PRIMARY stages seem to indicate a lack of signicant ex-
Pb isotope signature of late-Variscan Sn-W- ternal Pb contributed to the deposits.
Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F and Ag-base metal mine-
ralization stages in the Erzgebirge-Slavkovsk Figure 51 shows that the lamprophyres and
les region reported by Seifert et al. (2001), MVSEB are dominated by 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/
204
and Seifert et al. (submitted). The uranogenic Pb (A) and 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb ratios
and thorogenic isotope ratios of the measured (B) between the elds of non-micaceous kim-
galena-bearing polymetallic sulde ores and berlites and orangeites, similar to WEV lam-
galena separates are similar to the low-radio- prophyres and Colima minettes. The strongly
genic (primary) signatures of the lamprophyre enriched thorogenic and radiogenic Pb isotope
dikes (Fig. 50) and overlap with WEV minettes values (see above) plot outside this cluster. The
(Turpin et al., 1988). The Pb isotope composi- isotopic composition of Pb in non-micaceous
tion of the para- and orthogneisses of the local kimberlites is distinct from that of orangeites,
upper crust is very different. The eld for the implying that their parental magmas origi-
paragneisses overlaps the Pb data eld of Sn- nated from sources with very different U/Pb
W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F and Ag-base metal mine- and Th/Pb ratios and Pb evolutionary histories
ralization stages, whereas the results for the (cf. Mitchell, 1995). Figure 51 shows that the
orthogneisses show a wide range from low to only other potassic magmas with Pb isotopic
high radiogenic ratios. It cannot be excluded, compositions similar or lower to those of oran-
that the Pb isotope signatures of the para- and geites are lamproites from Leucite Hills and
orthogneisses were slightly inuenced by Pb- Smoky Butte, and NW Colorado minettes, re-
enriched hydrothermal uids of late-Variscan spectively. In contrast, the Navajo minettes are
mineralization stages. However, the dominant characterized by high 206Pb and 207Pb values,
host rocks of the polymetallic sulde veins in similar to the high-radiogenic lamprophyres in
the central Freiberg district plot far outside this study. Lamproites have Pb isotopic com-
92 Th. Seifert

positions unlike those of lamprophyres (CAL,


AL, UML), with exception of NW Colorado
minettes (Fig. 51B).
93

FIGURES TO CHAPTER 7.2.

Figure 48. Initial Nd- and Sr-isotope variations of late-Variscan lamprophyres and volcanic ows, and dif-
ferent Variscan host rocks for comparison. Data of this study and ages for calculation samples
see Tables A10 and A12. Literature data and ages (T) for calculation: Paragneisses Erzgebirge -
Tichomirowa (2001), Mingram and Rtzler (1999), T = 330 Ma; Orthogneisses Erzgebirge -
Krner et al. (1995), Mingram and Rtzler (1999), T = 330 Ma; Late-collisional granites Erzge-
birge - see Table A24 and Fig. 57, T = 325 Ma; Post-collisional granites Erzgebirge - see Table
A24 and Fig. 57, T = 310 Ma; Eclogites Erzgebirge - Schmdicke et al. (1995), T = 360 Ma; Late-
Variscan granites Meissen massif - Wenzel et al. (1997), T = 330 Ma; Monzonites and diorites
Elbe Valley zone - Wenzel and v. Quadt (1993), T = 320 Ma; WEV (West European Variscan)
minettes and kersantites - Turpin et al. (1988), T = 295 Ma; Abbreviations: SEB = Sub-
Erzgebirge basin, CBM = central Bohemian massif. CHUR = Hypothetical Chondritic Uniform
Reservoir, UR = Undifferentiated Reservoir (according to DePaolo, 1988).
94 Th. Seifert

Figure 49. Initial Nd-Sr ratios of studied samples in comparison with different mantle-
enriched magmatic rocks. Literature data: non-micaceous kimberlites,
orangeites, West Kimberley (WK), Smoky Butte, Leucite Hills, and Spanish
lamproites - compiled by Nelson et al. (1986), Mitchell and Bergman (1991),
and Mitchell (1995); Navajo minettes, Arizona - Alibert et al. (1986), T = 27 Ma;
Colima minettes, West-Mexico - Luhr et al. (1989), subrecent age; NW
Colorado minettes, Elkhead Mts. igneous province - Thompson et al. (1989),
T = 10 Ma. Abbreviations: MORB = Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts, OIB = Ocean
Island Basalts, compiled by Faure (1986); SEB, CBM, CHUR, and UR see Fig. 48.
Figures 48 - 51 95

Figure 50. Uranogenic (50A) and thorogenic (50B) lead isotope diagrams showing the Pb
isotope compositions in lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study), and metamorphic
and granitic host rocks. For comparison Pb isotope analyses of bulk ores and galena
separates from Ag-base metal and tin deposits in the Erzgebirge (Freiberg,
Marienberg, Wolkenstein, Annaberg, Ehrenfriedersdorf, Zinnwald; n = 102) were
included (Th. Seifert and B. Belyatsky, unpublished data, 2002; Seifert 1994a, 1999).
Data of this study and ages for calculation see Tables A11 and A13. Literature data:
minettes and kersantites WEV (West European Variscan) - Turpin et al. (1988),
T = 295 Ma; para- and orthogneisses in the Erzgebirge - Tichomirowa (2001),
T = 330 Ma. S/K - growth curve from Stacey and Kramers (1975). CBM see Fig. 48.
96 Th. Seifert

LEGEND TO FIGURE 50

Figure 50. Continued (Legend)


Figures 48 - 51 97

Figure 50. Continued


98 Th. Seifert

Figure 51. Thorogenic (51A) and uranogenic (51B) lead isotope diagrams showing Pb iso-
tope compositions of lamprophyres and MVSEB (this study) in comparison with
Pb isotope signatures of kimberlites, lamproites, and minettes. Literature data:
non-micaceous kimberlites, orangeites, West Kimberley, Smoky Butte, and
Leucite Hills lamproites - compiled by Nelson et al. (1986), Mitchell (1995), and
Mitchell and Bergman (1991); WEV (West European Variscan) minettes and
kersantites - Turpin et al. (1988), T = 295 Ma; Colima minettes, West-Mexico,
subrecent age - Luhr et al. (1989); NW Colorado minettes, Elkhead Mts.
igneous province, T = 10 Ma - Thompson et al. (1989); Navajo minettes and
MORB eld compiled by Rock (1991); S/K - growth curve from Stacey and
Kramers (1975). Legend see Figure 50.
99

8. Ar-Ar, K-Ar, Pb-Pb, AND U-Pb GEOCHRONOLOGY

8.1. 40Ar-39Ar and K-Ar Analyses Marienberg district (Fig. 11) is statistically
Phlogopite phenocryst separates with minor different from other samples of the Marien-
Mg-biotite from eight mica-lamprophyres BERG DISTRICT ,$C TYPE !"&  !"& !
show K-Ar ages in the range from 328 7 to ,$7/,+ 1 4HESPECTRAOFTHELATTERSAM-
294 6 Ma (Tab. A15). Additionally seven ples are characterized by a series of gradually
phlogopite concentrates (Tab. A16) including decreasing apparent ages (332.0 to 321.5 Ma)
minor contents of Mg-biotite were analyzed by from 800 to 1,200 C (Tab. A16), with no well-
40
Ar-39Ar techniques and show total gas, pla- dened plateaus (Fig. 52C to 52E). All three
teau, weighted mean, and isochron dates be- spectra show disturbance due to admixed chlo-
tween 327.8 0.5 Ma and 315.4 0.5 Ma (Fig. rite with typical 39Ar recoil in the mid-part of
52). Phlogopite separates from three mica-mi- the age spectrum. However, these spectra at-
nettes in the Freiberg district have K-Ar ages ten out in the upper temperature steps with
from 322 6 Ma to 300 6 Ma (Tab. A15). ages between 321.5 and 323.8 Ma. The weight-
The K-Ar dating of phlogopites from sam- ed mean ages of phlogopite concentrates from
PLES,$"% -A AND,$"%  the Marienberg district (excluding sample G2-
(322 6 Ma) agree with 40Ar-39Ar analyses of 1A) range from 325.2 0.6 up to 327.8 0.5
SAMPLE ,$"%  PLATEAU AGE OF   Ma (Tab. A17). These ages are similar to the
Ma) on three high-temperature steps (1,100 to conventional K-Ar age (328 7 Ma) of sample
1,200 C) that contain 53.4 percent of the total ,$7/,+ )NCONTRAST THE+ !RDATINGOF
39
Ar, Fig. 52A). A statistically different K-Ar PHLOGOPITES FROM ,$7/,+ 1 INDICATE AN
age (300 6 Ma) was analyzed from phlogopite age of 294 6 Ma.
OFLAMPROPHYRE,$"% 
The spectrum of phlogopites from a represent-
Five samples of LD2a- and LD2c-type lampro- ative LD2d-dike of the uranium deposit Nied-
phyres in the Marienberg district show Ar-Ar ERSCHLEMA!LBERODA ,$    SEE &IG
and K-Ar ages from 328 7 Ma to 296 7 Ma 23) shows that high-temperature steps (1,100 -
(Tab. A17). Phlogopite from a mica-minette 1,200 C) form a plateau with 55.7 percent of
dike in the Gehringswalde ore eld of the total 39Ar (Fig. 52G) and an age of 321.9 0.5
-ARIENBERG DISTRICT ' ! SEE 0LATE )  TO Ma. This age is statistically identical to Ar-Ar
-7) yielded a well-behaved spectrum and a pla- weighted mean date of 322.8 0.5 Ma and the
teau age of 315.4 0.5 Ma on three high-tem- K-Ar age (320 6 Ma) of phlogopites from
perature steps (1,150 - 1,300 C) that contain ,$   9OUNGERAGESAND
50.2 percent of total 39ArK released (Fig. 52B). -A OFSAMPLES,$   AND," 
Intermediate and high-temperature steps (850 1 are indicated by K-Ar dating of phlogopite
- 1,300 C) produce relatively at segments of (Tab. A15).
the spectra (97.5 % of the total gas released)
with a date of 316.2 0.5 Ma. The 40Ar-39Ar Whole rock analyses of the LD3- and LD2a-
AGE OF PHLOGOPITE FROM MICA MINETTE ' TYPE LAMPROPHYRE SAMPLES  AND
1A which show a clear spatial relationship to 7( -ARIENBERG DISTRICT 4AB ! SHOW
the most important Ag-base metal vein in the K-Ar ages of 319 7 and 286 7 Ma (Tab.
100 Th. Seifert

A18). The K-Ar analyses of the latter sample two analyses of zoned rims giving much higher
represent probably the age of alteration by hy- concentrations (>1,000 ppm). Apart from two
drothermal uids of the late-Variscan mine- ANALYSES BOTH ON GRAIN  ALL DATA CAN BE
ralization stage. Whole rock K-Ar analyses of combined to give a weighted mean 206Pb/238U
-63%" :  :  :  #   GIVES age of 317.7 2.7 Ma (95% condence limits,
ages that range from 293.3 6 Ma up to 306.8 MSWD = 1.30; probability of t = 0.22). The
4.1 Ma. Rhyolitic ows, dikes, and ignimbrites TWOREJECTEDANALYSESONGRAINAREIDENTI-
INTHE3UB %RZGEBIRGEBASIN#  &  &  cal and give 206Pb/238U dates signicantly older
&  &  SHOW+ !RWHOLEROCKAGEDATAIN than that calculated for the bulk of the zircons,
the range from 273.6 3.7 Ma to 311.8 5.2 and it would appear that this particular zircon
Ma. Some of these analyses are not compara- is a xenocryst or contaminant. A concordia age
ble with lithostratigraphic age data (see chap- of 317.4 2.7 Ma can be calculated for this data
TER@$)3#533)/.  set (and is shown in Figure 54) but with a low
probability of concordance (0.078). This mean
206
Pb/238U date of 317.7 2.7 Ma is interpreted
8.2. U-Pb Single Zircon SHRIMP, Vapor- to represent the best estimate of the age of
Transfer (VTM) and Pb-Pb Single crystallization of this rock. The data of vapor-
Zircon Evaporation Analyses transfer method (VTM) analyses on zircons
FROMLAMPROPHYRE' #ARESUMMARIZEDIN
The zircons from mica-minette dike in the 4ABLE!:IRCONGRAINSHOWAN206Pb-238U
Gehringswalde ore eld of the Marienberg age of 311.2 6.2 Ma. Two other large grains
DISTRICTSAMPLE' #&IG SHOWALARGE ! " HAVE GIVEN AN 206Pb-238U age of
range in size, shape and habit, and it is possible 286.8 2 Ma.
that this is a mixed-age population. From 10 kg
of material 134 zircons were separated. Most The results of single zircon evaporation Pb-Pb
grains are clear and subhedral to anhedral with ANALYSESOF,$ TYPELAMPROPHYRE(  
cracks through the length of the crystals. Some from the Pobershau district (see Fig. 12) and
grains have longitudinal tubes or holes that related 207Pb/206Pb age data (calculated using
might be lled by melt inclusions. This is a tex- the model of Stacey and Kramers (1975) for
ture commonly found in rapidly crystallized or the correction of common lead) are presented
quenched zircons (R. Armstrong, pers. comm., in Table A21. Fifteen zircons were separated
2003). Cathodoluminescence imaging (Fig. 53) FROM  KG OF SAMPLE (   4HE HO-
shows that the crystals are zoned, with concen- mogeneous zircon suite include clear zircons
tric compositional zoning of variable intensity with euheadral to subheadral elongated shapes
AND WIDTH /NE GRAIN  HAS A SHARPLY CON- (Plate IV-A). Some grains show cracks through
trasting form to the zircons described above, the lengths of crystals (Plate IV-B). Five ana-
being well rounded with virtually no zoning. lyses give a mean isochrone 207Pb/206Pb age of
All thirteen of the grains were analyzed, with 309.5 6.9 Ma (Fig. 55), and a weighted mean
some grains being analyzed in different spots age of 313.5 5.2 Ma. Two analyses plot out-
where some potential internal structure was side this group and show a younger (297.4 6
present. The data are plotted in Figure 54, as Ma) and older age (362.1 31.6 Ma).
a Tera-Wasserburg concordia plot of meas-
ured ratios (i.e. uncorrected for common Pb), Additionally, zircons from typically LD2c-
and are presented in Table A19. Most zircons type lamprophyres of the U deposit Nieder-
have moderate (~200 ppm) U contents with schlema were analyzed (Fig. 23). Eighteen
Ar-Ar, K-Ar, Pb-Pb, and U-Pb Geochronology 101

zircons were separated from LD2c-type lam- Ma up to 2685 2.4 Ma. The 2.0 to 2.7 Ga (5
PROPHYRE ,$  (  KG WEIGHT AND rounded zircons) and the 0.5 - 1.5 Ga age data
 ZIRCONS FROM SAMPLE ,$    KG (11 (sub)rounded zircons) probably represent
weight). Typically for these LD2c-type lam- an age spectrum through the central Erzge-
prophyres is a wide spectrum of shapes (long birge crust and conrm the deep source and
prismatic with rounded edges to well-rounded the crustal contamination of LD1-type lam-
grains; Plate IV-C to -E). The zircons of sam- prophyric melts.
PLE ,$  ( SHOW VERY LOW INTENSITIES
therefore no age data were measasured. The Forty-nine zircons (length 100 - 280 m) were
0B 0BDATINGOFZIRCONSFROMSAMPLE,$ separated from 50 kg of the shoshonitic ow
7-2 gave a weighted mean age of 470.1 4.8 Ma /BERHOHNDORF,$:/ !SEE&IG 4HE
(range from 430.9 4.8 Ma to 491.9 3.4 Ma, zircons show a wide spectrum of crystal shapes.
n = 4). The relatively age relationship of LD2c- Only 2 % of the grains have an euhedral me-
type lamprophyre dikes to the late-Variscan dium prismatic form ([110] prism) with slightly
Schlema granite (Tables A1, A2) shows that rounded edges (Plate IV-L). About 10 % of
these Pb-Pb data cannot represent the intru- the zircons are characterized by long-prismatic
sion age. Rather the pre-collisional ages and forms with well-rounded edges (Plate IV-M).
the rounded forms indicate that the studied The majority of the grains (about 70 %) shows
zircons are xenocrysts from deeper levels of a spectrum from elongated rounded to well-
the basement. rounded forms (Plate IV-N to -R). The Pb-Pb
analyses overall gave a wide range of age data
Zircons separated from LD1a-type lampro- from 173 10 Ma up to 1987 12 Ma (Tab.
phyres from the Ehrenfriedersdorf district A23). The single zircon evaporation Pb-Pb
,$%$   ZIRCONS FROM  KG MATERIAL ANALYSESOFGRAIN:AND:YIELDEDANOT
,$%$  ZIRCONSFROMKG%    well-dened age of 296.6 3.9 Ma. However,
3 zircons from 2.3 kg) are variable in size this date is in context with the tectonomagmat-
(lengths from 90 to 280 m), form, and color. ic evolution of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (see
The habit of the crystals varies from euhedral CHAPTER @$)3#533)/.  /NLY SEVEN ZIRCONS
medium prismatic forms with sharp (Plate IV- (length: 100 to 320 m) were separated from
F) and strongly corroded edges (Plate IV-G), 100 kg of the ultrapotassic ow Seifersdorf
to long prismatic with rounded edges (Plate 3& 5 SEE &IG   &IVE ZIRCONS SHOW VERY
IV-H), to well-rounded grains (Plate IV-I and long intensities, therefore no age data were
-K). The results of single zircon evaporation measured. Two medium prismatic clear grains
Pb-Pb analyses and calculated 207Pb/206Pb ages gave age data of 341.9 9.3 Ma and 344.5 6.8
of zircons from the sample LDED-8 are pre- Ma. These data agree not with the lithostrati-
sented in Table A22. The measured zircons graphic ages of SEB units (cf. Fig. 26).
show a wide range of age data from 335 11.2
102 Th. Seifert

FIGURES TO CHAPTER 8

Figure 52. 40
Ar-39Ar age spectrum diagrams for phlogopite from mica-lamprophyres (sample description
see Table A2; 40Ar-39Ar analytical data see Table A16, L.W. Snee, USGS, Denver).
Ar-Ar, K-Ar, Pb-Pb, and U-Pb Geochronology 103

Figure 53. View of a selection of cathodoluminescence images of zircons from the mica-lamprophyre sample
G2-1C. The numbers refer to the analyses as listed in Table A19, and the circles represent location
of the spots analyzed.

Figure 54. Tera-Wasserburg U-Pb concordia plot of SHRIMP data for the zircons from the
mica-minette #G2-1C. Note that the data are plotted uncorrected for common
Pb. The two analyses from grain #12 (shaded grey) were excluded from the age
calculation.
104 Th. Seifert

Figure 55. Pb-Pb isochrone of zircons from LD3-type lamprophyre #1H1-155-1, calculated isochrone age = 309.5 6.5 Ma.
105

9. INDICATIONS FOR THE MAGMATIC-(MANTLE-)


RELATED SOURCES OF LATE-VARISCAN MINE-
RALIZATION IN THE ERZGEBIRGE

The association of F-rich granites and rhyolites alteration in the Harz mountains (Mertz et al.,
with various tin-tungsten and rare metal de- 1989), Kokanee Range (Beaudoin et al., 1992a),
posits has been described from many districts and Coeur dAlene district (Leach et al., 1998)
all over the world (e.g., temprok, 1965; Lugov, demonstrate lack of a temporal relation be-
1968; Mulligan, 1975; Groves and McCarthy, tween granite intrusion and mineralization. In
1978; Taylor, 1979; Plimer, 1987; Lehmann, this context the spatial and time relationships
1990; temprok, 1991; Raimbault et al., 1995; of late-Variscan Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F and sil-
Gonevchuk, 2002). The tin deposits in the ver-base metal mineralization to lamprophyric
Erzgebirge show a clear spatial relationship to and felsic A-type intrusions in the Erzgebirge
post-kinematic granitic and (sub)volcanic fel- are of special interest (this study).
sic intrusions (e.g., Oelsner, 1952a; temprok,
1967, Bolduan, 1972; Tischendorf et al., 1978; The hydrothermal uranium vein-type de-
Kumann, 1985; Schilka, 1986; Seifert and posits in the Erzgebirge and Slavkovsk
Kempe, 1994; Wasternack et al., 1995; Bau- les show a clear spatial association to late-
mann et al., 2000; Rojk, 2005). The tradition- Variscan granites (e.g., Dymkov, 1961; Tischen-
al model for the genesis of these tin deposits dorf, 1989; Komnek et al., 1994; Seifert et al.,
favored a crustal-derived syn- to late-collision 1996a; Frster, 1998). Comparing age data of
granite magmatism (Tischendorf, 1969, 1986, the initial stage of uranium vein deposition
1989). An alternative model suggests a man- @UQK ORE TYPE PITCHBLENDE   -A
tle-related magmatic event and associated SEE CHAPTER @-).%2!, $%0/3)43 WITH
high-temperature uids as a source of Sn- and THEAGEOFLATE COLLISIONAL@OLDERGRANITES
rare metal-bearing mineralization (Leeder, - 320 Ma; see Tab. A24) reveals a signicant
1983, 1985; Dahm, 1985; Seifert, 1994a, 1997; lack between the emplacement of granites and
Zoubek et al., 1996). the deposition of uranium veins. However, the
geochemical and mineralogical characteristics
The relationship of silver-base metal vein-type of the uraninite-bearing late-collisional gran-
deposits to granitic intrusions has been a sub- ites (20 - 60 ppm U; Seifert 1994a, b; Barsukov
ject of debate (cf. Beaudoin et al., 1999). Lind- et al., 1996; Frster et al., 1998; Kempe, 2003;
gren (1933), Oelsner (1952b), and Baumann this study; see Tab. A25) indicate a genetic
(1957, 1965) considered that these deposits RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN @OLDER GRANITES AND URA-
were of magmatic (granitic) afliation. Lind- nium veins. Some authors discuss a remobili-
gren (1933) placed them into the mesothermal zation of uranium from U-rich granites in the
category. Guilbert and Park (1986) considered central Erzgebirge (Seifert, 1994a), and west-
THAT @#ORDILLERAN VEIN TYPE DEPOSITS WERE RE- ern Erzgebirge-Slavkovsk les area (Velikin
lated to igneous activity and formed from et al., 1983; Komnek et al., 1994; Tischendorf
magmatic or meteoric uids. New radiometric and Frster, 1994; Frster, 1998; Kempe, 2003).
dating of silver-base metal mineralization and
106 Th. Seifert

In this context it is important to note that the rocks and hypothetic crust composition (cf.
late-Variscan uranium mineralization shows a Baumann et al., 2000).
strong spatial relationship to lamprophyre dike
swarms in uranium deposits of the Erzgebirge 9.1.1. Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mineraliza-
and the Pbram district (Aejev and Harlass, tion
1968; Kramer, 1974; Seifert, 1994a; Kramer $ARK PURPLE lNE GRAINED @MAGMATIC mUORITE
and Seifert, 1994; Vlaimsk et al., 1995; Seif- is one of the most typical mineral in Sn vein-
ert et al., 1996a; this study, see Figures 1, 2; and greisen-type ores of the Erzgebirge. The
Tables A1, A2). Lamprophyre dikes are also REE pattern of this uorite indicates a mixing
reported from the super-large uranium district of magmatic uids and the inuence of meta-
Ronneburg (cf. Schuster, 1995; Seifert et al., morphic and granitic host rocks, since they lie
1996a; this study). After Keppler and Wyllie between the host rock and primary REE sig-
(1990) uranium is complexed by chloride and natures (cf. Seifert and Kempe, 1994; Monecke
CO2 in uids. The extraordinarily high enrich- et al., 2002). Pink uorite from the early stage
ment of U over Th observed in carbonatite of Sn mineralization (tourmaline veinlets) in
lavas from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano empha- the Ehrenfriedersdorf district show a signi-
sizes the possible importance of carbonate cant enrichment of HREE which is quite dif-
complexes in the transport of U (cf. Keppler and ferent from the REE pattern of the host rocks
Wyllie, 1990). Keeping this in mind, the CO2- and probably represents the primary REE
rich LD2-type lamprophyres (see Tables A7, composition of a deep-seated uid (Seifert and
A9; Fig. 46) could be important for the deposi- Kempe, 1994).
tion of uranium veins in the Erzgebirge, Ron-
neburg, and Pbram-South district. CO2-rich High HFSE (Nb, Ta, Sc, Th, In) concentrations
high-temperature uids, which are associated in bulk rocks and mineral separates of Sn-W-
with the intrusions of mantle-derived CO2- Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mineralization (up to 9,000
rich lamprophyric melts, are easily capable of ppm Nb, 4,500 ppm Ta, and 3 wt.% Sc in cas-
leaching high-U granites of the late-collisional siterites from Sn deposits in the Erzgebirge; up
type (e.g., Eibenstock and Kirchberg massif), to 7 wt.% Nb, up to 0.6 wt.% Ta, up to 1.1 wt.%
and of transporting high U concentrations in Sc, and up to 67 ppm Th in wolframites of the
ssure-controlled hydrothermal systems. Sn deposits Sadisdorf, Cnovec, and Krupka;
up to 210 ppm Ta in the Cnovec granite stock
The following mineralogical, geochemical, associated with Ta-rich columbite; up to 2.5
isotopic, uid inclusion, age relationship, and wt.% In in sphalerites and up to 0.3 wt.% In
structural features indicate a genetic link to a in bulk ores of Sn-polymetallic deposits in the
magmatic-(mantle-)related source of late-Var- Erzgebirge; cf. Seifert, 1994a; Breiter and Fr-
iscan mineralization stages. da, 1995; Seifert et al., 1997; Rub et al., 1998;
Kempe and Wolf, 2006; Seifert and Sandmann,
2006) may reect the inuence of mantle-de-
9.1. Mineralogical and Geochemical rived rare metal-bearing uids. Additionally,
Data there is a general trend to higher Sc contents
with increasing Nb concentration in wolframite
The Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F, silver-base metal, of the Erzgebirge and tin districts in Russia
and uranium-quartz-carbonate mineralization (Kempe and Wolf, 2006). In this context it is
stages in the Erzgebirge show relative similar important to note, that there are no indications
mineral associations independent of their host for a primary enrichment of HREE and HFSE
Indications for the Magmatic- (Mantle-)Related Sources of 107
Late-Variscan Mineralization in the Erzgebirge

in the metamorphic units (cf. Seifert, 1994a; DIUMINTHE@KBORE TYPEVEINSCF3EIFERTAND


Tichomirowa, 2001). Including these data, 3ANDMANN  4HEMAGMATICORIGINOF@KB
the spatial-time relationship and geochemical mineralization is also indicated by signicant
characteristic of post-collisional felsic and lam- ENRICHMENTSOF3NINTHE@KBORE TYPEVEINSIN
prophyric intrusions (cf. this study; see Figure the Freiberg (up to 1.3 wt.%), and Marienberg
25) favor a genetic link to the deposition of Sn district (up to 0.5 wt.%), which is related to the
ores. occurrence of cassiterite and stannite (Bau-
mann, 1958; Seifert, 1994a; Seifert and Sand-
9.1.2. Silver-base metal mineralization mann, 2006). Moderate Sn contents (up to 0.18
The late-Variscan Ag-base metal ores through- WT WERE MEASURED IN SAMPLES FROM @EB
OUTTHE%RZGEBIRGE ESPECIALLYTHE@KBORE TYPE ore-type veins in the southern part of the Frei-
veins (Baumann, 1965; Seifert, 1999; Baumann berg district (Seifert and Sandmann, 2006). In
et al., 2000; Seifert and Sandmann, 2006) show consequence, the mineralogical, trace element
similar mineralogical and geochemical charac- and isotopic signatures of Ag-base metal veins
teristics independent from their different host suggest a genetic link to Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F
rocks (e.g., central and southern part of the mineralization.
Freiberg district, and Sayda deposit: orthog-
neiss, minor paragneiss; Marienberg, Annab- 9.1.3. Uranium vein-type mineralization
erg, Hora Sv. Kateiny, Hora Sv. ebastina, and The uranium-carbonate-hematite-sulde veins
Mdnec district: different units of paragneiss- in the Pbram district, with a production of
es with intercalations (e.g., metablackshales, about 50,000 t U-metal (cf. Vlamsk et al.,
metacarbonates, and metabasalts), and gran- 1995), show clear paragenetic and age similari-
ite; northern part of the Freiberg district: para- TIES TO THE @UQK ORE TYPE VEINS IN THE %RZGE-
gneisses and micaschists with intercalations of BIRGE 4HE @INITIAL STAGE OF 5 DEPOSITION IN
metablackshales and metagabbros; Johann- the Saxothuringian zone is represented by the
georgenstadt, Jchymov, and Schneeberg dis- @UQK ORE TYPE VEINS SEE CHAPTER @5RANIUM
trict: phyllites with intercalations of quartzites Vein-Type Mineralization). The late-Variscan
and metabasalts, and granite; Schlema district: uranium veins (age: 300 260 Ma) throughout
phyllites, carbon- and pyrite-bearing schists, the Erzgebirge show similar mineralogical and
metacarbonates, metadiabases, granites; geochemical characteristics independent from
Schwarzenberg district: micaschists, ortho- their host rocks (cf. Seifert et al., 1996a; cf.
gneisses, and granite; Oelsnitz district: phyl- Baumann et al., 2000).
lite, granite).

4YPICAL FOR THE @KB ORE TYPE VEINS ESPECIALLY 9.2. Pb Isotopes
in the Freiberg, Marienberg, and Annaberg
districts, are high In (up to 8,000 ppm) and The Pb isotope ratios of galena-bearing ores
Cd concentrations (up to 7,000 ppm; Seifert, and galena-separates from Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-
1994a; Seifert and Sandmann, 2006). The oc- Li-F and Ag-base metal mineralization stages
currence of In in magma-afliated (Sn-poly- form a distinct cluster (206Pb/204Pb = 17.890 -
metallic, hydrothermal silver-base metal, 18.586, n = 112; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.490 - 15.590,
epithermal Au-Ag-base metal, Cu(-Mo-Au) n = 97; 208Pb/204Pb = 37.890 - 38.750, n = 114,
porphyry, and VMS) deposits as well as the ob- Seifert, 1994a, 1999; Seifert et al., 2001; Th.
servation of In in fumaroles of active volcanic Seifert and B. Belyatsky, unpublished data,
systems may suggest the magmatic origin of in- 2002; Seifert et al., submitted). This Pb isotope
108 Th. Seifert

COMPOSITION IS INTERPRETED TO BE THE @PRIMARY BERG ANDTHE@&ELSITHORIZONTINTHE(ALSBRCKE


Pb isotope signature of late-Variscan Sn and area north of Freiberg show a range from +0.5
Ag-base metal mineralization (Seifert et al., to +3.5 (mean +1.5 , n = 63) (Weinhold,
2001; Seifert et al., submitted) which overlaps 1977; Jung, 1992; Seifert, 1994a; Jung and
the low-radiogenic, primary Pb isotope ratios Seifert, 1996).
OF LAMPROPHYRE DIKES SEE CHAPTER @)SOTOPE
Geochemistry; Fig. 50; Tab. A14). The sulfur isotope composition of suldes in
Sn ores is similar to the S isotope ratios of
The similarity in Pb isotope compositions be- suldes from Ag-base metal veins (Seifert,
tween lamprophyric rocks (LD2- and LD3- 1994a; Jung and Seifert, 1996). Despite the po-
type lamprophyres), and galena-bearing vein- tential of post source 34S/32S fractionation, the
AND GREISEN TYPE ORES ESPECIALLY FROM @KB @KBORE TYPESULlDE34S values show an overall
ore-type veins, implies a genetic relationship tight grouping around 0 (mean = 0.7; range
between mineralized veins and the intrusion from -1.9 up to +2.0 , n = 119; Tab. A26).
of lamprophyric dikes. It is likely that the Pb The narrow range of 34S values indicates lit-
was introduced to the ore uids directly from tle variation in ore uid O2 conditions during
the lamprophyric magmas. Additionally, the mineralization, and a dominance of sulde in
weak enrichment of thorogenic Pb indicates that uid. Moreover, these data indicate that
an inuence of a homogenous Pb source from sulfur derived from the reduction of sedimen-
the granulite facies-metamorphosed lower tary sulfate was unimportant as a source of the
crust (Seifert et al., submitted). The Pb isotope sulde S (cf. Wareham et al., 1998). Instead, the
data does not preclude leaching of Pb from sulde 34S values are consistent with a mag-
metamorphic host rocks by mineralizing uids matic sulfur source (typical range = 0 3 ;
SEE CHAPTER @)SOTOPE 'EOCHEMISTRY  3TABLE Ohmoto, 1986).
isotope data provide further evidence for the For most porphyry- and skarn-type deposits in
source of uids. the western United States and South America
associated with I-type granites 34S sulde val-
ues of 0 5 are reported in the literature
9.3. Stable Isotopes and Fluid Inclu- (cf. Ohmoto and Goldhaber, 1997). Fluids
sions from magmas that acquired most of their sul-
fur through assimilation of country rocks are
9.3.1. Sulfur isotopes suggested as source for S2- in ores of these de-
The 34S value of sulde deposited from an ore posits.
uid ultimately depends upon the sulfur source.
However, variables such as uid O2, metal- 9.3.2. Oxygen and carbon isotopes, and
sulde strength, depositional temperature, uid inclusions
and the degree of isotopic equilibrium among Published oxygen and carbon isotope studies of
uid and precipitating sulfur species can ef- late-Variscan vein and greisen quartz, and vein
fect hydrothermal sulfur isotopic composition carbonate in different tin, silver-base metal,
(Ohmoto and Rye, 1979). The sulfur isotopic and uranium districts of the Erzgebirge suggest
composition of the W deposit Pechtelsgrn that the W-Mo and Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mine-
ranges from +1.8 to +4.7 34S (mean +3.6 , ralization had a large magmatic water compo-
n = 9; Rsler et al., 1966). The 34S values of nent (Harzer, 1970; Rank, 1977; Thomas, 1979;
suldes from the Sn deposits Ehrenfrieders- E. Nmet, Th. Seifert and G. Beaudoin, unpub-
dorf, Geyer, Pobershau, Marienberg, Anna- lished data, 2003). The 18Oquartz values range
Indications for the Magmatic- (Mantle-)Related Sources of 109
Late-Variscan Mineralization in the Erzgebirge

from +7.7 to +12.9 (Tab. A27). The mean with a salinity of up to 8.6 NaCl equ.% and
18O values of quartz and carbonate from Ag- homogenize into the vapor phase. In a few cases
base metal and uranium veins indicate also an in type 1 inclusions low concentrations of CO2
inuence of magmatic-related hydrothermal were detected by melting of clathrates between
uids (Tab. A27). Because of the post-colli- +1 and +5 C. Type 2 inclusions contain a gas-
sional tectonic environment of the late-Varis- eous phase of pure CO2 detected by the melt-
can mineralizations it is improbable that meta- ing point at -56.6 C. Above this temperature
morphic uids are envolved (see Fig. 57). the solid CO2 changed into the gaseous phase
The 18O values for uids that were in equilib- by sublimation. Quartz with a high abundance
rium with quartz and carbonate are difcult of CO2-bearing uid inclusions shows initially
to calculate due to uncertainties in formation yellow to brown CL-colors. The high tempera-
temperatures. The temperatures of quartz ture hydrothermal ore-forming processes and
deposition, in particular, are difcult to assess the CO2-bearing uids indicate a magmatic
because quartz was precipitated in the veins source for the Ag-base metal hydrothermal
throughout the paragenesis, and temperatures SYSTEMS 1UARTZ FROM @EB ORE TYPE VEINS HAS
could have varied greatly. lower homogenization temperatures between
120 C and 300 C and homogenizes into the
High formation temperatures and pressures liquid phase (M. Drechsel and Th. Seifert, un-
for the uids responsible for the formation of published data, 2002).
the W-Mo and Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mine-
ralization stages are indicated by homogeniza- 5SINGATEMPERATUREOF#FOR@KBORE TYPE
tion temperatures of primary uid inclusions in QUARTZES AND#FOR@EBORE TYPECARBON-
quartz and cassiterite with a range of 350 C ates (temperatures are based on uid inclusion
to 690 C, and calculated uid pressures from study; see above), the means of calculated 18O
28 up to 120 MPa (Thomas, 1979; Kumann, uid composition are +4.6 and +9.5 , re-
1985; Seifert et al., 1992; Seifert, 1994a; Jung spectively (Tab. A27). These data indicate a
and Seifert, 1996). The salinity of primary magmatic source for the hydrothermal uids.
uid inclusions ranges from low-salinity uids The temperature of ore-forming processes in
up to extremely high salt contents, which are URANIUM VEINS OF THE LATE 6ARISCAN @UQK ORE
indicated by the presence of salt crystals in type range between 100 C and 300 C (Klemm,
uid inclusions (Thomas, 1979; Kumann, 1985; 1986). The oxygen isotope uid composition in
Seifert, 1994a). Using the quartz-water frac- equilibrium with quartz and carbonate at 250 C
tionation equation of Clayton et al. (1972), cal- shows means of +9.1 and +10.3 , respec-
culated 18O uid composition in equilibrium tively (Tab. A27).
with quartz (e.g., at 440 C) range from +5.0
to + 9.7 and +4.5 to + 9.5 , respectively In summary, the calculated 18O uid composi-
(Tab. A27). tions in equilibrium with quartz in W and Sn
ores range from +4.5 to +9.7 , which overlaps
4HEmUIDINCLUSIONSIN@KBORE TYPEVEINQUARTZ the range for typical magmatic water (18O =
show homogenization temperatures between +5.5 to +9.5 ; Taylor, 1997). The widespread
250 C and 410 C and can be grouped into two 18OuidVALUESFORQUARTZES@KBORE TYPE AND
types on the basis of their phase relationships CARBONATES@EBORE TYPE FROM!G BASEMETAL
at room temperature (Thomas, 1979; Seifert et veins (Tab. A 27) overlap the elds of primary
al., 1992; Seifert, 1994a; Drechsel et al., 2003): magmatic water and many formation waters
Type 1 inclusions contain an aqueous phase (cf. Hoefs, 1997). Relative to the W-Mo and
110 Th. Seifert

Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F mineralization stages, of a worldwide database (Rock, 1991; Fig. 56).


the 18O uid composition of the Ag-base metal The 13C-18O diagram shows that the calcu-
mineralization indicates an increase of mete- lated uids in equilibrium with carbonates of
oric water inuence. THE@EBAND@UQKORE TYPECARBONATESAREOVER-
lapped by the elds of primary calc-alkaline
The magmatic origin of Ag-base metal hydro- lamprophyre carbonates (Rock, 1991), lampro-
thermal uids is apparent from carbonates of phyre carbonates from the Saxo-Thuringian
THE@EBORE TYPEWHICHSHOWTHEFOLLOWING13C ZONE.ESTLER  ANDTHE@CARBONATITEBOX
means and ranges (Harzer, 1970; Seifert, 1999): (in Coulson et al., 2003).
rhodochrosite (-9.0 , -7.9 to -11.0 ; n = 9), In agreement to these observations conrma-
siderite (-6.8 , -3.0 to -10.7 ; n = 30), and tion to the 13C and 18/VALUESOF@EBORE TYPE
calcite (-6.9 , -1.6 to -10.1 ; n = 37). These carbonates, which indicate a mantle source for
13C values overlap the carbon isotope compo- carbon, the CO2-bearing uid inclusions in
sition of carbonates in calc-alkaline lampro- QUARTZES OF THE @KB ORE TYPE SEE ABOVE SUG-
phyres of the Saxothuringian zone (mean = gest a genetic link to CO2-rich lamprophyric
-7.9 , -6.4 to -12.1 , n = 8; Nestler, 1976; magmas.
Seifert, 1994a) and lamprophyre carbonates

Figure 56. 18O versus 13C ratios of calculated uid composition of eb and uqk ore-type
carbonates (see Tab. A27) in comparison to calc-alkaline lamprophyre carbonates and
carbonatites. Sources: eb and uqk ore-type samples (18O values see Tab. A27; 13C
values according to Harzer, 1970 and Seifert, 1999); eld of carbonates from minettes
and kersantites of the Saxo-Thuringian zone (Erzgebirge, eastern Thuringia) according to
Nestler (1976); eld of primary carbonates from calc-alkaline lamprophyres according
to Rock (1991); mantle carbonatite box compiled according to Deines (1989), and Keller
and Hoefs (1995) in Coulson et al. (2003).
Indications for the Magmatic- (Mantle-)Related Sources of 111
Late-Variscan Mineralization in the Erzgebirge

9.4. Structural Relationships to Mag- 4HE MAJORITY OF @KB ORE TYPE VEINS IN THE
matic Rocks Marienberg district shows an ENE-WSW strike
direction (Fig. 9; cf. Seifert, 1994a). The largest
The late-Variscan ore deposits are spatially as- LAMPROPHYREDIKE@"AUER'ANGGESTEIN WITHA
sociated with Permo-Carboniferous post-col- length of about 7 km and a thickness of up to 10
lisional rhyolitic to mac (sub)volcanic intru- m and the most important Ag-base metal vein
sions along deep-rooted NW-SE fault zones, @"AUER-ORGENGANGVEINSEE0LATE) TO 
especially at the intersections of major struc- and subparallel ore veins are structurally con-
tural zones (cf. Seifert, 1994a; cf. Baumann et TROLLED BY AN %.% 737 TO .% 37 @CENTRAL
al., 2000; Figs. 1, 2). Post-collisional lampro- shear fault zone (Fig. 9; Plate I-2, -3). It is part
phyric and rhyolitic intrusions show a struc- of the Central Erzgebirge Fault Zone (CEFZ),
tural relationship to several Sn deposits (e.g., which is a large scale structural element with
Krupka, Sachsenhhe, Seiffen, Phla, Gottes- signicant metallogenetic importance (Hsel,
berg; see Tab. A1) which are located in the 1972; cf. Seifert, 1994a). The emplacement of
crosscutting areas of NW-SE (e.g., Flha zone) late-Variscan mineralization and lamprophyric
AND %.% 737 FAULT ZONES EG @3OUTHERN intrusions in the Marienberg district (Lauta,
Erzgebirge Fault Zone; Tzschorn, 1970; Hsel, Gehringswalde and Wolkenstein subdistricts)
1972; Kumann, 1985; Wetzel, 1989; Breiter et are controlled by the intersection of the above
al., 1991; Seltmann and Schilka, 1991; Kusch- mentioned ENE-WSW shear fault zone (as
ka, 1994; Seifert, 1994a; Seifert and Kempe, part of the CEFZ) with NW-SE deep-rooted
1994; Frster et al., 1995; this study). FAULTZONES@#HOMUTOV 7ARMBADAND@%LISA-
beth Flacher fault zone; Figs. 10, 11).
-INERALIZED@CENTRALSHEARFAULTZONESANDAS-
sociated mineralized ssure systems are also The uranium deposits in the eastern part of the
a prominent feature of districts with Ag-base Saxo-Thuringian zone (e.g., Schlema-Schnee-
metal veins in the Erzgebirge. These fault berg district, Erzgebirge; Zobes-Bergen dis-
zones show a clear relationship to subparal- trict, Vogtland Synclinorium; Ronneburg dis-
lel or orthogonal lamprophyric and rhyolitic trict, Berga Anticlinorium) are localized at
dikes, which are focused in intersections of intersections of major NW-SE (e.g., Gera-J-
deep-rooted NW-SE (e.g., Marienberg-Tbor chymov-Budweis fault zone) and ENE-WSW
fault zone) and ENE-WSW fault zones (e.g., to NE-SW structural zones (e.g., Central Saxo-
Central Erzgebirge Fault Zone). Key localities nian Lineament; Figs. 1, 2). The spatial rela-
for the spatial relationship between LD2-type tionship between uranium veins and lampro-
lamprophyres (especially mica-minettes) and phyre dikes are exposed in most U deposits,
@KB ORE TYPE VEINS ARE THE &REIBERG -ARIEN- especially in the Niederschlema-Alberoda and
berg, and Annaberg districts (Tab. A1; Fig. 2). Marienberg districts where a high density of
4HE SO CALLED @&REIBERG VEIN NETWORK IS CHA lamprophyre dikes occurs (see Tab. A1; Figs.
racterized by two NNE-SSW to N-S and E-W 9 - 11, 22, 23).
to ENE-WSW shear systems, and spatially as-
SOCIATED lSSURE VEINS 4HE MINERALIZED @CEN-
tral shear fault zone (with ore lenses of up to
10 m; Baumann, 1960) is about 14 km long and
strikes NNE-SSW (Fig. 5).
112 Th. Seifert

9.5. Relatively and Absolutely Age MVSEB, and RVSEB overlap the age data of
Relationships to Magmatic Rocks Sn-W-Mo mineralization (Fig. 57), which indi-
cates a genetic relationship. In this context it is
9.5.1. W-Mo and Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F important to note, that LD3-type lamprophyres
mineralization (310 Ma) in the Pobershau district crosscut the
Field relationships show that W- and Sn-veins Sn ore bodies (see Tab. A1; cf. Seifert, 1994a).
and stringer zones crosscut LD1-type lampro- In result of these data, it is suggested that the
phyres (e.g., Ehrenfriedersdorf, Phla) and Sn mineralization in the Erzgebirge is associ-
late-collisional granites (e.g., Pechtelsgrn, ated with two different mantle-derived mag-
Eibenstock, Ehrenfriedersdorf, Marienberg- matic events.
Pobershau), which are characterized by age
data between 335 Ma and 320 Ma (Tab. A24). 9.5.2. Ag-base metal and U mineralization
Additionally, the Sn-W-Mo greisen- and vein- Field relationships suggest that LD2-type lam-
type mineralizations have younger ages relative prophyres and post-collisional rhyolitic dikes
to LD2-type lamprophyres and post-collisional are crosscut or overprinted by Ag-base metal
rhyolitic intrusions (e.g., Sachsenhhe, Krupka, and U mineralization (e.g., Freiberg, Marien-
Seiffen, Annaberg, Gottesberg-Mhlleithen; berg, Annaberg, Jchymov, Phla, Nieder-
Fig. 2; Tab. A1). The mica-minette dikes in the schlema; Tab. A1). Literature and archive
Sachsenhhe and Krupka Sn deposits are cross- data (Mller, 1848; cf. Seifert, 1988) and study
cut by Sn-greisen mineralization (see Tab. A1; on samples from Ag-Cu-Zn-Sn mines in the
Figs. 7, 8). They crosscut the gneiss and Tep- Marienberg district (Seifert, 1994a) indicate
lice rhyolite units, and probably also the oldest that Sn-W-Mo veins were replaced by Ag-base
late-Variscan granite intrusion in the Krupka metal mineralization. LD2-type lamprophyres
DEPOSIT@0REISELBERG)GRANITE )TISIMPORTANT as well as Sn- and Ag-base metal ore bodies are
to note that the LD2a-type lamprophyres are crosscut by hydrothermal U veins, which show
OLDERTHANTHEALBITE ZINNWALDITEGRANITE@0REI isotope ages between 300 and 260 Ma (see
selberg II granite) in the Krupka deposit as CHAPTER @-).%2!, $%0/3)43  (OWEVER
WELLASTHEALBITEGRANITE@' GRANITE INTHE the inadequate resolution of the age dating re-
Sachsenhhe deposit (see Figs. 7, 8). In conse- sults in an overlap of the age of the Ag-base
quence, the mica-minette dikes in the eastern metal mineralization with ages from LD2-type
Erzgebirge and in the Gottesberg-Mhlleithen lamprophyres, post-collisional granites/rhyo-
district (cf. Seifert and Armstrong, submitted) lites and Permo-Carboniferous bimodal mag-
show similar age relationships to the post-colli- matic events in the SEB (Fig. 57).
sional acidic magmatism and Sn mineralization
(Tab. A1). The age relationship between rhyolitic and
LD2-type lamprophyric dikes in the Freiberg
The age relationships and petrographic char- district is not clear. A rhyolitic breccia from
acteristics of late-Variscan lamprophyre dikes, the Halsbrcke mining area is cemented by
explosive breccia pipes, rhyolitic subvolcanic lamprophyric matrix (see Plate I-1). In con-
intrusions, and greisenization processes favor trast, lamprophyre dikes at the similar area
that the Sn-W-Mo mineralization event in the are crosscut by rhyolitic dikes (Tab. A1). How-
western Erzgebirge occurred between 310 Ma ever, both rock types are crosscut or altered by
and 290 Ma (cf. Seifert and Armstrong, sub- @KBAND@EBVEIN TYPEMINERALIZATIONINDICAT-
mitted; Fig. 25). The age data of post-collision- ing a pre-ore genesis of the lamprophyres and
al granites/rhyolites, LD2-type lamprophyres, the rhyolites. A representative mica-minette
Indications for the Magmatic- (Mantle-)Related Sources of 113
Late-Variscan Mineralization in the Erzgebirge

,$"%  FROM THE SOUTHERN &REIBERG SUB- minette dike intrusion which strikes subparal-
district shows Ar-Ar and K-Ar ages of 323.7 lel to the most important Ag-base metal vein
6 Ma and 318 3.4 Ma, respectively (see Tab. @"AUER-ORGENGANG VEIN INTHE-ARIENBERG
A17). Phlogopite concentrates of two mica- district (see above) shows a phlogopite Ar-Ar
MINETTES ,$"%  ,$"%  WITH SIMILAR plateau age of 315.4 0.5 Ma and a U-Pb zir-
petrological characteristics show signicant con age of 317.7 2.7 Ma. The crosscutting Ag-
different K-Ar ages of 300 6 Ma and 322 6 base metal mineralization, which is similar to
Ma. The 320 3 Ma biotite Ar-Ar total gas age THE @KB ORE TYPE IN THE &REIBERG DISTRICT &IG
from a minette dike in the St. Michaelis mining 4), is therefore younger than 315 Ma.
area (Freiberg southern district; Von Seckend-
orff et al., 2004) corresponds with the majority The Ag-base metal veins in the Marienberg dis-
of age data of lamprophyres in the Freiberg dis- TRICTARECROSSCUTBYURANIUMVEINSWITH@UQK
trict (see Tab. A24). In consequence, the 320 ore-type mineralization with ages between 300
Ma age data of mica-minettes represent the up- -A AND  -A SEE CHAPTER @5RANIUM 6EIN
PERANDTHE -AAGESOF@UQKORE TYPE Type Mineralization). The well-dened 270
VEINS THE LOWER LIMIT OF @KB AND @EB ORE TYPE -A 5 0B AGE OF @UQK PITCHBLENDE FROM THE
mineralization in the Freiberg district. Only Schlema-Alberoda U deposit suggest that the
the 300 Ma phlogopite K-Ar age overlap the Ag-base metal mineralization is probably not
probable age range of the Ag-base metal veins younger than 270 Ma (Frster, 1996). The age
(Fig. 57). relationship between LD3-type lamprophyres
and Ag-base metal veins is not clear. However,
The most important outcrop for the spatial and the relatively high Zn (up to 500 ppm) and As
time relationship between lamprophyre mag- contents of the lamprophyres (up to 1,300 ppm)
matism and Ag-base metal mineralization is may indicate an inuence of Ag-base metal
located in the Gehringswalde and Wolkenstein mineralization (see Figs. 47E, G).
subdistricts (Fig. 2; Tab. A1). A large mica-
114 Th. Seifert

Figure 57. Diagram of summarized geochronological data of late-Variscan magmatic events and mineralization stages
in the Erzgebirge and surrounded areas, and tectonic setting. Explanation and sources for age data of late-
Variscan magmatism (numbers 1 to 66, see Table A24). Abbreviations: LD1, LD2, LD3 = LD1-, LD2-, LD3-type
lamprophyre; MVSEB = Mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin; RVSEB = Rhyolitic volcanics in the Sub-
Erzgebirge basin; E = Erzgebirge; SG = Saxonian Granulitgebirge. Data sources for ages of mineralization
stages see chapter Mineral Deposits; Abbreviations and ages: W-Mo (315 - 290 Ma), Sn-W-Mo = Sn-W-
Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F (310 - 285 Ma), Ag-Pb-Zn-Sn-Cu = Ag-base metal (310 - 270 Ma), U = uranium-quartz-
calcite (300 - 260 Ma). Data base for geotectonic setting: sources for metamorphic and uplift events:
A = Kroner and Sebastian (1997), Gerdes et al. (1998), Werner et al. (1998); B = Schmdicke et al. (1995);
C = Willner et al. (1997); D = Schmdicke et al. (1992), Massone (1994), Werner et al. (1997); additionally
sources: Peach (1978), Jentsch (1981), Peach et al. (1985), Fischer (1991), Seifert (1994a), Frster et al.
(1995), Seifert (1997), Frster (1998), Gaitzsch (1998), this study. Time scale compiled by Schneider (2001);
L. Rotlieg. = Lower Rotliegend; Steph. = Stephanian; Z. = Zechstein.
115

10. DISCUSSION

1.) Many years of study have not resulted The generation of different lamprophyric melts
in a general agreement concerning the petro- is suggested by very low-degree partial melt-
genesis of lamprophyres and shoshonites (e.g., ing of garnet lherzolite (for minette) through
Scheumann, 1922; Gabert, 1959; Joplin, 1966; transitional spinel-garnet lherzolite (2.5 to
Wimmenauer and Hahn-Weinheimer, 1966; 4 wt.% melting for kersantite), to a high degree
Kramer, 1976a, b; Rock, 1977; Bachinski and of melting of spinel lherzolite (4.5 to 7 wt.%
Scott, 1979; Roden, 1981; Esperanca and Hol- melting for spessartite) during the rise of as-
loway, 1987; Kramer, 1988; Turpin et al., 1988; thenospheric mantle (cf. Shand et al., 1994; cf.
Luhr et al., 1989; Stille et al., 1989; Wyman Von Seckendorff et al., 2004).
and Kerrich, 1989; Thompson et al., 1989; Leat
et al., 1990; Rock, 1991; Foley and Peccerillo, Intraoceanic island arcs provide the simplest
1992; Mitchell, 1994; Shand et al., 1994; Fowler setting in which to examine the characteristics
and Henney, 1996; Woolley et al., 1996; Wen- and causes of shoshonitic volcanism associated
zel et al., 1997; Von Seckendorff et al., 2004). with subduction zone processes (e.g., Bloomer
However, lamprophyres and shoshonitic/ultra- et al., 1989; Lin et al., 1989). Most alkalic vol-
potassic volcanic rocks are important in the re- canism of island arcs is characterized by low
construction of the tectonic setting of any giv- concentrations of high eld strength elements
en area (e.g., Leat et al., 1986; Thompson and (HFSE). These K-rich, HFSE-poor alkalic
Fowler, 1986; Rock, 1991; Schaltegger et al., rocks are often called members of the shosho-
1991; Mller et al., 1992; Romer et al., 2001). nitic series (cf. Gill and Whelan, 1989).

Importantly, studies of lamproites, kimberlites, The complexity of the tectonic setting in which
and lamprophyres have suggested that simple shoshonitic lamprophyres occur is documented
garnet lherzolites are not suitable source rocks in Thompson et al. (1989). They argue that a
for their parental magmas (Edgar, 1987; Mit- strong case can be made for their association in
chell, 1986; Smith et al., 1985; Foley, 1990, space and time with heating and/or thinning of
1992; Rock, 1991; Mitchell and Bergman, sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Selected
1991). Rather a metasomatized mantle source, examples of thermotectonic regimes associat-
previously enriched in LILE and HFSE, is ed with strongly potassic mac magmatism are
favored by several authors (cf. Kramer, 1988; grouped by Thompson et al. (1989) as follows:
Rock, 1991). Production of metasomatic aure- (a) possible cases where subcontinental
oles and stoping mantle wall rock must in many lithospheric mantle is heated above a
instances modify the chemistry of the rising thermal plume (e.g., lamproites of
asthenospheric melt (cf. Menzies et al., 1987). Leucite Hills area, Wyoming, USA);
As a result of these processes lithospheric (b) continental rifting combined with
mantle below continental and oceanic crust lithospheric heating above a plume
is anomalously enriched in K, Ti, Fe, REEs, (e.g., minettes of Elkhead Mountains,
other LILE and volatiles in zones of genesis of NW Colorado; leucitites of Virunga
kimberlite and alkaline magmas (cf. Menzies province, Zaire and Ruanda);
et al., 1987).
116 Th. Seifert

(c) continental rifting remote from mantle Mica lamprophyres may be produced at lev-
plums (e.g., minettes of the Colima els below the stability eld of amphibole
Graben, western Mexico; minettes of (26 30 kb) where CO2 is the dominant control
the Navajo province, Arizona); on melting behavior (cf. Shand et al., 1994).
(d) continental extension by transtension The higher CaO content of minettes and the
along transcurrent shear zones rather more abundant carbonate (primary, primary
than rifting (e.g., lamproites of the Vera remobilized, secondary?) is compatible with
area, SE Spain; ultrapotassic dikes of these being produces from a mantle source
the Pernambuco fault belt, NE Brazil); with primary carbonate (cf. Rock, 1991; cf.
(e) rifting above an active subduction zone Shand et al., 1994; Mitchell, 1995). According
or shortly after subduction has cased to Kaszuba and Wendlandt (2000) CO2 may
(e.g., leucitites of the Roman province, have played an important role in production of
Italy); alkali-rich magmas. The solubility of carbonate
(f) rifting and transtension during the col- at high pressures (>16 kb) and its effectiveness
lapse of thickened continental litho- as a buffer for CO2 however, ensures that any
sphere following orogeny, and its return free uid/vapor, after the hydration of mica,
to normal thickness or even further will be H 2O-rich at high pressures, and that u-
thinning locally (e.g., minettes in ids at low pressures may be CO2-rich (cf. Shand
Scotland and Northern England; lam- et al., 1994). Carbonate minerals in calc-alka-
prophyres in the Devon area, SW line lamprophyres include calcite, dolomite,
England; minette and lamproites in the ankerite, and siderite, in approximate decreas-
western Alps, Switzerland and Italy). ing percentages (Rock, 1991; this study).

Esperanca and Holloway (1987) concluded CO2 metasomatism in lamprophyres from the
that any minette containing olivine + clinopy- Erzgebirge has partly to completely replaced
roxene + phlogopite opaque oxide could not phenocrysts of phlogopite (Plate II-3), olivine
have been signicantly re-equilibrated at low (Plate II-7, -9, -10, -35), and plagioclase (Plate II-
pressure and temperature. This supports a 27) with carbonate minerals possibly indicating
model of a rapid ascent of lamprophyric hot that CO2-rich uids exsolved from the primary
magma (1,000 1,200 C temperature) that is magma upon cooling (DeWitt et al., 1996).
chilled rapidly under near surface conditions Fine-grained, euhedral, interstitial carbonate
(Esperanca and Holloway, 1987; cf. Rock, minerals with the groundmass that are not re-
1991). Swanson (1989), using the summary of placement products indicate that fairly large
Edgar (1987), suggested that phenocrysts of amounts CO2 were dissolved in the magma
lamprophyres crystallized at depths between before solidication. DeWitt et al. (1996) pos-
about 24 and 41 km and temperatures of about tulated that such CO2-rich uids or gases were
1,210 1,270 C. In contrast, potassic magmas, derived from the original partial melting event
retaining volatiles during cooling at low pres- in the mantle that generated the alkalic lam-
sure, may include phenocrysts of K-feldspar in prophyre magma.
addition to phlogopite (cf. Shand et al., 1994),
like the LD3-type lamprophyres. The presence 2.) Various previous studies have demon-
of LD3-type lamprophyres with compositions strated that deep degassing, and input of vola-
similar to LD2-type lamprophyres provides tiles which derived from ore-hosting magmas
evidence of similar origins but different evolu- are the key process for ore deposition of mag-
tionary P-T histories through the crust. matic-hydrothermal systems (e.g., Hedenquist
Discussion 117

and Henley, 1985; Lowenstern et al., 1991; to move into the vapor phase and act as ligands
Hedenquist and Lowenstern, 1994; Heinrich, for some metals.
1995; Giggenbach, 1997; Webster et al., 1998; Chlorine and uorine are also typical vola-
John, 2001; Lowenstern, 2001; Lang and Bak- tile components of magmatogene uids, for
er, 2001; Hattori and Keith, 2001; Kelley and example in hydrothermal Cu-Mo porphyry
Ludington, 2002). High volatile concentrations (e.g., Berzina et al., 1997), Sn-W-Mo-Be grei-
and the extreme LILE and HFSE enrichment sen (e.g., Zaraisky and Aksyuk, 1996), base
of lamprophyric melts are important for the metal mineralization (e.g., Hedenquist and Lo-
metallogenetic potential of this magmatism. wenstern, 1994), and Au, Cu, Ag (Hg, Bi, Pb,
During decompression and/or crystallization Zn) high-suldation deposits (e.g., Arribas Jr.,
of a magma at low (<200 MPa) pressures it may 1995). Results of Signorelli and Carroll (2000)
become saturated with both low-density vapor demonstrate that Cl solubility in hydrous silicic
and high-density brine (cf. Signorelli and Car- melts is a strong function of melt composition
roll, 2000). As described by Hedenquist and and high solubilities can be expected in alkali-
Lowenstern (1994), the low density phase will rich, low silica activity compositions.
contain components such as H 2O, CO2, S, HCl,
and the higher density brine phase will contain Other deposits where a spatial and temporal
alkali salts, metals, water, and sulfates. relationship to lamprophyric and small gra-
nitic intrusions is described show similari-
A few studies have documented apparent mo- ties to the Sn-polymetallic, Ag-base metal,
bilization of metals by CO2-rich uids, prima- and uranium deposits in the Erzgebirge (e.g.,
rily in the deep crust (cf. Lowenstern, 2001). Losert, 1962; Koutek, 1967; Sainsbury, 1969;
The presence of abundant CO2 may be a key N mec, 1971; Fyles et al., 1973; Leroy and
inuence on all stages of evolution of intrusion- Sonet, 1976; Vlamsk, 1976; Leroy, 1978;
related gold systems, from initial magma gen- Tauson et al., 1984; Leat et al., 1987; Pavlova,
eration to late-stage fractionation and volatile 1987; Hannah et al., 1991; cf. Rock, 1991;
exsolution (cf. Lang and Baker, 2001). Accord- k and Dobe, 1991; k et al., 1991; Beau-
ing to Newberry (1998) the intrusion-related doin et al., 1992a, b; Fedotov, 1994; Turnilina,
gold-systems also have similarities to reduced 1994; cf. temprok, 1995; Simmons and Al-
tin- and tungsten-rich magmatic-hydrothermal binson, 1995; Vlamsk et al., 1995; DeWitt
systems. In a petrographic study of tungsten- et al., 1996; Wareham et al., 1998; Novk et al.,
mineralized rocks, Higgins (1980) noted a cor- 2001; Maughan et al., 2002; Martn-Crespo et
relation between CO2-rich uid inclusions and al., 2004).
tungsten concentrations. Heinrich (1995) sum-
marizes evidence for vapor-phase transport 3.) Compared with other orogens, the
of copper in a number of intrusion-hosted de- Variscan orogeny had an unusually complex
posits, and especially in tin deposits. Keppler evolution and many aspects are the subject of
and Wyllie (1990) found signicant uranium active debate (cf. Franke, 2000). However, its
mobility in high-temperature magmatic uids development and architecture have become
at moderate crustal pressure. These authors much clearer since the identication and cor-
noted that increasing CO2 concentrations in relation of plate tectonic elements (cf. Franke
the uid were accompanied by higher uranium et al., 2000). There is no indication of active
concentrations. Lowenstern (2001) argued that subduction of oceanic crust and related calc-
the presence of CO2 will hasten the creation of alkaline magmatism in the Erzgebirge and the
a vapor phase causing H 2S, and possibly HCl, Sub-Erzgebirge basin and surrounding areas
118 Th. Seifert

(e.g., Saxonian Granulitgebirge, Elbe Zone) at basin. These rocks are, based on the Cr con-
340 to 335 Ma (uplift of the Erzgebirge meta- TENT WITHIN THE lELD OF THE @PRIMARY MAGMAS
morphic core complex) and in the following dened by Rock (1991).
extension stages (Fig. 57; Table A24 and refer- The high concentration of LILE (Cs, Rb, K,
ences therein). The late-collisional LD1-type Ba, Sr) and HFSE (Sc, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Ti, P,
lamprophyre and S-type granite magmatism Th, Y, LREE) of K-rich magmas is generally
postdate Upper Devonian/Lower Carbonifer- explained by melting of a metasomatically en-
ous subduction and collision by at least 10 Ma. riched mantle source (Fraser et al., 1985; Foley
However, uids released during earlier (Upper et al., 1987; Rock, 1991; Nelson, 1992). Simi-
Devonian/Lower Carboniferous) subduction lar enrichments have been found in various
and dehydration of oceanic crust are likely to lamprophyre intrusions in the Saxo-Thuring-
have mobilized LILE and LREE, and concen- ian (Kramer, 1974, 1988; Kramer and Seifert,
trated these in OH- and F-bearing micas and 1994; Kurze et al., 1998; Seifert, 1994a, 1999)
amphiboles in the lithospheric mantle (cf. Von ANDDURINGTHISSTUDYSEECHAPTER@7HOLE2OCK
Seckendorff et al., 2004). Evidence for such and Trace Element Characteristics). Most of
MANTLEMETASOMATISMISPROVIDEDBY@ENRICHED the lamprophyres show slightly to moderate
spinel lherzolite xenoliths of presumed Permo- ENRICHED3RAND.DISOTOPESSEECHAPTER@)SO-
Carboniferous age that were transported to the tope Geochemistry) which support the meta-
surface by Tertiary basalts in the Elbe Zone somatized mantle source for these magmas.
and Eastern Erzgebirge (Kramer and Seifert, The higher abundances of LILE, HFSE and
2000). Nd model ages T(DM) of lamprophyres ,2%% IN MINETTES SEE CHAPTER @7HOLE 2OCK
varying from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga indicate an interac- and Trace Element Characteristics) may be a
tion between old lithospheric mantle and lam- function of smaller degrees of partial melting,
PROPHYRIC MELTS SEE CHAPTER @3R AND .D ISO- derivation from the more extensively meta-
topes). somatized mantle, or a function of different
uid compositions (Shand et al., 1994). The
The primary status of mantle-derived lampro- strong enrichment of LILE and HFSE and the
phyric melts (cf. Rock, 1991) is commonly in- @ENRICHED .D AND 3R ISOTOPE COMPOSITIONS OF
FERREDFROMHIGHMGn #Rn mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin
ppm), Ni (90 700 ppm), Co (25 80 ppm), and indicate their clear geochemical afnity to
Sc contents (15 30 ppm). Signicant contents K-rich calc-alkaline lamprophyres. However,
of these mantle-compatible elements meas- high concentration of LILE and HFSE, and
ured in lamprophyres from the Erzgebirge and PRIMITIVEBULKGEOCHEMISTRYHIGHMG #R .I
mac volcanics of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin Co, and Sc contents) exclude signicant crustal
(Tables A7, A9; Fig. 32) verify a mantle-related contamination as the cause of this enrichment
magmatism corresponding with literature data in the Erzgebirge lamprophyres and mac vol-
SEECHAPTER@7HOLE2OCKAND4RACE%LEMENT canics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
#HARACTERISTICS 2ELATIVELYLOWMGn
and low contents of Ni (2 80 ppm) and Co The whole rock trace element and isotopic sig-
(5 20 ppm) are caused by the replacement of nature of the Erzgebirge lamprophyres and ma-
phlogopite and olivine by greisen and hydro- c volcanics of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin, their
thermal uids (Fig. 32). Chromium-spinel is geotectonic settings, and their age relationships
relatively stable, explaining the high Cr con- to late- and post-collisional granites (Fig. 57)
tents of low-Ni lamprophyres (e.g., LD3) and indicate that their parent magmas were derived
low-Ni mac volcanics of the Sub-Erzgebirge from metasomatized mantle sources.
Discussion 119

Pre-type Eibenstock granite age lampro- tion (Fig. 57) suggest an S-type character for
phyres (type LD1) these late-collisional granites in the Erzge-
Major and trace element contents as well as birge. In the light of the new age data and
Nd(T) vs. 87Sr/86Sr(T) ratios of LD1-type lam- the post-metamorphic emplacement of LD1-
prophyres (late-collisional kersantites) show type lamprophyre intrusions (Kramer, 1974;
geochemical afnities to the CAL average Seifert, 1994a; this study), the presence of
(Figures 29 - 36, 40, 48). Based on literature LD1-type lamprophyre dikes suggest a mantle-
data (cf. Rock, 1991; Mller and Groves, 1995) derived magmatic event between the nal stage
the signicant low Nb (avg. 13 ppm), TiO2 (avg. of uplift and the initial extension stage before
0.85 wt.%), LREE (avg. 211 ppm), Th (avg. 330 Ma.
22 ppm), Zr (avg. 208 ppm), and Hf (avg.
5 ppm) concentrations (see Tables A7, A9) sug- Post-type Eibenstock granite age lam-
gest that these late-orogenic magmas appear to prophyres (type LD2 + LD3)
be derived from partial melting of subduction- Signicant element plots of LD2e-type lam-
modied mantle lithosphere. prophyres are similar to those of LD1-type
lamprophyres (Zr vs. Nb, Hf vs. Zr, LREE
A crustal contamination of these older (LD1- vs. Ba, LREE vs. Th, Nb, Hf, and Zr, La/Yb
type) lamprophyres in the Ehrenfriedersdorf vs. Sm, Sm vs. Ce/Yb; Figures 34, 35, 40 - 42).
district is indicated by a high SiO2 content of This could be interpreted as indication for an
up to 58.4 wt.% (Fig. 28) which is associated equivalent mantle source of both lamprophyre
with quartz-xenocrysts (Plate II-29, -30), and (kersantite) types. In this context it is of inter-
the occurrence of (sub)rounded zircons (Plate est that the age relationship of some LD2e-
IV-G to -K) which represent an age spectrum type lamprophyres (Freiberg, Phla) to late-
(0.5 2.7 Ga) probably related to subsampling COLLISIONAL GRANITES OF @TYPE .IEDERBOBRITZSCH
of the entire Erzgebirge crust. However, the AND @TYPE %IBENSTOCK IS NOT CLEAR )T CAN NOT
high Cr and moderate Ni concentrations and be excluded that these lamprophyres pre-date
MG ARE SIMILAR TO LOW 3I/2 lamprophyres of @TYPE%IBENSTOCKGRANITEINTRUSIONSLIKE,$
the LD1 type in Phla-Globenstein (Tab. A7) type lamprophyres.
and document a mantle source for LD1-type
lamprophyric melts (Fig. 32). Excluded the LD2e-type lamprophyres, the
LD2- and LD3-type lamprophyres postdate
The crosscutting eld relationships of some of CLEAR THE LATE COLLISIONAL GRANITES EG @TYPE
the lamprophyric intrusions, especially in the Eibenstock) and represent a mantle-derived
Ehrenfriedersdorf Sn district show a clear pre- magmatism which is associated with a fast
@%IBENSTOCK TYPE GRANITE AGE .EW AGE DATA extension setting (Fig. 57). Mica-minettes
INDICATE THAT THESE @%IBENSTOCK TYPE GRANITES (LD2a) and mica-phyric transitional type ker-
and other late-collisional granites (e.g., Kirch- santites/minettes (LD2c) show petrographical
berg granite massif) intruded into the uplifted and geochemically characteristics which are
metamorphic core complex and surrounded signicant different from the latter. LD2a- and
low-metamorphic units between 335 Ma and LD2c-type lamprophyres are most common
325 Ma (Tab. A24). These granites are char- and pre-date the late-Variscan mineraliza-
acterized by low HFSE, low HREE, and high tions. They crosscut different types of late-col-
P 2O5 contents (Tab. A25) and plot into the lisional granites and predate post-collisional
lELDOF@3YN COLLISIONGRANITESOF0EARCEETAL (sub)volcanic rhyolitic intrusions of anorogenic
(1984). This and their tectonomagmatic posi- (A-type) character (Fig. 58; Pearce et al., 1984;
120 Th. Seifert

Figure 58. Nb versus Y (58A) and Ta versus Yb (58B) discriminant diagrams of Pearce et al.
(1984) for different geotectonic granite types with plots of late-collisional granites
with S-type afnity (see Tab. A25) and post-collisional acidic (sub)volcanic rocks
with A-type afnity (see Tab. A8). Abbreviations: VAG = Volcanic Arc Granites,
syn-COLG = syn-Collision Granites, WPG = Within Plate Granites, ORG = Ocean-
Ridge Granites.
Discussion 121

Whalen et al., 1987; Eby, 1990). The spatial Data of this study conrm that the Erzgebirge
and temporal relationship between LD2a-type lamprophyres show geochemical similarities to
lamprophyres and younger rhyolitic intrusions the mac volcanism in the Sub-Erzgebirge ba-
with A-type signature is documented in differ- sin (Figures 28 - 30, 33 - 35, 40 - 42, 43B, 45; Tab.
ent districts (Freiberg, Krupka, Sachsenhhe, A9). Additionally, the post-collisional rhyolitic
Gottesberg-Mhlleithen; Tab. A1). These post- magmatism in the Erzgebirge shows similari-
collisional intrusions are controlled by cross- ties to RVSEB (Tab. A8; Fig. 58). An excellent
cutting orthogonal deep fault zones (cf. Seifert, example for the postulated bimodal magma-
ATHISWORK&IG WHICHSUGGESTSA@&AST tism in the Erzgebirge are lamprophyric and
Extension setting (Fig. 57). The major struc- rhyolitic intrusions in the Gottesberg-Mhl-
tural manifestation of extension in the Upper leithen tin district (Figs. 24, 25; c.f. Seifert and
Carboniferous and Lower Permian in the stud- Armstrong, submitted). A Permo-Carbonifer-
ied area is the Sub-Erzgebirge basin, which is ous bimodal magmatism in the Erzgebirge and
controlled by the NE-SW Central Saxonian the Sub-Erzgebirge basin is suggested (see Fig.
Lineament (Fig. 2). In this context the discus- 57), although this is not conrmed sufciently
sion about a tectonomagmatic relationship be- by absolute age dating of the Erzgebirge lam-
tween post-collisional lamprophyric and silicic prophyres.
(sub)volcanic intrusions in the Erzgebirge and
the Sub-Erzgebirge basin is of special interest. The discrepancies of some of these age data
in comparison to the lithostratigraphic units
Mac and rhyolitic volcanics of the Sub- in the SEB (Fig. 26) are signicant and speak
Erzgebirge basin at rst against a genetic relationship between
The Sub-Erzgebirge basin is characterized by the post-collisional magmatism in the Erzge-
an intensive mac (MVSEB) and rhyolitic vol- birge and SEB. However, it is difcult to in-
canism (RVSEB) within an age range of about terpret the measured age data. K-Ar ages of
305 - 290 Ma (Fig. 57, and references therein). phlogopite separates and whole rock samples
The ages of lithostratigraphic units (Planitz from lamprophyres with similar petrographic
and Leukersdorf formation) with MVSEB and and geochemically characteristics show a wide-
RVSEB indicate bimodal magmatic activities spread range between 328 7 Ma and 286 7
during the Lower Rotliegend (Fig. 26). The Ma (see Fig. 57; Tables A17, A18, A24). K-Ar
bimodal character of these volcanic sequences dating of lamprophyres from different districts
is interpreted to be the result of intra-conti- (see numbers 14, 34, 44, 45, and 53 in Figure
nental rifting and mantle-generated magma- 57 and Table A24) indicate Stephanian and
tism coupled with an extensional setting (cf. Lower Rotliegend ages which are similar to
Fischer, 1991; cf. Seifert, 1994a; Seifert and those of the mac volcanism in the Sub-Erzge-
Baumann, 1994). Based on petrographical birge basin. The Ar-Ar ages of phlogopite
and geochemical data some authors postulate separates show a small range of total gas ages
that the Sn-F-enriched Zeisigwald ignimbrites and plateau ages between 314.5 0.5 Ma and
and tuffs (Jentsch, 1981; Kumann, 1985; Rank 323.7 0.6 Ma (n = 7). Six total gas ages show
and Plchen, 1989; Seifert and Kempe, 1994) a range between 320.5 0.5 Ma and 323.6
or both the upper rhyolitic and shoshonitic/ 0.7 Ma which is conrmed by two plateau ages
ultrapotassic magmatism in the SEB (Seifert, (see Tab. A17). The weighted mean and iso-
1994a; Seifert and Baumann, 1994; Kramer and chrone Ar-Ar ages of four samples show sig-
Seifert, 1994) are volcanic equivalents of the nicant higher ages (322.8 0.5 Ma and 327.8
post-collisional intrusions in the Erzgebirge. 0.5 Ma). Phlogopite separates of lamprophyres
122 Th. Seifert

FROM7OLKENSTEIN,$7/,+ 1 AND3CHLE process can cause dramatic changes in zircon


MA ,$     HAVE SIGNIlCANTLY DIFFER- mineralogy as well as in the U-Pb system (cf.
ent K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages with a discrepancy Kempe et al., 2004). This suggests that zircons
of up to 30 Ma between the two methods (see from slightly greisenized rhyolites and lam-
Tab. A17). prophyres may not represent the real intrusion
age. Therefore it is possible that the emplace-
Based on these data the interpretation of the ment of mica-minettes is younger than the
above K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages is not clear. In this measured 320 Ma and 316 Ma age data which
context the dating of phlogopites and zircons would explain the discrepancies of age data
of a representative mica-minette dike in the of LD2-type lamprophyres in relationship to
-ARIENBERG DISTRICT SAMPLES ' ! ' lithostratigraphic ages of mac volcanics in the
1C; Fig. 11) is of special interest. Excluding two Sub-Erzgebirge basin. For this discussion the
analyses, all SHRIMP zircon analyses of sam- Ar-Ar dating of a kersantite dike distal to the
PLE ' # GIVE A WEIGHTED MEAN 206Pb/238U ore deposits in the Kirchberg granite (Fig. 2)
age of 317.7 2.7 Ma, which is similar to the is of special interest. According to Von Secken-
!R !RPLATEAUAGEOFSAMPLE' ! dorff et al. (2004) biotite from this kersantite
0.5 Ma). These data indicate a Upper Namu- gave an Ar-Ar total gas age of 294 2.8 Ma,
rian/Lower Westphalian intrusion age of mica- which indicate a co-magmatic relationship to
minettes in the Marienberg district which are the MVSEB of the Planitz formation (Fig. 26)
in agreement with the Pb-Pb zircon age (about in the Zwickau area.
310 Ma) of a post-Sn mineralization age lam-
prophyre (LD3) in the Pobershau district (Fig. In summary, the radiogenic isotope systems
57 and Tab. A24). for dating of lamprophyres and rhyolitic
(sub)volcanics in mineralized zones of Sn, Ag-
Zircons extracted from a mica-minette dike in base metal, and U deposits in the Erzgebirge
THE 3N DEPOSIT -HLLEITHEN SAMPLE ,$4A may not always represent the true age of melt
gave a SHRIMP 206Pb/238U age of 320 3 Ma, emplacement at high crustal levels. Rather
and a single zircon evaporation 207Pb/206Pb age dating from post-collisional lamprophyres
age of 316 2.7 Ma (Seifert and Armstrong, (about 295 Ma) and rhyolites (about 290 300
submitted). This indicates an intrusion age for Ma) distal to the ore deposit districts (cf. Von
the mica-minette dike of about 315 320 Ma. Seckendorff et al., 2004; cf. Kempe et al.,
The 207Pb/206Pb and 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 2004) may represent true intrusion ages. The
non-greisenized, slightly altered K-rich rhy- signicant petrographical, geochemical, and
olitic dikes distal from the Gottesberg-Mhl- structural similarities between lamprophyre
leithen district give 290 5 Ma and 297 8 Ma dikes (LD2a, LD2c) as well as (sub)volcanic
(Kempe et al., 2004). Based on petrographic rhyolitic intrusions in the Erzgebirge and the
and geochemical data they are possibly as- Lower Rotliegend volcanism in the Sub-Erzge-
sociated with the emplacement of the above birge basin (MVSEB, RVSEB) indicate a ge-
mentioned (sub)volcanic rhyolitic intrusions netic link of the bimodal magmatism in both
in this district (Figures 24, 25; cf. Seifert and areas. Most of the bimodal assemblages form
Armstrong, submitted). It is not adequate clear potassium-rich mac and rhyolitic series (Fig-
how greisenization and hydrothermal process- ures 27, 28) with an age of about 315 290 Ma
es inuence the U-Pb system in zircons. How- (Tab. A24; Fig. 57).
ever, investigation of zircon from rhyolite in-
volved in greisenization demonstrates that this Based on the above mentioned data and discus-
Discussion 123

sion a model for the post-collisional magmatic- extensional tectonic environment that allowed
tectonic evolution and associated late-Varis- rapid ascent of lamprophyric magmas from the
can mineralizations is postulated (Figure 59). upper mantle. The F-enriched rhyolitic rocks
From Westphalian time onwards, a regional were probably produced by small amounts of
scale, approximately E-W-oriented stress eld partial melting of the lower crust, resulting
was superimposed on the collapsing Variscan from underplating of hot and uid-enriched
orogen (cf. Timmermann, 2004 and references lamprophyric melts.
therein). The likely cause of this was the colli- Based on petrochemical data the genesis of
sion of the Gondwana continent with eastern these uid-enriched lamprophyric melts can be
North America, and dextral movements be- discussed: Geochemically the LD2-type lam-
tween the two continents. Regional extension prophyres and most of the mac volcanism in
leading to lithospheric thinning, the develop- the Sub-Erzgebirge basin show compositions
ment of shear zones, the formation of fault- which are different from the CAL average and
controlled basins, and decompression melting ARE SIMILAR TO THE AVERAGE OF COCITES @TRANSI-
of updoming asthenosphere (cf. Franke et al., tional lamproites; Rock, 1991) and other lam-
2000; cf. Praeg, 2004; cf. Wilson et al., 2004) proite occurrences worldwide (Figures 28 - 30,
may have been an important factor for the Per- 32 - 38, 42, 43, 45).
mo-Carboniferous bimodal magmatism in the
Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge basin. In contrast to the geochemical data, the Sr-Nd
The bimodal lamprophyre (shoshonitic/ultra- isotopic signatures of LD2-type lamprophyres
potassic)-rhyolite assemblage in the Erzgebirge indicate not a clear afnity to a lamproitic
and the Sub-Erzgebirge basin was erupted dur- source (Figures 48, 49). Most of the lampro-
ING INTRACONTINENTAL RIFTING IN A @&AST %XTEN- phyres, including MVSEB and Ronneburg
sion setting (Fig. 57) which formed the modern lamprophyres, plot in the Sr-Nd diagram be-
morphology of the SEB and activated the NW- tween the non-micaceous kimberlite, carbona-
SE and NE-SW deep fault zones in the Erzge- tite, and OIB elds and the orangeite and lam-
birge (see Fig. 2). This assemblage was formed proite signatures. However, the Sr-Nd isotope
during continental extension under conditions ratios of, for example Colima, Navajo, and NW
of high differential horizontal stress unrelated Colorado minettes (Fig. 49) show that the in-
to subduction, but possibly due to lithospheric terpretation of Sr-Nd isotope data and its re-
extension over a mantle plume (Fig. 59). It is lationship to the magmatic-tectonic setting is
important to note that these tectonic and mag- not always clear. Especially the NW Colorado
matic features are similar to those of the Ceno- (Elkhead mountains) minettes show discrep-
zoic Basin and Range province in the Western ancies in their interpretation as lamprophyres
United States (cf. John, 2001; cf. Praeg, 2004). which are associated with continental rifting
combined with lithospheric heating above a
The emplacement of uid-enriched lampro- mantle plume (cf. Thompson et al., 1989) and
phyric (shoshonitic/ultrapotassic) melts at the the low Nd(T) values that are far outside the
base of the lower crust in the Erzgebirge and range of asthenospheric magmas. On the other
Sub-Erzgebirge basin is probably associated hand, the Sr-Nd isotope signatures of Colima
with asthenospheric doming (upwelling of the and Navajo minettes which are postulated
hot asthenospheric mantle into the lithosphere; as continental rifting remote from a mantle
Fig. 59). The types of eruptions and orienta- plume (cf. Thompson et al., 1989) show simi-
tions of dikes and shallow intrusions in the larities to the elds of asthenospheric magmas
bimodal assemblage are consistent with an (non-micaceous kimberlites, OIBs; Fig. 49). In
124 Th. Seifert

Figure 59. Generalized magmatic-tectonic setting of the post-collisional bimodal lamprophyre


(shoshonitic/ultrapotassic)-rhyolite (sub)volcanic assemblage and associated late-
Variscan mineralization in the Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge basin (SEB) during the
Stephanian / Lower Rotliegendes (305 290 Ma). Post-collisional magmatism in
the Erzgebirge and surrounding areas is probably associated with upwelling of
asthenospheric mantle into the lithosphere, possible due to impingement of a
mantle plume, which led to partial melting of the subduction-modied lithospheric
mantle. Continental extension allowed rapid ascent of uid-enriched lamprophyric
(shoshonitic/ultrapotassic) magmas through the crust and eruption as thin lava
ows, and dike swarm intrusions with little interaction with the crust. Small
amounts of partial melting of the base of the crust resulted from underplating of
uid-enriched lamprophyric magmas formed F-enriched rhyolitic melts in an ano-
rogenic setting. The rhyolite magmas emplaced as subvolcanic small intrusions and
dikes in the upper crust or erupted as domes and lava ows. Especially in the Sub-
Erzgebirge basin, a local accumulation of these melts in moderate depth magma
chambers led to eruptions of ignimbrite and ash-ow tuffs and formation of
calderas. MVSEB = Mac volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
Discussion 125

consequence, the position of the Sr-Nd isotope SEE CHAPTER @3ILVER "ASE -ETAL 6EIN
ratios of LD2- and LD3-type lamprophyres, Type Mineralization), in the Kutn
MVSEB, and Ronneburg lamprophyres in Hora district (central Bohemian Massif)
Figure 49 could also be discussed as indication as well as the Sn-W-Mo-Bi-Cu-Li-F
for asthenospheric magmatic pulses where the mineralization in the Erzgebirge was
Sr-Nd isotopic signatures were modied by the not signicantly inuenced by wall
interaction with the lithospheric mantle and/or rock leaching (Seifert, 1994a; Baumann
the crust. et al., 2000; Seifert and Sandmann,
2006);
4.) The metallogenetic importance of post- (4) comparable lead isotope compositions
collisional lamprophyres (especially type LD2) of galena and galena-bearing ores from
is indicated by its high volatile concentrations Ag-base metal and Sn-Polymetallic de-
(CO2, H 2O+, F, Cl, S, P 2O5) and relationships to posits and post-collisional lamprophyres
A-type rhyolitic intrusions and late-Variscan SEE CHAPTERS @)SOTOPE 'EOCHEMISTRY
Sn-W-Mo / Zn-Sn-Cu-In-Pb-Ag / U ore deposi- AND@0BISOTOPESAND 
tion. Additionally, they frequently occur in dis- (5a)sulfur, oxygen, and carbon isotope data
tricts with intensive and economic important for suldes, quartz, and carbonate and
late-Variscan mineralization processes. The (5b)hot to very hot (350 to 690 C), low to
high volatile fugacities of the lamprophyres very-high salinity uid inclusions in cas-
and shoshonitic/ultrapotassic volcanics are siterite and quartz from Sn-polymetallic
documented in their whole rock composition mineralizations and high-temperature
(CO2 up to 12.2 wt.%, H 2O+ up to 7.92 wt.%, Ag-base metal systems with homogeni-
F up to 4,600 ppm, Cl up to 1,700 ppm, S up to zation temperatures between 250 and
3,160 ppm, P 2O5 up to 1.33 wt.%) and in high 410 C and CO2-bearing uids indicate
H 2O+, F, and Cl contents of early magmatic the signicant inuence of postmag-
phlogopites and apatites. Volatile components matic uids and different levels of mix-
(H 2O, CO2, Cl, S, F, P) and metals can be lost ing with meteoric water (see chapter
to the atmosphere during eruptive degassing @3TABLE)SOTOPESAND&LUID)NCLUSIONS 
(cf. Lowenstern et al., 1991; cf. Johnson et al.,
1994). In consequence, the measured contents In this context it is important to note that simi-
may only represent the minimum volatile con- larities of geological, age, mineralogical, geo-
centration of lamprophyric melts. chemical, uid inclusion, as well as S- and Pb-
isotope data of Sn-W-Mo and Ag-base metal
Direct and indirect supporting evidence of a mineralization in the Erzgebirge suggest their
magmatic origin for the late-Variscan miner- genetic co-relationship (cf. Seifert, 1994a; Jung
alization in the Erzgebirge includes: and Seifert, 1996; cf. Baumann et al., 2000;
(1) close spatial association of the deposits Seifert and Sandmann, 2006; this study).
with igneous rocks;
(2) probably close temporal association Because of eld age relationships (see chapter
between igneous rocks and associated @0ETROGRAPHIC4YPESAND2ELATIVELY!GES POST-
mineralization (Fig. 57); magmatic Sn-W-Mo and Ag-base metal miner-
(3) similar mineralogical, geochemical, iso- alization cannot be related to the late-Variscan
topic, and uid inclusion characteristics magmatic events which are represented by a
show that the polymetallic Ag-base small mantle-derived magmatism (LD1-type
metal mineralization in the Erzgebirge lamprophyres) followed by large S-type granitic
126 Th. Seifert

INTRUSIONS @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE WITH AN formation of tin and silver-base metal depos-
age of about 335 - 325 Ma. Based on this study its, and possibly U deposits was probably the
and literature data it is more likely that late- emplacement of volatile-rich lamprophyric
Variscan Sn, W, Mo, Ag, Pb, Zn, Cu, In, and and rhyolitic magmas and related mineraliza-
U metal deposition in the Erzgebirge is associ- tion systems during intracontinental rifting in
ated with a post-collisional, bimodal (lampro- the Westphalian/Lower Rotliegend which is
phyric and rhyolitic) magmatism with an age of associated with asthenospheric doming (see
about 315 - 290 Ma. Figures 57, 59).
The fundamental feature important in the
127

11. CONCLUSIONS

This study investigated the association of late- characteristics indicating a genetic link
to post-collisional lamprophyre dike intru- between the two and suggesting the
sions for late-Variscan ore mineralization in occurrence of bimodal magmatism
the Erzgebirge (Germany, Czech Republic), in both areas ~ 315 290 Ma ago.
one of the most important silver, tin, tungsten, The Sn-W-Mo, Ag-base metal, and
uranium, lead, zinc, copper, indium, bismuth, U mineralization post-date LD2-
cobalt, and nickel ore provinces in Europe with type lamprophyre dikes whereas LD3-
a mining history of more than 800 years. Most type lamprophyres crosscut cassiterite-
lamprophyric dikes occur in areas of crosscut- quartz veins (Pobershau Sn deposit)
ting deep fault zones which also acted as path- AND PREDATE PROBABLY @KB ORE TYPE
ways for post-collisional F-enriched rhyolitic mineralization. The relatively age
intrusions and postmagmatic Sn-W-Mo, Ag- relationships and age data of bimodal
base metal, and U mineralizations. magmatic events and late-Variscan
mineralization indicate their genetic
The genesis and metallogenetic importance of relationship.
the lamprophyre magmatism in the Erzgebirge 3.) The bimodal lamprophyre-rhyolite as-
can be summarized as follows: semblage in the Erzgebirge - Sub-Erzge-
1.) Late-collisional kersantite dikes (pre- birge basin area was formed during in-
@TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE AGE ,$ TRACONTINENTAL RIFTING IN A @&AST %XTEN
represent a mantle-derived magmatic sion setting by melting of a metasomatic
event between the nal stage of uplift enriched mantle source. The emplace-
and the initial extension stage (335 325 ment of uid-enriched lamprophyres
Ma). These late-orogenic magmas ap- and rhyolitic intrusions at the same time
pear to be derived from partial melting is probably associated with decompres-
of subduction-modied mantle litho- sion melting of updoming astheno-
sphere. The age relationships between sphere. These tectonic and magmatic
LATE OROGENIC@TYPE%IBENSTOCKGRANITES features are similar to those of the
post-collisional lamprophyric/rhyolitic Basin and Range Province in the
intrusions and late-Variscan mineraliza- Western United States.
tion processes suggest no metallogenetic 4.) The metallogenetic importance of post-
importance of LD1-type lamprophyres. collisional lamprophyres (especially
2.) Post-collisional lamprophyric intrusions LD2-type lamprophyres) is indicated
POST @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE AGE by their high volatile concentrations
LD2, LD3) and MVSEB (Stephanian (CO2, H 2O+, F, Cl, S, P 2O5) and rela-
to Lower Rotliegend age), and (sub-) tionships to post-collisional, high-F
volcanic rhyolitic intrusions in the rhyolitic intrusions and late-Variscan Sn-
Erzgebirge (Westphalian to Lower W-Mo / Ag-Pb-Zn-Cu-In / U ore deposi-
Rotliegend age data) and RVSEB tion. Additionally, they frequently occur
(Lower Rotliegend age) show similar in districts with intensive and economic
petrographic, geochemical and isotopic important late-Variscan mineralization
128 Th. Seifert

processes. berg, Annaberg).


5.) The post-magmatic origin of Sn-W-Mo 7.) CO2-rich LD2-type lamprophyres could
and Ag-base metal mineralizations and be important for the formation of ura-
their genetic link is indicated by minera- nium veins in the Erzgebirge and in
logical, geochemical, isotopic, uid in- other districts in the Variscan orogen
clusions, age relationship, and structural (e.g., Ronneburg, Pbram-South), since
features. Because of this fact and the CO2-rich high-temperature uids, which
close spatial and time relationship to are associated with the intrusion of CO2-
post-collisional lamprophyric and rhy- rich lamprophyric melts, are easily ca-
olitic intrusions mantle-derived uids pable of leaching the high-U, late-
which are associated with the Permo- collisional granites, and of transporting
Carboniferous bimodal magmatism are high U concentrations in ssure-
likely the main source of Sn-W-Mo and controlled hydrothermal systems.
Ag-base metal mineralization systems.
6.) Important for any future exploration of The following features are positive indications
epigenetic Sn-W-Mo and Ag-base metal for the exploration for hydrothermal U vein-
deposits in the Erzgebirge are: type deposits:
s THERE IS NO GENETIC RELATIONSHIP BE s OCCURRENCE OF LARGE MASSIFS OF 5
TWEEN THE LATE OROGENIC @TYPE %IBEN ENRICHED @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITES
stock granite intrusions and the ori- (late-collisional granites with S-type
gin of late-Variscan Sn-W-Mo and Ag- signature);
base metal mineralization; s HIGH FREQUENCY OF #/2-rich lampro-
s LATE 6ARISCAN ORE DEPOSITS ARE SPA phyres that are structurally controlled
tially associated with intrusion centers by intersections of NW-SE and
of Permo-Carboniferous post- NE-SW/ENE-WSW deep rooted fault
collisional mac and rhyolitic (sub)- zones;
volcanic magmatism along deep- s ELEVATED THICKNESS OF SEDIMENTARY
rooted NW-SE fault zones, especially (metamorphic) host rocks with inter-
at the intersections with NE-SW and calations of meta-black shales,
E-W major structural zones; meta-carbonates, and pyrite-bearing
s POST COLLISIONAL LAMPROPHYRIC AND schists around the late-collisional
granitic subvolcanic intrusions which granite massifs.
POSTDATE @TYPE %IBENSTOCK GRANITE
complexes and associated explosive
breccia pipes and microgranitic/rhy-
olitic stocks and dikes are an impor-
tant positive metallogenetic factor
for the exploration of Sn-W-Mo de-
posits (e.g., Krupka, Gottesberg-
Mhlleithen);
s THE OCCURRENCE OF ,$ TYPE LAMPRO
phyres is a signicant indicator for
a high economic potential of Ag- and
In-rich polymetallic base metal sulde
ore deposits (e.g., Freiberg, Marien-
129

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155

13. APPENDIX

13.1 Plates
Plate I - Field Geology

P I-1 Brecciated rhyolite cemented by very ne-grained lamprophyre. Lamprophyre #LD-Halsb 5353, Beihilfe mine,
200 m level, mining area of Samuel Morgengang vein (kb ore-type), Halsbrcke, Freiberg central district. P I-2 Bauer
Morgengang vein (kb ore-type and younger post-Variscan hydrothermal mineralization) with ENE-WSW strike direc-
tion. Subparallel to the ore vein strikes the so called Bauer Ganggestein (lamprophyre dike). View from West to East,
dump of former uranium shaft #139, Lauta, Marienberg district. P I-3 Bauer Morgengang and Eleonore Morgengang
veins. Subparallel to the ore veins strikes the so called Bauer Ganggestein (lamprophyre dike). View from East to West,
old mining area Kiesholz, Gehringswalde, Marienberg district. P I-4 to P I-7 ENE-WSW mica-lamprophyre is spatial
related to a subparallel vein with kb ore-type mineralization (Bauer Morgengang), both crosscut gneiss (Marien-
berg Flasergneis). Himmelreich mining eld, shaft #238, level 3, Querschlag 23, Gehringswalde, Marienberg district:
I-4 overview;
156 Th. Seifert

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-5 detail of the hanging wall contact; I-6 central part of the lamprophyre dike (thickness about 10 m), sample locality
G2-1C. I-7 Detail of I-6: fresh (dark-grey/black) mica-lamprophyre with symmetric cooling ssure system. P I-8 NW-SE
mica-lamprophyre dike (thickness about 4 m) is crosscutted by late-Variscan uorite-quartz veinlets, sample locality
LDWOLK-1, uranium exploration adit #41, Wolkenstein, Marienberg district. P I-9 to P I-12 NW-SE mica-lamprophyre
dike (thickness about 5 m) is spatial related with a tin-polymetallic ore-type vein/disseminated shear fault, Arme Leute
Bergfreude mine, Arme Leute Hoffnung Morgengang vein, Wolkenstein/Streckewalde, Marienberg district: I-9 NW-
SE mica-lamprophyre dike and a footwall subparallel fault (partly mineralized tin-polymetallic disseminated ore-
type), both crosscut Marienberg gneiss.
Appendix - Plate I 157

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-10 Contact between at dipping shear fault and mica-lamprophyre dike. I-11 and I-12 Mining area of the tin-polyme-
tallic ore-type vein with a hanging wall lamprophyre dike (thickness about 5 m), sample locations ABF-1 and ABF-3. The
dike is crosscutted by quartz-veinlets, which are probably associated with the tin-polymetallic vein. P I-13 Aplitic facies
of the topaz-albite granite intruded into a brecciated kersantite dike. Sn-deposit Vierung, level 2. Gezeugstrecke,
about 30 m southern of Kurt Leopold shaft. (photograph from Rohrlack, 1958). P I-14 to I-20 Kersantite dikes in the
Sn(-W) deposit Ehrenfriedersdorf, Sauberg mining eld: I-14 Lamprophyre xenolithes in the top of type Eibenstock
granite (ne-grained facies). Level 5010 (Etage), 10 m above level 5. I-15 NNW-SSE kersantite dike (thickness about
1.5 m) is crosscutted by ENE-WSW quartz-cassiterite-sulde veinlets of the stringer zone type, both are crosscutted by
N-S uorine-rich aplite. Richtstrecke 5000-South, level 5.
158 Th. Seifert

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-16 Kersantite is crosscutted by quartz-cassiterite-sulde (qtz-cas-sf) veinlets of stringer zone type. Both are cross-
cutted by a slightly greisenized, F-rich aplite. Gangstrecke 5/2010-West, level 5 (sample E5-2010-2). I-17 NNW-SSE
lamprophyre dike (thickness about 8 m) is crosscutted by an ENE-WSW quartz-cassiterite-sulde-uorite stringer zone.
Strecke 2-206, level 2, vein #20 (sample LDED-11). I-18 Greisen veinlets (main stage of Sn-mineralization) crosscut
Stockscheider (pegmatite) at the contact granite/quartz-micaschist. Level 5010 (Etage), 10 m above level 5. I-19 and
I-20 NNW-SSE kersantite dike (up to 0.3 m thickness), Fllort shaft #2, level 2: I-19 tourmaline veinlets (early stage of
Sn-W association) crosscut a kersantite dike (sample LDED-16). I-20 kersantite dike was faulted by a shear zone parallel
to the main foliation of quartz-micaschists. I-21 A NW-SE mica-lamprophyre dike crosscuts mica-schists. Svornost shaft,
level 12, Querschlag J XII (Sample SV 13L).
Appendix - Plate I 159

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-22 Lamprophyre dikes crosscut a rhyolitic dike intrusion. N-S lamprophyre dike in the western (left) part (sample St-
6-L); NE-SW lamprophyre dike in the central part (sample ST-1-L). Old quarry, 2.5 km southern of Svornost shaft, J-
chymov district. I-23 and I-24 Lamprophyre dike crosscuts micaschist-hosted dolomitic skarn layers. Skarn ore layers are
crosscutted by hydrothermal uranium veins of the late-Variscan uranium-quartz-calcite mineral association (cf. Hsel et
al., 2003). Polymetallic skarn and uranium deposit Phla-Globenstein. I-23 Querschlag 111, 21 m from the entrance;
I-24 Strecke 113, 7 m from the Polygonpunkt 175. Photographes in Hsel et al. (2003). I-25 to I-28 Lamprophyre
dikes of the uranium deposit Niederschlema, shaft #371, -540 m level. I-25 Contact of a NE-SW mica-kersantite dike to
the quartz-micaschist unit. Feldstrecke 900A, 400 m from shaft #371. Samples LD540-8-1-2 and LD540-8-1-5 from
the central dike. I-26 Detail from Fig. I-25. Transition zone from the coarse-grained to very ne-grained mica-kersantite
(central dike hanging wall contact). Typically are quartz-xenolithes from the host rock units. I-27 Mica-kersantite dike
(Kb = so-called biotite kersantite: sample LD 540-6-6) is crosscutted by a 1 m thick mica-phyric transitional minette/
kersantite dike (Kh = so-called chlorite kersantite dike: samples LD 540-1/2D and LD 540-6-2M; central part), sample LD
540-6-2L (footwall contact). Feldstrecke 909.
160 Th. Seifert

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-28 ENE-WSW mica-phyric transitional minette/kersantite dike (thickness: about 2 m) crosscuts the quartz-
micaschist unit. Sample LD 540-7-2. Feldstrecke 909, 10 m from the entrance. I-29 and I-30 NW-SE mica-minette dikes.
Querschlag #6, Schneeberg district. I-29 50 m from the entrance of Querschlag #6, main level (sample LDQ-6-1-4).
I-30 10 m below main level, mining area of Greif-Flacher vein. I-31 and I-32 ENE-WSW lamprophyre dike swarm
hosted by type Eibenstock granite. Tannenberg adit, Mhlleithen tin deposit. I-31 ENE-WSW minette dike (thickness:
about 3 m) and hanging wall contact of type Eibenstock granite (sample LDT1-1). I-32 ENE-WSW minette dike (thick-
ness about 0.6 m) crosscuts type Eibenstock granite.
Appendix - Plate I 161

Plate I - Field Geology (continued)

I-33 Fracture-controlled metagranite greisen zones hosted by type Eibenstock granite. These greisen zones were
described in the former literature as lamprophyres. I-34 and I-35 Granite open pit Bergen, Bergen granite massif:
I-34 NNW-SSE to NNE-SSW kersantite dike (up to 10 m thickness) crosscuts the Bergen main granite (serialporphyric
type). I-35 NNW-SSE to NW-SE kersantite dike (up to 1 m thickness) crosscuts Bergen granite (sample LDBERG-1).
The kersantite dike crosscuts an E-W aplitic dike (up to 10 m thickness) located in the central part of the open pit.
I-36 Lower Rotliegend shoshonitic ow. Zwickau-Oberhohndorf, Sub-Erzgebirge basin, (samples Z-19, LDZO-1A).
I-37 Lower Rotliegend ultrapotassic ow. Seifersdorf near Oelsnitz, Sub-Erzgebirge basin, (samples C-6-I, SF4-U).
162 Th. Seifert

Plate II - Photomicrographs

Photomicrographs of selected lamprophyre rock-types (transmitted light: PPL = plane-polarized light, XPL = cross-
polarized light; initial CL image = initial cathodoluminescence image; abbreviations of minerals: amph = amphibole
(unmodied), ap = apatite; au = augite, bt = biotite, carb = carbonate, chl = chlorite, cpx = clinopyroxene (unmodied),
fs = feldspar (unmodied), kfs = K-feldspar, ol = olivine, phl = phlogopite, plag = plagioclase, py = pyrite, qtz = quartz.

P II-1 Zoned phlogopite-phenocryst show skeletal texture, surrounded by ne-grained groundmass with mica-, feld-
spar-, and apatite-microlites and carbonates. The light-brown rim of the phlogopite phenocryst indicates higher Fe-Ti
contents as the much paler core. Type LD2a (lamprophyre #LDBE-1), PPL. P II-2 Zoned and unzoned phlogopite mi-
crophenocrysts and microlites surrounded by a very ne-grained groundmass with carbonates. Type LD2a (#LDBE-2),
PPL. P II-3 Zoned phlogopite microphenocrysts partly resorbed by ne-grained groundmass with mica-, feldspar-,
amphibole-, and apatite-microlites and carbonates. Type LD2a (#LDBE-6), PPL. P II-4 Altered (carbonatizised) amphi-
bole-glomerocryst surrounded by a ne-grained matrix consisting of phlogopite/biotite, feldspars, carbonate, chlorite,
and opaque minerals. Type LD2a (#LDBE-6), PPL.
Appendix - Plate II 163

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-5 Zoned phlogopite-phenocryst show skeletal texture, surrounded by ne-grained groundmass with phlogopite/
biotite-, feldspar-, amphibole-, and apatite-microlites and carbonates. Type LD2a (#LDBE-6), XPL. P II-6 Phlogopite-
microphenocrysts and fragments show ow texture. Fine-grained groundmass includes mica-, feldspar-, amphibole-,
clinopyroxene-, and apatite-microlites. Type LD 2a (#LDBE-8), XPL 45. P II-7 Partly serpentinizised and sericitizised
olivine-microphenocryst fragment surrounded by a ne-grained groundmass consisting of mica, feldspar, amphibole,
apatite, and carbonate. Phlogopite-microphenocrysts are common. Type LD2a (#LDBE-4560), PL. P II-8 Phlogopite-
and biotite-microphenocrysts with skeletal texture surrounded by a groundmass of micas, feldspars, apatite, and car-
bonates. Type LD2a (#LDBE-4560), PPL.
164 Th. Seifert

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-9 Possibly replaced phenocryst of olivine with carbonate surrounded by a ne-grained groundmass and mi-
crolites consisting of micas, feldspars, and carbonates. Type LD2a (#LDBE-4560), PPL. P II-10 Carbonate-inclusion
(replaced phenocryst of olivine?) surrounded by an ophitic groundmass consisting of feldspars, phlogopite/biotite,
apatite, and carbonates. Type LD2b (#LDBE-4), PPL. P II-11 Quartz-xenocryst surrounded by a ne-grained matrix
consisting of micas, feldspars, amhpiboles, apatite, chlorite. Type LD2b (#Krupka-626), PPL. P II-12 Altered plagioclase-
microphenocryst ( chloritization) surrounded by a groundmass of micas, feldspars, carbonates, chlorite, and suldes
with plagioclase-microlites. Type LD3 (#1H1-90), PPL.
Appendix - Plate II 165

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-13 Mg-biotite-phenocryst intergrowth with subheadral to euheadral apatite microlites. Type LD2a (#G2-1A), PPL.
P II-14 Quartz-xenocryst, and phlogopite-microphenocryst surrounded by an ophitic groundmass consisting of biotite-,
feldspar-, and apatite-microlites, carbonate and chlorite. Type LD2a (#G2-1A), PPL. P II-15 Relictic phlogopite- and
altered amphibole-microphenocrysts intergrowth with subheadral pyrite. Type LD2a (#G2-1A), PPL. P II-16 Slightly cor-
roded clinopyroxene-microphenocryst intergrowth with phlogopite/biotite- and feldspar-microlites. Type LD2c (#G1-8),
XPL.
166 Th. Seifert

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-17 Serialporphyric texture with biotite-, phlogopite-, plagioclase-, K-feldspar-, and apatite-microphenocrysts and
microlites. Type LD2c (#G1-8), XPL. P II-18 Phlogopite-microphenocryst intergrowth with an euheadral early-magmatic
apatite-microlite. At the top on the right the sericitizised relictic clinopyroxene-microphenocryst intergrowth with an
euheadral early-magmatic(?) apatite-microlite. Type LD2c (#G1-8), PPL. P II-19 Phlogopite/biotite-microphenocryst with
typically zonation: Fe-Ti-rich (biotitic) rim surrounded much paler, Mg-rich (phlogopitic) core. Type LD2c (#G1-8), PPL.
P II-20 Clinopyroxene- (diopside, augite) and amphibole-(micro-)phenocrysts intergrowth with K-feldspar-microlites.
Biotite-microphenocryst intergrowth with a typically needle-like apatite-microphenocryst. Type LD2a (#LD Wolk-1),
PPL. P II-21 Phlogopite-, clinopyroxene-, plagioclase- and K-feldspar-microphenocrysts show serialporphyric texture.
Late-stage minerals are biotite and pyrite. Type LD2c (#ABF-3A), PPL. P II-22 Early-magmatic microphenocryst (al-
tered, probably augite) mantled by biotite- and phlogopite-microphenocrysts. The matrix consists mainly of feldspars,
phlogopite/biotite, pyroxenes, amphiboles, and apatite. Type LD2c (#A2-2), PPL.
Appendix - Plate II 167

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-23 Biotite/phlogopite-, clinopyroxene-, and K-feldspar-microphenocrysts are surrounded by a very ne-


grained groundmass consisting of these minerals. Type LD2c (#A6-10), PPL. P II-24 Slightly corroded subhead-
ral plagioclase-microphenocrysts intergrowth with phlogopite-microphenocrysts. Type LD1a (#E5000), XPL.
P II-25 Distribution of apatite- and carbonate-microlites. Type LD1a (#E521), initial CL image. P II-26 Euhedral early-
magmatic apatite-microphenocrysts surrounded by ne-grained groundmass. Type LD1a (#E509), PPL. P II-27 Rela-
tively fresh cores of plagioclase-microphenocrysts with carbonatizised rims. Type LD1a (#E-5-1910-1), initial CL image.
P II-28 Slightly corroded, euheadral amphibole-microphenocryst surrounded by feldspars and micas. Type LD1a
(#ED-3), XPL.
168 Th. Seifert

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-29 Bluish initial cathodoluminescence of a quartz-xenocryst indicates a plutonic source (J. Gtze, pers. comm.,
2002). Type LD1a (#ED-11), initial CL image. P II-30 Rounded quartz-xenocryst with corona (quartz, mica, amphibole).
The ophitic groundmass consisting of feldspar- (plagioclase dominated), phlogopite/biotite-, amphibole- and apatite-
microlites. Type LD1a (#ED-10), XPL. P II-31 Plagioclase-microphenocryst fragments surrounded by a groundmass con-
sisting of micas, feldspars, apatite, and chlorite. Type LD3 (#ST-1-L), XPL. P II-32 Phlogopite-microphenocryst inter-
growth with ophitic plagioclase- and K-feldspar-microphenocrysts and microlites. Type LD2e (#LD-206-2), XPL. P II-33
Twinned plagioclase-microphenocrysts intergrowth with plagioclase-, mica-, apatite- and clinopyroxene-microlites.
Type LD2e (#LD-206-2), XPL. P II-34 Serpentinizised olivine-microphenocryst surrounded by ophitic plagioclase-micro-
lites cemented by micas, carbonates, chlorite, and sulde ore-minerals. Typically are late-stage carbonate-microveinlets.
Type LD2e (#LD-206-2), XPL.
Appendix - Plate II 169

Plate II - Photomicrographs (continued)

P II-35 Globular structures composed of carbonate and chlorite with anheadral opaque minerals in the centre
(probably pyrite). The ophitic groundmass consisting of plagioclase- and phlogopite/biotite-microlites, carbon-
ates, chlorite, and opaque minerals. The carbonate-microveinlet is probably associated with hydrothermal min-
eralization. Type LD2e (#LD-206-2), XPL. P II-36 Altered plagioclase-microphenocryst show sericitization of the
anorthite-rich core. Relictic olivine fragments are cemented by K-feldspar. Type LD2d (#LD-540-8-1-2), XPL.
P II-37 Phlogopite-microphenocryst fragments intergrowth with plagioclase- and K-feldspar-microphenocrysts
and microlites (slightly sericitizised), relictic olivine is also cemented by feldspars. Type LD2d (#LD-540-8-1-2), XPL.
P II-38 Clinopyroxene- and biotite/phlogopite-(micro)phenocrysts cemented by a very ne-grained groundmass.
Type LD2d (#LB-371-1), PPL. P II-39 Euheadral early-magmatic apatite microlites (ap) intergrowth with euheadral
phlogopite-phenocrysts. Phlogopite-phenocrysts and microlites in the groundmass show ow-texture. Type LD2a
(#LDQ-6-1-4), PPL. P II-40 Rounded quartz-xenocryst with corona (ne-grained chloritizised micas). Phlogopite/biotite-
microphenocrysts and microlites are surrounded by a ne-grained matrix mainly consisting of feldspar, micas, apatite,
carbonates, and chlorite. Type LD2a (#LDQ-6-1-4), PPL.
170 Th. Seifert

Plate III - BSE/SE images of magmatic micas and apatites

Secondary electron (P III-A) and back-scattered electron images (P III-B to I) of phlogopite/Mg-biotite and apatites
from different petrographic lamprophyre types. G = mica (micro)phenocrysts, number corresponds to microprobe anal-
yses in Table A3. Minerals: amph = amphibole, ap = apatite, ttn = titanite. A Ti-rich amphibole phenocryst intergrowth
with plagioclase. Euheadral apatite microlites intergrowth with plagioclase. Type LD1a (#E-521), secondary electron
image, 20 kV, 0.3 nA. B Phlogopite microphenocryst intergrowths with an euheadral, early magmatic apatite micro-
phenocrysts. Type LD2a (#LDBE-6). C Phlogopite microphenocryst (G5) with zonation (partly resorbed by groundmass
minerals) intergrowths with apatite microlites. Type LD2a (#LDBE-8). D, E Mg-biotite (G8) and phlogopite microphen-
ocryst (G9) mantled by apatite microlites. Type LD2a (#G2-1A). F Phlogopite microphenocryst (G9) intergrowths with an
amphibole microphenocryst. Type LD2c (#LDWOLK-1).
Appendix - Plate III 171

Plate III - BSE/SE images of magmatic micas and apatites (continued)

G Mg-biotite microphenocryst (G7). Type LD2c (#ABF-3A). H Mg-biotite microphenocryst (G2). Type LD2d (#LB-371-1).
J Mg-biotite microphenocrysts (G9, G10) intergrowth with subheadral, early magmatic apatite microlites. Type LD2d
(#LD-540-8-1-2). K Phlogopite microphenocryst (G5) with apatite inclusions, partly resorbed by groundmass minerals.
Type LD2e (#LD-206-2).
172 Th. Seifert

Plate IV - SE images of zircons for single grain evaporation Pb-Pb analyses

Scanning electron (SE) images (20 kV, 300 pA) of zircon crystals from different petrographic lamprophyre types of the
Erzgebirge and mac volcanics of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin (MVSEB). A Zircon, euheadral elongated shape. Type LD3
(#1H1-155-1). B Zircon, subheadral elongated shape, with cracks through the length of the crystal. Type LD3 (#1H1-155-
1). C Long prismatic zircon with rounded edges. Type LD2c (#LD540-7-2). D Zircon grain with well-rounded edges. Type
LD2c (#LD540-7-2). E Well-rounded zircon grain. Type LD2c (#LD540-7-2). F Euhedral medium prismatic zircon crystal
with sharp edges, [110]- and [001]-prism. Type LD1a (#LDED-3).
Appendix - Plate IV 173

Plate IV - SE images of zircons for single grain evaporation Pb-Pb analyses (continued)

G Medium prismatic zircon grain with strongly corroded edges. Type LD1a (#LDED-3). H Long prismatic zircon with
rounded edges. Type LD1a (#LDED-8). I and K Short prismatic zircon, well-rounded. Type LD1a (I, #LDED-8; K, #LDED-
3). L Euhedral medium prismatic zircon with slightly rounded edges. Shoshonitic ow Sub-Erzgebirge basin (#LDZO-1A).
M Long-prismatic zircon with rounded edges. Shoshonitic ow Sub-Erzgebirge basin (#LDZO-1A).
174 Th. Seifert

Plate IV - SE images of zircons for single grain evaporation Pb-Pb analyses (continued)

N Long-prismatic zircon with well-rounded edges and partly corroded surface. Shoshonitic ow Sub-Erzgebirge basin
(#LDZO-1A). O Medium-prismatic zircon with well-rounded edges and partly corroded surface. Shoshonitic ow Sub-
Erzgebirge basin (#LDZO-1A). P Medium-prismatic zircon with well-rounded edges. Shoshonitic ow Sub-Erzgebirge
basin (#LDZO-1A). R Short-prismatic zircon, well-rounded. Shoshonitic ow Sub-Erzgebirge basin (#LDZO-1A).
13.2 Tables
Table A1 Characteristic of late-Variscan lamprophyre intrusions in the Erzgebirge and Ronneburg district, and mafic volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge
basin. Sample description see table A2.

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships (host rocks, Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type mineralization) samples

Eastern Erzgebirge
Freiberg southern subdistrict/ 1A 4 main lamprophyre dikes carbonate-(quartz)-bearing Ag- crosscut orthogneisses, paragneisses, and garnet- LDBE-1
mica-lamprophyre (mica- strike direction: NW-SE, rich polymetallic sulfide veins bearing micaschists, type 'Niederbobritzsch granite'; LDBE-2
minette dominated) NNE-SSW of the 'eb' ore-type, minor crosscut by 'eb' and 'kb' ore-type veins and post- LDBE-6
max. thickness: 6 m quartz-polymetallic sulfide Variscan mineralization (Frster, 1869; Mller, LDBE-8
(Mller and Frster, 1869) veins of the 'kb' ore-type 1901; Gotte, 1956; Kraft and Seifert, 1959); LDBE-4563
lamprophyre xenoliths in a rhyolite dike, both are LDBE-4562
probably younger as the 'hidden Freiberg granite' LDBE-4560
(Kramer, 1962; Kramer, 1966); a subparallel LDBE-4545
rhyolitic dike show A-type signature (this study) altered lamprophyres:
LDBE-4
see Figures 5, 6 LDBE-5
LDBE-7

Freiberg central subdistrict/ 1B 3 main lamprophyre dikes quartz-polymetallic sulfide crosscut ortho- and paragneisses, and type LDHALSB-5395
mica-kersantite strike direction: NE-SW, NW-SE veins of the 'kb' ore-type, minor 'Niederbobritzsch granite'; crosscut by 'kb' and 'eb' altered lamprophyres:
max. thickness: several meters carbonate-(quartz)-bearing Ag- ore-type veins and post-Variscan mineralization LDFG-1
rich polymetallic sulfide veins (Sauer, 1886; Mller, 1901; Baumann, 1957); LDHALSB-1
of the 'eb' ore-type lamprophyre dikes are crosscut by two ENE-WSW LDHALSB-5255
rhyolitic dikes (up to 12 m thickness; Jahn, 1950); in
contrast: sample LDHALSB-5353 (Beihilfe mine,
Halsbrcke) represent a rhyolitic breccia cemented
by lamprophyric matrix; rhyolitic dikes are crosscut
by 'kb' ore-type veins and younger hydrothermal
mineralization (Mller, 1901; Zurlo and Kramer,
1961; Kramer, 1962)

see Figure 5, PI-1

175
176
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 (strike direction, max. Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples
thickness)

Freiberg northern subdistrict/ 1C 3 main lamprophyre dikes 'eq' ore-type veins, minor 'kb' crosscut paragneisses and micaschists with LDKVB-1
mica-minette strike direction: NW-SE max. ore-type veins intercalation of meta-blackshales, crosscut gabbros;
thickness: 8 m crosscut by 'eq' ore-type veins (Mller, 1850;
Mller, 1901)

see Figure 5

Sachsenhhe near 2 1 main lamprophyre dike explosive breccia related Sn- crosscut paragneisses; crosscut by Sn-(W-Bi) veins, LDSA-4
Brenstein/ strike direction: NW-SE max. (W-Bi) vein-type, vein-like and vein-like greisen; older as G3-granite (G3-
mica-minette thickness: about 10 m greisen and stockwork ores, and granite is younger as Sn-(W-Bi) mineralization); up
W ores (compiled by W. to 0.25 wt.% Sn in lamprophyres (Lafo-Akte
Schilka, 2001) 131406/OBA-LF472; W. Schilka, pers. comm.,

Th. Seifert
2001)

see Figure 7

Krupka district/ Preiselberg 3 4 main lamprophyre dikes Sn-W-Mo greisen- and vein- crosscut orthogneiss, type 'Teplice rhyolite', granite KRUPKA-626
deposit strike direction: NW-SE, NE-SW type mineralization related to porphyry, and 'Preiselberg I granite'; crosscut by
low-phyric mica-minette max. thickness: 10 m Li-F-granites and F-enriched albite-zinnwaldite-granite ('Preiselberg II granite');
explosive breccia pipes (cf. overprinted by Sn-W-Mo greisen- / vein-type
temprock et al., 1994) mineralization (up to 1 wt.% Sn, up to 400 ppm Bi
(Beck, 1914; Khn, 1988; temprock et al., 1994;
Janeka et al., 1971; Eisenreich and Breiter, 1993 in
Breiter and Frda, 1995; Novk et al., 2001; pers.
comm. Novk and Tichy, 1988 in Khn, 1988; pers.
comm. W. Schilka, 1986; pers. comm. W. Schilka,
2003; this study)

see Figure 8
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples

Central Erzgebirge

Pobershau district/ 4A 8 main lamprophyre dikes Sn-polymetallic vein- and crosscut para- and orthogneisses, and probably type 1H1-90
feldspar-phyric kersantite strike direction: N-S to NW-SE, greisen-type ores, and quartz- 'Eibenstock granite'; crosscut vein-like orthogneiss- 1H1-93
E-W to ENE-WSW bearing Ag-rich polymetallic hosted Sn greisen zones ('Schiesswecken zone'), and 1H1-98

Appendix - Table A1
max. thickness: 8 m sulfid veins of the 'kb' ore-type paragneiss-hosted Sn veins and stringer zones 1H1-155-2
('Burkhardter Trmerzug'); crosscut by Ag-rich 1-HG-1-1
veins of the 'Bi-Co-Ni' ore-type (Mller and Beck, altered lamprophyre:
1912; v. Sivers, 1939 in Lafo-Akte LF442; Seifert, 3U2-A2
1988; Seifert, 1994a; this study)

see Figures 9, 12 and 13

Lauta, Marienberg district/ 4B 3 main lamprophyre dikes quartz-polymetallic Zn-Cu-Ag- crosscut paragneisses and type 'Eibenstock granite'; LD-20-1-1
feldspar-phyric kersantite strike direction: NW-SE, ENE- Sn sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- crosscut by Sn Veins polymetallic veins of the 'kb' LD-19-3-2
and altered minette WSW type, minor Sn veinlets, U veins ore-type, U veins of the 'uqk' ore-type, and Ag-U LD-19-18-1
max. thickness: 5 m of the 'uqk' ore-type, fluorite veins of the 'Bi-Co-Ni' ore-type (Mller, 1848; L1-1
veins Mller and Beck, 1912; Seifert, 1988; Seifert, altered lamprophyre:
1994a; this study) WH7-1
WH7-2
see Figures 9 and 10, PI-2 4H3-25
4H3-10
3U8-A1

177
178
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 (strike direction, max. Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples
thickness)

Gehringswalde and 4C 7 main lamprophyre dikes quartz-polymetallic Zn-Cu-Ag- crosscut paragneisses and probably type 'Eibenstock G2-1A
Wolkenstein, Marienberg strike direction: NW-SE, ENE- Sn sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- granite'; crosscut by pre-greisen high-F rhyolitic G2-1C
district/ WSW type, minor Sn veinlets, U veins dikes; crosscut by Sn-enriched 'kb' ore-type veins, U G1-8
mica-minette and mica- max. thickness: 10 m of the 'uqk' ore-type, fluorite veins of the 'uqk' ore-type and Ag-U veins of the G1-13
phyric transitional type veins 'Bi-Co-Ni' ore-type (Mller, 1848; Mller and Beck, 7H1-20
kersantite/minette, (feldspar- 1912; Seifert, 1988; Seifert, 1994a; this study) LDWOLK-Q
phyric kersantite) LDWOLK-1
see Figures 9 and 11, PI-3 to -12 ABF-1
ABF-3A

Th. Seifert
Drebach mining area/ 4D strike direction: probably NW-SE carbonate-bearing Ag-rich crosscut micaschists; crosscut by 'eb' ore-type veins altered lamprophyre:
kersantite polymetallic sulfide veins of the (cf. Seifert, 1988) D-1
'eb' ore-type

Frohnau, Annaberg district/ 5 7 main lamprophyre dikes Sn-veins, quartz-bearing Ag- crosscut paragneisses, and probably type A1-7
mica-phyric transitional type strike direction: NW-SE to N-S rich polymetallic sulfide veins 'Eibenstock granite'; crosscut by Sn veins, A2-2
kersantite/minette max. thickness: 3 m of the 'kb' ore-type, Sn- polymetallic veins of the 'kb' ore-type and U veins A6-10
polymetallic metasomatites, U of the 'uqk' ore-type and Ag-U veins of the 'Bi-Co-
veins of the 'uqk' ore-type Ni' ore-type, and Tertiary basaltic dikes; in the
'Thiele-Fundgrube' meta-lamprophyre Sn-greisen
ores were mined (Mller, 1894; cf. Khne et al.,
1969; Seifert et al., 1996b; pers. comm. S. Kunze,
2000; this study)

see Figure 14
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples

'Vierung' Sn deposit, 6A 2 main lamprophyre dikes Sn-greisen and Sn-W veins crosscut para- and orthogneisses; crosscut by type LDVG-2A
Ehrenfriedersdorf district/ strike direction: NNW-SSE to 'Eibenstock granite', and topaz-albite granite partly
feldspar- and mica-phyric NW-SE associated with greisenized aplites; crosscut by
kersantite max. thickness: 4 m vein-like Sn-greisen zones and Sn-polymetallic
veins (Rohrlack, 1958; Bolduan and Hoffmann,
1963; cf. Hsel et. al., 1994; this study)

see Figure 15, PI-13

Appendix - Table A1
'Sauberg' Sn deposit, 6B 3 main lamprophyre dikes Sn-W mineralization (greisen, crosscut micaschists; crosscut by type 'Eibenstock 11402
Ehrenfriedersdorf district/ strike direction: NW-SE to N-S veins, stringer zones), and 'kb' granite' and associated aplites, Sn-W-(polymetallic) 31402
feldspar-, amphibole- and max. thickness: 8 m ore-type veins veins and stringer zones, and Ag veins of the 'Bi- E-5000
phlogopite-microphyric Co-Ni' ore-type (Rohrlack, 1958; Baumann and E-521
kersantite with tendency to Tgl, 1963; Kramer, 1974; Seifert, 1994a; this E-509
spessartitic lamprophyre study; pers. comm. H. Meyer, 1992) E-5-1910-1
E-5-FO
see Figures 15 and 16, PI-14 to -20 LDED-3
LDED-11
LDED-10
LDED-7
LDED-16

Western Erzgebirge

Jachymov district/ 7 6 main lamprophyre dikes minor Sn and 'kb' ore-type crosscut micaschists, type 'Eibenstock granite', and SV-13-L
mica-phyric transitional type strike direction: dominated NW- mineralization, U veins of the UK\ROLWLFGLNHVFURVVFXWE\
NE
RUHW\SHYHLQV %Rt SV-11-L
kersantite/minette, SE, minor NE-SW and N-S 'uqk' ore-type Dar, according to Vogl 1856) and Ag-U veins of the SV-15-L
spessartitic lamprophyre, max. thickness: 6 m
%L&R1L
RUHW\SH .UDXV.RPtQHNHWDO ST-6-L
feldspar-phyric kersantite 1994; this study) ST-1-L
EV-6-L
see Figure 17, PI-21 and -22

179
180
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples

bore hole Z206/76, 8 several main lamprophyre dikes Sn-veins, polymetallic sulfide crosscut micaschists and type 'Eibenstock granite' LD-206-10
Breitenbrunn subdistrict, (lamprophyre dike swarm) veins of the 'kb' ore-type, (this study) LD-206-7
Schwarzenberg district/ strike direction: probably NW-SE U veins of the 'uqk' ore-type LD-206-2
mica- and feldspar- max. thickness: 20 m see Figure 18
microphyric kersantite (small lamprophyre intrusion
body ?)

Phla-Tellerhuser mining 9A several lamprophyre dike swarms Sn-bearing skarn crosscut graphite-bearing micaschists; crosscut by PHLA-3A
field/ strike direction: NW-SE mineralization, Sn-W- polymetallic veins of the 'kb' ore-type, U veins of PHLA-3C
mica- and feldspar- max. thickness: 5 m polymetallic veins, polymetallic the 'uqk' ore-type and younger hydrothermal vein- PHLA-5

Th. Seifert
microphyric transitional type sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- type mineralization (Hiller, 1995; this study)
kersantite/minette type, U veins of the 'uqk' ore-
type see Figure 20

Phla-Globenstein mining 9B several lamprophyre dike swarms skarn mineralization (quartz- crosscut graphite-bearing micaschists; probably LDP-42
field/ strike direction: NNW-SSE cassiterite, quartz-fluorite- crosscut by type 'Eibenstock granite'; older LDP-66
feldspar-phyric kersantite to NW-SE, minor NE-SW, E-W to scheelite, quartz-sulfide- kersantitic dikes in the area of shaft #98 are crosscut
WNW-ESE wolframite), Sn veins, U veins by type 'Eibenstock granite'; according to Hsel
max. thickness: several meters of the 'uqk' ore-type (1964) a lamprophyre dike (Querschlag 13, 410 m-
level) includes a granite xenolith; crosscut by 'kb'
ore-type veins, U veins of the 'uqk' ore-type and
younger hydrothermal mineralization; overprinted
by Sn mineralization; (Schuppan, 1995; cf. Hsel et
al., 2003; Leonhardt et al., 2004; this study)

see Figure 21, PI-23 and -24


Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples

U deposit Niederschlema- 10A several lamprophyre dike swarms wolframite veins, polymetallic crosscut micaschists and phyllites (+ different mica-kersantite:
Alberoda/ strike direction: NW-SE to sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- intercalations), metacarbonates and diabases; mica- LD540-8-1-2
mica-kersantite and mica- ENE-WSW type, U veins of the 'uqk' ore- kersantite (so-called 'biotite-kersantite' according to LD540-8-1-5
phyric transitional type max. thickness: type Aejev and Harlass, 1968) is probably crosscut by LB-371-1
minette/kersantite mica-kersantite: 30 m the 'Aue granite', the transitional type LD540-6-6

Appendix - Table A1
transitional type: 7 m minette/kersantite (so-called 'chlorite-kersantite' altered mica-phyric
according to Aejev and Harlass, 1968) crosscut the transitional type
mica-kersantite ('biotite-kersantite') and the 'Aue minette/kersantite:
granite' and associated aplites; 4 NE-SW 'chlorite- LD540-1/2D
kersantite' dikes crosscut the 'Aue granite' (-1710 m- LD540-6-2M
level, blind-shaft 383b, 'Fllort'; both lamprophyre LD540-6-2L
types are crosscut by 'kb' and 'uqk' ore-type veins LD540-7-2
(Aejev and Harlass, 1968; unpublished material LD540-12-1
SDAG Wismut; pers. comm. A. Hiller, 1996; this LC-371-1
study) LDSCH-1
LDSCH-2
see Figures 22 and 23, PI-25 to -28 LDSCH-3

Schneeberg district/ mica- 10B strike direction: NW-SE wolframite veins, polymetallic crosscut micaschists and the 'Schneeberg granite'; LDQ-6-1-4
minette (subparallel to the Gera-Jachymov sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- crosscut by Ag-U veins of the 'Bi-Co-Ni' ore-type LDQ-6-2-1
fault zone) type, U veins of the 'uqk' ore- (Mller, 1860; Herrmann et al., 1995; this study)
max. thickness: 5 m type
see PI-29 and -30

181
182
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 (strike direction, max. Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples
thickness)

Mhlleithen Sn deposit/ 11 strike direction: NW-SE, ENE- Sn-(Cu-As-Bi) greisen and crosscut phyllites (partly contact-metamorphosed) LDT1-1
low-phyric mica-minette WSW veins, W veins, polymetallic and type 'Eibenstock granite'; crosscut by explosive
max. thickness: 3 m sulfide veins of the 'kb' ore- breccia pipes, subvolcanic acidic A-type intrusions,
type, U veins and Sn and U veins (unpubl. material SDAG
Wismut; Wasternack et al., 1995; cf. Seifert and
Armstrong, submitted); overprinted by Sn-greisen
mineralization (this study)

see Figures 24 and 25, PI-31 to -33

Th. Seifert
Bergen granite massif/ 12 strike direction: NNW-SSE to W-Mo and U veins, and minor crosscut type 'Eibenstock granite' and a post-granitic LDBERG-1
carbonate-rich mica- NW-SE 'kb' ore-type veins around the aplite; crosscut by a younger aplite type (Bergen U-
kersantite max. thickness: 10 m Bergen granite massif; U veins deposit, 450-m-level, Strecke #21) (Bezgubov,
crosscut the granite (U deposit 1955; this study)
Bergen)
see PI-34 and -35

Kirchberg granite massif/ 13 strike direction: N-S W-Mo veins in the Kirchberg crosscut the Kirchberg granite (pers. comm. J. LDKI-56
mica-lamprophyre max. thickness: 1 m granite massif Hutschenreuther, 2002)

Sub-Erzgebirge basin

Zwickau-Friedrichsgrn and 14 flow thickness: about 10 m Rotliegend (lower Permian) Z-17


Zwickau-Oberhohndorf/ Z-18-II
shoshonitic flow see Figure 26, PI-36 Z-19
LDZO-1A
Table A1 (continued)

Location/ No. in Dike characteristics (strike Spatial related late- Relatively age relationships Representative
Lamprophyre type Fig. 2 direction, max. thickness) Variscan ore deposit type (host rocks, mineralization) samples

Appendix - Table A1
Zwickau-Schedewitz and 14, 15 flow thickness: about 7 m Rotliegend (lower Permian) Z-13
Seifersdorf (Oelsnitz)/ C-6-I
ultrapotassic flow see Figure 26, PI-37 SF4-U

Ronneburg district 16 strike direction: N-S disseminated and micro-stringer crosscut the Ordovician to Devonian units of the RON-4215-76
kersantite, minette max. thickness: 1 m, zone-type U mineralization Berga Anticlinorium; crosscut by late-Variscan RON-432673-3
controlled by the NW-SE Gera- hosted by upper Ordovician to quartz-carbonate-U-pitchblende-sulfide veinlets; RON-4209-75
Jachymov fault zone; middle Devonian and lamprophyres (up to 0.15 wt.% U) (Schuster, 1995; RON-8029-84
lamprophyric dikes and eruption sedimentary and volcanic rocks cf. Seifert, 1996a)
breccias (e.g., Silurian meta-blackshales)

183
184
Table A2 Location and description of the Saxo-Thuringian lamprophyres and mafic volcanics and samples for comparison.
* All rocks were measured by geochemical methods.
Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDBE-1 'Glck auf' shaft, Langenau, 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 4 mm mica-minette Pb-Pb, K-Ar,
Freiberg southern subdistrict size); groundmass consisting of phlogopite/biotite- and feldspar- (LD2a) microprobe
(dump sample) microlites, partly glassy matrix, partly chloritization and
hematitization (PII-1)

LDBE-2 'Himmelsfrst' mine, subparallel 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 3 mm, mica-minette Pb-Pb
dike to the 'OWO-Spat' vein, corroded by groundmass minerals), altered K-feldspar-phenocrysts (LD2a)
Brand-Erbisdorf, Freiberg (up to 2 mm, chloritization); groundmass consisting of
southern subdistrict phlogopite/biotite, feldspar, chlorite and apatite (partly microlites); ore
minerals: subheadral pyrite xx (PII-2)

LDBE-6 'Glck auf' shaft, Langenau, 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-(micro)phenocrysts (up to 2 mica-minette Pb-Pb, K-Ar, Ar-Ar,
Freiberg southern subdistrict mm); apatite-microlites intergrowth with mica-phenocrysts, altered (LD2a) microprobe

Th. Seifert
(dump sample) amphibole-microphenocrysts (partly replaced by sericite); K-feldspar-
microlites are common, ore minerals: subheadral pyrite xx (PII-3 to
-5; PIII-B)

LDBE-8 'Glck auf' shaft, Langenau, 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 2 mica-minette K-Ar, microprobe
Freiberg southern subdistrict mm); groundmass consisting of mica-, feldspar- and altered (LD2a)
(dump sample) amphibole-microlites, partly disseminated by hematite (PII-6;
PIII-C)

LDBE- 'Glck auf' shaft, level 15, 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 cm), transitional type mica- Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
4563 mining area of 'Schweinskopf- amphibole-microphenocrysts (up to 500 m), plagioclase- kersantite/alkaline
Flacher' vein, Langenau, microphenocrysts (up to 500 m); primary(?) carbonates (up to lamprophyre+
Freiberg southern subdistrict 1 mm) (+camptonite = major variety of
alkaline lamprophyre, cf. Rock,
1991)
(LD2d)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDBE-4562 'Hauptquerschlag', level 15, 1A carbonate-rich lamprophyre with amphibole-phenocrysts and altered carbonate-rich amphibole- Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
'Lade-des-Bundes-Flacher' feldspar-microphenocrysts; groundmass consisting of lamprophyre with cocitic
vein, Brand-Erbisdorf, phlogopite/biotite, K-feldspar and plagioclase and carbonates (partly geochemical signature
Freiberg southern subdistrict microlites); crosscut by carbonate microveinlets (cocite = lamproite type, cf.
Rock, 1991)
(LD2f)

Appendix - Table A2
LDBE-4560 'Hauptquerschlag', level 15, 1A mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm), mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
100 m eastern from 'Lade-des- relictic olivine-phenocrysts (up to 1.5 cm, serpentinizised), altered (LD2a)
Bundes-Flacher' vein, Brand- feldspar- and apatite-microphenocrysts; primary(?) carbonates (up to 2
Erbisdorf, Freiberg southern mm) (PII-7 to -9)
subdistrict

LDBE-4545 'Glck auf' shaft, 30 m 1A mica-lamprophyre with altered olivine-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm, low-phyric mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
northern from 'Vertrau-auf- serpentinizised); fine-grained groundmass consisting of (LD2a)
Gott' shaft, Langenau, phlogopite/biotite, feldspar, carbonates; ore minerals: minor
Freiberg southern subdistrict subheadral pyrite xx

LDBE-4 Himmelsfrst' mine, north- 1A altered lamprophyre; replacement of unidentified phenocrysts by low-phyric minette (carbonate
eastern part of 'OWO-Spat' carbonates, sericite and chlorite; fine-grained groundmass consisting rich)
vein, Brand-Erbisdorf, of altered K-feldspar (clay minerals) and phlogopite/biotite; carbonate (LD2b, altered)
Freiberg southern subdistrict inclusions (up to 2 mm) (PII-10)
(according to W. Gotte
"porphyrite")

LDBE-5 Himmelsfrst' mine, north- 1A altered lamprophyre; replacement of unidentified phenocrysts by low-phyric minette (carbonate Pb-Pb
eastern part of 'OWO-Spat' carbonates, sericite and chlorite; fine-grained groundmass consisting rich)
vein, Brand-Erbisdorf, of altered K-feldspar (clay minerals) and phlogopite/biotite; carbonate (LD2b, altered)
Freiberg southern subdistrict inclusions (up to 4 mm); crosscut by carbonate microveinlets
(according to W. Gotte
"porphyrite")

185
186
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDBE-7 'Glck auf' shaft, Langenau, 1A lamprophyre with altered feldspar (plagioclase)-microphenocrysts; strongly altered lamprophyre
Freiberg southern subdistrict groundmass consisting of altered feldspars and phlogopite/biotite with significant crustal
(dump sample) (sericitization); quartz-xenocrysts are common contamination (unmodified)

LDFG-1 'David' shaft, Freiberg central 1B strongly altered lamprophyre with sulfide impregnation (overprinting strongly altered lamprophyre Pb-Pb
district (dump sample) by 'kb' ore-type) (unmodified)

LDHALSB- 'Beihilfe' mine, 250 m-level, 1B mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 5 mm), mica-kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
5395 Halsbrcke, Freiberg central plagioclase- and minor K-feldspar-microphenocrysts (partly (LD2d)

Th. Seifert
district intergrowth with ore minerals); groundmass consisting of amphibole,
phlogopite/biotite, feldspar, carbonates, chlorite; flow texture;
crosscut by carbonate microveinlets; ore minerals: pyrrhotite with
chalcopyrite and pentlandite, magnetite

LDHALSB- 'Beihilfe' mine, Halsbrcke, 1B slightly altered lamprophyre; plagioclase- and minor K-feldspar- aphyric (feldspar- and mica-
1 Freiberg central district microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm, chloritization); groundmass consisting microphyric) kersantite
(sample from underground of feldspars, phlogopite/biotite, chlorite; ore minerals: minor pyrite (LD2e)
mining area)

LDHALSB- 'Beihilfe' mine, 350 m-level, 1B feldspar- and mica-microphyric kersantite (slightly altered) with aphyric (feldspar- and mica-
5255 mining area 'Halsbrcker-Spat' sulfide impregnation microphyric) kersantite
vein, Halsbrcke, Freiberg (LD2e)
central district

LDKVB-1 'Alte-Hoffnung-Gottes' mine, 1C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
Kleinvoigtsberg, Freiberg 1 mm), feldspar-microphenocrysts (up to 200 m) and clinopyroxene- (LD2a)
northern district microphenocrysts (up to 200 m); fine-grained groundmass consisting
of feldspar, phlogopite/biotite, carbonate; primary(?) carbonate
inclusion (up to 1 mm)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDSA-4 Sachsenhhe, 'Michaelis- 2 low-phyric mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite- mica-minette


Fundgrube' mine, 'Hiob-Stolln', microphenocrysts (up to 500 m); groundmass consists of feldspar, (LD2a)
NW-SE dike phlogopite/biotite, carbonate; crosscut by quartz-cassiterite
550 m from the entrance (dump microveinlets (sample is overprinted by tin mineralization)
sample)

KRUPKA- '5. Kvten' adit, Vrchoslav 3 low-phyric to aphyric mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite- low-phyric mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
626 dump, Krupka district microphenocrysts (up to 300 m); groundmass consisting of feldspar, (LD2a)
phlogopite/biotite, apatite; quartz-xenocrysts (up to 1 mm);
overprinted by tin mineralization (PII-11)

Appendix - Table A2
1H1-90 'Tiefer Wildsberger 4A lamprophyre with plagioclase-phenocrysts (up to 5 mm); groundmass feldspar-phyric kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
1H1-93 Richtschacht', 300 m-level, (partly chloritizised) consisting of feldspar, phlogopite/biotite, (LD3) zircon dating (Pb-Pb
1H1-98 Pobershau district (dump amphibole, apatite, chlorite, carbonate; ore minerals: (sub)headral single zircon
1H1-155-2 sample) pyrite xx, probably Zn-spinel (PII-12) evaporation)

3U2-A2 'Molchner-Stolln', 'Jung- 4A low-phyric altered lamprophyre low-phyric kersantite


Burkhardt-Morgengang' vein, (LD3, low-phyric)
Pobershau district

1-HG-1- NW-SE lamprophyre dike 4A lamprophyre with plagioclase-phenocrysts (up to 4 mm); groundmass feldspar-phyric kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
1 swarm outcrop railway line (partly chloritizised) consisting of feldspar, phlogopite/biotite, (LD3)
Marienberg-Pockau, amphibole, carbonate, apatite, chlorite
Httengrund, Pobershau district

WH7-1 shaft #139, Lauta, Marienberg 4B altered lamprophyre with carbonate inclusions (probably carbonate- altered minette with carbonate Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
district (dump sample) pseudomorphoses) inclusions

WH7-2 shaft #139, Lauta, Marienberg 4B lamprophyre (altered) with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to altered mica-minette K-Ar (WR)
district (dump sample) 300 m), pyroxene-microphenocrysts (up to 150 m); minor (LD2a, altered)
euheadral zircon-microphenocrysts (up to 300 m); carbonate
inclusions; olivine-microphenocrysts replaced by carbonates, chlorite,
and talc

187
188
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

4H3-25 shaft #139, Lauta, Marienberg 4B aphyric lamprophyre (altered) with phlogopite/biotite- altered minette/ kersantite
district (dump sample) microphenocrysts and pyroxene-microphenocrysts (LD2e, altered)

4H3-10 shaft #45, Lauta, Marienberg 4B lamprophyre (altered) with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts altered mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
district (dump sample) (LD2a, altered)

3U8-A1 'Vater-Abraham' shaft, level 5, 4B strongly altered lamprophyre with carbonate inclusions (probably strongly altered lamprophyre
'Amandus-Flacher' vein, so- replacement of older phenocrysts, flow texture)
called 'Amandus Ganggestein',
Lauta, Marienberg district

Th. Seifert
L1-1 'Bauer-Morgengang' vein, 4B low-phyric lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts; low-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb
most eastern dump, Lauta, groundmass consisting of phlogopite/biotite, feldspar, apatite, kersantite/minette
Marienberg district carbonate (LD2c, low-phyric)

LD-20-1-1 'Bauer-Morgengang' vein, 4B lamprophyre with plagioclase phenocrysts (up to 3 mm); groundmass feldspar-phyric kersantite K-Ar (WR)
LD-19-3-2 dump #20 and #19 (see Seifert (altered, partly chloritizised) consisting of feldspar, phlogopite/biotit, (slightly altered)
LD-19-18-1 1994a), Lauta, Marienberg amphibole, apatite; quartz-xenocrysts (LD3)
district

G2-1A shaft #238, level 3, 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm); mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
G2-1C 'Querschlag' 23, mining field fine- to medium-grained groundmass (partly chloritization, (LD2a) Ar-Ar, zircon dating
'Himmelreich', Gehringswalde, sericitization) consisting of biotite/phlogopite-microphenocrysts (up to (Pb-Pb single zircon
Marienberg district, so-called 300 m) intergrowth with apatite-microphenocrysts, feldspar, evaporation,
'Bauer Ganggestein' clinopyroxene (augite), carbonate; olivine-pseudomorphoses; ore U-Pb SHRIMP),
(ENE-WSW lamprophyre dike minerals: minor pyrite intergrowth with phlogopite microphenocrysts; microprobe
with about 10 m thickness) quartz-xenocrysts with 'sericite-corona' (PII-13 to -15; PIII-D, -E)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

G1-8 shafts #44 and #48, 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm, mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, microprobe
Gehringswalde, Marienberg partly chloritizised), characteristic mica-phenocryst zoning is from kersantite/minette
district (dump sample) pale yellow cores to dark brown rims; the matrix consist of (LD2c)
microphenocrystal phlogopite/biotite (up to 300 m), K-feldspar- and
plagioclase (up to 200 m) and clinopyroxene (up to 500 m);
euheadral quartz-xenocrysts; ore minerals: sphalerite (PII-16 to -19)

G1-13 shafts #44 and #48, 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, zircon dating

Appendix - Table A2
Gehringswalde, Marienberg mm, partly chloritizised); coarse-grained groundmass consisting of kersantite/minette (Pb-Pb single zircon
district (dump sample) phlogopite/biotite (partly chloritizised), feldspar, amphibole; crosscut (LD2c) evaporation)
by quartz-microveinlet

7H1-20 shaft #137, Wolkenstein, 4C lamprophyre with plagioclase phenocrysts; groundmass (partly feldspar-phyric kersantite
Marienberg district (dump chloritizised) consisting of feldspar, phlogopite/biotit, amphibole, (LD3)
sample) apatite

LDWOLK- adit #41 (uranium exploration), 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 3 mm) mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, K-Ar, Ar-Ar
Q 'Querschlag', Wolkenstein, intergrowth with apatite-microlites; fine-grained groundmass minette/kersantite
Marienberg district (NW-SE consisting of feldspar and phlogopite/biotite (partly microphenocrysts (LD2c)
lamprophyre dike with about 6 up to 500 m); phlogopite/biotite-macro- and microphenocrysts show
m thickness) flow texture indicating subsurface emplacement; quartz-xenocrysts

LDWOLK- adit #41 (uranium exploration), 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm); mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, Ar-Ar,
1 'Strecke 96NW', 'Tropper groundmass consisting of microphenocrystal amphibole (up to 1 mm) minette/kersantite microprobe
Gesenk', Wolkenstein, and common clinopyroxene (up to 1 mm) intergrowth with feldspar; (LD2c)
Marienberg district (NW-SE ore minerals: disseminated pyrite; quartz-xenocrysts
lamprophyre dike with about 4 (PII-20; PIII-F)
m thickness, crosscut by
fluorite-quartz vein)

189
190
Table A2 (continued)
Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

ABF-1 'Arme Leute Bergfreude' mine, 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, Ar-Ar
'Tiefer-Elisabeth-Stolln', 'Arme- 500 m), pyroxene-microphenocrysts, pseudomorphoses of feldspar- kersantite/minette
Leute-Hoffnung-Morgengang' phenocrysts (up to 1.5 mm, sericitization), altered augite- (LD2c)
vein, mining area (Sn, Cu, Ag), microphenocrysts (up to 400 m); fine-grained groundmass consisting
Wolkenstein/Streckewalde of feldspar, phlogopite/biotite, pyroxene (slightly overprinted by tin-
('Finstere Aue'), Marienberg polymetallic mineralization)
district (lamprophyre dike with
about 5 m thickness, crosscut by
partly greisenized F-enriched
rhyolitic dike)

ABF-3A see sample ABF-1, locality 4C mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, Ar-Ar,
'berhauen', sample is crosscut 500 m), clinopyroxene-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm), K-feldspar- kersantite/minette microprobe
by a tin-veinlet microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm); fine-grained groundmass consisting (LD2c)
of euheadral to subheadral plagioclase-microlites and

Th. Seifert
phlogopite/biotite-microlites; probably spinel; ore minerals:
subheadral disseminated pyrite; minor quartz-xenocrysts (up to
200 m) (PII-21; PIII-G)

D-1 'Drebachs Hoffnung Bessere 4D altered low-phyric lamprophyre overprinted by 'eb' ore-type altered kersantite
Zeiten' mine, Drebach mining mineralization
area (dump sample)

A1-7 'Marcus Rhling' mine, 5 mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb
Frohnau, Annaberg district 500 m) and feldspar-microphenocrysts (up to 300 m); very fine- kersantite/minette
(dump sample) grained groundmass consisting of feldspar, phlogopite/biotite, (LD2c)
carbonate; quartz-macroxenocrysts (up to 4 mm) are mantled by a
corona of fine-grained light mica

A2-2 'Malwine' mine, Frohnau, 5 mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb
Annaberg district (dump mm); medium-grained groundmass consisting of feldspar and kersantite/minette
sample) phlogopite/biotite; ore minerals: euheadral disseminated pyrite xx; (LD2c)
quartz-xenocrysts; crosscut by a siderite-veinlet (Bi-Co-Ni ore-type?)
(PII-22)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

A6-10 shaft #79 (uranium 5 mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb, microprobe
exploration), Frohnau, 500 m), pyroxene-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm), K-feldspar- kersantite/minette
Annaberg district (dump microphenocrysts (up to 500 m), partly mantled by micas; fine- (LD2c)
sample) grained groundmass consisting of feldspar (common plagioclase) and
phlogopite/biotite; ore minerals: subheadral pyrite and chalcopyrite
are common (PII-23)

LDVG-2A dump of 'Klein Vierunger 6A lamprophyre with plagioclase-, phlogopite/biotite-, amphibole- and feldspar- and mica-phyric Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
Gangzug', 150 m NE of minor pyroxene-microphenocrysts (up to 500 m, partly sericitization, kersantite
'Leopold' shaft, 'Vierung' tin chloritization); fine-grained groundmass consisting of plagioclase, (LD1b)

Appendix - Table A2
deposit, Ehrenfriedersdorf phlogopite/biotite, apatite, chlorite, sericite, hematite; quartz-
district (lamprophyre is xenocrysts
crosscut by aplites and quartz-
cassiterite-veinlets) (dump
sample)

11402 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B lamprophyre with euheadral amphibole- (up to 700 m), mica-, amphibole- and feldspar- Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
'Richtstrecke 6000W', level 6, phlogopite/biotite-, plagioclase- and minor pyroxene- microphyric transitional type
dike #3, Ehrenfriedersdorf microphenocrysts (up to 500 m) intergrowth with apatite, carbonate, kersantite/spessartite
district chlorite and zircon; plagioclase partly strongly altered (sericitization); (LD1a)
ore minerals: chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, cassiterite (samples are
overprinted by tin mineralization); quartz-xenocrysts (up to 1 cm) are
common

31402 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
'Richtstrecke 5000N', level 5, (LD1a)
dike #3, Ehrenfriedersdorf
district

E-5000 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 (PII-24) similar to sample 11402 Pb-Pb, CL
'Richtstrecke 5000N', 25 m (LD1a)
south of the water dam, level
5, dike #3, Ehrenfriedersdorf
district

191
192
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

E-521 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402 Pb-Pb, microprobe,
'Gangstrecke 5210W', 15 m crosscut by aplite and quartz-cassiterite-sphalerite-chalcopyrite veinlet (LD1a) REM
western of 'Querschlag 1510', (PII-25; PIII-A)
level 5, dike #3,
Ehrenfriedersdorf district

E-509 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 35 m 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
western of 'Querschlag 1510', dark-violet fluorite on microveinlets, euheadral apatite- (LD1a)
level 5, dike #3, microphenocrysts (PII-26)
Ehrenfriedersdorf district

E-5-1910-1 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402 Pb-Pb
'Gangstrecke 5-1910W', level 59 vol.% feldspar content, plagioclase partly carbonitizised (LD1a)
5, dike #3, Ehrenfriedersdorf (PII-27)

Th. Seifert
district

E-5-FO 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
'Leergleisseite am Fllort', (LD1a)
shaft #2, level 5, dike #3,
Ehrenfriedersdorf district

LDED-3 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
'Richtstrecke 2000W', high amphibole content (21 vol.%) (PII-28) (LD1a)
'Polygonpunkt 1560', level 2,
dike #3, Ehrenfriedersdorf
district

LDED-11 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 'Strecke 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402 microprobe
2-206', level 2, dike #3, crosscut by an ENE-WSW quartz-cassiterite-sulfide-fluorite-bearing (LD1a)
Ehrenfriedersdorf district stringer zone (veinlets 1 - 5 cm) (PII-29)
(NNW-SSE lamprophyre dike
with a thickness of about 8 m)

LDED-10 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 'Strecke 6B similar to sample 11402 (PII-30) similar to sample 11402
2-1901', level 2, dike #2, (LD1a)
Ehrenfriedersdorf district
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDED-7 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 'Tiefer- 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
LDED-8 Sauberger-Stolln', 'stliche possible influenced by a post-Variscan hydrothermal vein (LD1a)
Bohrkammer', dike #1, ('Rothirschner-Stehender')
Ehrenfriedersdorf district

LDED-16 'Sauberg' tin deposit, 'Fllort', 6B similar to sample 11402 similar to sample 11402
shaft #2, level 2, dike #2, tourmaline-bearing veinlets (Sn-W association) crosscut dike #2 (LD1a)
Ehrenfriedersdorf district

Appendix - Table A2
SV-13-L 'Svornost' shaft, 'Querschlag J 7 lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite microphenocrysts mica-phyric transitional type Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
XII' about 200 m southern of kersantite/minette
'Svornost' shaft, level 12, (LD2c)
Jchymov district (lamprophyre
dike crosscutting type
'Eibenstock granite', according
to Komnek et al. 1994; same
age relationship for the samples
SV-11-L and SV-15-L)

SV-11-L 'Svornost' shaft, level 12, 7 lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite microphenocrysts; crosscut by mica-phyric transitional type Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
Jchymov district carbonate veinlets kersantite/minette
(LD2c)

SV-15-L 'Svornost' shaft, about 100 m 7 lamprophyre with amphibole-phenocrysts (up to 3 mm); slightly (LD2f, altered)
western of 'Svornost' shaft, altered fine-grained groundmass (chloritization); olivine-
level 12, Jchymov district microphenocrysts replaced by carbonates, chlorite, and talc

ST-6-L old quarry (rhyolitic dike 7 lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm); mica-phyric transitional type Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
intrusion), 2.5 km southern of fine-grained groundmass kersantite/minette
'Svornost' shaft, Jchymov (LD2c)
district; N-S lamprophyre dike
in the western part of the quarry
(thickness up to 6 m)

193
194
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

ST-1-L old quarry, 2.5 km southern of 7 lamprophyre with plagioclase-phenocrysts (up to 5 mm); fine-grained feldspar-phyric kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
'Svornost' shaft, Jchymov groundmass consisting of plagioclase, K-feldspar and (LD3)
district; NE-SW lamprophyre phlogopite/biotite (PII-31)
dike at the central part of the
quarry (thickness 0.5 m)

EV-6-L 'Eva' shaft, Jchymov district 7 mica-lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts mica-phyric transitional type Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
(dump sample) kersantite/minette
(LD2c)

LD-206-10 uranium-exploration bore hole 8 lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm, mica- and feldspar-microphyric microprobe
LD-206-7 Z206/76, 300 m SSE of partly chloritization), feldspar-microphenocrysts, serpentinizised kersantite
LD-206-2 'Heinrich-Stolln' at the olivine-microphenocrysts; globular structures with sulfides in the (LD2e)
'Ortsbach', 200 m SW of the core; fine-grained groundmass consisting of phlogopite/biotite,

Th. Seifert
Breitenbrunner fault (part of feldspar, carbonate, chlorite, opaque minerals (e.g., chalcopyrite,
the Gera-Jchymov fault magnetite); globular structures are mantled by very fine-grained
system = 'Bruchzone Unruhe'), coronas; crosscut by carbonate-microveinlets (PII-32 to -35)
Breitenbrunn subdistrict,
Schwarzenberg district
(lamprophyre dike swarm
(thickness of up to 20 m)
crosscut type 'Eibenstock
granite'); LD-206-10: 201.2 -
201.3 m depth (20 m
thickness); LD-206-7: 155.8 -
155.9 m depth (1 m thickness):
LD-206-2: 140.9 - 141 m
depth (1 m thickness)

PHLA-3A Tellerhuser uranium deposit, 9A slightly altered lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts mica- and feldspar-microphyric Nd, Sr isotopes
PHLA-3C +85 m-level, level uranium (partly chloritization, sericitization); groundmass consisting of transitional type
PHLA-5 mining area of 'Luchsbach' subheadral feldspar-microlites, phlogopite/biotite, carbonate, chlorite; kersantite/minette with
vein carbonate inclusions (ocelli ?) are common; quartz-xenocrysts (up to carbonate inclusions
3.5 cm) (LD2e)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDP-42 shaft #24, 350 m-level, 2 m 9B lamprophyre with altered feldspar phenocrysts (sericitization), and feldspar- and mica-phyric
from the entrance of phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts; fine-grained groundmass kersantite (slightly altered)
'Querschlag 125' in NW- consists of phlogopite/biotite, feldspar, carbonate, sericite, chlorite, (LD1b)
direction, Phla-Globenstein apatite
mining area

LDP-66 shaft #24, 350 m-level, 9B similar to sample LDP-42 feldspar- and mica-phyric
'Strecke 103', 20 m from the kersantite (slightly altered)

Appendix - Table A2
entrance of 'Querschlag 117 (LD1b)
in SE-direction', Phla-
Globenstein mining area

LD540-8-1-2 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A slightly altered lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up mica-kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
LD540-8-1-5 'Feldstrecke 900A', 400 m to 2 mm), plagioclase-microphenocrysts (up to 500 m, zonation is (LD2d) K-Ar, Ar-Ar,
from the shaft #371, uranium common: anorthite core often sericitizised), clinopyroxene- microprobe
deposit Niederschlema; N-S microphenocrysts (up to 500 m, partly ilmenite/magnetite
lamprophyre dike with a inclusions), olivine-microphenocrysts (up to 200 m), minor
thickness of 18 m (samples of occurrence with K-feldspar-microphenocrysts (altered); groundmass
the central part); according to consisting of subheadral feldspar-microlites, phlogopite/biotite, minor
Aejev and Harlass (1968) carbonate, minor chlorite; ore minerals: pyrite (PII-36 and
type 'biotite-kersantite' -37; PIII-J)

LB-371-1 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm), mica-kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
'Feldstrecke 900', uranium plagioclase/K-feldspar-microphenocrysts (up to 1 mm), (LD2d) K-Ar, microprobe
deposit Niederschlema; clinopyroxene-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm); coarse-grained groundmass
according to Aejev and consists of phlogopite/biotite-, feldspar-, pyroxene- and amphibole-
Harlass (1968) type 'biotite- microlites; clinopyroxene is common; ore minerals: pyrite (PII-38;
kersantite' PIII-H)

195
196
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LD540-6-6 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite-phenocrysts (up to 2 mm), fine- mica-kersantite
'Feldstrecke 909', uranium grained groundmass consisting of feldspar- and phlogopite/biotite- (LD2d)
deposit Niederschlema; microlites, carbonate; rounded quartz-xenocrysts mantled by corona
according to Aejev and structures; ore minerals: euheadral pyrite xx (up to 100 m); crosscut
Harlass (1968) type 'biotite- by carbonate microveinlets
kersantite'; crosscutting area
between 'biotite-kersantite'
and 'chlorite-kersantite'

LD540-1/2D shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A slightly to moderate altered lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite- mica-phyric transitional type Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
LD540-6-2M 'Feldstrecke 909', uranium phenocrysts (up to 5 mm, typically chloritization); groundmass minette/kersantite (slightly Pb-Pb single zircon
LD540-6-2L deposit Niederschlema; consists of phlogopite/biotite-microphenocrysts (up to 500 m) altered)
LD540-6- according to Aejev and intergrowth with feldspar- and apatite-microlites, carbonate and (LD2c)
3H5 Harlass (1968) type 'chlorite- opaque minerals; characteristic are rounded quartz-xenocrysts
kersantite'; crosscutting area (assimilated from the host rocks) and carbonate inclusions (corroded

Th. Seifert
between 'biotite-kersantite' by groundmass, indicate primary carbonates)
and 'chlorite-kersantite'

LD540-7-2 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A similar to sample LD540-1/2D, LD540-6-2M, LD540-6-2L, LD540-6- mica-phyric transitional type
'Feldstrecke 909', NW 3H5 minette/kersantite (slightly
entrance of 'Feldstrecke 909', altered)
uranium deposit (LD2c)
Niederschlema; according to
Aejev and Harlass (1968)
type 'chlorite-kersantite';
ENE-WSW lamprophyre dike
with a thickness of about 2 m

LD540-12-1 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A similar to sample LD540-1/2D, LD540-6-2M, LD540-6-2L, LD540-6- mica-phyric transitional type
'Feldstrecke 903', uranium 3H5 minette/kersantite (slightly
deposit Niederschlema; altered)
according to Aejev and (LD2c)
Harlass (1968) type 'chlorite-
kersantite'; ENE-WSW
lamprophyre dike with a
thickness of 2.5 m (in the
'productive unit' of uranium
mining)
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LC-371-1 shaft #371, -540 m-level, 10A similar to sample LD540-1/2D, LD540-6-2M, LD540-6-2L, mica-phyric transitional type Pb-Pb
'Feldstrecke 909', uranium LD540-6-3H5 minette/kersantite (slightly
deposit Niederschlema; altered)
according to Aejev and (LD2c)
Harlass (1968) type 'chlorite-
kersantite'

LDSCH-1 shaft #271, uranium deposit 10A similar to sample LD540-1/2D, LD540-6-2M, LD540-6-2L, mica-phyric transitional type
LDSCH-2 Niederschlema (dump sample) LD540-6-3H5 minette/kersantite (slightly
altered)

Appendix - Table A2
(LD2c)

LDSCH-3 shaft #311, uranium deposit 10A similar to sample LD540-1/2D, LD540-6-2M, LD540-6-2L, mica-phyric transitional type
Niederschlema (dump sample) LD540-6-3H5 minette/kersantite (slightly
altered)
(LD2c)

LDQ-6-1-4 'Querschlag #6' (former 10B slightly to moderate altered lamprophyre with phlogopite/biotite- mica-minette microprobe
uranium mining), 50 m from phenocrysts (up to 4 mm, zonation, partly intergrowth with subheadral (LD2a)
entrance, main level, apatite-microlites); very fine-grained groundmass consists of
Schneeberg district phlogopite/biotite-microlites intergrowth with feldspar, apatite,
sericite, chlorite; rounded quartz-xenocrysts mantled by corona
structures (sericite); quartz-xenocrysts and phlogopite/biotite-
phenocrysts show flow textures (PII-39 and -40)

LDQ-6-2-1 10 m below main level of 10B similar to sample LDQ-6-1-4 mica-minette Pb-Pb
'Querschlag #6', mining area (LD2a)
of 'Greif-Flacher' vein,
Schneeberg district ('Greif-
Flacher' vein (Bi-Co-Ni ore-
type) crosscuts lamprophyre
dike)

197
198
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

LDT1-1 'Tannenberg' adit, Mhlleithen 11 low-phyric lamprophyre with a fine-grained groundmass consisting of low-phyric mica-minette Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes,
tin deposit (lamprophyric dike phlogopite/biotite, K-feldspar, minor plagioclase, amphibole, chlorite, (LD2a) zircon dating (Pb-Pb
swarm with ENE-WSW strike sericite, apatite, zircon; quartz-xenocrysts; overprinted by tin greisen single zircon
direction and a thickness of up mineralization evaporation,
to 3 m crosscut type U-Pb SHRIMP)
'Eibenstock granite')

LDBERG-1 granite open pit, Bergen 12 moderate altered mica-lamprophyre with altered phlogopite/biotite- carbonate-rich mica-kersantite Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
(lamprophyric dike with microphenocrysts (chloritization); altered groundmass (LD2d, carbonate rich)
NNW-SSE to NW-SE strike (carbonitization) consists of plagioclase/K-feldspar-microlites
direction and a thickness of up (sericitization), phlogopite/biotite-microlites, needle-like euheadral
to 10 m crosscuts type apatite, carbonate; ore minerals: chalcopyrite; carbonate ocelli
'Eibenstock granite' and a post-

Th. Seifert
'Eibenstock granite' aplite)

LDKI-56 temporary outcrop on the 13 mica-lamprophyre mica-minette


Lengefelder Road between (LD2a)
Hirschfeld and Wolfersgrn,
Kirchberg granite massif
(N-S lamprophyre dike with a
thickness of 1 m crosscuts the
Kirchberg granite)

Z-17 'Melaphyr' flow, Zwickau- 14 basic to intermediate volcanic flow with shoshonitic geochemical shoshonitic flow K-Ar (WR)
Z-18-II Friedrichsgrn, Sub- signature
Erzgebirge basin

Z-19 'Latit' ('Melaphyr') flow, 14 basic to intermediate volcanic flow with shoshonitic geochemical shoshonitic flow Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
LDZO-1A Zwickau-Oberhohndorf, Sub- signature
Erzgebirge basin

Z-13 'Melaphyr' flow, Zwickau- 14 intermediate volcanic flow with ultrapotassic/shoshonitic geochemical ultrapotassic flow K-Ar (WR)
Schedewitz, Sub-Erzgebirge signature
basin
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location No. in Fig. 2 Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

Z-14 'Olivine-basalt' flow, Zwickau- 14 intermediate volcanic flow with shoshonitic geochemical signature shoshonitic flow K-Ar (WR)
Cainsdorf, Sub-Erzgebirge
basin

C-6-I 'Melaphyr' flow, Seifersdorf 15 intermediate volcanic flow with ultrapotassic/shoshonitic geochemical ultrapotassic flow Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes;
SF4-U (Oelsnitz), Sub-Erzgebirge signature (lower part with compact texture, upper part with typical K-Ar (WR)
basin flow texture and cavities with agate filling); very fine-grained
groundmass with plagioclase microlites (up to 50 m), olivine-
microphenocrysts (altered, up to 500 m), and pyroxene-
microphenocrysts (up to 1.5 mm)

Appendix - Table A2
RON- U deposit Beerwalde, 16 phlogopite/biotite-phyric lamprophyre with apatite-microphenocrysts; carbonate-rich mica- Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
4215-76 exploration bore hole 4215-76, carbonate inclusions lamprophyre
849.9 - 851.1 m depth,
Ronneburg district

RON- U exploration field Prehna- 16 phlogopite/biotite-phyric lamprophyre, feldspar-microphenocrysts; mica-lamprophyre Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
432673-3 southwest (Untschen-Mohlis), cavities with carbonates; disseminated sulfides (slightly altered)
exploration bore hole 4226-73,
195.2 - 195.5 m depth,
Ronneburg district

RON- U exploration field Prehna- 16 altered phlogopite/biotite-phyric lamprophyre with fresh apatite- mica-lamprophyre Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
8029-84 southwest, exploration bore microphenocrysts (minor quartz-xenocrysts), phlogopite/biotite-
hole 8029-84, 915 - 935.5 m phenocrysts up to 3 mm; crosscut by quartz-microveinlets
depth, Ronneburg district

RON- U exploration field Zeitz- 16 altered phlogopite/biotite- (feldspar-)phyric lamprophyre (minor carbonate-rich mica- Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
4209-75 southwest, exploration bore quartz-xenocrysts), cavities with carbonates, minor carbonate- lamprophyre
hole 4209-75, microveinlets; disseminated pyrite
540.4 - 545.8 m depth, about 20
km north of Ronneburg

Pr-LD- U district Pbram, dump of 'Lill see mica- (feldspar-)phyric lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
1/10 shaft' Fig. 1

199
200
Table A2 (continued)

Sample # Location Figure Description (microphotographs and CL images see Plate II) Lamprophyre type Methods*

Dub-LD-1/12 U district Pbram-south, dump see mica-phyric lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
of shaft #19 (Dubenec) Fig. 1

Byt-LD-1/7 U district Pbram-south, dump see mica- phyric lamprophyre (altered) mica-lamprophyre (altered) Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
of shaft #11 (Bytz) Fig. 1

Haj-LD-1/3 U district Pbram-south, dump see medium-grained lamprophyre with phlogopite-, pyroxene-, and feldspar- mica- and feldspar-phyric Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes
of shaft #9 (Hje) Fig. 1 (micro)phenocrysts lamprophyre

Kra-LD-1/7 Au-Sb deposit Krsn Hora, see mica-phyric lamprophyre with minor pyroxene and apatite mica-lamprophyre Nd, Sr, Pb isotopes

Th. Seifert
dump Fig. 1 microphenocrysts

L-1M Midnight mine (Au), Rossland, medium grained mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre


L-2M British Columbia
L-2M
L-HM

BC96-L33-1 Banker adit, Kokanee district, dense mica-lamprophyre subparallel to a quartz-sulfide vein mica-lamprophyre
(Pb-Zn-Ag), British Columbia

BC96-L32-2 100 m E Spokane mine, medium-grained mica-lamprophyre with pyroxene-phenocrysts, mica-lamprophyre


Kokanee district, (Pb-Zn-Ag), N-S strike direction, 2-4 m thickness
British Columbia

NB96-L2-3 Lake George mine (Sb), mining medium-grained mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre


area 1125, New Brunswick
Appendix - Table A3 201

Table A3 Representative microprobe analyses of phlogopite and biotite (micro)-


phenocrysts from lamprophyres in ore deposits of the Erzgebirge.
Calculation of H2O- by iteration. XMg-values = (Mg/(Mg+Fe2+))

Sample #E-521
(LD1a-type lamprophyre)
Mg-biotite G5 G7 G8 G9 G10 G12
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=14) (n=6) (n=6) (n=10) (n=22) (n=11)
SiO2 38.87 38.12 37.90 38.18 38.41 38.26
TiO2 1.12 1.39 1.57 1.49 1.30 0.96
Al2O3 13.51 13.77 14.11 14.24 13.97 13.93
Cr2O3 0.06 0.12 0.07 0.07 0.05 0.03
MgO 15.25 15.04 14.63 14.47 14.98 15.22
CaO 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.08 0.04 0.06
MnO 0.19 0.19 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.19
FeO (tot) 15.58 15.98 16.10 15.76 15.76 15.23
BaO 0.05 0.05 0.03 0.10 0.04 0.13
Na2O 0.09 0.11 0.09 0.24 0.10 0.07
K 2O 9.86 9.79 10.24 10.03 10.07 10.18
P 2O 5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H 2O 4.05 4.03 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.03
Cl- 0.10 0.12 0.12 0.13 0.12 0.11
-
F 1.83 1.71 1.66 1.65 1.73 1.79
Total 100.57 100.45 100.76 100.66 100.81 100.19
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.875 2.834 2.816 2.833 2.843
Ti 0.062 0.078 0.088 0.083 0.072
Al 1.178 1.206 1.236 1.245 1.218
Cr 0.003 0.007 0.004 0.004 0.003
Mg 1.682 1.666 1.622 1.601 1.653
Ca 0.002 0.003 0.001 0.006 0.003
Mn 0.012 0.012 0.013 0.012 0.013
Fe2+ 0.964 0.994 1.000 0.978 0.975
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.003 0.001
Na 0.013 0.016 0.012 0.035 0.015
K 0.930 0.928 0.971 0.950 0.951
Total cations 7.723 7.746 7.764 7.750 7.747
XMg 0.64 0.63 0.62 0.62 0.63
202 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDED-11
(LD1a-type lamprophyre)
phlogopite/ G1 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G10 G11
Mg-biotite avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=15) (n=20) (n=18) (n=10) (n=9) (n=8) (n=11) (n=14)
SiO2 38.16 37.38 38.65 38.23 38.05 37.56 39.62 38.97
TiO2 1.13 1.01 1.19 1.17 1.11 1.11 1.18 1.15
Al2O3 14.31 14.90 14.19 14.55 14.59 15.73 13.77 13.71
Cr2O3 0.07 0.07 0.15 0.11 0.06 0.07 0.04 0.06
MgO 15.23 14.74 15.42 15.00 14.83 14.45 15.49 15.81
CaO 0.02 0.06 0.02 0.10 0.04 0.04 0.12 0.04
MnO 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.19 0.18 0.21 0.18 0.18
FeO (tot) 15.62 15.18 15.43 15.78 15.80 16.46 15.34 15.03
BaO n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
Na2O 0.10 0.09 0.12 0.14 0.09 0.07 0.16 0.16
K2O 9.20 9.75 9.73 9.42 9.91 9.76 9.73 9.64
P2O5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H2O 3.88 3.97 4.05 4.03 4.01 4.03 4.09 4.06
Cl- 0.09 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.09 0.09
F- 2.07 1.81 2.10 1.91 1.84 1.52 2.10 2.36
Total 100.05 99.24 101.35 100.73 100.59 101.09 101.91 101.28
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.952 2.824 2.859 2.845 2.842 2.793 2.908 2.881
Ti 0.066 0.057 0.066 0.065 0.062 0.062 0.065 0.064
Al 1.305 1.327 1.237 1.276 1.285 1.378 1.191 1.195
Cr 0.004 0.004 0.009 0.007 0.003 0.004 0.003 0.004
Mg 1.756 1.661 1.700 1.664 1.651 1.602 1.695 1.743
Ca 0.001 0.005 0.002 0.008 0.003 0.003 0.009 0.003
Mn 0.012 0.011 0.011 0.012 0.011 0.013 0.011 0.011
Fe2+ 0.622 0.959 0.955 0.982 0.987 1.024 0.941 0.929
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Na 0.015 0.013 0.018 0.021 0.012 0.01 0.023 0.024
K 0.908 0.94 0.918 0.894 0.944 0.926 0.911 0.91
Total cations 7.642 7.802 7.776 7.773 7.802 7.815 7.756 7.763
XMg 0.64 0.63 0.64 0.63 0.63 0.61 0.64 0.65
Appendix - Table A3 203

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDBE-1
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=11) (n=54) (n=25) (n=60) (n=60)
SiO2 37.99 37.40 37.40 37.67 37.09
TiO2 4.34 3.75 3.75 3.56 4.24
Al2O3 14.14 13.98 13.98 14.06 14.30
Cr2O3 0.03 0.18 0.18 0.50 0.12
MgO 17.57 20.10 20.10 20.49 19.16
CaO 0.04 0.06 0.06 0.01 0.02
MnO 0.08 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.05
FeO (tot) 10.88 7.71 7.71 6.62 8.46
BaO 0.28 0.12 0.12 0.13 0.31
Na2O 0.26 0.28 0.28 0.31 0.38
K 2O 9.27 9.74 9.74 10.01 9.70
P 2O 5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H 2O 3.97 4.06 4.06 4.08 4.06
Cl- 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02
-
F 0.46 0.76 0.76 0.83 0.69
Total 99.32 98.20 98.20 98.32 98.60
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.719 2.760 2.760 2.768 2.739
Ti 0.246 0.208 0.208 0.197 0.235
Al 1.259 1.216 1.216 1.217 1.244
Cr 0.002 0.010 0.010 0.029 0.007
Mg 1.978 2.211 2.211 2.244 2.109
Ca 0.003 0.004 0.004 0.000 0.002
Mn 0.005 0.003 0.003 0.002 0.003
Fe2+ 0.687 0.476 0.476 0.407 0.523
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.008 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.009
Na 0.038 0.040 0.040 0.045 0.054
K 0.893 0.916 0.916 0.938 0.914
Total cations 7.838 7.848 7.848 7.850 7.838
XMg 0.74 0.82 0.82 0.85 0.80
204 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDBE-6
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G1 G2 G5 G6 G7 G8
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=15) (n=16) (n=69) (n=18) (n=49) (n=22)
SiO2 39.80 38.50 39.80 37.66 39.70 38.81
TiO2 3.69 4.35 3.89 4.32 3.29 4.22
Al2O3 13.78 14.11 14.23 13.96 13.76 13.59
Cr2O3 0.42 0.08 0.24 0.07 0.52 0.16
MgO 20.67 18.24 20.60 18.87 20.73 19.45
CaO 0.01 0.02 n.d. 0.41 0.01 0.01
MnO 0.04 0.07 0.04 0.06 0.04 0.05
FeO (tot) 7.03 9.95 6.89 9.22 6.36 8.04
BaO 0.01 0.03 n.d. n.d. 0.01 0.02
Na2O 0.26 0.19 0.24 0.20 0.21 0.28
K2O 9.20 8.90 9.20 9.10 9.30 9.28
P2O5 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.41 0.01 0.01
-
H2O 4.20 4.06 4.21 4.09 4.17 4.12
Cl- 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02
F- 1.25 1.00 1.24 1.11 1.33 1.18
Total 100.38 99.54 100.61 99.51 99.44 99.22
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.843 2.770 2.832 2.764 2.857 2.824
Ti 0.198 0.242 0.208 0.238 0.178 0.231
Al 1.161 1.229 1.194 1.207 1.167 1.165
Cr 0.024 0.005 0.013 0.004 0.030 0.009
Mg 2.202 2.008 2.185 2.064 2.224 2.110
Ca 0.001 0.002 0.000 0.033 0.000 0.001
Mn 0.002 0.004 0.002 0.004 0.002 0.003
Fe2+ 0.420 0.614 0.410 0.566 0.383 0.489
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001
Na 0.036 0.027 0.033 0.029 0.030 0.039
K 0.839 0.839 0.835 0.852 0.854 0.862
Total cations 7.726 7.740 7.714 7.761 7.725 7.733
XMg 0.84 0.77 0.84 0.79 0.85 0.81
Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDBE-8
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10a G13 G14 G15


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=20) (n=22) (n=9) (n=6) (n=21) (n=22) (n=11) (n=17) (n=10) (n=16) (n=22) (n=10) (n=8)
SiO2 38.34 38.08 39.65 38.89 38.14 38.84 38.96 37.73 38.70 38.57 38.12 37.48 38.16
TiO2 4.34 4.55 4.44 3.85 4.31 4.18 4.58 4.60 4.62 4.08 4.57 4.59 4.63
Al2O3 14.78 14.74 15.10 14.99 14.46 14.62 14.60 14.68 14.48 14.61 14.69 14.63 14.55
Cr2O3 0.32 0.08 0.22 0.11 0.09 0.34 0.21 0.03 0.12 0.54 0.13 0.07 0.12
MgO 18.83 18.10 17.45 18.68 18.61 18.93 18.24 18.39 18.22 18.87 18.45 17.62 18.20
CaO 0.04 0.13 0.09 0.08 0.42 0.02 0.04 0.08 0.35 0.02 0.03 0.73 0.08
MnO 0.04 0.06 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.09 0.05
FeO (tot) 8.23 8.94 8.55 9.56 8.40 8.13 9.08 8.88 8.67 8.29 8.70 9.22 8.56
BaO 0.14 0.13 0.20 0.11 0.08 0.08 0.16 0.14 0.17 0.07 0.15 0.14 0.16
Na2O 0.39 0.46 0.41 0.27 0.45 0.44 0.47 0.43 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.35 0.36

Appendix - Table A3
K 2O 8.63 8.33 8.20 7.61 8.72 8.63 8.29 8.71 8.69 8.83 8.77 8.43 8.51
P 2O 5 0.01 0.08 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.34 0.01 0.01 0.04 0.01
H 2O - 4.07 4.04 4.00 4.03 4.05 4.09 4.04 4.04 4.02 4.08 4.06 4.01 4.04
Cl- 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01
F- 0.85 0.80 0.77 0.74 0.85 0.88 0.76 0.80 0.78 0.83 0.84 0.80 0.83
Total 99.05 98.53 99.17 99.01 98.66 99.27 99.51 98.60 99.65 99.32 99.04 98.20 98.28
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.749 2.750 2.750 2.742 2.751 2.774 2.743 2.729 2.735 2.761 2.742 2.728 2.759
Ti 0.240 0.254 0.250 0.215 0.240 0.231 0.256 0.257 0.259 0.226 0.254 0.258 0.258
Al 1.282 1.288 1.335 1.313 1.263 1.263 1.277 1.285 1.271 1.266 1.279 1.290 1.274
Cr 0.019 0.005 0.013 0.007 0.005 0.020 0.012 0.002 0.007 0.031 0.008 0.004 0.007
Mg 2.067 2.002 1.951 2.070 2.056 2.069 2.018 2.036 2.024 2.067 2.032 1.964 2.015
Ca 0.004 0.010 0.007 0.007 0.033 0.002 0.003 0.007 0.028 0.001 0.002 0.059 0.007
Mn 0.002 0.004 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.002 0.003 0.003 0.006 0.003
Fe2+ 0.507 0.555 0.537 0.594 0.520 0.499 0.564 0.551 0.541 0.509 0.537 0.576 0.532
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.004 0.004 0.006 0.003 0.002 0.002 0.005 0.004 0.005 0.002 0.004 0.004 0.005
Na 0.055 0.067 0.059 0.039 0.065 0.063 0.068 0.062 0.063 0.064 0.063 0.050 0.052
K 0.810 0.788 0.785 0.721 0.825 0.807 0.785 0.826 0.826 0.828 0.827 0.804 0.806
Total cations 7.739 7.725 7.696 7.714 7.764 7.733 7.734 7.762 7.760 7.758 7.752 7.742 7.717
XMg 0.80 0.78 0.78 0.78 0.80 0.81 0.78 0.79 0.79 0.80 0.79 0.77 0.79

205
206 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #G2-1A
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)
phlogopite/ G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10
Mg-biotite avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=13) (n=14) (n=14) (n=29) (n=16) (n=11) (n=35) (n=20) (n=17) (n=17)
SiO2 36.78 37.35 36.09 38.14 39.63 36.98 36.45 36.40 38.96 37.71
TiO2 4.52 4.26 5.08 3.64 3.06 5.08 5.27 4.76 3.17 3.86
Al2O3 15.11 14.70 14.87 15.13 14.77 14.62 15.28 14.81 14.78 14.32
Cr2O3 0.02 0.12 0.01 0.11 1.48 0.01 0.03 0.03 1.85 0.03
MgO 14.99 16.87 13.51 17.86 21.69 14.02 14.99 15.27 20.36 14.70
CaO 0.02 0.07 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.03 0.01 0.03 0.53
MnO 0.13 0.13 0.22 0.09 0.02 0.17 0.09 0.13 0.03 0.14
FeO (tot) 13.99 11.70 15.26 11.00 4.99 14.58 13.08 13.48 5.91 14.08
BaO 0.70 0.70 0.96 0.64 0.40 0.97 0.87 0.86 0.43 0.24
Na2O 0.33 0.25 0.25 0.24 0.11 0.26 0.34 0.32 0.14 0.26
K 2O 8.60 8.77 8.65 8.84 9.73 8.57 8.58 8.61 9.46 8.80
P2O5 0.01 0.05 0.01 n.d. 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.01 n.d.
H 2O - 3.96 3.99 3.91 4.04 4.16 3.89 3.96 3.94 4.10 3.95
-
Cl 0.22 0.07 0.11 0.06 0.06 0.10 0.17 0.17 0.06 0.33
F- 0.43 0.57 0.38 0.66 1.06 0.33 0.42 0.45 0.94 0.46
Total 99.81 99.60 99.31 100.50 101.22 99.60 99.58 99.23 100.23 99.42
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.785 2.808 2.771 2.829 2.855 2.773 2.757 2.772 2.847 2.859
Ti 0.861 0.831 0.859 0.844 0.801 0.848 0.870 0.848 0.812 0.817
Al 0.404 0.378 0.460 0.318 0.260 0.461 0.470 0.427 0.273 0.345
Cr 0.001 0.007 0.001 0.007 0.085 0.001 0.002 0.002 0.107 0.002
Mg 1.692 1.890 1.546 1.975 2.330 1.610 1.691 1.733 2.218 1.662
Ca 0.002 0.005 0.002 0.003 0.002 0.001 0.003 0.001 0.002 0.043
Mn 0.009 0.008 0.014 0.006 0.001 0.011 0.006 0.008 0.002 0.009
Fe2+ 0.886 0.736 0.980 0.682 0.301 0.940 0.828 0.858 0.361 0.893
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.021 0.021 0.029 0.019 0.011 0.029 0.026 0.026 0.012 0.007
Na 0.049 0.036 0.037 0.034 0.016 0.038 0.050 0.048 0.020 0.038
K 0.830 0.841 0.847 0.837 0.894 0.843 0.828 0.836 0.882 0.851
Total cations 7.538 7.562 7.545 7.552 7.555 7.556 7.530 7.559 7.536 7.525
XMg 0.66 0.72 0.61 0.74 0.89 0.63 0.67 0.67 0.86 0.65
Appendix - Table A3 207

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LD-WOLK-1
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=26) (n=18) (n=26) (n=18) (n=17) (n=15) (n=18) (n=20) (n=27)
SiO2 37.08 37.20 36.81 37.29 36.74 37.24 36.31 36.53 37.00
TiO2 3.63 3.67 3.48 3.47 2.93 2.62 3.55 3.55 3.49
Al2O3 16.62 16.56 16.68 16.58 16.75 16.56 16.78 16.73 16.87
Cr2O3 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.05 0.09 0.03 0.01 0.02 0.02
MgO 17.26 17.11 17.81 17.70 16.86 17.11 17.67 17.62 17.70
CaO 0.05 0.10 0.04 0.30 0.04 0.06 0.04 0.03 0.09
MnO 0.05 0.06 0.05 0.05 0.08 0.11 0.06 0.07 0.07
FeO (tot) 10.50 10.23 10.28 9.86 11.91 11.40 10.51 10.72 10.54
BaO 1.41 1.51 1.52 1.50 1.26 1.15 1.49 1.50 1.44
Na2O 0.55 0.50 0.52 0.51 0.45 0.42 0.50 0.46 0.47
K2O 8.10 8.03 8.15 7.95 8.21 8.42 8.22 8.28 8.21
P 2O 5 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.04
-
H2O 4.04 4.04 4.10 4.11 4.07 4.08 4.08 4.10 4.12
Cl- 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02
-
F 0.01 0.06 0.08 0.04 n.d. 0.01 0.12 0.05 0.03
Total 99.33 99.12 99.58 99.45 99.42 99.25 99.38 99.69 100.13
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.744 2.767 2.807 2.772 2.767 2.758 2.789 2.792 2.759
Ti 0.106 0.094 0.091 0.103 0.098 0.103 0.101 0.096 0.104
Al 1.450 1.435 1.381 1.428 1.454 1.442 1.419 1.402 1.433
Cr 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001
Mg 1.909 1.785 1.707 1.737 1.610 1.637 1.568 1.817 1.672
Ca 0.004 0.002 0.003 0.002 0.002 0.010 0.002 0.001 0.002
Mn 0.005 0.006 0.009 0.007 0.009 0.011 0.012 0.006 0.009
Fe2+ 0.733 0.861 0.950 0.879 0.972 0.951 1.012 0.819 0.942
3+
Fe 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.039 0.037 0.030 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.038 0.037 0.037
Na 0.058 0.050 0.046 0.045 0.043 0.030 0.029 0.050 0.042
K 0.810 0.810 0.805 0.835 0.851 0.867 0.855 0.807 0.849
Total cations 7.858 7.848 7.831 7.849 7.850 7.850 7.825 7.828 7.849
XMg 0.75 0.75 0.76 0.76 0.72 0.73 0.75 0.75 0.75
208 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDQ-6-1-4
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10 G11


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=7) (n=14) (n=12) (n=8) (n=14) (n=10) (n=11) (n=5) (n=18) (n=18) (n=31)
SiO2 37.17 36.83 37.34 37.55 37.39 37.60 37.56 36.90 37.40 36.92 37.44
TiO2 3.34 3.48 3.51 3.27 3.21 3.37 3.40 3.36 3.19 3.53 3.30
Al2O3 15.05 15.62 15.27 14.74 15.09 15.19 15.19 14.71 15.28 14.90 15.01
Cr2O3 0.02 0.05 0.03 0.01 0.55 0.27 0.20 0.01 0.03 0.03 0.38
MgO 16.72 18.30 19.44 17.73 20.30 19.84 19.65 18.11 18.15 17.59 20.29
CaO 0.46 0.02 0.02 0.69 0.06 0.03 0.03 0.55 0.05 0.03 0.01
MnO 0.11 0.05 0.06 0.08 0.04 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.08 0.09 0.04
FeO (tot) 11.48 9.77 8.25 9.55 7.57 7.48 7.68 9.53 9.44 10.56 7.00
BaO 0.70 0.65 0.53 0.49 0.38 0.51 0.52 0.55 0.54 0.57 0.47
Na2O 0.35 0.34 0.27 0.31 0.20 0.23 0.27 0.31 0.31 0.34 0.21
K2O 9.36 9.56 9.82 9.73 9.71 10.03 9.99 9.86 9.74 9.65 10.01
P2O5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
H2O- 3.99 4.08 4.10 4.06 4.09 4.11 4.11 4.04 4.07 4.04 4.10
-
Cl 0.05 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03
F- 0.79 0.82 0.92 1.07 0.73 0.66 0.95 1.08 1.04 0.93 0.58
Total 99.59 99.60 99.59 99.32 99.35 99.39 99.63 99.14 99.35 99.21 98.87
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.717 2.710 2.729 2.773 2.742 2.743 2.740 2.738 2.754 2.740 2.740
Ti 0.189 0.193 0.193 0.182 0.177 0.185 0.186 0.188 0.177 0.197 0.182
Al 1.332 1.354 1.315 1.283 1.304 1.307 1.305 1.286 1.326 1.303 1.295
Cr 0.001 0.003 0.002 0.001 0.032 0.016 0.012 0.001 0.002 0.002 0.022
Mg 1.872 2.007 2.119 1.951 2.219 2.158 2.137 2.002 1.993 1.946 2.214
Ca 0.037 0.001 0.002 0.055 0.005 0.002 0.003 0.043 0.004 0.003 0.001
Mn 0.007 0.003 0.003 0.005 0.002 0.002 0.002 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.002
Fe2+ 0.721 0.601 0.504 0.590 0.403 0.457 0.468 0.591 0.581 0.655 0.429
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.021 0.019 0.015 0.014 0.011 0.015 0.015 0.016 0.016 0.017 0.014
Na 0.051 0.048 0.038 0.044 0.028 0.032 0.039 0.045 0.044 0.049 0.030
K 0.897 0.897 0.916 0.916 0.909 0.934 0.929 0.933 0.915 0.914 0.935
Total cations 7.846 7.837 7.836 7.813 7.832 7.849 7.837 7.849 7.816 7.830 7.863
XMg 0.72 0.77 0.81 0.77 0.85 0.83 0.82 0.77 0.77 0.75 0.83
Appendix - Table A3 209

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LDQ-6-1-4
(LD2a-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite G12 G13 G14 G15 G16 G18 G19


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=14) (n=18) (n=10) (n=28) (n=38) (n=17) (n=37
SiO2 37.32 37.07 37.18 37.87 37.64 37.77 37.79
TiO2 3.38 3.47 3.40 3.16 3.39 3.12 3.27
Al2O3 14.93 14.89 15.14 15.07 14.97 14.79 15.12
Cr2O3 0.04 0.07 0.04 0.26 0.26 0.36 0.33
MgO 18.56 18.72 19.47 19.63 20.09 19.18 18.54
CaO 0.04 0.01 0.09 0.13 0.01 0.01 0.03
MnO 0.06 0.09 0.04 0.05 0.03 0.06 0.07
FeO (tot) 8.94 8.87 8.52 8.84 7.42 8.40 9.29
BaO 0.56 0.56 0.59 0.50 0.52 0.50 0.47
Na2O 0.27 0.25 0.31 0.28 0.26 0.26 0.25
K2O 9.56 9.83 9.37 9.13 9.95 9.99 9.80
P 2O 5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H2O 4.05 4.05 4.07 4.04 4.11 4.08 4.10
-
Cl 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.03 0.03 0.03
F- 0.53 0.58 0.41 0.37 0.51 0.51 0.52
Total 98.28 98.48 98.66 99.36 99.19 99.06 99.61
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.765 2.747 2.736 2.738 2.749 2.774 2.766
Ti 0.189 0.193 0.188 0.176 0.186 0.172 0.180
Al 1.303 1.300 1.314 1.319 1.288 1.280 1.305
Cr 0.002 0.004 0.002 0.015 0.015 0.021 0.019
Mg 2.049 2.068 2.136 2.174 2.187 2.100 2.023
Ca 0.003 0.001 0.007 0.010 0.001 0.001 0.002
Mn 0.004 0.006 0.002 0.003 0.002 0.004 0.004
Fe2+ 0.554 0.550 0.524 0.487 0.453 0.516 0.569
3+
Fe 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.016 0.016 0.017 0.015 0.015 0.014 0.013
Na 0.039 0.036 0.044 0.040 0.037 0.038 0.035
K 0.904 0.929 0.879 0.865 0.927 0.936 0.915
Total cations 7.829 7.850 7.850 7.843 7.860 7.855 7.831
XMg 0.79 0.79 0.80 0.82 0.83 0.80 0.78
210 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #G1-8
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite/ G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G9 G10 G11 G12


Mg-biotite avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=20) (n=6) (n=11) (n=14) (n=15) (n=30) (n=21) (n=30) (n=10) (n=24) (n=26)
SiO2 37.17 36.13 37.31 37.18 35.82 38.61 36.42 35.56 37.41 37.39 35.75
TiO2 3.62 4.04 3.52 4.03 4.99 2.52 4.84 4.91 4.93 5.27 4.81
Al2O3 13.97 14.29 14.28 14.49 14.71 13.61 14.86 14.74 14.79 14.77 14.71
Cr2O3 0.07 0.11 0.55 0.09 0.04 0.48 0.06 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.04
MgO 16.64 14.89 18.55 17.52 15.25 20.67 14.41 14.58 14.49 14.06 14.70
CaO 0.01 0.03 0.09 0.03 0.34 0.15 0.03 0.01 0.02 0.06 0.02
MnO 0.16 0.25 0.09 0.13 0.12 0.11 0.11 0.09 0.09 0.12 0.11
FeO (tot) 12.29 14.03 9.21 10.26 12.47 8.20 13.50 13.47 13.46 13.44 13.58
BaO 0.51 0.66 0.45 0.70 0.85 0.24 1.15 0.74 0.74 0.86 0.82
Na2O 0.17 0.13 0.16 0.19 0.29 0.12 0.30 0.39 0.38 0.42 0.34
K 2O 10.02 9.83 10.00 10.00 9.52 9.93 9.31 9.37 9.36 9.23 9.59
P2O5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
H 2O - 4.01 3.95 4.05 4.04 3.98 4.11 3.94 3.95 3.94 3.93 3.96
-
Cl 0.10 0.08 0.06 0.07 0.16 0.06 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.11 0.14
F- 0.29 0.23 0.37 0.34 0.18 0.67 0.16 0.26 0.18 0.20 0.27
Total 99.02 98.66 98.69 99.09 98.72 99.50 99.25 98.26 99.97 99.86 98.84
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.782 2.743 2.764 2.759 2.700 2.817 2.698 2.701 2.698 2.700 2.705
Ti 0.204 0.231 0.196 0.225 0.283 0.138 0.277 0.281 0.283 0.302 0.274
Al 1.233 1.279 1.247 1.268 1.307 1.170 1.334 1.320 1.328 1.328 1.312
Cr 0.004 0.006 0.032 0.005 0.002 0.028 0.004 0.002 0.001 0.001 0.002
Mg 1.857 1.686 2.049 1.938 1.713 2.248 1.637 1.651 1.645 1.599 1.658
Ca 0.000 0.002 0.007 0.003 0.027 0.012 0.002 0.001 0.002 0.005 0.001
Mn 0.010 0.016 0.006 0.008 0.008 0.007 0.007 0.006 0.006 0.008 0.007
Fe2+ 0.769 0.891 0.570 0.637 0.786 0.500 0.860 0.856 0.858 0.857 0.859
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.015 0.020 0.013 0.020 0.025 0.007 0.034 0.022 0.022 0.026 0.024
Na 0.024 0.020 0.024 0.027 0.043 0.017 0.045 0.058 0.055 0.062 0.050
K 0.957 0.952 0.945 0.947 0.915 0.924 0.904 0.908 0.910 0.898 0.926
Total cations 7.856 7.845 7.853 7.837 7.811 7.867 7.801 7.805 7.808 7.787 7.818
XMg 0.71 0.65 0.78 0.75 0.69 0.82 0.66 0.66 0.66 0.65 0.66
Appendix - Table A3 211

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #G1-8
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite/ G13 G14 G15 G16


Mg-biotite avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=36) (n=27) (n=20) (n=18)
SiO2 35.49 37.05 37.24 36.88
TiO2 5.02 4.78 3.90 4.66
Al2O3 15.00 14.26 14.50 14.78
Cr2O3 0.05 0.05 0.13 0.07
MgO 14.38 15.51 19.21 14.88
CaO 0.01 0.24 0.01 0.02
MnO 0.10 0.13 0.05 0.14
FeO (tot) 14.03 12.21 8.48 13.19
BaO 0.87 0.72 0.61 0.76
Na2O 0.36 0.28 0.26 0.29
K 2O 9.50 9.42 9.97 9.53
P 2O 5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H 2O 3.97 3.96 4.07 3.96
Cl- 0.15 0.15 0.07 0.14
F- 0.21 0.25 0.58 0.13
Total 99.13 99.00 99.09 99.43
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.683 2.730 2.742 2.716
Ti 0.285 0.272 0.216 0.265
Al 1.336 1.273 1.259 1.318
Cr 0.003 0.003 0.008 0.004
Mg 1.620 1.751 2.109 1.679
Ca 0.001 0.019 0.001 0.002
Mn 0.007 0.008 0.003 0.009
Fe2+ 0.887 0.773 0.522 0.835
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.026 0.022 0.018 0.023
Na 0.052 0.041 0.037 0.042
K 0.916 0.910 0.936 0.920
Total cations 7.816 7.802 7.851 7.813
XMg 0.65 0.69 0.80 0.67
212 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #ABF-3A
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

Mg-biotite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10 G11


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=16) (n=12) (n=4) (n=15) (n=6) (n=11) (n=11) (n=17) (n=25) (n=18) (n=7)
SiO2 36.67 36.17 36.23 36.09 36.95 37.39 36.46 36.61 37.04 37.01 37.56
TiO2 2.87 2.96 2.54 3.15 3.09 3.09 3.18 2.67 1.85 1.63 1.58
Al2O3 16.31 15.98 15.41 15.83 15.60 15.68 15.86 15.94 16.16 15.84 16.26
Cr2O3 0.01 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01
MgO 16.84 15.46 13.74 15.11 13.86 13.78 13.92 16.37 16.82 11.58 15.92
CaO 0.03 0.05 0.07 0.04 0.06 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.05 0.03 0.04
MnO 0.06 0.11 0.17 0.10 0.18 0.16 0.14 0.09 0.07 0.10 0.14
FeO (tot) 11.35 13.56 16.53 13.57 15.94 15.34 15.85 13.02 13.51 11.39 14.79
BaO 1.36 1.33 1.03 1.54 1.53 1.44 1.39 1.15 1.30 1.21 1.01
Na2O 0.42 0.38 0.30 0.34 0.28 0.24 0.37 0.36 0.39 0.34 0.31
K 2O 8.31 8.27 8.22 8.19 8.23 8.62 8.25 8.42 8.34 8.26 8.22
P2O5 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01
H 2O - 4.02 3.98 3.93 3.96 3.85 3.90 3.93 4.01 3.94 3.90 3.90
-
Cl 0.02 0.03 0.06 0.03 0.06 0.04 0.04 0.03 0.01 0.02 0.04
F- 0.16 0.09 0.11 0.14 0.16 0.21 0.09 0.15 n.d. n.d. n.d.
Total 98.43 98.39 98.35 98.14 99.81 99.94 99.54 98.86 99.52 99.32 99.78
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.733 2.727 2.765 2.733 2.723 2.718 2.704 2.736 2.744 2.767 2.807
Ti 0.161 0.168 0.146 0.180 0.181 0.178 0.183 0.150 0.106 0.094 0.091
Al 1.433 1.420 1.386 1.413 1.432 1.419 1.426 1.404 1.450 1.435 1.381
Cr 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000
Mg 1.871 1.738 1.563 1.706 1.494 1.578 1.583 1.824 1.909 1.785 1.707
Ca 0.002 0.004 0.005 0.003 0.005 0.003 0.002 0.002 0.004 0.002 0.003
Mn 0.004 0.007 0.011 0.007 0.012 0.011 0.009 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.009
Fe2+ 0.707 0.855 1.055 0.859 1.039 0.985 1.011 0.814 0.733 0.861 0.950
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.040 0.039 0.031 0.046 0.047 0.043 0.042 0.034 0.039 0.037 0.030
Na 0.061 0.055 0.044 0.050 0.042 0.035 0.055 0.052 0.058 0.050 0.046
K 0.790 0.796 0.800 0.791 0.818 0.845 0.803 0.803 0.810 0.810 0.805
Total cations 7.802 7.811 7.805 7.789 7.792 7.816 7.818 7.825 7.858 7.848 7.831
XMg 0.73 0.67 0.60 0.67 0.59 0.62 0.61 0.69 0.72 0.68 0.64
Appendix - Table A3 213

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #ABF-3A
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

Mg-biotite G12 G13 G14 G15 G16 G17


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=12) (n=12) (n=15) (n=11) (n=22) (n=10)
SiO2 37.85 37.09 37.12 37.05 37.87 37.77
TiO2 1.76 1.65 1.74 1.74 1.69 1.80
Al2O3 15.67 15.64 15.58 15.56 15.71 15.76
Cr2O3 n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01
MgO 15.07 16.70 15.98 14.60 16.09 15.54
CaO 0.03 0.02 0.12 0.02 0.02 0.02
MnO 0.10 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.09 0.14
FeO (tot) 14.59 14.74 14.48 15.64 13.93 14.60
BaO 1.34 1.37 1.33 1.25 1.24 1.23
Na2O 0.30 0.28 0.19 0.19 0.34 0.28
K 2O 8.47 8.46 8.65 8.66 8.36 8.63
P 2O 5 0.01 0.01 0.07 0.01 0.01 0.01
-
H 2O 3.88 3.80 3.82 3.88 3.96 3.89
Cl- 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02
-
F n.d. 0.01 0.20 0.20 0.13 0.20
Total 99.09 99.95 99.49 99.01 99.47 99.90
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.772 2.767 2.758 2.789 2.792 2.759
Ti 0.103 0.098 0.103 0.101 0.096 0.104
Al 1.428 1.454 1.442 1.419 1.402 1.433
Cr 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001
Mg 1.737 1.610 1.637 1.568 1.817 1.672
Ca 0.002 0.002 0.010 0.002 0.001 0.002
Mn 0.007 0.009 0.011 0.012 0.006 0.009
Fe2+ 0.879 0.972 0.951 1.012 0.819 0.942
3+
Fe 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.038 0.037 0.037
Na 0.045 0.043 0.030 0.029 0.050 0.042
K 0.835 0.851 0.867 0.855 0.807 0.849
Total cations 7.849 7.850 7.850 7.825 7.828 7.849
XMg 0.66 0.62 0.63 0.65 0.69 0.64
214 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #A6-10
(LD2c-type lamprophyre)

phlogopite/ G1 G2 G6 G9 G11 G10 G12


Mg-biotite avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=19) (n=7) (n=22) (n=21) (n=19) (n=12) (n=5)
SiO2 35.77 34.21 36.31 35.89 36.14 35.52 36.04
TiO2 5.18 5.27 5.25 5.18 5.17 5.33 5.03
Al2O3 15.24 16.93 15.22 15.40 15.31 15.52 15.35
Cr2O3 0.14 0.02 0.13 0.27 0.24 0.09 0.24
MgO 16.78 12.96 15.77 18.08 18.40 17.04 17.89
CaO 0.06 0.05 0.47 0.76 0.24 0.57 0.03
MnO 0.09 0.18 0.10 0.07 0.06 0.09 0.05
FeO (tot) 10.77 16.86 11.82 9.83 9.76 11.36 9.63
BaO 0.90 0.77 0.85 0.96 0.96 0.90 0.92
Na2O 0.16 0.13 0.17 0.16 0.21 0.21 0.16
K 2O 9.27 9.80 9.21 9.60 9.66 9.48 9.80
P2O5 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d.
-
H 2O 4.01 4.00 3.98 4.09 4.10 4.06 4.06
-
Cl 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01
F- 0.20 0.01 0.15 0.24 0.22 0.19 0.26
Total 98.57 101.20 99.45 100.52 100.48 100.37 99.48
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.673 2.623 2.646 2.663 2.567 2.659 2.632
Ti 0.291 0.296 0.285 0.279 0.297 0.298 0.286
Al 1.342 1.350 1.321 1.337 1.497 1.351 1.331
Cr 0.008 0.005 0.014 0.014 0.001 0.008 0.015
Mg 1.869 1.876 2.008 1.971 1.450 1.770 1.976
Ca 0.005 0.045 0.018 0.003 0.004 0.038 0.060
Mn 0.005 0.006 0.004 0.003 0.012 0.007 0.004
Fe2+ 0.673 0.701 0.598 0.595 1.057 0.744 0.603
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.026 0.026 0.027 0.027 0.023 0.025 0.028
Na 0.024 0.031 0.030 0.023 0.019 0.025 0.023
K 0.884 0.893 0.902 0.924 0.938 0.885 0.898
Total cations 7.801 7.852 7.854 7.839 7.863 7.808 7.855
XMg 0.74 0.58 0.70 0.77 0.77 0.73 0.77
Appendix - Table A3 215

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LB-371-1
(LD2d-type lamprophyre)

Mg-biotite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G9 G10 G11 G12 G15 G18 G19


avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=14) (n=3) (n=12) (n=58) (n=8) (n=10) (n=7) (n=10) (n=15) (n=15) (n=25) (n=14)
SiO2 36.36 36.04 36.97 37.88 35.62 36.56 36.17 35.21 37.08 36.32 36.06 36.83
TiO2 4.16 4.26 4.01 4.25 4.25 4.25 4.00 4.09 4.04 3.81 4.03 4.09
Al2O3 14.55 14.82 14.54 14.60 15.00 14.84 14.84 15.39 14.89 15.10 14.91 14.60
Cr2O3 0.11 0.02 0.02 0.20 0.02 0.22 0.04 0.01 0.14 0.03 0.08 0.13
MgO 12.55 11.95 11.86 13.74 12.93 13.04 13.12 12.02 13.52 14.32 13.48 12.72
CaO 0.29 0.01 0.84 0.05 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.06 0.05 0.24 0.02
MnO 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.16 0.17 0.20 0.16 0.19 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.19
FeO (tot) 16.97 18.07 16.90 14.93 16.72 16.28 16.45 17.73 15.68 15.37 16.19 17.06
BaO 0.87 0.94 0.85 0.94 0.86 0.91 0.78 0.91 0.93 0.71 0.82 0.90
Na2O 0.11 0.15 0.10 0.15 0.13 0.19 0.11 0.14 0.12 0.11 0.08 0.09
K 2O 8.85 8.94 8.72 8.82 8.97 8.82 9.18 8.91 8.73 8.61 8.69 8.73
P 2O 5 0.23 0.01 0.68 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01
H 2O - 3.88 3.87 3.84 3.92 3.92 3.91 3.94 3.90 3.94 3.97 3.95 3.91
Cl- 0.05 0.02 0.10 0.10 0.05 0.07 0.06 0.02 0.08 0.09 0.09 0.04
F- 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.03
Total 99.21 99.34 99.66 99.77 98.70 99.34 98.91 98.59 99.41 98.70 98.82 99.36
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.731 2.712 2.733 2.747 2.723 2.725 2.753 2.709 2.749 2.745 2.740 2.750
Ti 0.242 0.248 0.236 0.245 0.245 0.245 0.229 0.236 0.231 0.217 0.230 0.236
Al 1.324 1.352 1.339 1.318 1.351 1.340 1.331 1.396 1.337 1.345 1.335 1.321
Cr 0.007 0.001 0.001 0.012 0.001 0.014 0.003 0.001 0.008 0.002 0.005 0.008
Mg 1.445 1.379 1.382 1.568 1.473 1.489 1.489 1.379 1.536 1.613 1.527 1.456
Ca 0.024 0.001 0.070 0.004 0.002 0.000 0.002 0.002 0.005 0.004 0.019 0.002
Mn 0.012 0.013 0.012 0.010 0.011 0.013 0.010 0.012 0.011 0.011 0.011 0.012
Fe2+ 1.096 1.170 1.105 0.001 1.069 1.043 1.047 1.141 0.001 0.001 1.029 1.095
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.026 0.029 0.026 0.028 0.026 0.027 0.023 0.027 0.028 0.021 0.024 0.027
Na 0.017 0.023 0.015 0.022 0.019 0.028 0.016 0.021 0.017 0.017 0.012 0.014
K 0.872 0.882 0.869 0.861 0.875 0.863 0.891 0.875 0.848 0.830 0.842 0.855
Total cations 7.798 7.811 7.789 7.772 7.795 7.788 7.795 7.800 7.769 7.776 7.774 7.777
XMg 0.57 0.54 0.56 0.62 0.58 0.59 0.59 0.55 0.61 0.62 0.60 0.57
216 Th. Seifert

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LD-540-8-1
(LD2d-type lamprophyre)

Mg-biotite G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=50) (n=25) (n=37) (n=41) (n=10) (n=10) (n=39) (n=16) (n=13) (n=12)
SiO2 37.37 37.80 37.20 37.26 36.93 36.82 37.32 37.27 37.23 37.22
TiO2 4.42 5.03 4.39 4.31 3.76 4.33 4.27 4.40 4.20 3.77
Al2O3 15.87 15.83 15.76 15.74 15.56 15.75 15.93 15.90 15.63 15.50
Cr2O3 0.04 0.06 0.05 0.03 0.01 0.03 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.01
MgO 13.90 14.10 13.32 13.22 12.16 12.41 13.08 12.74 13.22 12.29
CaO 0.01 0.55 0.05 0.13 0.02 0.03 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.01
MnO 0.16 0.12 0.17 0.16 0.22 0.20 0.18 0.19 0.17 0.21
FeO (tot) 14.63 13.89 15.46 15.65 17.79 16.79 15.81 16.10 15.90 17.65
BaO 0.95 1.03 1.01 0.89 0.72 0.89 0.93 0.90 0.80 0.63
Na2O 0.28 0.34 0.27 0.28 0.15 0.28 0.30 0.30 0.27 0.21
K2O 8.52 8.64 8.94 8.91 9.36 8.88 8.85 8.90 9.01 9.11
P2O5 0.01 n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.02 n.d. 0.01
H2O- 3.95 4.00 3.93 3.93 3.89 3.90 3.94 3.93 3.92 3.90
-
Cl 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03
F- 0.04 0.05 0.02 0.02 n.d. n.d. 0.02 0.01 0.01 n.d.
Total 100.17 101.46 100.60 100.57 100.62 100.34 100.76 100.77 100.43 100.55
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.688 2.681 2.683 2.688 2.693 2.677 2.688 2.688 2.692 2.707
Ti 0.253 0.283 0.252 0.247 0.218 0.250 0.244 0.252 0.241 0.218
Al 1.421 1.397 1.415 1.414 1.414 1.427 1.428 1.428 1.407 1.404
Cr 0.002 0.004 0.003 0.002 0.000 0.002 0.001 0.002 0.001 0.001
Mg 1.574 1.574 1.514 1.502 1.397 1.422 1.484 1.447 1.505 1.408
Ca 0.001 0.044 0.004 0.010 0.002 0.002 0.005 0.004 0.001 0.001
Mn 0.010 0.008 0.011 0.011 0.015 0.013 0.012 0.012 0.011 0.014
Fe2+ 0.930 0.870 0.985 0.998 1.147 1.079 1.006 1.026 1.016 1.135
3+
Fe 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.028 0.030 0.030 0.027 0.022 0.027 0.028 0.027 0.024 0.019
Na 0.041 0.049 0.040 0.041 0.022 0.042 0.044 0.045 0.040 0.031
K 0.826 0.825 0.869 0.867 0.920 0.871 0.860 0.865 0.878 0.894
Total cations 7.775 7.766 7.807 7.806 7.849 7.812 7.800 7.796 7.817 7.830
XMg 0.63 0.64 0.61 0.60 0.55 0.57 0.60 0.59 0.60 0.55
Appendix - Table A3 217

Table A3 (continued)
Sample #LD-206-2
(LD2e-type lamprophyre)
phlogopite G1 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 G10 G11
avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg. avg.
wt.% (n=13) (n=10) (n=12) (n=17) (n=15) (n=11) (n=13) (n=19) (n=39)
SiO2 37.85 37.67 37.95 38.50 38.58 39.67 39.31 39.53 40.05
TiO2 3.87 3.82 3.57 3.86 2.32 2.29 2.15 2.25 2.20
Al2O3 14.88 14.36 14.39 14.63 14.44 14.40 14.28 14.81 14.80
Cr2O3 0.19 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.18 0.24 0.11 0.09 0.07
MgO 17.99 19.32 19.24 18.97 18.07 18.38 18.69 18.84 18.83
CaO 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.09 0.05 0.11 0.08 0.06
MnO 0.06 0.05 0.06 0.08 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.05
FeO (tot) 9.97 8.89 9.11 9.58 10.76 10.45 10.63 9.56 8.74
BaO 0.72 0.58 0.50 0.54 0.63 0.56 0.52 0.47 0.43
Na2O 0.38 0.27 0.31 0.29 0.38 0.33 0.27 0.27 0.28
K2O 9.14 9.28 9.08 9.05 8.98 9.02 8.93 9.11 9.15
P 2O 5 0.01 0.01 0.01 n.d. 0.05 0.04 0.09 0.01 0.01
-
H2O 3.99 3.98 3.87 3.65 3.92 3.93 3.96 3.94 3.99
Cl- 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02
-
F 0.57 0.67 0.74 0.67 0.49 0.50 0.50 0.56 0.65
Total 99.65 99.05 98.97 99.93 98.98 99.95 99.65 99.62 99.33
Ions (O=12)
Si 2.696 2.689 2.627 2.422 2.799 2.800 2.825 2.858 2.862
Ti 0.219 0.217 0.208 0.238 0.134 0.132 0.123 0.129 0.124
Al 1.319 1.276 1.312 1.416 1.302 1.296 1.274 1.240 1.223
Cr 0.012 0.007 0.006 0.005 0.011 0.015 0.007 0.005 0.004
Mg 2.017 2.172 2.220 2.322 1.946 1.978 1.996 2.025 2.112
Ca 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.007 0.004 0.009 0.007 0.005
Mn 0.004 0.003 0.004 0.005 0.005 0.005 0.005 0.004 0.003
Fe2+ 0.627 0.561 0.589 0.658 0.688 0.667 0.673 0.609 0.550
Fe3+ 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
Ba 0.021 0.017 0.015 0.017 0.019 0.017 0.015 0.014 0.013
Na 0.056 0.039 0.046 0.046 0.057 0.048 0.040 0.040 0.041
K 0.877 0.892 0.896 0.948 0.876 0.879 0.863 0.885 0.878
Total cations 7.848 7.873 7.925 8.078 7.843 7.841 7.829 7.815 7.816
XMg 0.76 0.80 0.79 0.78 0.74 0.75 0.75 0.77 0.79
218
Table A4 Representative XMg, TiO2, Cr2O3, BaO, Cl, and F ranges of phlogopite/Mg-biotite (micro)phenocrysts (see also Table A3).
n.d. - not detected

Lamprophyre Sample (number Number XMg TiO2 (wt.%) Cr2O3 (wt.%) BaO (wt.%) Cl (wt.%) F (wt.%)
type of measured of
grains) analyses

range mean range mean range mean range mean range mean range

LD1a E-521 (n=5) 105 0.62-0.64 1.30 0.96-1.57 0.07 0.03-0.12 0.07 0.03-0.13 0.12 0.10-0.13 1.73 1.65-1.83

LDED-11 (n=8) 69 0.61-0.74 1.13 1.01-1.19 0.08 0.04-0.15 n.d. n.d. 0.10 0.09-0.10 1.96 1.52-2.36

LD2a LDBE-1 (n=5) 210 0.74-0.85 3.93 3.56-4.34 0.20 0.03-0.50 0.19 0.12-0.31 0.02 0.02-0.02 0.70 0.46-0.83

LDBE-6 (n=6) 189 0.77-0.85 3.96 3.29-4.35 0.25 0.07-0.52 0.01 n.d.-0.03 0.02 0.02-0.02 1.18 1.00-1.33

LDBE-8 (n=13) 194 0.77-0.81 4.41 3.85-4.63 0.18 0.07-0.57 0.13 0.07-0.17 0.02 0.01-0.02 0.81 0.74-0.85

Th. Seifert
G2-1A (n=10) 186 0.65-0.89 4.27 3.17-5.27 0.40 0.01-2.50 0.68 0.24-0.97 0.14 0.06-0.33 0.57 0.42-1.06

LDQ-6-1-4 (n=18) 310 0.72-0.85 3.34 3.12-3.53 0.16 0.01-0.38 0.54 0.38-0.70 0.02 0.02-0.05 0.72 0.37-1.08

LD2c G1-8 (n=15) 308 0.65-0.80 4.39 2.52-5.27 0.12 0.01-0.55 0.71 0.24-0.87 0.12 0.06-0.16 0.29 0.13-0.58

ABF-3A (n=17) 224 0.60-0.73 2.33 1.58-3.18 0.01 n.d.-0.01 1.30 1.03-1.54 0.03 0.02-0.06 0.11 0.09-0.16

A6-10 (n=7) 105 0.58-0.77 5.20 5.03-5.33 0.16 0.02-0.27 0.89 0.77-0.96 0.01 n.d.-0.02 0.18 0.01-0.26

LDWOLK-1 (n=9) 186 0.72-0.76 3.38 2.62-3.67 0.03 0.01-0.09 1.42 1.15-1.52 0.02 0.02-0.03 0.05 0.01-0.12

LD2d LB-371-1 (n=12) 191 0.54-0.62 4.10 3.81-4.26 0.09 0.02-0.22 0.87 0.78-0.94 0.06 0.02-0.10 0.03 0.02-0.03

LD-540-8-1-5 253 0.55-0.64 4.29 3.76-5.03 0.03 0.01-0.06 0.88 0.63-1.03 0.03 0.02-0.04 0.02 n.d.-0.05
(n=10)

LD2e LD-206-2 (n=9) 139 0.74-0.79 3.01 2.15-3.86 0.13 0.07-0.24 0.55 0.43-0.63 0.02 0.02-0.02 0.59 0.49-0.67
Table A5 Representative microprobe analyses of phlogopite/Mg-biotite microphenocryst #G9 (see Plate III-E) from lamprophyre sample G2-1A.
Calculation of H2O- by iteration.

G9-1 G9-2 G9-3 G9-4 G9-5 G9-6 G9-7 G9-8 G9-9 G9-10 G9-11 G9-12 G9-13 G9-14 G9-15 G9-16 G9-17 G9-18
wt.% rim transitional core core core core core core core core core core core core core core transitional rim

SiO2 37.58 38.63 39.23 39.40 38.72 39.18 39.25 38.49 39.28 38.66 39.34 39.40 39.25 39.68 39.36 38.72 38.09 37.58

TiO2 3.78 3.54 3.23 3.06 3.00 3.01 3.03 3.00 3.03 3.08 3.06 2.98 3.07 3.19 3.31 3.15 3.34 3.78

Appendix - Table A4 and A5


Al2O3 13.82 14.01 14.65 14.99 15.17 14.99 14.96 14.97 14.95 15.11 15.06 15.12 14.82 14.65 14.74 14.94 14.34 13.82

Cr2O3 0.25 0.96 1.53 2.44 2.47 2.40 2.47 2.38 2.33 2.43 2.36 2.37 2.20 0.45 0.89 2.26 1.34 0.25

MgO 15.42 18.41 20.84 20.62 21.01 21.00 20.88 20.86 20.87 20.85 20.94 20.99 21.10 22.01 21.89 20.39 18.08 15.42

CaO 0.11 0.04 0.03 0.05 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.03 0.02 0.04 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.01 0.03 0.01 0.11

MnO 0.17 0.08 0.01 0.02 0.05 n.d. n.d. 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 n.d. 0.02 0.09 0.17

FeO (tot) 14.62 9.57 5.64 4.89 4.67 4.73 4.69 4.56 4.58 4.67 4.58 4.58 4.58 4.74 4.66 5.33 9.37 14.62

BaO 0.48 0.53 0.42 0.41 0.42 0.34 0.41 0.45 0.46 0.44 0.42 0.43 0.39 0.38 0.46 0.41 0.49 0.48

Na2O 0.15 0.18 0.16 0.12 0.13 0.17 0.15 0.09 0.16 0.20 0.10 0.09 0.11 0.12 0.15 0.15 0.17 0.15

K2O 8.49 9.29 9.46 9.52 9.68 9.55 9.42 9.71 9.60 9.62 9.53 9.58 9.44 9.63 9.60 9.50 9.16 8.49

P2O5 0.04 0.02 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. 0.02 n.d. n.d. n.d. 0.01 0.02 n.d. n.d. n.d. n.d. 0.04
-
H2O 4.97 4.69 4.61 4.30 4.46 4.42 4.57 5.23 4.41 4.72 4.40 4.20 4.76 4.86 4.69 4.92 5.37 4.97

Cl- 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.06 0.07 0.06 0.06 0.07 0.05 0.06 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.06 0.08 0.06 0.07 0.06
-
F 0.55 1.02 1.02 0.99 0.97 0.95 0.96 0.96 0.96 0.94 0.95 0.92 0.99 1.16 1.17 0.96 0.74 0.55

Total 100.48 101.04 100.88 100.85 100.84 100.82 100.85 100.84 100.71 100.81 100.82 100.79 100.86 101.00 101.01 100.83 100.65 100.48

219
220
Table A5 (continued)

Ions G9-1 G9-2 G9-3 G9-4 G9-5 G9-6 G9-7 G9-8 G9-9 G9-10 G9-11 G9-12 G9-13 G9-14 G9-15 G9-16 G9-17 G9-18
(0=12) rim transitional core core core core core core core core core core core core core core transitional rim

Si 2.74 2.76 2.77 2.78 2.73 2.76 2.76 2.70 2.77 2.72 2.77 2.78 2.75 2.77 2.76 2.73 2.72 2.74

Ti 0.21 0.19 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.18 0.21

Al 1.19 1.18 1.22 1.25 1.26 1.25 1.24 1.24 1.24 1.25 1.25 1.26 1.23 1.21 1.22 1.24 1.20 1.19

Cr 0.01 0.05 0.09 0.14 0.14 0.13 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.12 0.02 0.05 0.13 0.08 0.01

Mg 1.68 1.96 2.19 2.17 2.21 2.21 2.19 2.18 2.20 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.21 2.29 2.28 2.14 1.92 1.68

Ca 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01

Th. Seifert
Mn 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01

Fe2+ 0.89 0.57 0.33 0.29 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.27 0.27 0.28 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.28 0.27 0.31 0.56 0.89
3+
Fe 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Ba 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01

Na 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02

K 0.79 0.85 0.85 0.86 0.87 0.86 0.85 0.87 0.86 0.86 0.86 0.86 0.84 0.86 0.86 0.85 0.83 0.79

Total 7.57 7.62 7.65 7.67 7.69 7.68 7.64 7.57 7.67 7.65 7.67 7.70 7.61 7.62 7.65 7.60 7.53 7.57
cations

XMg 0.51 0.66 0.79 0.81 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.82 0.79 0.66 0.51
Table A6 Representative compositions of F-apatite from lamprophyres. SrO was not analyzed, based on data from Rock
(1991), Mitchell and Bergman (1991), and Mitchell (1995). The difference to total 100 % is dominated by SrO
contents. In brackets intergrowthing mica-(micro)phenocrysts (see Plate III-B, -C, and -D). Averages are
compiled for apatite analyses of samples E-521 and LDED-11. n.d. - not detected, n.a. - not analyzed.

wt.% SiO2 TiO2 FeO Cr2O3 MgO CaO MnO BaO Na2O K2O P2O5 Cl F Total Comment
(tot)

#E-521 (LD1a-type lamprophyre)

0.40 0.01 0.18 0.01 n.d. 55.22 0.02 n.d. 0.02 n.a. 44.16 n.d. 3.01 101.95 apatite 1 (avg., n=3)

2.66 0.01 0.08 n.d. n.d. 53.62 0.03 0.01 0.14 n.a. 42.03 0.01 3.07 101.07 apatite 2 (avg., n=14)

0.32 0.01 0.10 0.01 n.d. 55.01 0.04 0.02 0.02 n.a. 43.34 0.01 3.52 101.24 apatite 3 (avg., n=9)

Appendix - Table A5 and A6


0.20 0.01 0.05 0.01 n.d. 54.18 0.03 0.02 0.07 n.a. 42.42 0.07 3.20 99.13 apatite 4 (avg., n=14)

0.25 0.01 0.06 0.01 n.d. 55.27 0.03 0.01 0.01 n.a. 43.12 0.01 3.66 101.21 apatite 5 (avg., n=17)

#LDED-11 (LD1a-type lamprophyre)

0.61 0.02 0.43 0.01 0.17 54.19 0.06 0.01 0.01 n.a. 43.26 0.01 3.36 101.19 apatite 1 (avg., n=16)

0.35 0.01 0.18 n.d. 0.02 54.76 0.06 0.01 0.01 n.a. 43.97 0.02 3.58 101.91 apatite 2 (avg., n=7)

0.23 0.01 0.25 0.01 0.03 54.58 0.05 0.01 0.02 n.a. 43.79 0.01 3.33 101.26 apatite 3 (avg., n=18)

0.29 0.01 0.20 0.01 0.04 54.95 0.06 0.01 0.01 n.a. 43.85 0.01 3.56 101.87 apatite 4 (avg., n=14)

0.39 0.01 0.18 0.01 0.03 54.79 0.06 0.01 0.03 n.a. 43.66 0.02 3.45 101.65 apatite 5 (avg., n=15)

#LDBE-6 (LD2a-type lamprophyre)

0.50 0.02 0.37 n.d. 0.31 53.55 0.04 0.02 0.10 0.11 43.05 0.19 3.07 99.99 apatite (G1)

0.53 n.d. 0.33 0.01 0.33 53.05 0.06 0.01 0.08 0.06 42.40 0.17 2.46 98.42 apatite 1 (G2)

0.52 0.01 0.41 n.d. 0.40 52.81 0.07 0.06 0.06 0.06 42.49 0.17 2.35 98.39 apatite 1 (G2)

0.49 0.03 0.42 0.01 0.36 53.52 0.08 0.01 0.08 0.07 42.68 0.19 3.35 99.87 apatite 2 (G2)

0.39 n.d. 0.34 n.d. 0.33 54.02 0.04 n.d. 0.11 0.02 42.85 0.19 3.30 100.15 apatite 2 (G2)

0.39 n.d. 0.27 n.d. 0.35 53.90 0.06 0.03 0.11 0.03 42.24 0.19 2.92 99.21 apatite 2 (G2)

221
0.41 n.d. 0.28 n.d. 0.37 56.75 0.06 0.01 0.10 0.01 42.46 0.13 1.46 101.40 apatite 2 (G2)
222
Table A6 (continued)
0.36 n.d. 0.29 n.d. 0.31 56.60 n.d. n.d. 0.16 0.01 42.68 0.15 1.71 101.52 apatite 2 (G2)

0.47 0.01 0.32 0.01 0.34 55.85 0.01 0.07 0.12 0.04 41.99 0.13 1.86 100.40 apatite 2 (G2)

0.33 0.04 0.41 n.d. 0.32 53.97 0.04 0.03 0.09 0.07 42.17 0.18 2.52 99.07 apatite (G6)

0.42 0.01 0.45 0.01 0.32 53.34 0.03 0.02 0.08 0.11 42.12 0.19 2.79 98.68 apatite (G6)

#LDBE-8 (LD2a-type lamprophyre)

0.43 n.d. 0.26 n.d. 0.24 52.89 0.02 n.d. 0.03 0.02 42.05 0.20 3.03 97.84 apatite (G3)

0.37 0.01 0.37 n.d. 0.28 52.40 0.04 n.d. 0.06 0.02 42.14 0.20 2.93 97.56 apatite (G4)

0.42 0.01 0.32 n.d. 0.27 52.60 n.d. n.d. 0.06 0.05 42.26 0.20 2.94 97.86 apatite (G4)

0.67 0.06 0.42 0.01 0.31 52.31 0.04 0.02 0.07 0.27 41.53 0.22 3.01 97.68 apatite (G4)

0.49 0.03 0.39 n.d. 0.29 52.63 0.04 0.03 0.05 0.16 41.83 0.19 2.99 97.85 apatite (G4)

0.44 0.03 0.32 n.d. 0.26 52.57 0.03 0.03 0.07 0.06 42.18 0.20 3.06 97.94 apatite 2 (G5)

Th. Seifert
0.47 0.03 0.44 n.d. 0.32 52.54 n.d. 0.02 0.07 0.16 41.58 0.20 3.10 97.62 apatite 2 (G5)

0.43 0.02 0.39 n.d. 0.31 52.71 0.03 0.02 0.06 0.12 42.10 0.19 3.13 98.16 apatite 1 (G5)

0.71 0.02 0.52 n.d. 0.30 53.57 0.04 n.d. 0.08 0.19 40.56 0.17 2.16 97.41 apatite (G7)

0.66 0.03 0.46 0.02 0.32 54.54 0.04 0.02 0.10 0.27 40.63 0.13 1.69 98.20 apatite (G7)

0.51 n.d. 0.34 0.01 0.27 52.52 0.05 0.01 0.07 0.07 41.39 0.19 2.71 96.96 apatite (G7)

#G2-1A (LD2a-type lamprophyre)

0.46 0.04 0.67 n.d. 0.04 55.68 0.09 n.d. 0.18 0.19 41.54 0.61 2.37 100.80 apatite (G7)

0.39 0.05 0.62 n.d. 0.03 55.95 0.05 0.02 0.18 0.16 41.26 0.32 2.66 100.52 apatite (G7)

0.29 0.04 0.65 0.01 0.20 54.77 0.06 0.01 0.14 0.06 41.74 0.97 2.14 99.97 apatite (G8)

#LDWOLK-1 (LD2c-type lamprophyre)

0.37 0.03 0.51 n.d. 0.09 56.13 0.07 0.02 0.05 0.12 42.45 0.24 1.52 100.92 apatite (G6)

0.61 n.d. 0.50 n.d. 0.08 54.78 0.09 0.03 0.08 0.02 41.34 0.35 1.16 98.49 apatite (G7)

0.47 0.01 0.52 0.02 0.18 55.69 0.03 0.03 0.08 0.04 41.50 0.61 1.18 99.73 apatite (G8)

0.77 0.06 0.56 n.d. 0.15 53.89 0.04 n.d. 0.07 0.18 41.27 0.08 1.77 98.11 apatite (G8)
Table A6 (continued)
F-apatite

wt.% SiO2 TiO2 FeO Cr2O3 MgO CaO MnO BaO Na2O K2O P2O5 Cl F Total Comment
(tot)

#LB-371 (LD2d-type lamprophyre)

0.43 n.d. 0.24 n.d. 0.05 54.17 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.27 43.00 0.26 2.80 100.07 apatite (G1)

0.87 0.01 0.23 0.01 0.09 54.11 0.06 0.01 0.04 0.16 42.41 0.29 3.58 100.58 apatite (G2)

0.41 0.04 0.63 0.01 0.01 54.20 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.20 42.74 0.17 3.70 100.59 apatite (G2)

Appendix - Table A6
0.46 n.d. 0.41 n.d. 0.08 54.26 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.09 42.92 0.35 3.64 100.67 apatite (G3)

0.78 0.07 0.54 0.02 0.08 53.69 0.05 0.03 0.05 0.20 42.22 0.30 2.82 99.67 apatite (G5)

0.53 0.05 0.51 n.d. n.d. 54.44 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.27 42.41 0.22 3.12 100.43 apatite (G5)

0.40 0.01 0.22 n.d. 0.09 54.52 0.05 n.d. n.d. 0.11 43.20 0.33 3.08 100.65 apatite (G5)

1.01 0.03 0.61 n.d. 0.15 53.83 0.08 n.d. 0.02 0.12 42.29 0.22 3.46 100.36 apatite (G9)

3.31 n.d. 0.86 n.d. 0.86 51.46 0.05 0.04 0.04 0.21 40.01 0.19 3.23 99.24 apatite (G10)

1.16 0.02 0.52 n.d. 0.53 54.27 0.05 0.01 0.03 0.06 42.62 0.15 3.76 101.65 apatite (G10)

1.62 n.d. 0.68 0.01 0.52 53.26 0.08 0.02 n.d. 0.33 41.86 0.17 3.50 100.89 apatite (G11)

0.46 0.03 0.48 n.d. 0.16 54.97 0.07 0.01 n.d. 0.09 43.38 0.29 3.15 101.70 apatite (G12)

0.45 0.01 0.34 n.d. 0.05 54.39 0.06 0.06 n.d. 0.03 41.79 0.29 3.43 99.41 apatite (G15)

0.59 0.06 0.60 0.01 0.08 54.92 0.05 n.d. 0.01 0.31 42.92 0.24 3.03 101.53 apatite (G15)

0.41 n.d. 0.25 n.d. n.d. 55.17 0.06 0.03 0.05 0.03 43.47 0.29 3.41 101.67 apatite (G18)

1.44 0.01 0.36 n.d. 0.46 54.35 0.09 0.01 0.04 0.05 42.72 0.17 3.37 101.64 apatite (G18)

223
224
Table A6 (continued)
#LD-540-8-1 (LD2d-type lamprophyre)

0.24 0.02 0.36 0.02 n.d. 56.22 0.09 0.04 0.07 0.08 42.52 0.17 2.44 101.22 apatite (G1)

0.31 0.04 0.56 n.d. 0.05 55.31 0.09 n.d. 0.09 0.17 42.26 0.24 2.42 100.49 apatite (G1)

0.25 0.05 0.67 n.d. 0.14 55.31 0.07 n.d. n.d. 0.15 42.75 0.21 1.97 100.69 apatite (G2)

0.22 n.d. 0.51 0.02 0.14 54.82 0.05 n.d. 0.05 0.04 42.84 0.29 2.59 100.42 apatite (G3)

Th. Seifert
0.23 n.d. 0.48 n.d. 0.15 55.78 0.08 0.01 0.06 0.02 42.21 0.35 2.21 100.59 apatite (G4)

0.25 0.01 0.47 0.03 0.20 55.98 0.08 0.04 0.06 0.05 42.28 0.29 2.28 100.99 apatite (G5)

0.27 n.d. 0.72 0.01 0.12 55.75 0.09 0.03 0.04 0.13 41.55 0.26 2.38 100.31 apatite (G6)

0.24 n.d. 0.40 0.02 0.09 54.85 0.14 0.05 0.08 0.02 42.21 0.34 2.45 99.80 apatite (G10)

0.19 n.d. 0.49 n.d. 0.19 54.51 0.08 n.d. 0.07 0.03 42.91 0.42 2.28 100.12 apatite (G10)

#LD-206-2 (LD2e-type lamprophyre)

0.41 n.d. 0.36 0.02 0.25 53.42 0.05 0.03 0.10 0.08 41.60 0.18 2.44 97.86 apatite (G1)
Appendix - Table A6 and A7 225

Table A7 Major and trace element compositions of Permo-Carboniferous lamprophyres from selected ore
deposits in the Erzgebirge and mafic volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin, and lamprophyres
from areas for comparison. Major elements in weight percent (wt.%), trace elements and rare
earth elements (REE) in parts per million (ppm), Au and Hg in parts per billion (ppb).

Sample # LDBE-1 LDBE-2 LDBE-6 LDBE-8 LDBE-4563 LDBE-4562 LDBE-4560 LDBE-4545

Locality 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A
(Fig. 2 )

Rock type LD2a LD2a LD2a LD2a transitional LD2f LD2a LD2a
LD2d/AL

Major elements (weight percent)

SiO2 50.10 49.70 49.52 49.03 45.23 41.62 48.02 48.73

TiO2 1.55 1.56 1.65 1.35 3.23 1.32 1.53 1.14

Al2O3 12.20 12.20 11.91 12.28 12.98 13.65 12.16 11.46

Fe2O3 7.15 7.32 6.59 7.46 13.40 11.01 7.86 7.73

MnO 0.10 0.12 0.13 0.16 0.13 0.27 0.15 0.16

MgO 7.93 8.01 7.95 7.97 8.81 4.55 9.04 7.37

CaO 5.73 5.88 6.87 7.31 8.43 9.24 6.65 7.64

Na2O 0.69 0.80 0.40 0.84 2.52 0.17 1.16 0.84

K2O 7.65 6.37 7.35 5.20 2.82 5.35 5.39 5.66

P2O5 1.05 1.04 0.84 0.92 0.19 1.12 0.88 0.88

LOI 4.85 5.65 6.44 7.47 1.93 10.39 6.31 7.46

Total 99.40 99.00 99.66 100.00 99.67 98.68 99.15 99.06


+
H2O 2.00 2.70 -- 2.33 -- 5.06 -- --

CO2 3.26 3.50 4.58 4.70 0.62 6.50 4.10 4.90

Trace elements (ppm)

S 920 1480 1100 -- -- -- -- --

Cl 175 168 964 200 -- 300 -- --

F 2660 2480 3500 2163 1253 1074 3972 2088

mg# 85 85 86 85 77 68 86 83
2
mg# molecular % Mg/[Mg+Fe ]

Analytical methods: Major and trace element contents were measured at the Activation Laboratories Ltd., Ancaster, Ontario, Canada.
Methods: XRF (major elements, Cl, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba), ICP (Sc, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ag, Sr, Y, Mo, Li, Be), ICP-MS (Ga, In, Ti, Bi,
REE), INAA (Cr, As, Au, Sb, Cs, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U), WET chemical (Hg, F), Coulum (CO2) and LECO methods (S); Fe2O3 = Fe total
(Fe2O3 + FeO).
* analyzed by 'Staatliche Umweltbetriebsgesellschaft Sachsen, Fachbereich Geoanalytik', Dr. S. Goldstein; Major and the most trace
elements by XRF, H2O+ by gravimetric method, CO2 + S by infrared-spectroscopic method, F by ionic-sensitive electrode method; Be,
Cd, Co, W by ICP-OES; REE, Bi, Tl by ICP-MS; Hg by FIMS; Li by FAAS; Fe2O3 = Fe total (Fe2O3 + FeO).
226 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDBE-4 LDBE-5 LDBE-7 LDFG-1 LDHALSB-5395 LDHALSB-1 LDHALSB-5255

Locality 1A 1A 1A 1B 1B 1B 1B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD2b LD2b strongly altered strongly altered LD2d LD2e LD2e
lamprophyre lamprophyre

Major elements (weight percent)

SiO2 52.70 51.40 60.62 54.16 43.38 50.60 52.51


TiO2 1.35 1.43 0.81 1.28 3.71 1.12 1.06
Al2O3 13.40 13.90 16.84 15.48 10.83 15.20 14.97
Fe2O3 9.22 9.33 5.59 14.68 13.25 7.46 6.91
MnO 0.26 0.18 0.09 1.27 0.25 0.13 0.12
MgO 2.19 2.07 1.82 3.20 8.25 5.25 4.93
CaO 6.03 4.69 1.22 0.74 9.85 5.65 5.34
Na2O 2.64 1.96 1.85 0.07 1.22 3.14 3.15
K2O 4.69 6.12 8.46 2.91 1.92 4.04 3.63
P2O5 0.43 0.44 0.16 0.35 0.52 0.52 0.52
LOI 7.45 8.80 3.38 5.70 6.68 5.80 7.12
Total 100.50 100.40 100.83 99.84 99.87 99.10 100.25
H2O+ 1.50 1.80 -- -- -- 3.30 3.41
CO2 6.10 7.28 1.16 0.98 4.80 3.66 3.75
Trace elements (ppm)
S 150 180 < 50 1500 -- 3160 --
Cl 216 232 < 500 < 500 -- 189 400
F 975 1010 1200 1400 1522 1200 890

mg# 55 53 63 53 76 78 79
Appendix - Table A7 227

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDKVB-1 LDSA-4 KRUPKA-626 1H1-90 1H1-93 1H1-98 1H1-155-2 3U2-A2
Locality 1C 2 3 4A 4A 4A 4A 4A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD2a LD2a LD2a LD3 LD3 LD3 LD3 LD3 (low-phyric)
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 50.46 56.93 56.18 49.70 50.20 48.30 48.82 51.90
TiO2 1.01 1.39 0.91 2.03 2.00 1.99 1.96 2.07
Al2O3 12.06 11.01 14.87 15.40 15.10 15.20 15.49 15.10
Fe2O3 6.92 11.85 8.63 10.50 10.10 10.40 10.26 10.70
MnO 0.13 0.08 0.13 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.13 0.08
MgO 8.78 8.13 6.58 7.53 7.30 7.58 7.47 5.99
CaO 6.31 1.40 2.87 3.07 3.21 4.23 3.69 1.61
Na2O 1.65 0.08 0.72 2.32 2.35 2.30 2.61 1.47
K 2O 5.84 5.88 5.06 3.21 3.15 3.08 2.46 4.71
P 2O 5 0.91 0.96 0.42 0.73 0.72 0.73 0.78 0.79
LOI 4.47 1.50 2.71 5.60 5.75 5.80 6.33 5.90
Total 98.53 99.20 99.08 100.40 100.20 99.90 100.00 100.40
H 2O + -- 1.51 -- -- -- -- 3.00 --
CO2 2.60 < 0.05 0.37 0.56 0.78 1.43 0.98 0.04
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- -- 470 740 1220 -- 3250
Cl -- 1400 -- 207 232 188 400 177
F 1047 15830 16480 1410 1360 1400 1132 1630

mg# 87 78 80 79 79 79 79 74
228 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # 1-HG-1-1 WH7-1 WH7-2 4H3-25 4H3-10 3U8-A1 L1-1 LD-20-1-1
Locality 4A 4B 4B 4B 4B 4B 4B 4B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD3 altered LD2a LD2e LD2a strongly LD2c (low-phyric) LD3
type minette with (altered) (altered) (altered) altered
carbonate lamprophyre
inclusions
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 49.77 51.20 51.90 52.70 50.90 52.20 51.98 52.10
TiO2 2.03 0.99 1.39 1.14 1.11 1.12 0.80 2.25
Al2O3 15.96 15.60 18.80 16.70 16.70 16.70 14.87 15.60
Fe2O3 9.84 5.01 5.59 7.04 6.35 5.72 7.73 10.90
MnO 0.12 0.50 0.20 0.13 0.41 0.46 0.12 0.14
MgO 4.29 2.65 1.61 5.09 3.93 2.14 9.02 4.20
CaO 4.49 5.76 5.01 3.95 3.72 4.25 4.48 1.55
Na2O 2.12 2.68 4.11 4.44 3.51 2.44 3.12 3.53
K2O 5.92 5.37 6.37 3.34 5.59 6.25 2.78 3.65
P2O5 0.80 0.39 0.29 0.41 0.42 0.43 0.25 0.86
LOI 4.96 8.65 4.40 4.75 6.50 7.65 3.69 4.80
Total 100.30 99.00 100.10 99.90 99.40 99.60 98.84 99.70
H2O+ 2.88 -- -- -- -- -- 3.14 --
CO2 1.14 8.17 0.14 2.43 4.52 6.66 0.22 --
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- 5280 220 3180 330 5530 -- 1870
Cl 300 449 101 188 284 440 800 157
F 1320 1010 1240 545 815 985 655 --

mg# 69 73 60 79 76 66 86 67
Appendix - Table A7 229

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD-19-3-2 LD-19-18-1 G2-1A G2-1C G1-8 G1-13 7H1-20 LDWOLK-Q LDWOLK-1
Locality 4B 4B 4C 4C 4C 4C 4C 4C 4C
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD3 LD3 LD2a LD2a LD2c LD2c LD3 LD2c LD2c
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 50.60 52.50 54.40 55.91 54.52 52.37 53.00 52.43 52.00
TiO2 2.28 1.08 1.20 1.28 0.73 0.72 0.93 0.79 0.86
Al2O3 15.90 16.80 12.59 14.30 13.78 13.40 14.30 14.88 15.60
Fe2O3 11.30 6.97 6.56 6.32 7.51 8.32 7.35 7.97 13.60
MnO 0.12 0.14 0.13 0.15 0.13 0.13 0.15 0.12 0.29
MgO 3.59 5.30 7.50 6.64 7.86 9.38 7.66 9.00 8.82
CaO 1.81 3.35 4.95 4.11 5.15 7.18 5.67 5.77 0.84
Na2O 2.71 4.28 1.49 2.10 2.49 1.13 1.78 2.03 0.08
K2O 4.79 4.29 5.92 5.99 3.66 2.01 2.93 3.73 1.99
P2O5 0.99 0.39 0.74 0.88 0.43 0.54 0.47 0.50 0.53
LOI 5.25 4.60 3.23 2.81 3.01 4.21 4.70 2.93 5.40
Total 99.50 99.80 98.71 100.48 99.28 99.39 99.20 100.16 100.20
H2O+ -- 3.10 -- 1.75 1.97 3.38 -- 7.92 6.10
CO2 0.03 1.83 0.98 0.22 0.77 0.95 1.75 < 0.05 0.06
Trace elements (ppm)
S 2130 1780 -- -- -- -- 1100 -- 810
Cl 205 188 -- 1000 400 500 133 300 108
F 1280 757 3036 1710 1216 1023 1180 1154 1490

mg# 62 80 86 84 84 85 84 85 77
230 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # ABF-1 ABF-3A D-1 A1-7 A2-2 A6-10 LDVG-2A 11402 31402 E-5000 E-521
Locality 4C 4C 4D 5 5 5 6A 6B 6B 6B 6B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD2c LD2c altered LD2c LD2c LD2c LD1b LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a
kersantite
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 52.31 51.77 56.10 52.49 49.63 50.93 57.62 58.40 56.00 56.10 57.70
TiO2 0.73 0.73 0.92 1.13 1.23 1.13 0.59 0.82 0.74 0.69 0.76
Al2O3 14.09 13.86 13.80 12.11 11.51 11.73 14.98 15.90 15.10 14.80 15.90
Fe2O3 8.15 9.06 15.50 7.28 8.63 7.51 6.37 6.14 6.91 6.82 6.52
MnO 0.17 0.24 0.93 0.14 0.17 0.13 0.12 0.09 0.13 0.11 0.08
MgO 9.28 9.80 4.68 10.80 11.48 11.02 7.62 4.83 7.15 7.30 4.87
CaO 7.73 7.75 1.28 6.07 6.78 6.45 4.91 4.74 5.29 5.52 4.99
Na2O 1.66 0.94 0.15 1.46 1.06 1.38 3.07 3.37 2.56 2.56 3.23
K2O 2.47 2.22 1.46 3.93 3.92 3.88 2.99 3.55 3.80 3.21 2.83
P2O5 0.52 0.44 0.55 0.60 0.73 0.63 0.20 0.28 0.24 0.23 0.25
LOI 2.58 3.56 4.85 3.00 3.91 5.26 1.71 0.90 1.05 0.90 1.50
Total 99.70 100.37 100.30 99.01 99.04 100.05 100.17 99.20 99.20 98.40 98.80
H2O+ 1.92 2.83 -- 1.81 1.42 1.64 1.59 -- -- 1.10 1.10
CO2 < 0.05 0.22 0.65 1.10 2.05 2.90 < 0.05 0.08 0.07 0.14 0.20
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- 420 -- -- -- -- 1070 150 170 460
Cl 500 300 < 100 700 500 200 700 396 365 339 454
F 1614 1734 1330 1599 1606 1599 1100 6730 1870 2680 11100

mg# 86 85 61 88 87 88 86 80 84 85 79
Appendix - Table A7 231

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # E-509 E-5-1910-1 E-5-FO LDED-3* LDED-11* LDED-10* LDED-7* LDED-16* SV-13-L
Locality 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 7
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD2c
type
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 55.90 54.30 54.20 55.00 57.90 55.60 55.50 55.70 53.95
TiO2 0.71 0.76 0.80 0.73 0.80 0.86 1.08 0.80 1.19
Al2O3 15.50 14.60 14.70 14.60 16.20 14.90 15.90 14.90 16.76
Fe2O3 6.80 7.09 7.09 7.60 6.87 6.70 8.11 7.87 7.67
MnO 0.11 0.12 0.09 0.10 0.14 0.11 0.10 0.11 0.12
MgO 6.76 8.21 8.25 8.21 5.67 6.66 5.82 8.20 5.58
CaO 4.73 5.58 5.10 6.37 4.82 6.50 3.87 2.77 4.88
Na2O 2.90 2.73 3.14 2.83 3.09 2.95 2.58 0.43 2.20
K2O 3.31 3.22 3.22 2.49 2.74 3.60 3.95 5.34 3.51
P2O5 0.25 0.24 0.29 0.25 0.27 0.44 0.79 0.30 0.63
LOI 2.15 1.25 1.20 -- -- -- -- -- 3.64
Total 99.30 98.20 98.30 98.55 99.17 98.85 98.76 97.19 100.14
H2O+ 1.20 1.50 1.40 0.51 0.81 0.64 1.44 0.99 2.01
CO2 0.84 0.12 0.02 0.33 0.37 0.22 0.15 0.18 1.14
Trace elements (ppm)
S 130 80 700 200 200 1500 1800 100 --
Cl 340 306 574 -- -- -- -- -- 900
F 14100 1290 2890 9566 9602 1395 2625 17500 841

mg# 84 86 86 85 81 84 79 84 79
232 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # SV-11-L SV-15-L ST-6-L ST-1-L EV-6-L LD-206-10 LD-206-7 LD-206-2 PHLA-3A
Locality 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 9A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD2c LD2f LD2c LD3 LD2c LD2e LD2e LD2e LD2e
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 53.43 37.66 50.28 63.15 57.49 49.30 49.60 50.20 48.30
TiO2 1.16 3.90 1.25 0.82 0.95 1.18 1.17 1.19 1.22
Al2O3 16.07 14.30 15.46 15.86 15.52 15.70 15.30 15.80 13.20
Fe2O3 8.69 10.61 8.06 3.70 7.96 7.69 8.79 7.02 8.43
MnO 0.14 0.25 0.13 0.09 0.09 0.16 0.15 0.14 0.28
MgO 6.92 3.02 8.76 3.21 5.35 5.80 8.14 6.37 7.98
CaO 4.96 10.67 6.68 3.68 3.14 7.10 2.10 7.27 6.68
Na2O 1.63 1.01 2.55 3.07 2.27 2.13 1.42 2.07 1.51
K2O 4.01 2.53 3.38 2.87 3.81 2.19 5.27 2.13 4.16
P2O5 0.67 0.84 0.62 0.22 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.41 0.71
LOI 2.21 14.19 1.94 1.99 1.72 8.55 7.65 7.65 7.35
Total 99.88 98.97 99.08 98.68 98.69 100.30 100.10 100.40 99.90
H2O+ 1.78 -- 1.17 -- 1.94 2.00 4.00 2.20 4.00
CO2 0.66 6.20 < 0.05 0.51 < 0.05 5.10 2.52 3.96 3.43
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- -- -- -- 1030 500 730 210
Cl 1000 -- 700 -- 1000 203 165 283 197
F 999 4078 742 1407 934 1330 1470 1590 3430

mg# 80 60 85 -- 78 80 83 82 83
Appendix - Table A7 233

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # PHLA-3C PHLA-5 LDP-42 LDP-66 LD540-8-1-2 LD540-8-1-5 LB-371-1
Locality 9A 9A 9B 9B 10A 10A 10A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2e LD2e LD1b LD1b LD2d LD2d LD2d
type
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 49.20 49.50 47.44 45.94 51.77 51.85 47.30
TiO2 1.22 1.36 1.11 1.43 1.15 1.12 1.07
Al2O3 13.10 14.30 14.61 16.49 15.45 15.41 11.50
Fe2O3 8.39 9.50 7.71 8.13 8.13 8.09 9.07
MnO 0.26 0.20 0.23 0.28 0.13 0.13 0.17
MgO 7.83 7.51 10.52 8.19 8.06 8.02 11.40
CaO 6.58 4.28 11.19 11.03 6.43 6.50 8.18
Na2O 1.44 0.19 1.22 1.63 2.43 2.39 1.40
K2O 4.16 4.70 2.65 3.38 3.85 3.95 4.49
P2O5 0.71 0.79 0.38 0.56 0.65 0.64 0.85
LOI 7.35 7.40 3.47 2.17 2.04 2.13 1.85
Total 100.40 99.90 100.52 99.21 100.09 100.23 97.70
H2O+ 4.10 4.20 -- -- 1.67 1.84 2.00
CO2 3.46 4.71 0.16 0.07 < 0.05 0.33 0.61
Trace elements (ppm)
S 640 70 < 50 < 50 -- -- 180
Cl 222 288 < 500 < 500 500 600 447
F 2730 1970 4200 3000 930 948 1660

mg# 83 80 88 84 84 84 87
234 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD540-6-6 LD540-1/2D LD540-6-2M LD540-6-2L LD540-7-2 LD540-12-1 LC-371-1
Locality 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2d LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c
type
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 45.28 55.69 56.96 56.35 57.54 54.66 55.40
TiO2 1.14 0.96 0.96 0.98 1.03 0.95 1.09
Al2O3 11.69 14.13 15.26 15.16 14.81 14.02 14.70
Fe2O3 7.41 6.38 5.56 6.27 5.90 6.73 6.16
MnO 0.16 0.09 0.09 0.08 0.11 0.09 0.13
MgO 10.81 6.05 4.20 4.08 3.75 5.97 4.22
CaO 9.58 6.04 3.86 3.80 3.78 5.93 3.39
Na2O 0.44 2.49 2.69 1.69 2.79 2.49 2.57
K2O 4.23 3.29 4.93 5.99 4.96 3.28 5.57
P2O5 0.88 0.78 0.83 0.84 0.74 0.76 0.73
LOI 8.09 4.26 4.80 4.94 4.70 4.39 4.75
Total 99.69 100.17 100.15 100.17 100.11 99.26 99.00
H2O+ 2.95 2.92 2.83 2.13 2.60 3.04 2.50
CO2 4.90 0.88 2.02 1.95 2.24 1.14 2.50
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- -- -- -- -- 240
Cl 800 500 800 1200 800 900 1390
F 1553 1320 916 837 990 1294 1180

mg# 88 83 80 77 77 82 78
Appendix - Table A7 235

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDSCH-1 LDSCH-2 LDSCH-3 LDT1-1 LDBERG-1 LDKI-56 Z-17 Z-18-II
Locality 10A 10A 10A 11 12 13 14 14
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2a LD2d LD2a shoshoni shoshonitic flow
type (carbonate-rich) tic flow
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 56.50 52.50 56.70 52.65 51.10 46.51 52.00 47.70
TiO2 1.07 0.99 1.05 1.17 0.95 1.98 1.35 1.32
Al2O3 14.90 13.90 14.70 13.05 15.45 13.73 14.70 14.40
Fe2O3 5.92 6.81 5.82 15.30 6.24 10.98 8.60 6.21
MnO 0.14 0.11 0.17 0.13 0.23 1.68 0.29 0.19
MgO 4.38 5.58 3.68 5.96 5.22 5.34 6.09 6.24
CaO 2.83 5.66 3.76 0.88 4.99 3.24 7.23 6.62
Na2O 2.31 2.13 2.61 0.08 0.15 2.24 2.03 1.91
K2O 5.39 4.74 5.37 6.82 4.37 5.46 3.39 4.66
P2O5 0.70 0.84 0.71 0.66 0.47 1.08 0.82 0.83
LOI 4.75 6.50 4.30 1.99 11.18 6.27 3.40 9.85
Total 99.20 100.10 99.20 98.68 100.35 98.51 100.10 100.10
H2O+ 2.50 3.50 2.50 -- -- 2.18 -- --
CO2 2.50 3.40 2.17 < 0.05 6.50 4.35 0.27 3.44
Trace elements (ppm)
S 1550 400 130 -- -- 400 120 130
Cl 318 394 253 -- -- < 100 153 255
F 1120 1330 999 20450 2941 4100 1710 2430

mg# 79 81 77 67 81 72 79 84
236 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # Z-19 LDZO-1A Z-13 Z-14 C-6-I SF4-U
Locality 14 14 14 14 15 15
(Fig. 2 )
Rock shoshonitic shoshonitic ultrapotassic shoshonitic ultrapotassic ultrapotassic
type flow flow flow flow flow flow
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 45.00 49.84 53.10 49.00 52.20 44.35
TiO2 1.78 1.78 2.15 1.90 2.06 1.95
Al2O3 13.60 13.48 16.90 19.80 15.20 14.41
Fe2O3 8.82 8.62 7.74 10.20 8.54 10.24
MnO 0.21 0.16 0.11 0.17 0.09 0.54
MgO 4.27 6.56 2.04 1.62 2.14 3.81
CaO 7.70 6.73 2.16 1.81 2.16 5.81
Na2O 1.74 2.39 1.77 1.38 1.56 1.63
K2O 6.43 5.13 8.74 5.58 8.23 7.56
P2O5 1.33 1.30 1.20 0.97 1.24 1.13
LOI 8.10 3.49 3.50 7.05 4.70 7.46
Total 99.40 99.49 99.80 99.70 98.40 98.89
H2O+ -- 1.94 -- -- -- 1.46
CO2 4.45 0.22 < 0.01 0.53 0.01 5.85
Trace elements (ppm)
S 180 300 950 430 140 200
Cl < 100 < 100 140 220 155 < 100
F 3150 4600 3060 1960 3000 3800

mg# 71 80 58 45 56 66
Appendix - Table A7 237

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # RON-4215-76 RON-432673-3 RON-4209-75 RON-8029-84
Locality 16 16 16 16
(Fig. 2 )
Rock carbonate-rich mica-lamprophyre carbonate-rich mica- mica-lamprophyre
type mica-lamprophyre lamprophyre

Major elements (weight percent)


SiO2 41.86 52.26 45.94 56.51
TiO2 1.13 0.98 0.78 0.85
Al2O3 9.79 16.51 14.10 12.62
Fe2O3 5.88 7.15 8.44 5.20
MnO 0.14 0.05 0.12 0.10
MgO 9.23 6.70 4.11 5.01
CaO 10.95 2.04 9.10 4.49
Na2O 3.33 3.92 2.79 0.43
K2O 0.10 3.51 0.63 5.96
P2O5 2.28 0.34 0.53 0.59
LOI 14.30 5.35 13.48 8.76
Total 98.98 98.80 100.02 100.50
H2O+ -- -- 3.18 1.77
CO2 12.20 0.66 10.00 5.85
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- -- --
Cl -- -- 500 1700
F 3200 1327 805 1004

mg# 89 83 72 83
238 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # PR-LD-1-10 DUB-LD-1-12 BYT-LD-1-7 HAJ-LD-1-3 KRA-LD-1-7 L-1M
Locality see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2
Rock carbonate-rich carbonate-rich carbonate-rich mica- and mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre
type mica- mica- mica-lamprophyre feldspar-phyric
lamprophyre lamprophyre (altered) lamprophyre
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 41.72 40.37 46.58 45.98 56.81 47.20
TiO2 2.13 0.85 0.79 0.62 0.97 1.23
Al2O3 13.32 10.46 11.01 11.87 13.69 11.90
Fe2O3 10.84 7.67 8.06 11.17 5.87 9.52
MnO 0.15 0.15 0.16 0.21 0.10 0.13
MgO 8.90 11.41 10.75 13.25 5.80 13.10
CaO 7.97 10.79 7.82 10.20 3.93 4.78
Na2O 2.20 0.93 1.45 0.76 2.12 2.03
K2O 3.24 4.36 4.02 3.21 6.36 3.38
P2O5 1.18 0.89 0.67 0.34 0.97 0.91
LOI 7.01 11.01 8.93 2.58 3.77 3.35
Total 98.65 98.88 100.23 100.18 100.39 98.00
H2O+ 3.58 3.02 1.97 2.13 1.57 --
CO2 3.80 7.75 6.90 0.15 1.80 0.30
Trace elements (ppm)
S -- -- -- -- -- 2040
Cl 100 600 300 600 < 100 273
F 878 1645 1170 990 2163 1780

mg# 81 89 87 86 84 88
Appendix - Table A7 239

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # L-2M L-3M L-HM BC96-L33-1 BC96-L32-2 NB96-L2-3
Locality see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2
Rock mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre
type
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 51.20 45.60 46.10 50.20 47.77 55.01
TiO2 0.76 1.15 1.06 1.05 1.84 1.30
Al2O3 14.10 11.30 9.89 15.56 17.29 13.89
Fe2O3 7.86 9.44 9.69 8.08 11.20 8.08
MnO 0.14 0.16 0.19 0.15 0.17 0.15
MgO 7.72 11.90 14.10 5.72 5.01 5.94
CaO 5.74 5.77 7.33 7.24 6.68 6.66
Na2O 2.38 1.80 1.41 2.74 3.42 2.11
K2O 5.01 2.57 3.24 3.30 2.19 4.14
P2O5 0.65 0.86 0.82 0.53 0.78 0.58
LOI 3.00 5.75 2.60 5.28 3.03 2.61
Total 98.90 96.60 96.80 99.85 99.38 100.48
H2O+ -- -- -- 1.57 2.14 1.66
CO2 1.75 1.60 1.29 3.85 1.10 1.17
Trace elements (ppm)
S 1590 13000 6400 -- -- --
Cl 229 130 384 300 600 200
F 1330 1470 1680 1028 621 1882

mg# 84 87 88 79 70 79
240 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDBE-1 LDBE-2 LDBE-6 LDBE-8 LDBE-4563 LDBE-4562 LDBE-4560 LDBE-4545
Locality 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A 1A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD2a LD2a LD2a LD2a transitional LD2f LD2a LD2a
LD2d/AL
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 18 17 19 21 27 31 20 25
V 143 141 146 148 254 170 159 150
Cr 280 280 338 453 265 581 374 524
Ni 122 122 140 169 152 371 170 233
Co 26 26 31 36 54 37 31 36
Cu 41 34 24 28 12 23 36 46
Zn 175 428 233 93 77 152 33 36
Ga 22 25 23 20 21 19 17 15
As 2 3 4 8 13 79 <5 11
Pb <2 24 34 92 8 170 6 18
Ag 2.8 1.6 0.4 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.0 < 0.5 < 0.5
Au <1 <1 <2 -- -- -- -- --
Hg 9 7 <1 -- -- -- -- --
Sb 0.5 1.6 1.6 4.4 3.5 3.8 1.1 1.9
Rb 413 333 341 264 113 257 268 251
Sr 545 797 1003 868 238 875 645 1340
Y 26 31 29 29 23 73 26 31
Zr 753 789 484 562 127 808 440 557
Nb 26 25 26 25 15 29 25 26
Mo <1 <1 <1 3 2 10 <2 2
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.1 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2
Sn 3 6 4 4 4 4 2 3
Cs 14.2 10.2 9.2 9.7 11.2 12.3 12.1 40.2
Li 60 65 81 82 69 142 70 98
Be 16 14 15 10 4 11 11 13
Ba 2640 2260 2896 3190 327 3060 2680 4020
Hf 21.0 19.0 8.4 7.1 3.9 23.6 13.6 17.3
Ta < 0.5 < 0.5 1.3 1.3 1.0 2.0 1.4 1.5
W 5 5 3 5 2 12 4 5
Tl 3.6 3.6 4.6 1.9 0.5 6.0 1.5 1.9
Bi < 0.5 < 0.5 0.1 1.7 < 0.4 1.7 < 0.4 < 0.4
Th 87.0 76.0 76.2 66.4 1.8 120.0 63.4 94.3
U 13.6 11.7 12.1 10.9 1.1 22.7 10.2 14.6
La 125.0 121.0 113.0 110.0 11.4 133.0 107.0 129.0
Ce 301.0 293.0 269.6 238.0 28.4 307.0 240.0 300.0
Pr 34.1 34.4 30.7 30.0 4.0 40.6 30.8 40.0
Nd 153.0 146.0 134.5 122.0 18.6 173.0 122.0 158.0
Sm 23.4 24.8 22.0 18.4 5.7 26.4 19.6 24.7
Eu 5.02 5.14 4.50 4.10 2.24 5.82 3.97 4.67
Gd 14.2 14.5 11.5 12.7 6.6 16.5 11.9 14.2
Tb 1.7 1.8 1.3 1.2 1.0 2.4 1.1 1.2
Dy 6.2 6.8 5.3 5.4 4.9 12.1 5.2 6.0
Ho 1.06 1.22 0.84 0.90 0.80 2.10 0.80 1.00
Er 3.1 3.4 2.4 2.3 2.1 5.6 2.0 2.3
Tm 0.30 0.40 0.25 0.29 0.27 0.73 0.29 0.34
Yb 2.1 2.4 1.7 1.7 1.5 3.9 1.7 2.1
Lu 0.32 0.33 0.29 0.19 0.19 0.45 0.20 0.25
Appendix - Table A7 241

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDBE-4 LDBE-5 LDBE-7 LDFG-1 LDHALSB-5395 LDHALSB-1 LDHALSB-5255

Locality 1A 1A 1A 1B 1B 1B 1B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2b LD2b strongly strongly LD2d LD2e LD2e
type altered altered
lamprophyre lamprophyre
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 17 16 15 29 23 20 22
V 128 139 89 167 245 178 164
Cr 13 16 92 136 363 130 124
Ni 21 19 40 8 267 24 < 20
Co 14 14 9 17 56 20 21
Cu 19 9 15 93 62 16 < 10
Zn 68 58 107 4341 200 78 77
Ga 19 20 21 25 20 21 18
As 16 16 28 5 10 3 <5
Pb 21 5 7 4484 17 8 22
Ag 1.2 1.3 0.6 0.6 < 0.5 0.9 < 0.5
Au <1 <1 6 <2 -- 11 --
Hg <5 <5 <1 <1 -- 16 --
Sb 3.4 2.0 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.1 1.4
Rb 297 387 446 210 109 157 165
Sr 154 126 117 51 399 496 470
Y 42 35 28 39 29 26 27
Zr 337 343 186 209 270 204 204
Nb 27 27 14 11 42 15 12
Mo <1 <1 <1 7 <2 1 <2
In < 0.5 < 0.5 1.2 2.2 < 0.2 < 0.5 < 0.2
Sn 24 28 113 353 4 7 5
Cs 23.3 22.1 29.1 7.9 16.1 6.0 5.2
Li 62 60 121 116 98 84 83
Be 4 4 3 2 4 3 3
Ba 717 823 1007 434 290 1550 1550
Hf 7.4 8.5 4.7 4.8 8.4 5.3 6.9
Ta < 0.5 1.1 1.0 0.6 2.5 0.7 0.8
W 11 13 9 19 3 2 2
Tl 2.0 2.6 5.3 3.0 1.1 1.6 1.6
Bi 1.7 19.3 8.0 1.3 < 0.4 1.8 0.8
Th 12.0 12.0 11.8 9.8 4.6 11.0 12.1
U 2.3 2.1 4.1 4.1 1.1 3.0 3.3
La 65.1 53.2 41.3 37.1 34.7 40.0 36.0
Ce 135.0 115.0 85.2 76.4 75.6 82.6 72.3
Pr 14.3 12.2 8.5 7.9 9.7 10.1 8.6
Nd 56.3 48.9 35.6 33.5 41.1 40.0 35.2
Sm 11.7 9.7 7.9 7.1 9.6 8.5 6.9
Eu 2.53 2.17 1.70 1.65 3.17 2.05 2.02
Gd 10.5 8.8 6.2 6.2 9.4 7.1 6.0
Tb 1.7 1.4 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.0 0.9
Dy 8.4 7.2 4.2 5.8 6.3 5.5 4.9
Ho 1.64 1.47 0.89 1.18 1.00 0.99 0.90
Er 4.7 4.1 2.7 3.6 2.6 3.0 2.8
Tm 0.70 0.60 0.35 0.54 0.32 0.40 0.40
Yb 4.1 4.0 2.5 3.7 1.7 2.8 2.5
Lu 0.58 0.55 0.38 0.60 0.19 0.42 0.36
242 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDKVB-1 LDSA-4 KRUPKA-626 1H1-90 1H1-93 1H1-98 1H1-155-2 3U2-A2
Locality 1C 2 3 4A 4A 4A 4A 4A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2a LD2a LD2a LD3 LD3 LD3 LD3 LD3 (low-
type phyric)
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 22 20 22 19 19 19 22 20
V 134 134 144 177 173 194 156 185
Cr 382 449 399 150 140 150 158 91
Ni 130 301 152 65 70 79 < 20 49
Co 19 20 29 23 25 29 32 24
Cu 33 < 10 12 39 42 35 24 22
Zn < 30 138 67 501 460 327 285 412
Ga 11 22 24 25 23 25 20 25
As <5 23 34 20 26 29 35 55
Pb <5 13 <5 <2 3 18 80 <2
Ag 2.7 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.6 1.3 1.8 < 0.5 2.1
Au -- -- -- <2 <2 <2 -- <2
Hg -- -- -- 6 9 9 -- 48
Sb 0.5 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.6 0.7 1.9 1.8
Rb 159 924 787 105 110 110 98 206
Sr 990 94 130 152 147 170 165 46
Y 31 35 22 33 36 45 50 45
Zr 596 1070 342 369 366 370 386 428
Nb 37 40 23 35 36 36 34 39
Mo <2 3 3 <1 <1 <1 <2 <1
In < 0.2 0.7 0.2 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.2 < 0.5
Sn 4 76 48 6 13 14 2 12
Cs 4.5 62.8 57.2 13.4 13.0 13.3 11.9 9.4
Li 56 315 232 159 157 157 150 120
Be 6 3 10 6 6 7 3 10
Ba 3490 1200 949 782 781 719 683 673
Hf 23.1 36.1 12.2 9.4 9.0 9.5 10.5 9.8
Ta 2.5 2.2 1.5 1.9 1.6 1.2 2.1 2.5
W 2 50 9 1 <1 2 <1 4
Tl 0.2 18.1 5.7 0.9 1.1 1.6 1.4 2.1
Bi < 0.4 297.0 0.7 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.5 < 0.4 < 0.5
Th 63.5 75.2 38.0 4.8 4.7 4.4 5.4 5.5
U 11.3 12.5 7.7 1.0 1.9 0.9 1.1 1.2
La 162.0 79.7 62.0 52.6 51.4 50.6 46.8 47.2
Ce 316.0 165.0 118.0 120.0 115.0 117.0 103.0 113.0
Pr 34.9 19.1 13.1 14.8 14.0 14.4 12.8 14.2
Nd 124.0 72.8 45.9 60.2 57.4 59.1 53.7 58.5
Sm 19.3 12.2 7.9 13.1 12.3 12.8 11.1 13.0
Eu 3.87 2.69 1.92 3.29 3.17 3.42 3.04 2.87
Gd 12.1 9.4 6.3 12.2 11.5 12.3 10.2 12.3
Tb 1.3 1.2 0.8 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.8
Dy 6.2 6.1 4.2 9.4 8.9 9.1 8.8 10.5
Ho 1.00 1.10 0.80 1.65 1.57 1.60 1.70 1.98
Er 2.6 3.2 2.2 4.6 4.5 4.6 4.8 5.6
Tm 0.36 0.43 0.33 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.69 0.70
Yb 2.3 2.5 1.9 4.1 3.9 4.0 4.2 4.8
Lu 0.27 0.33 0.26 0.58 0.56 0.57 0.60 0.69
Appendix - Table A7 243

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # 1-HG-1-1 WH7-1 WH7-2 4H3-25 4H3-10 3U8-A1 L1-1
Locality 4A 4B 4B 4B 4B 4B 4B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD3 altered minette LD2a LD2e LD2a (altered) strongly altered LD2c (low-phyric)
type with carbonate (altered) (altered) lamprophyre
inclusions

Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)


Sc 23 14 3 15 17 14 23
V 158 146 146 185 180 180 155
Cr 69 59 <3 62 74 65 393
Ni < 20 40 2 44 39 39 200
Co 28 21 5 20 14 23 36
Cu 25 82 11 24 34 155 29
Zn 202 20 122 136 110 27 75
Ga 20 20 33 22 23 22 18
As 18 430 6 8 81 160 <5
Pb 11 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 20
Ag < 0.5 1.5 1.4 0.7 < 0.1 2.8 < 0.5
Au -- <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 --
Hg -- 12 6 <5 6 92 --
Sb 1.1 2.9 0.4 0.6 0.9 2.3 2.8
Rb 353 223 131 122 256 242 103
Sr 195 329 2030 419 780 464 488
Y 61 25 21 27 15 17 22
Zr 457 158 522 160 181 171 153
Nb 38 12 115 14 12 12 9
Mo <2 <1 <1 <1 13 1 <2
In < 0.2 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.2
Sn 2 4 7 5 7 5 3
Cs 7.5 16.6 2.4 10.1 28.7 15.2 4.1
Li 178 341 23 161 113 447 47
Be 3 7 7 5 7 8 2
Ba 752 1100 1480 1180 1600 1380 721
Hf 11.4 3.5 9.7 3.6 3.8 3.6 4.9
Ta 2.6 < 0.5 3.4 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.0 0.6
W 3 2 2 5 3 4 1
Tl 4.5 2.0 0.5 1.1 2.1 2.5 0.8
Bi 0.7 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.0
Th 7.5 7.2 23.0 8.5 9.3 8.2 13.1
U 1.4 2.0 3.5 1.8 1.6 1.7 3.5
La 51.0 60.8 115.0 54.5 53.0 62.6 36.4
Ce 115.0 121.0 189.0 110.0 111.0 128.0 69.8
Pr 14.8 13.1 16.8 12.3 12.5 14.1 7.7
Nd 63.0 49.1 52.5 45.4 46.4 52.6 29.5
Sm 12.7 9.4 8.1 8.2 8.4 9.7 5.2
Eu 3.25 2.56 2.40 2.17 2.26 2.72 1.37
Gd 10.5 9.3 9.9 8.1 8.4 10.1 4.5
Tb 1.9 1.0 0.8 0.9 0.8 1.0 0.6
Dy 10.8 5.2 4.4 4.9 4.3 5.0 3.5
Ho 2.00 0.87 0.69 0.87 0.72 0.80 0.70
Er 5.9 2.5 2.1 2.7 2.1 2.4 2.1
Tm 0.83 0.30 0.30 0.40 0.30 0.30 0.28
Yb 4.7 2.2 1.9 2.3 1.7 2.1 1.8
Lu 0.74 0.31 0.28 0.33 0.25 0.30 0.27
244 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD-20-1-1 LD-19-3-2 LD-19-18-1 G2-1A G2-1C G1-8 G1-13 7H1-20 LDWOLK-Q
Locality 4B 4B 4B 4C 4C 4C 4C 4C 4C
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD3 LD3 LD3 LD2a LD2a LD2c LD2c LD3 LD2c
type
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 20 19 16 18 21 19 22 20 24
V 174 200 148 134 133 123 135 153 155
Cr 47 26 64 358 280 469 593 290 566
Ni 44 15 43 80 111 168 231 118 267
Co 19 14 21 14 27 23 24 22 35
Cu 44 50 26 10 36 18 24 24 14
Zn 519 312 61 < 30 154 958 703 137 198
Ga 28 32 21 10 18 17 18 21 19
As 15 130 10 7 16 99 140 31 60
Pb <2 <2 <2 <5 95 18 17 <2 47
Ag 1.6 5.8 0.8 < 0.5 0.9 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.4 < 0.5
Au <2 <2 <1 -- -- -- -- <2 --
Hg 6 42 <5 -- -- -- -- 74 --
Sb 0.6 8.4 0.5 0.6 3.7 3.9 8.7 74.0 12.1
Rb 156 234 222 192 231 189 109 137 160
Sr 150 111 373 551 495 640 1280 670 1140
Y 66 66 26 26 31 19 23 26 25
Zr 479 534 153 408 506 211 276 205 203
Nb 44 46 13 13 17 12 16 14 10
Mo <1 <1 1 <2 3 2 4 <1 3
In < 0.5 0.7 < 0.5 < 0.2 < 0.2 2.5 2.0 < 0.5 < 0.2
Sn 4 17 12 1 6 61 68 31 9
Cs 5.5 5.4 10.0 9.8 8.9 67.4 23.4 16.5 13.6
Li 117 97 116 93 81 110 114 104 64
Be 5 6 2 5 5 4 4 6 4
Ba 1030 1550 927 2790 2690 2460 2480 1580 4120
Hf 11.0 14.0 3.8 12.1 14.7 6.7 8.7 3.8 6.6
Ta 2.2 2.6 0.7 0.9 1.3 0.8 0.9 < 0.5 0.6
W 4 130 2 1 2 2 4 <1 2
Tl 1.5 8.0 1.7 0.2 3.3 2.5 1.3 1.5 1.4
Bi < 0.5 < 0.5 1.5 < 0.4 1.0 1.7 3.9 < 0.5 0.9
Th 7.0 8.1 8.6 21.9 29.6 36.3 58.1 21.0 25.0
U 1.4 4.4 2.2 5.1 7.2 7.5 11.3 4.5 6.6
La 53.1 68.8 48.4 63.4 69.8 96.6 146.0 78.2 154.0
Ce 127.0 156.0 101.0 131.0 145.0 173.0 253.0 150.0 278.0
Pr 16.1 18.9 10.5 15.4 17.3 18.0 26.4 16.4 30.4
Nd 65.8 75.0 41.5 58.1 70.1 65.4 95.9 58.5 112.0
Sm 15.0 16.0 7.8 10.9 12.4 9.4 13.5 10.1 15.3
Eu 3.28 3.22 2.16 2.54 3.05 2.44 3.35 2.48 3.82
Gd 14.0 15.2 6.3 8.4 8.3 7.2 10.0 10.1 11.2
Tb 2.0 2.1 0.9 1.0 1.2 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0
Dy 11.4 12.2 5.1 5.0 6.1 3.5 4.4 5.2 4.9
Ho 2.12 2.38 1.05 0.90 1.00 0.60 0.80 0.81 0.80
Er 5.9 7.0 3.0 2.2 2.9 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.3
Tm 0.80 1.00 0.40 0.31 0.37 0.24 0.28 0.30 0.31
Yb 4.9 6.6 2.4 1.9 2.2 1.4 1.7 2.0 1.8
Lu 0.71 0.95 0.40 0.25 0.30 0.20 0.24 0.29 0.25
Appendix - Table A7 245

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDWOLK-1 ABF-1 ABF-3A D-1 A1-7 A2-2 A6-10 LDVG-2A 11402 31402
Locality 4C 4C 4C 4D 5 5 5 6A 6B 6B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2c LD2c LD2c altered LD2c LD2c LD2c LD1b LD1a LD1a
type kersantite
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 17 24 25 10 22 24 22 19 18 19
V 156 148 146 104 147 166 148 114 150 172
Cr 430 636 681 250 629 690 684 488 180 400
Ni 165 390 455 142 471 179 293 219 41 106
Co 34 41 45 14 36 38 40 31 16 25
Cu 222 13 18 247 22 < 10 27 < 10 79 3
Zn 694 345 279 619 160 224 83 206 205 252
Ga 19 19 19 25 16 16 16 20 27 24
As 22 106 110 41 101 204 11 45 120 51
Pb 22 28 32 234 11 9 22 6 <2 <2
Ag 5.1 < 0.5 < 0.5 6.6 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.6 0.8
Au <2 -- -- <2 -- -- -- -- <2 <2
Hg 25 -- -- 9 -- -- -- -- 50 15
Sb 2.3 28.8 65.1 110.0 3.2 7.6 2.3 1.0 0.9 1.5
Rb 171 217 213 82 267 253 209 314 231 238
Sr 135 1380 1050 26 473 515 471 410 591 467
Y 17 26 24 16 24 24 25 17 18 17
Zr 193 193 175 231 433 400 443 145 221 200
Nb 12 10 8 14 16 16 16 8 12 13
Mo <1 3 3 <1 <2 <2 <2 <2 <1 <1
In 14.8 0.8 0.8 < 0.5 < 0.2 0.3 < 0.2 0.3 0.7 0.9
Sn 417 116 164 21 27 43 4 32 62 101
Cs 14.0 67.8 63.2 6.4 75.9 69.3 33.1 68.4 47.5 53.4
Li 158 101 114 127 84 127 100 127 152 106
Be 4 5 5 3 4 4 4 4 8 7
Ba 1350 2920 1940 468 2280 2930 2510 1040 1070 1210
Hf 5.7 6.4 5.9 5.9 13.5 13.1 14.8 4.9 5.2 5.2
Ta < 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 0.9 < 0.5 1.8
W 11 2 2 4 2 1 2 3 14 <1
Tl 1.5 4.2 3.4 0.8 2.0 2.4 1.1 2.3 3.2 3.7
Bi 19.5 2.5 1.1 < 0.5 1.2 1.7 0.7 9.2 19.3 < 0.5
Th 22.0 24.9 21.2 24.0 18.8 18.1 19.9 15.2 16.0 15.0
U 14.5 6.4 5.7 7.9 4.6 4.0 4.8 6.6 5.2 5.4
La 84.3 167.0 126.0 96.3 76.1 79.8 79.8 36.6 50.4 44.7
Ce 169.0 306.0 234.0 171.0 155.0 161.0 163.0 68.5 103.0 89.4
Pr 19.7 33.8 25.5 19.0 17.8 18.9 18.9 7.3 11.4 10.2
Nd 71.1 123.0 94.0 70.7 69.2 74.7 73.2 27.4 41.6 37.5
Sm 10.1 16.4 13.1 11.5 11.3 12.2 12.2 4.8 7.6 6.9
Eu 3.35 4.27 3.72 2.67 2.69 2.88 2.92 1.19 1.87 1.74
Gd 6.4 12.3 10.1 8.9 8.5 9.4 9.4 4.2 7.4 6.9
Tb 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.6 0.8 0.7
Dy 4.0 5.1 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.8 4.9 3.1 4.3 4.1
Ho 0.60 0.90 0.80 0.65 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.60 0.72 0.69
Er 2.1 2.4 2.2 1.9 2.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.1 2.0
Tm 0.20 0.31 0.29 0.20 0.31 0.29 0.32 0.25 0.30 0.30
Yb 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.6 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.5 1.9 1.7
Lu 0.26 0.23 0.23 0.24 0.22 0.21 0.25 0.22 0.27 0.25
246 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # E-5000 E-521 E-509 E-5-1910-1 E-5-FO LDED-3* LDED-11* LDED-10* LDED-7*
Locality 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B 6B
(Fig. 2 )
Rock type LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a LD1a
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 17 16 18 18 17 -- -- -- --
V 130 127 134 136 129 144 164 145 153
Cr 370 210 330 440 350 492 314 362 230
Ni 98 46 87 129 148 113 60 131 122
Co 28 21 26 33 29 32 23 28 26
Cu 17 78 6 13 35 38 106 34 300
Zn 146 826 323 136 220 287 278 104 449
Ga 21 23 22 20 21 19 20 18 23
As 110 330 98 85 53 332 233 19 172
Pb 2 <2 <2 <2 78 10 7 19 97
Ag 1.0 0.8 0.5 1.0 0.9 -- -- -- --
Au <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 -- -- -- --
Hg <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 < 50 < 50 < 50 < 50
Sb 2.1 1.6 1.7 1.2 1.4 2.5 2.0 3.1 3.2
Rb 207 388 661 245 276 463 614 185 270
Sr 411 371 368 428 593 412 383 935 583
Y 17 17 18 17 18 19 20 20 30
Zr 192 179 192 176 215 191 186 230 291
Nb 12 9 11 12 12 10 10 13 23
Mo <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 4 2 1 2
In < 0.5 10.6 1.4 < 0.5 0.6 -- -- -- --
Sn 60 131 136 51 56 85 227 12 23
Cs 63.5 78.0 104.0 62.8 73.8 -- -- -- --
Li 105 172 312 117 129 180 260 90 170
Be 4 7 10 4 3 9 9 3 5
Ba 755 742 886 824 1010 420 580 1815 1530
Hf 5.4 4.9 5.0 4.4 5.5 -- -- -- --
Ta < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 5.3 7.6 1.3 2.1
W 7 15 19 2 2 12 14 3 4
Tl 2.0 4.1 6.6 2.9 3.4 -- -- -- --
Bi 1.2 44.4 27.0 < 0.5 1.4 46.2 1.8 0.2 0.5
Th 15.0 13.0 15.0 14.0 18.0 26.1 16.1 27.5 57.7
U 5.4 5.1 5.2 4.5 4.9 6.5 6.6 8.1 9.5
La 45.0 40.9 45.8 41.5 60.3 -- -- -- --
Ce 93.1 86.1 93.6 88.2 123.0 -- -- -- --
Pr 9.2 8.5 9.2 8.9 12.0 -- -- -- --
Nd 35.1 33.3 35.9 34.5 45.6 -- -- -- --
Sm 6.2 6.3 6.6 6.4 8.0 -- -- -- --
Eu 1.50 1.52 1.66 1.38 1.93 -- -- -- --
Gd 5.0 5.1 5.4 5.2 5.9 -- -- -- --
Tb 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.8 -- -- -- --
Dy 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.8 4.1 -- -- -- --
Ho 0.70 0.72 0.75 0.77 0.78 -- -- -- --
Er 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.1 -- -- -- --
Tm 0.20 0.30 0.30 0.20 0.30 -- -- -- --
Yb 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.9 -- -- -- --
Lu 0.26 0.25 0.26 0.25 0.26 -- -- -- --
Appendix - Table A7 247

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LDED-16* SV-13-L SV-11-L SV-15-L ST-6-L ST-1-L EV-6-L LD-206-10 LD-206-7
Locality 6B 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD1a LD2c LD2c LD2f LD2c LD3 LD2c LD2e LD2e
type
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc -- 22 22 8 24 11 17 22 22
V 129 152 154 442 164 75 118 163 164
Cr 458 209 213 < 20 333 111 198 210 230
Ni 166 132 145 < 20 214 < 20 84 43 45
Co 34 33 34 20 43 8 21 30 26
Cu 16 14 < 10 52 22 < 10 < 10 20 6
Zn 273 112 116 34 146 33 193 78 66
Ga 22 19 19 21 17 15 18 19 19
As 46 49 51 5 98 33 32 13 7
Pb 5 12 7 23 8 7 23 <2 <2
Ag -- < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.9 1.0
Au -- -- -- -- -- -- -- <1 <1
Hg < 50 -- -- -- -- -- -- <5 <5
Sb 2.4 39.0 74.1 0.8 6.7 1.3 7.5 1.0 0.9
Rb 883 184 174 70 151 130 193 86 283
Sr 234 646 559 1243 701 429 354 304 133
Y 22 24 23 44 24 19 21 28 27
Zr 212 299 282 354 247 228 225 219 216
Nb 10 21 22 194 18 12 14 20 18
Mo 3 2 <2 3 <2 <2 2 <1 <1
In -- 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 0.4 < 0.5 < 0.5
Sn 32 11 4 2 11 3 28 <2 6
Cs -- 42.5 40.5 35.3 33.5 16.0 50.6 9.9 19.4
Li 350 84 112 78 54 88 94 83 170
Be 7 4 3 9 2 4 3 4 3
Ba 1231 3090 2070 1180 1830 879 512 605 653
Hf -- 8.1 8.3 9.0 7.0 6.5 6.2 4.6 4.5
Ta 9.1 1.6 1.6 14.0 1.3 0.9 1.2 < 0.5 0.9
W 22 1 1 2 1 1 <1 2 1
Tl -- 2.6 2.7 < 0.1 2.0 0.5 2.8 0.7 2.3
Bi 53.5 5.0 1.2 0.5 1.2 < 0.4 1.2 < 0.5 0.6
Th 32.3 43.6 42.2 14.6 27.7 19.8 20.4 8.2 7.8
U 6.9 9.3 8.9 4.1 5.2 4.2 5.2 1.7 1.8
La -- 79.7 85.9 151.0 75.6 56.2 50.5 45.6 41.8
Ce -- 149.0 159.0 287.0 142.0 101.0 95.9 95.7 91.0
Pr -- 16.2 17.2 32.2 15.8 11.1 10.6 9.8 9.4
Nd -- 59.4 61.3 118.0 59.1 40.1 39.7 38.2 37.5
Sm -- 8.8 9.0 19.4 9.1 6.9 6.6 8.3 7.3
Eu -- 2.35 2.21 5.57 2.27 1.60 1.94 2.09 1.79
Gd -- 6.5 6.7 15.0 6.5 5.0 4.9 6.9 7.0
Tb -- 0.8 0.8 1.9 0.9 0.6 0.7 1.1 1.0
Dy -- 4.6 4.5 9.4 4.8 3.4 3.9 5.3 5.4
Ho -- 0.80 0.80 1.60 0.90 0.60 0.70 1.14 1.13
Er -- 2.3 2.2 4.0 2.3 1.6 1.9 3.1 3.2
Tm -- 0.32 0.33 0.56 0.33 0.25 0.27 0.40 0.40
Yb -- 1.9 1.9 3.2 2.0 1.5 1.7 3.0 3.0
Lu -- 0.28 0.27 0.36 0.28 0.19 0.24 0.44 0.41
248 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD-206-2 PHLA-3A PHLA-3C PHLA-5 LDP-42 LDP-66 LD540-8-1-2
Locality 8 9A 9A 9A 9B 9B 10A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2e LD2e LD2e LD2e LD1b LD1b LD2d
type
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 22 18 18 18 24 23 31
V 164 135 137 133 145 166 199
Cr 230 280 280 340 580 353 356
Ni 43 119 123 121 235 198 76
Co 34 26 25 21 30 139 33
Cu 21 20 32 14 19 9 31
Zn 40 362 317 92 293 262 79
Ga 20 21 21 25 18 23 17
As 29 5 6 11 258 600 32
Pb <2 <2 <2 4 25 33 41
Ag 0.8 1.2 0.8 1.1 < 0.4 < 0.4 < 0.5
Au <1 <2 <2 <2 <2 6 --
Hg <5 <5 <5 <5 <1 <1 --
Sb 1.0 1.6 1.3 1.3 4.6 8.0 14.1
Rb 78 246 242 374 203 203 146
Sr 333 169 207 168 530 344 698
Y 30 29 28 33 25 26 26
Zr 223 246 243 270 205 282 293
Nb 19 21 17 21 14 26 14
Mo <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <2
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.3 0.7 < 0.2
Sn 13 8 5 10 43 60 2
Cs 15.3 7.6 7.6 22.6 41.0 71.5 22.2
Li 108 182 184 217 202 211 106
Be 4 6 5 5 2 4 3
Ba 659 829 810 1090 292 684 2930
Hf 5.1 7.3 7.1 7.9 4.6 6.2 8.8
Ta 1.1 1.3 1.1 1.4 0.7 1.5 1.0
W <1 14 13 24 3 7 <1
Tl 1.1 2.4 2.3 2.1 1.8 1.4 2.1
Bi < 0.5 0.8 0.7 < 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.5
Th 8.4 7.9 8.1 9.6 16.9 32.6 29.0
U 1.6 1.9 2.2 16.0 2.9 7.1 5.6
La 46.2 41.6 41.9 36.7 55.9 87.8 59.2
Ce 99.0 90.9 91.8 87.5 116.1 170.1 118.0
Pr 10.2 9.9 9.6 9.6 11.3 15.6 13.7
Nd 40.2 39.6 39.0 39.7 44.3 58.1 53.4
Sm 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.7 7.6 9.7 8.8
Eu 2.09 2.00 2.01 2.37 1.77 2.05 2.23
Gd 7.8 7.2 7.2 7.7 5.3 6.4 6.1
Tb 1.2 1.1 1.0 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.9
Dy 5.8 5.7 5.8 6.6 4.2 4.5 5.0
Ho 1.24 1.14 1.08 1.25 0.79 0.82 0.90
Er 3.4 3.1 2.9 3.6 2.4 2.4 2.5
Tm 0.50 0.40 0.40 0.50 0.34 0.32 0.35
Yb 3.1 2.8 2.8 3.2 2.2 2.0 2.1
Lu 0.47 0.41 0.37 0.45 0.32 0.29 0.30
Appendix - Table A7 249

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD540-8-1-5 LB-371-1 LD540-6-6 LD540-1/2D LD540-6-2M LD540-6-2L LD540-7-2
Locality 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2d LD2d LD2d LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c
type
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 30 27 31 17 16 16 14
V 194 207 191 126 124 124 108
Cr 343 890 878 227 87 51 62
Ni 76 240 316 111 80 < 20 38
Co 33 42 42 25 18 16 16
Cu 32 15 31 21 18 27 13
Zn 80 80 101 71 80 72 58
Ga 18 17 16 19 21 20 21
As 51 290 269 7 18 26 8
Pb 42 12 10 29 17 19 32
Ag < 0.5 1.3 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Au -- <2 -- -- -- -- --
Hg -- 25 -- -- -- -- --
Sb 20.6 20.0 32.3 7.3 3.8 6.3 3.3
Rb 144 185 169 100 152 201 155
Sr 676 757 316 1350 1020 1160 733
Y 25 23 26 26 29 40 26
Zr 293 300 319 445 437 444 505
Nb 15 16 16 16 15 16 17
Mo <2 <1 3 3 3 3 <2
In < 0.2 < 0.5 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2
Sn 2 16 2 3 3 3 4
Cs 22.6 22.0 16.9 3.6 7.6 9.1 5.7
Li 114 87 104 73 87 78 105
Be 3 7 5 5 5 4 4
Ba 2770 4150 3770 2250 4370 5020 2810
Hf 8.7 9.2 9.8 12.9 13.1 13.2 15.6
Ta 1.0 < 0.5 1.1 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5
W <1 2 2 2 2 2 2
Tl 2.3 1.5 3.5 1.4 2.4 2.8 1.5
Bi < 0.4 2.2 < 0.4 0.6 2.8 1.3 1.8
Th 29.4 27.0 29.9 41.3 45.4 45.8 39.3
U 5.6 6.3 6.0 9.6 9.7 10.5 8.8
La 58.5 68.8 61.3 135.0 150.0 148.0 121.0
Ce 116.0 143.0 125.0 265.0 293.0 286.0 230.0
Pr 13.5 17.6 15.0 30.3 33.1 32.7 26.3
Nd 53.2 72.3 60.5 116.0 127.0 125.0 102.0
Sm 9.0 13.1 10.3 17.4 19.2 19.3 15.2
Eu 2.17 1.90 2.49 4.25 4.73 4.91 3.59
Gd 6.1 8.7 6.8 10.5 11.6 12.3 9.7
Tb 0.9 1.1 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.2
Dy 5.0 5.9 4.7 5.4 6.1 6.9 5.4
Ho 0.90 0.89 0.80 0.90 0.90 1.10 0.90
Er 2.5 2.5 2.2 2.2 2.5 3.1 2.3
Tm 0.36 0.30 0.28 0.27 0.31 0.37 0.30
Yb 2.1 2.0 1.7 1.6 1.8 2.1 1.8
Lu 0.30 0.28 0.21 0.19 0.22 0.29 0.21
250 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # LD540-12-1 LC-371-1 LDSCH-1 LDSCH-2 LDSCH-3 LDT1-1 LDBERG-1 LDKI-56
Locality 10A 10A 10A 10A 10A 11 12 13
(Fig. 2 )
Rock LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2c LD2a LD2d LD2a
type (carbonate-rich)

Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)


Sc 17 11 16 16 12 20 16 18
V 128 125 141 128 102 144 141 164
Cr 230 55 60 230 60 274 42 167
Ni 116 43 46 97 39 39 < 20 112
Co 25 17 17 21 17 17 13 35
Cu 27 14 5 24 9 34 12 45
Zn 68 80 144 83 105 131 42 252
Ga 19 23 22 21 23 43 17 23
As 7 11 6 15 55 37 6 12
Pb 49 5 <2 5 3 22 <5 42
Ag < 0.5 1.7 2.0 1.2 1.5 < 0.5 1.8 < 0.5
Au -- <2 <1 <1 4 -- -- --
Hg -- 6 11 <5 <5 -- -- --
Sb 4.9 2.5 1.4 4.2 2.2 3.5 1.7 0.2
Rb 99 165 218 179 198 1100 256 261
Sr 1130 654 536 847 689 18 44 400
Y 25 27 23 26 23 28 23 38
Zr 427 538 535 482 517 232 164 362
Nb 15 19 21 17 19 16 14 44
Mo 3 <1 <1 <1 <1 <2 <2 2
In < 0.2 0.8 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 4.9 < 0.2 < 0.1
Sn 3 14 10 16 5 1350 3 2
Cs 3.6 6.0 14.0 9.2 5.8 101.0 39.7 28.5
Li 72 91 98 126 70 228 77 --
Be 4 4 6 5 4 8 7 --
Ba 2020 2870 2400 2140 2120 885 818 2330
Hf 12.4 16.0 16.0 12.0 15.0 6.7 5.1 8.3
Ta 1.2 < 0.5 1.3 0.9 1.3 0.9 0.8 2.2
W 2 4 6 5 6 25 9 1
Tl 1.3 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.6 19.9 1.5 1.1
Bi 1.2 2.8 0.9 0.5 1.0 0.7 0.5 < 0.1
Th 39.8 33.0 33.0 33.0 34.0 28.6 16.4 8.9
U 9.2 7.7 7.7 9.5 11.6 4.7 6.8 2.0
La 129.0 138.0 125.0 159.0 142.0 105.0 52.3 77.6
Ce 254.0 268.0 255.0 324.0 273.0 204.0 99.7 157.0
Pr 28.9 31.0 25.5 33.1 26.9 22.8 11.1 19.0
Nd 112.0 114.0 92.2 127.0 99.7 85.2 42.1 70.4
Sm 17.0 20.0 15.9 20.5 16.4 14.6 7.6 12.2
Eu 4.23 4.11 4.90 6.65 4.80 2.35 1.97 3.32
Gd 10.0 13.3 10.3 13.4 11.1 9.5 5.8 8.8
Tb 1.2 1.9 1.3 1.7 1.4 1.1 0.8 1.3
Dy 5.3 7.4 5.3 6.2 5.5 5.7 4.2 6.8
Ho 0.80 1.49 0.93 1.01 0.98 0.90 0.70 1.25
Er 2.1 3.4 2.7 2.9 2.8 2.3 2.1 3.2
Tm 0.26 0.90 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.35 0.33 0.45
Yb 1.5 2.7 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.1 2.1 2.8
Lu 0.17 0.81 0.29 0.30 0.32 0.26 0.28 0.38
Appendix - Table A7 251

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # Z-17 Z-18-II Z-19 LDZO-1A Z-13 Z-14 C-6-I
Locality 14 14 14 14 14 14 15
(Fig. 2 )
Rock shoshonitic shoshonitic shoshonitic shoshonitic ultrapotassic shoshonitic ultrapotassic
type flow flow flow flow flow flow flow
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 21 21 19 21 19 19 19
V 166 151 175 174 194 182 161
Cr 360 370 150 192 190 310 230
Ni 127 171 62 90 49 309 62
Co 27 36 15 28 6 43 18
Cu 22 6 6 26 8 13 3
Zn 86 205 556 227 68 65 153
Ga 19 19 22 23 25 30 21
As 5 5 15 <5 6 3 3
Pb <2 9 13 38 9 <2 <2
Ag 0.7 0.7 0.7 < 0.5 0.9 1.2 0.8
Au <2 <2 <2 -- <2 <2 <2
Hg <5 10 <5 -- 6 70 199
Sb 0.2 0.4 0.2 < 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.2
Rb 96 132 125 122 190 192 171
Sr 559 210 903 1680 517 238 369
Y 35 14 16 41 30 16 24
Zr 289 262 476 470 458 471 414
Nb 28 18 51 47 52 24 49
Mo <1 <1 <1 <2 <1 <1 <1
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.1 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Sn 8 15 15 3 14 9 17
Cs 3.3 5.6 0.7 1.0 4.4 8.4 6.4
Li 37 59 58 -- 38 81 81
Be 5 4 5 -- 5 6 7
Ba 1290 935 2690 3090 2970 1550 1720
Hf 7.0 6.8 14.0 11.1 15.0 14.0 13.0
Ta < 0.5 2.0 1.8 2.7 2.6 2.2 3.5
W <1 2 3 <1 3 2 2
Tl 0.3 1.2 0.9 0.4 1.8 2.0 0.9
Bi < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.1 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Th 12.0 11.0 17.0 16.2 16.0 27.0 10.0
U 3.3 3.2 3.5 3.1 3.2 11.1 4.1
La 41.4 41.2 112.0 122.0 118.0 59.3 67.5
Ce 88.7 87.1 222.0 225.0 226.0 122.0 142.0
Pr 10.5 10.4 25.6 27.4 26.9 15.1 17.7
Nd 41.2 41.5 97.8 101.0 103.0 61.7 70.8
Sm 8.7 8.6 16.4 16.3 17.9 11.8 13.6
Eu 2.27 1.89 4.36 4.25 4.86 2.67 3.29
Gd 7.7 7.3 12.8 11.1 14.7 9.8 11.2
Tb 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.2 1.4
Dy 5.5 5.0 7.6 7.7 8.9 6.8 7.9
Ho 0.94 0.82 1.20 1.38 1.40 1.19 1.38
Er 2.7 2.4 3.3 3.5 3.8 3.3 3.9
Tm 0.40 0.30 0.40 0.48 0.50 0.40 0.50
Yb 2.4 2.0 2.7 3.1 2.9 2.8 3.3
Lu 0.33 0.29 0.36 0.43 0.43 0.41 0.51
252 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # SF4-U RON-4215-76 RON-432673-3 RON-4209-75 RON-8029-84
Locality 15 16 16 16 16
(Fig. 2 )
Rock ultrapotassic carbonate-rich mica- carbonate-rich mica-
type flow mica-lamprophyre lamprophyre mica-lamprophyre lamprophyre

Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)


Sc 20 17 21 17 12
V 180 149 168 129 80
Cr 231 284 102 359 134
Ni 68 193 < 20 229 52
Co 18 29 34 33 15
Cu < 10 169 < 10 55 10
Zn 97 82 52 257 52
Ga 22 17 18 17 18
As <5 43 70 6 16
Pb 54 14 11 15 9
Ag < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Au -- -- -- -- --
Hg -- -- -- -- --
Sb 0.2 10.2 0.6 8.3 6.1
Rb 181 5 91 19 117
Sr 394 2940 321 131 74
Y 38 36 19 25 25
Zr 390 247 134 271 331
Nb 52 50 11 25 31
Mo <2 3 <2 2 <2
In < 0.1 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2
Sn 3 3 1 2 3
Cs 3.9 1.1 6.9 5.1 35.3
Li -- 116 153 248 136
Be -- 4 2 3 3
Ba 1720 209 795 580 522
Hf 9.0 10.6 4.2 7.0 9.9
Ta 2.8 2.5 0.7 1.7 2.3
W 1 <1 1 <1 1
Tl 0.8 < 0.1 < 0.1 0.2 0.8
Bi 0.3 0.8 < 0.4 < 0.4 < 0.4
Th 8.5 135 13.9 29.8 20.1
U 3.0 19.7 1.8 5.7 3.4
La 62.6 371.0 49.8 117.0 50.5
Ce 131.0 623.0 90.7 212.0 101.0
Pr 16.2 74.80 10.10 22.50 11.40
Nd 62.3 252.0 36.8 83.3 43.6
Sm 11.4 34.7 6.2 12.4 7.7
Eu 3.02 7.37 1.76 3.63 1.55
Gd 8.8 22.9 5.1 8.7 5.5
Tb 1.3 1.7 0.7 1.2 0.9
Dy 6.8 7.3 3.6 5.4 4.8
Ho 1.28 1.10 0.70 0.90 0.90
Er 3.4 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.4
Tm 0.49 0.27 0.29 0.31 0.34
Yb 3.0 1.4 1.8 1.8 2.0
Lu 0.42 0.18 0.26 0.23 0.28
Appendix - Table A7 253

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # PR-LD-1-10 DUB-LD-1-12 BYT-LD-1-7 HAJ-LD-1-3 KRA-LD-1-7 L-1M
Locality see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2
Rock carbonate- carbonate-rich carbonate-rich mica- and feldspar- mica- mica-
type rich mica- mica- mica-lamprophyre phyric lamprophyre lamprophyre lamprophyre
lamprophyre lamprophyre (altered)

Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)


Sc 27 32 33 51 18 19
V 233 189 189 260 106 165
Cr 359 737 585 761 339 570
Ni 134 492 295 261 70 287
Co 44 52 44 48 27 31
Cu 44 76 54 24 27 45
Zn 130 83 63 119 53 54
Ga 18 12 13 12 19 16
As <5 <5 27 136 16 8
Pb 27 23 18 6 26 3
Ag < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 0.5 0.5
Au -- -- -- -- -- <2
Hg -- -- -- -- -- 11
Sb 1.3 21.9 17.3 5.0 34.2 2.2
Rb 69 184 114 101 408 93
Sr 1040 472 622 467 317 1170
Y 34 38 26 24 29 25
Zr 264 203 210 103 352 256
Nb 36 10 14 3 20 44
Mo 2 <2 4 3 <2 <1
In < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.5
Sn 2 5 5 3 5 9
Cs 8.2 16.4 10.1 7.9 18.8 7.3
Li 38 44 45 64 38 24
Be 2 4 5 2 12 4
Ba 2220 1310 2000 868 1740 2650
Hf 7.0 6.0 6.6 3.0 11.0 6.6
Ta 2.4 0.7 1.2 0.1 1.8 1.7
W 1 <1 4 <1 4 6
Tl 1.2 1.8 1.2 1.0 5.0 0.7
Bi 1.0 1.9 2.6 1.3 0.6 < 0.5
Th 18.9 28.2 24.2 9.0 72.4 11.0
U 4.9 11.9 8.6 2.6 27.2 3.8
La 89.9 55.9 38.8 31.4 38.0 62.2
Ce 171.0 121.0 81.6 66.7 92.5 122.0
Pr 19.30 15.40 10.30 8.30 13.40 13.60
Nd 77.1 67.0 44.1 35.4 68.8 54.0
Sm 13.2 14.9 8.9 7.8 17.7 10.1
Eu 3.96 3.27 1.82 2.28 3.15 2.95
Gd 10.0 11.2 6.4 6.2 9.2 8.0
Tb 1.3 1.7 1.0 1.0 1.2 0.9
Dy 7.0 8.2 5.2 5.3 5.7 5.0
Ho 1.20 1.30 0.90 0.80 0.90 0.84
Er 3.0 3.1 2.3 2.1 2.5 2.3
Tm 0.39 0.37 0.32 0.28 0.35 0.30
Yb 2.3 2.1 1.9 1.6 2.1 2.0
Lu 0.29 0.22 0.26 0.21 0.28 0.28
254 Th. Seifert

Table A7 (continued)
Sample # L-2M L-3M L-HM BC96-L33-1 BC96-L32-2 NB96-L2-3
Locality see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2 see Tab. A2
Rock mica- mica- mica- mica- mica- mica-
type lamprophyre lamprophyre lamprophyre lamprophyre lamprophyre lamprophyre
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 16 18 18 23 21 26
V 144 150 142 164 141 196
Cr 310 680 790 156 56 148
Ni 79 353 423 < 20 < 20 < 20
Co 23 36 36 28 31 31
Cu 42 30 22 40 19 119
Zn 72 68 72 162 143 122
Ga 16 16 12 16 18 20
As 6 18 21 <5 <5 14
Pb 11 9 12 51 13 13
Ag 0.3 0.4 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Au 14 12 <2 -- -- --
Hg 5 <5 <5 -- -- --
Sb 2.0 1.6 6.8 0.7 0.5 24.0
Rb 166 75 102 127 96 223
Sr 1050 823 909 1010 1150 554
Y 13 16 19 23 29 27
Zr 230 223 214 167 184 356
Nb 32 42 30 59 49 19
Mo <1 <1 <1 3 4 12
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.2 < 0.2 < 0.2
Sn 12 7 12 2 2 12
Cs 12.3 1.4 4.3 19.6 13.3 13.8
Li 14 25 28 46 61 42
Be 4 3 3 2 2 6
Ba 1760 2020 1950 2490 2530 1740
Hf 4.8 5.8 4.7 4.9 4.8 11.5
Ta 2.5 2.0 1.6 3.2 2.4 1.3
W 3 <1 <1 3 2 4
Tl 0.9 0.6 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.1
Bi < 0.5 0.7 1.1 0.6 < 0.4 12.6
Th 11.0 9.5 7.7 11.4 6.6 29.1
U 4.7 2.8 2.6 2.4 1.3 7.4
La 39.4 62.2 42.9 68.2 56.3 54.7
Ce 79.5 120.0 87.9 121.0 103.0 121.0
Pr 9.30 13.60 10.00 12.40 11.00 14.50
Nd 36.3 53.8 39.4 45.5 42.0 60.9
Sm 7.5 10.1 7.5 7.0 7.3 11.6
Eu 2.23 2.88 2.41 1.94 2.33 2.60
Gd 5.8 8.1 6.5 6.0 6.5 8.6
Tb 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.1
Dy 3.6 5.1 4.1 4.2 5.1 5.1
Ho 0.58 0.79 0.64 0.80 1.00 0.90
Er 1.7 2.3 1.9 2.3 3.0 2.4
Tm 0.20 0.30 0.20 0.35 0.44 0.33
Yb 1.4 2.0 1.5 2.2 2.7 2.0
Lu 0.21 0.28 0.23 0.31 0.40 0.27
Appendix - Table A8 255

Table A8 Major and trace element analyses of post-collisional acidic (sub)volcanic magmatites
from the Erzgebirge and Sub-Erzgebirge basin. Major elements in weight percent (wt.%),
trace elements in parts per million (ppm), Au and Hg in parts per billion (ppb).

Legend
rock types: rd/rf/rdo = rhyolitic dike/flow/dome; ri/rdi = rhyolitic/rhyodacitic ignimbrite;
gr = granite (small intrusion); mon = monzonite. Sample ALT-1 = albite granite.
Localities (see also Fig. 2): I - Freiberg (Brand-Erbisdorf); II - Altenberg; III - Zinnwald; IV - Seiffen borehole Sn Sei 1/65; V -
Hora Svat Kateiny (R); VI - Schlettau/Annaberg borehole W3100/86, 800 m depth; VII - Augustusburg (old quarry), VIII -
Oederan (old quarry at the B173); IX - Euba; Xa - Zeisigwald/Chemnitz-West (old quarry, 'Zeisigwald Tuff', samples #C1, #C2,
#C3, #C7); Xb - Chemnitz-Altendorf ('Leukersdorf Tuff', sample #C8); XI - Wstenbrand (sample #C5); XII - Gottesberg.

Sample # RYBE-3 RYBE-5 ALT-2 ALT-1 ZW-1 ZW-4 ZW-3 GSEIF-1 GKATHA-1

Locality (rom. I I II II III III III IV V


number in Fig. 2)

Rock type rd rd gr gr gr gr gr gr gr

Major elements (weight percent)

SiO2 77.30 74.85 74.00 66.50 86.90 74.70 70.10 76.40 75.97

TiO2 0.13 0.13 0.03 0.00 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.12 0.02

Al2O3 10.90 11.54 13.60 19.30 8.04 14.60 16.20 12.30 12.70

Fe2O3 1.62 2.09 1.35 0.18 1.57 0.92 1.39 1.11 1.11

MnO 0.03 0.08 0.08 0.02 0.14 0.09 0.16 0.02 0.03

MgO 0.42 0.55 0.06 0.11 0.03 0.15 0.13 0.14 < 0.10

CaO 0.86 1.02 0.40 0.28 0.71 0.65 1.07 0.69 0.32

Na2O 0.16 0.09 3.68 6.96 0.13 2.68 0.24 2.88 4.29

K2O 7.20 6.51 4.65 4.29 1.39 3.34 4.95 5.17 4.17

P2O5 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02 < 0.01 < 0.01 < 0.01 0.03 0.02

LOI 1.55 3.07 1.15 1.05 1.35 2.35 4.40 0.80 --

Total 100.20 99.97 99.00 98.70 100.30 99.50 98.70 99.70 99.34

H2O+ 0.90 -- 0.50 0.70 0.80 1.50 3.00 0.50 0.60

CO2 0.46 -- 0.17 0.03 0.05 < 0.01 0.03 0.28 0.01

Trace elements (ppm)

S 220 -- 50 90 150 140 140 170 --

Cl 164 -- 298 122 106 < 100 119 158 --

F 2680 1400 9370 1440 24600 9730 14200 3310 2300

Analytical methods: Major and trace element contents were measured at the Activation Laboratories Ltd., Ancaster, Ontario,
Canada, Methods: XRF (major elements. Cl, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba), ICP (Sc, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ag, Sr, Y, Mo, Li, Be) , ICP-MS
(Ga, In, Ti, Bi, REE), INAA (Cr, As, Au, Sb, Cs, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U) , WET chemical (Hg, F) , Coulum (CO2) and LECO
methods (S).
256 Th. Seifert

Table A8 (continued)
Sample # MON-1 F1 F4 AUGB-1 F5 F6 F8 C1 C2 C3

Locality (rom. VI VII VII VII VII VIII IX Xa Xa Xa


number in Fig. 2)

Rock type mon rf rdo rdo rf ri rf ri ri ri

Major elements (weight percent)

SiO2 54.50 75.70 76.40 77.70 73.80 76.40 76.40 75.90 74.70 71.50

TiO2 0.91 0.12 0.02 0.05 0.30 0.18 0.07 0.08 0.16 0.06

Al2O3 17.00 12.70 12.60 12.40 13.00 13.00 12.10 12.30 12.80 13.80

Fe2O3 5.98 1.07 0.35 0.60 2.68 1.42 1.22 1.26 1.20 1.98

MnO 0.12 0.07 0.02 < 0.01 0.03 0.03 0.05 0.03 0.03 0.04

MgO 4.36 0.22 0.12 0.10 0.38 0.28 0.23 0.62 0.43 1.37

CaO 4.43 0.15 0.07 0.29 0.15 0.04 0.45 0.09 0.10 0.33

Na2O 3.05 0.42 1.55 1.25 0.22 0.24 2.73 0.18 0.18 0.15

K2O 4.71 6.84 7.03 6.49 6.08 7.15 5.47 5.88 6.42 5.80

P2O5 0.28 0.04 0.02 < 0.01 0.07 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.03

LOI 3.00 2.00 1.30 1.30 2.65 2.05 1.20 2.75 3.05 4.45

Total 98.50 99.40 99.50 100.20 99.40 100.90 100.00 99.20 99.20 99.60
+
H2O 2.60 -- -- 0.90 -- -- -- -- -- --

CO2 0.49 0.02 0.02 0.16 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.01 0.01

Trace elements (ppm)

S 140 110 130 80 140 130 100 80 90 90

Cl 129 155 < 100 112 < 100 < 100 < 100 < 100 < 100 < 100

F 3920 564 302 1380 786 383 2380 1360 740 2940
Appendix - Table A8 257

Table A8 (continued)
Sample # C7 C8 C5 GRGOT
Locality (rom. Xa Xb XI XII
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type ri rdi rf gr
Major elements (weight percent)
SiO2 69.70 69.50 71.40 77.14
TiO2 0.20 0.64 0.48 0.09
Al2O3 12.00 15.00 15.00 11.96
Fe2O3 1.52 1.57 0.77 1.80
MnO 0.12 < 0.01 0.02 0.024
MgO 0.54 0.26 0.32 0.26
CaO 2.83 0.92 0.26 0.48
Na2O 0.20 2.57 1.34 2.86
K2O 5.12 6.81 7.34 4.42
P2O5 0.06 0.19 0.13 0.04
LOI 5.15 1.80 2.20 0.95
Total 97.50 99.40 99.40 100.01
+
H2O -- 1.00 -- --
CO2 0.69 < 0.01 < 0.01 --
Trace elements (ppm)
S 8470 6920 130 --
Cl 298 142 < 100 --
F 6040 498 742 1047
258 Th. Seifert

Table A8 (continued)
Sample # RYBE-3 RYBE-5 ALT-2 ALT-1 ZW-1 ZW-4 ZW-3 GSEIF-1 GKATHA-1
Locality (rom. I I II II III III III IV V
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type rd rd gr gr gr gr gr gr gr
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 4 4 6 1 8 5 8 4 7
V 9 <5 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 5 --
Cr 20 <5 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 --
Ni 2 < 20 <1 <1 <1 <1 2 <1 --
Co 1 3 <1 <1 2 2 <1 2 --
Cu 12.6 33.0 5.1 3.5 5.3 4.7 30.7 3.8 --
Zn 44.9 50.0 79.2 53.4 145.0 137.0 231.0 16.7 --
Ga 19 24 35 55 17 41 44 22 --
As 3.6 4.0 24.0 54.0 28.0 21.0 13.0 18.0 --
Pb 6 10 16 13 <2 <2 59 13 --
Ag 0.4 0.6 < 0.1 0.5 0.8 0.5 6.3 0.5 --
Au <2 <5 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 --
Hg <5 <1 <5 <5 31 <5 105 <5 --
Sb 3.3 < 0.5 0.7 0.3 1.0 0.5 1.6 0.3 --
Rb 553 489 1750 1230 1420 1960 2680 445 1125
Sr 94 69 44 80 44 49 41 62 15
Y 49 48 62 9 15 24 25 75 125
Zr 146 124 70 63 48 65 56 153 110
Nb 20 27 58 61 30 61 105 31 79
Mo <1 <2 5 2 <1 3 29 <1 --
In < 0.5 < 0.2 0.8 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.0 < 0.5 --
Sn 13 8 128 3 47 64 194 13 36
Cs 20.8 22.8 38.9 9.6 43.5 32.0 51.7 9.3 48.5
Li 17 -- 586 18 1760 1020 2260 33 580
Be 3 3 7 7 7 7 9 10 --
Ba 200 211 38 70 25 40 722 196 < 50
Hf 5.4 5.5 6.6 6.3 5.3 8.4 6.7 5.8 12.0
Ta 1.5 2.4 17.0 34.0 12.0 22.0 34.0 3.2 14.9
W 22 2 32 4 48 13 28 8 50
Tl 3.1 5.5 9.7 7.3 6.3 10.9 14.5 4.0 --
Bi 0.7 1.4 2.7 1.3 47.7 5.7 49.2 0.9 --
Th 51 49 28 3 30 14 26 41 40
U 5.7 5.9 18.3 16.1 7.0 14.8 18.6 18.9 11.2
La 56.7 59.4 26.0 13.5 11.1 15.2 14.8 42.1 22.8
Ce 125.0 128.0 75.8 34.0 32.6 47.2 43.3 99.7 68.8
Pr 12.7 14.2 8.3 3.3 3.3 4.9 4.7 10.9 --
Nd 47.8 53.0 28.3 9.4 8.6 13.5 13.4 43.7 --
Sm 10.6 11.8 9.3 2.4 2.8 4.1 4.6 12.1 --
Eu 0.56 0.33 < 0.05 0.09 < 0.05 < 0.05 0.37 0.43 < 0.02
Gd 9.6 10.1 9.1 1.7 2.3 3.6 3.7 11.9 --
Tb 1.6 1.9 2.0 0.3 0.6 1.0 0.9 2.2 --
Dy 9.1 10.5 14.0 2.4 4.4 7.2 6.6 13.0 --
Ho 1.88 1.90 3.09 0.52 0.98 1.68 1.48 2.72 --
Er 5.5 5.9 10.4 2.0 3.5 6.0 5.2 8.4 --
Tm 0.8 1.0 2.0 0.4 0.9 1.4 1.2 1.3 --
Yb 5.4 6.0 15.2 3.7 7.8 12.2 10.1 8.8 --
Lu 0.74 0.84 2.25 0.56 1.17 1.79 1.51 1.27 --

Zr+Ce+Y 320 300 208 106 96 136 124 328 304


Appendix - Table A8 259

Table A8 (continued)
Sample # MON-1 F1 F4 AUGB-1 F5 F6 F8 C1 C2 C3
Locality (rom. VI VII VII VII VII VIII IX Xa Xa Xa
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type mon rf rdo rdo rf ri rf ri ri ri
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 14 1 6 4 3 4 2 5 6 6
V 121 <2 <2 <2 18 7 3 8 17 6
Cr 180 6 18 17 13 5 21 27 25 18
Ni 105 3 4 <1 3 3 <1 5 6 5
Co 23 1 2 1 <1 <1 <1 2 2 <1
Cu 82.3 < 0.5 11.6 4.3 1.8 0.6 < 0.5 4.8 11.3 6.8
Zn 372.0 15.0 54.4 16.6 22.5 26.8 25.7 117.0 60.4 46.6
Ga 24 24 18 20 24 16 18 19 20 24
As 2.7 5.1 11.0 8.4 120.0 230.0 3.3 65.0 9.6 100.0
Pb 132 <2 14 <2 <2 6 6 5 8 <2
Ag 3.4 0.1 0.1 0.3 < 0.1 0.2 < 0.1 < 0.1 < 0.1 < 0.1
Au <2 3 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2
Hg <5 5 9 15 9 10 <5 <5 9 15
Sb 7.6 1.4 1.4 2.0 12.0 5.8 0.3 14.0 4.1 4.1
Rb 245 520 629 714 417 397 462 449 614 387
Sr 292 12 27 52 132 124 11 17 16 28
Y 18 66 56 83 77 33 97 141 84 208
Zr 262 159 105 107 233 163 145 99 115 98
Nb 12 22 26 29 19 23 31 34 31 39
Mo <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Sn 5 15 23 27 12 15 25 24 32 38
Cs 21.6 24.0 11.1 12.3 25.1 18.1 11.8 52.6 36.6 176.0
Li 125 272 39 18 34 60 36 39 67 90
Be 5 7 4 3 6 4 4 9 10 16
Ba 1170 185 98 18 368 172 71 129 295 126
Hf 7.8 7.0 6.1 6.0 8.4 7.5 6.9 5.1 5.5 5.8
Ta 1.0 2.9 4.9 4.9 1.7 1.8 4.3 5.9 5.9 7.4
W 5 3 3 3 26 21 4 23 2 7
Tl 3.4 3.2 3.4 4.1 2.3 2.9 2.0 2.7 3.3 2.4
Bi 2.0 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.9 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.0 < 0.5 0.7
Th 25 70 45 49 43 33 76 35 33 43
U 6.2 8.1 13.8 14.9 6.2 11.4 21.8 8.9 33.9 9.4
La 56.8 60.2 15.5 39.3 93.1 49.0 37.4 13.9 21.2 13.8
Ce 118.0 131.0 22.7 55.1 156.0 64.9 84.9 34.4 49.9 37.7
Pr 11.8 12.4 3.4 12.6 16.3 8.9 9.7 5.7 7.3 4.3
Nd 45.9 40.8 11.7 51.3 51.8 30.1 35.1 25.3 28.3 17.2
Sm 8.1 9.1 3.2 16.5 9.5 5.1 9.5 10.3 9.8 8.1
Eu 1.65 0.21 < 0.05 0.11 0.74 0.43 0.11 0.13 0.27 0.16
Gd 6.3 8.6 3.5 15.7 8.9 4.5 9.4 10.2 9.4 12.8
Tb 0.9 1.4 0.8 2.7 1.5 0.6 1.7 2.3 1.9 3.3
Dy 4.2 9.3 6.4 16.6 9.5 4.0 10.8 16.0 12.4 24.3
Ho 0.75 1.92 1.56 3.13 1.94 0.81 2.17 3.36 2.54 5.23
Er 2.2 6.1 5.4 9.5 5.9 2.5 6.8 10.2 7.7 15.9
Tm 0.3 1.0 0.9 1.4 0.9 0.4 1.0 1.6 1.2 2.4
Yb 1.9 6.4 6.5 10.0 5.6 2.6 7.0 10.3 8.4 15.0
Lu 0.29 0.94 0.96 1.47 0.80 0.37 1.01 1.48 1.19 2.12

Zr+Ce+Y 344 356 184 245 466 261 327 274 249 344
260 Th. Seifert

Table A8 (continued)
Sample # C7 C8 C5 GRGOT
Locality (rom. Xa Xb XI XII
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type ri rdi rf gr
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 6 10 7 2
V 19 58 36 <5
Cr 29 15 11 70
Ni 8 5 3 34
Co 1 6 3 3
Cu 5.0 15.3 3.7 19.0
Zn 28.0 22.9 30.1 50.0
Ga 16 19 18 19
As 14.0 100.0 10.0 7.0
Pb 10 21 14 16
Ag < 0.1 1.0 0.1 6.3
Au <2 <2 <2 --
Hg 22 24 21 --
Sb 2.7 3.7 0.9 < 0.5
Rb 492 214 251 265
Sr 15 100 38 21
Y 118 35 44 72
Zr 112 418 315 151
Nb 22 26 26 39
Mo <1 <1 <1 7
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.2
Sn 24 11 14 5
Cs 32.5 3.2 13.4 11.1
Li 91 42 45 21
Be 18 3 2 4
Ba 232 1080 892 71
Hf 4.9 11.0 11.0 7.1
Ta 4.1 1.6 2.3 5.9
W 6 6 6 6
Tl 2.2 2.6 1.7 1.5
Bi 0.5 1.0 < 0.5 1.0
Th 30 21 26 60
U 14.4 14.4 10.1 15.9
La 39.5 75.4 67.7 35.5
Ce 82.0 149.0 132.0 82.6
Pr 10.9 14.8 14.5 9.88
Nd 41.6 55.8 52.1 36.1
Sm 13.3 10.6 9.7 9.3
Eu 0.48 1.79 1.25 0.24
Gd 13.0 9.2 7.8 9.2
Tb 2.4 1.4 1.1 1.8
Dy 14.6 7.5 6.4 10.9
Ho 2.83 1.47 1.18 2.30
Er 8.3 4.4 3.5 7.6
Tm 1.2 0.6 0.5 1.3
Yb 8.0 4.3 3.3 8.4
Lu 1.15 0.63 0.51 1.26

Zr+Ce+Y 0 602 491 306


Appendix - Table A8 and A9 261

Table A9 Average and range of major and trace element contents of lamprophyres in the Erzgebirge and mafic
volcanics in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin.

Lamprophyre LD1 LD2a LD2c LD2d


type (n = 15) (n = 15) (n = 23) (n = 7)
Major elements
(wt.%)
SiO2 54.89 (45.94 - 58.40) 51.40 (46.51 - 56.93) 53.82 (49.63 - 57.54) 47.99 (43.38 - 51.85)
TiO2 0.85 (0.59 - 1.43) 1.35 (0.91 - 1.98) 0.98 (0.72 - 1.25) 1.77 (0.95 - 3.71)
MgO 7.22 (4.83 - 10.52) 6.85 (1.61 - 9.04) 7.17 (3.68 - 11.48) 8.65 (5.22 - 11.40)
CaO 5.83 (2.77 - 11.19) 4.84 (0.88 - 7.64) 5.08 (0.84 - 7.75) 7.71 (4.99 - 9.85)
Na2O 2.55 (0.43 - 3.37) 1.38 (0.08 - 4.11) 1.99 (0.08 - 3.12) 1.51 (0.15 - 2.52)
K2O 3.35 (2.49 - 5.34) 6.04 (5.06 - 7.65) 3.86 (1.99 - 5.99) 3.66 (1.92 - 4.49)
P2O5 0.33 (0.20 - 0.79) 0.80 (0.29 - 1.08) 0.63 (0.25 - 0.84) 0.60 (0.19 - 0.88)
CO2 0.20 (0.02 - 0.84) 2.55 (0.05 - 4.90) 1.26 (0.05 - 3.40) 2.54 (0.05 - 6.50)
LOI 1.63 (0.90 - 3.47) 4.80 (1.50 - 7.47) 3.93 (1.72 - 6.50) 4.84 (1.85 - 11.18)
Trace elements
(ppm)

F 5977 (1100 - 17500) 5438 (815 - 20450) 1182 (655 - 1734) 1544 (930 - 2941)
Sc 19 (16 - 24) 19 (3 - 25) 19 (11 - 25) 26 (16 - 31)
V 143 (114 - 172) 147 (133 - 180) 138 (102 - 166) 204 (141 - 254)
Cr 370 (180 - 580) 309 (3 - 524) 339 (51 - 690) 448 (42 - 890)
Ni 127 (41 - 235) 128 (2 - 301) 173 (20 - 471) 164 (20 - 316)
Co 35 (16 - 139) 24 (5 - 36) 28 (16 - 45) 39 (13 - 56)
Zn 284 (104 - 826) 135 (30 - 428) 219 (58 - 958) 94 (42 - 200)
Rb 359 (185 - 883) 394 (131 - 1100) 177 (99 - 267) 160 (109 - 256)
Sr 471 (234 - 935) 712 (18 - 2030) 780 (135 - 1380) 447 (44 - 757)
Y 20 (17 - 30) 28 (15 - 38) 25 (17 - 40) 25 (23 - 29)
Zr 208 (145 - 291) 520 (181 - 1070) 351 (153 - 538) 252 (127 - 319)
Nb 13 (8 - 26) 31 (12 - 115) 15 (8 - 22) 19 (14 - 42)
Cs 66 (41 - 104) 27 (2 - 101) 29 (4 - 76) 22 (11 - 40)
Li 179 (90 - 350) 114 (23 - 315) 94 (47 - 158) 94 (69 - 114)
Ba 939 (292 - 1815) 2340 (885 - 4020) 2488 (512 - 5020) 2151 (290 - 4150)
Hf 5 (4 - 6) 14 (4 - 36) 11 (5 - 16) 8 (4 - 10)
Th 22 (13 - 58) 51 (9 - 94) 32 (13 - 58) 20 (2 - 30)
U 6 (3 - 10) 9 (2 - 15) 8 (4 - 15) 5 (1 - 7)
La 51 (37 - 88) 100 (53 - 162) 112 (36 - 167) 49 (11 - 69)
Ce 103 (69 - 170) 212 (111 - 316) 215 (70 - 324) 101 (28 - 143)
Pr 10 (7 - 16) 25 (13 - 40) 24 (8 - 34) 12 (4 - 18)
Nd 39 (27 - 58) 97 (46 - 158) 89 (30 - 127) 49 (19 - 72)
Sm 7 (5 - 10) 16 (8 - 25) 14 (5 - 21) 9 (6 - 13)
LREE 211 (145 - 341) 449 (230 - 701) 454 (149 - 672) 220 (68 - 315)
HREE 17 (13 - 21) 27 (18 - 37) 25 (14 - 39) 21 (18 - 27)
262 Th. Seifert

Table A9 (continued)

Rock type LD2e LD3 SEB mafic volcanics


(n = 9) (n = 11) (n = 8)
Major elements
(wt.%)
SiO2 50.21 (48.30 - 52.70) 51.82 (48.30 - 63.15) 49.15 (44.35 - 53.10)
TiO2 1.18 (1.06 - 1.36) 1.77 (0.82 - 2.28) 1.79 (1.32 - 2.15)
MgO 6.54 (4.93 - 8.14) 5.83 (3.21 - 7.66) 4.10 (1.62 - 6.56)
CaO 5.44 (2.10 - 7.27) 3.31 (1.55 - 5.67) 5.03 (1.81 - 7.70)
Na2O 2.17 (0.19 - 4.44) 2.59 (1.47 - 4.28) 1.80 (1.38 - 2.39)
K2O 3.74 (2.13 - 5.27) 3.73 (2.46 - 5.92) 6.22 (3.39 - 8.74)
P2O5 0.54 (0.40 - 0.79) 0.68 (0.22 - 0.99) 1.10 (0.82 - 1.33)
CO2 3.67 (2.43 - 5.10) 0.91 (0.03 - 1.83) 1.85 (0.01 - 5.85)
LOI 7.07 (4.75 - 8.55) 5.06 (1.99 - 6.33) 5.94 (3.40 - 9.85)
Trace elements
(ppm)

F 1684 (545 - 3430) 1288 (757 - 1630) 2964 (1710 - 4600)


Sc 20 (15 - 22) 19 (11 - 23) 20 (19 - 21)
V 158 (133 - 185) 163 (75 - 200) 173 (151 - 194)
Cr 210 (62 - 340) 118 (26 - 290) 254 (150 - 370)
Ni 65 (20 - 123) 49 (15 - 118) 117 (49 - 309)
Co 25 (20 - 34) 22 (8 - 32) 24 (6 - 43)
Zn 138 (40 - 362) 295 (33 - 519) 182 (65 - 556)
Rb 195 (78 - 374) 169 (98 - 353) 151 (96 - 192)
Sr 300 (133 - 496) 237 (46 - 670) 609 (210 - 1680)
Y 28 (26 - 33) 43 (19 - 66) 27 (14 - 41)
Zr 221 (160 - 270) 361 (153 - 534) 404 (262 - 476)
Nb 17 (12 - 21) 32 (12 - 46) 40 (18 - 52)
Cs 12 (5 - 23) 11 (5 - 17) 4 (1 - 8)
Li 141 (83 - 217) 131 (88 - 178) 59 (37 - 81)
Ba 992 (605 - 1550) 941 (673 - 1580) 1996 (935 - 3090)
Hf 6 (4 - 8) 9 (4 - 14) 11 (7 - 15)
Th 9 (8 - 12) 9 (4 - 21) 15 (9 - 27)
U 4 (2 - 16) 2 (1 - 5) 4 (3 - 11)
La 43 (36 - 55) 55 (47 - 78) 78 (41 - 122)
Ce 91 (72 - 110) 120 (101 - 156) 155 (87 - 226)
Pr 10 (9 - 12) 14 (11 - 19) 19 (10 - 27)
Nd 39 (35 - 45) 58 (40 - 75) 72 (41 - 103)
Sm 8 (7 - 9) 12 (7 - 16) 13 (9 - 18)
LREE 191 (159 - 231) 259 (205 - 344) 338 (189 - 496)
HREE 24 (20 - 27) 35 (15 - 51) 30 (21 - 40)
Table A10 Whole rock Nd and Sr isotope compositions for lamprophyres of the Erzgebirge and MVSEB (localities see Table A2) and areas of comparison.

147
Sample # Locality Type Age Sm Nd Sm/144Nd 143
Nd/144Nd 2 Nd(T) Rb Sr 87
Rb/86Sr 87
Sr/86Sr 2 87
Sr/86Sr(T) T(DM) T(CHUR)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (m) (ppm) (ppm) (m) (Ma) (Ma)

LDBE-4563 1) 1A LD2d 315 5.2 19 0.1689 0.512749 7 3.3 113 238 1.3745 0.716951 10 0.71079 1222 -623

LDBE-4562 1) 1A LD2f 315 24.0 163 0.0899 0.512195 5 -4.3 257 875 0.8503 0.714191 10 0.71038 1128 630

LDBE-4560 1) 1A LD2a 315 20.0 134 0.0890 0.512228 7 -3.6 268 698 1.1115 0.713708 14 0.70873 1082 578

LDBE-4545 1) 1A LD2a 315 23.0 158 0.0866 0.512207 4 -3.9 251 1340 0.5423 0.710746 14 0.70832 1086 594

Appendix - Table A9 and A10


1)
LDHALSB-5395 1B LD2d 315 9.2 42 0.1336 0.512742 5 4.6 176 429 1.1868 0.712838 14 0.70752 730 -257

LDHALSB-1 1) 1B LD2e 315 6.8 36 0.1140 0.512238 5 -4.4 191 486 1.1361 0.713780 14 0.70869 1323 734

LDKVB-1 1) 1C LD2a 315 19.0 136 0.0839 0.512078 6 -6.4 171 1041 0.4761 0.711507 12 0.70937 1210 754

KRUPKA-626 1) 3 LD2a 315 6.7 41 0.0982 0.512261 6 -3.4 787 90 25.3152 0.831815 14 0.71833 1122 581

1H1-90 2) 4A LD3 310 11.4 58 0.1206 0.512390 8 -1.8 117 168 2.0904 0.714067 14 0.70484 1178 493

1H1-93 2) 4A LD3 310 11.1 56 0.1209 0.512389 9 -1.8 124 155 2.3299 0.714521 15 0.70424 1183 497

1-HG-1-1 1) 4A LD3 310 13.0 64 0.1228 0.512348 5 -2.7 353 177 5.7736 0.734931 10 0.70946 1271 595

WH7-1 2) 4B altered minette with 315 8.5 46 0.1127 0.512384 10 -1.5 282 332 2.4530 0.715245 20 0.70425 1099 458
carbonate inclusions

4H3-10 2) 4B altered type LD2a 315 7.5 45 0.1008 0.512810 14 7.3 300 698 1.2451 0.712665 10 0.70708 440 -278

1)
G2-1A 4C LD2a 315 12.0 58 0.1252 0.512333 3 -3.0 192 565 0.9838 0.712926 12 0.70852 1328 647
1)
G2-1C 4C LD2a 315 12.0 68 0.1066 0.512343 5 -2.1 275 423 1.8830 0.713927 12 0.70549 1095 496

LDVG-2A 1) 6A LD1b 330 4.2 25 0.1035 0.512309 7 -2.5 314 389 2.3368 0.718429 14 0.70745 1110 535

11402 2) 6B LD1a 330 6.1 37 0.1016 0.512363 17 -1.3 296 531 1.6146 0.713537 14 0.70595 1023 438

SV-13-L 1) 7 LD2c 315 8.6 61 0.0847 0.512284 7 -2.4 184 620 0.8592 0.712572 14 0.70872 984 480

SV-11-L 1) 7 LD2c 315 9.4 62 0.0912 0.512279 6 -2.7 174 567 0.8884 0.712778 10 0.70880 1040 517

SV-15-L 1) 7 LD2f 315 20.0 130 0.0910 0.512766 7 6.8 69 1312 0.1518 0.704693 14 0.70401 459 -188
1)
GFZ Potsdam. analyst: St. Littmann; 2) IPGG St. Petersburg. analyst: B. Belyatsky
Ages (T) for calculation of initial Nd- and Sr-ratios on the basis of geochronological and relatively age relationship data.
The Nd model ages T(DM) were calculated with 147Sm/144Nd = 0.213 and 143Nd/144Nd = 0.513151 for the depleted mantle after De Paolo (1981); The Nd model ages T(CHUR) were calculated with 147Sm/144Nd = 0.1967 and 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512638 for the
'chondritic uniform reservoir' after De Paolo and Wasserburg (1976).

263
264
Table A10 (continued)
147
Sample # Locality Type Age Sm Nd Sm/144Nd 143
Nd/144Nd 2 Nd(T) Rb Sr 87
Rb/86Sr 87
Sr/86Sr 2 87
Sr/86Sr(T) T(DM) T(CHUR)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (m) (ppm) (ppm) (m) (Ma) (Ma)

St-6-L 1) 7 LD2c 315 8.9 58 0.0935 0.512306 5 -2.3 151 693 0.6308 0.709569 14 0.70674 1026 488

St-1-L 1) 7 LD3 315 6.6 39 0.0999 0.512308 5 -2.5 130 422 0.8918 0.710563 10 0.70657 1078 517

EV-6-L 1) 7 LD2c 315 6.6 42 0.0951 0.512331 4 -1.9 193 283 1.9743 0.720347 10 0.71150 1009 458

PHLA-3A 2) 9A LD2e 310 7.9 37 0.1280 0.512298 54 -3.9 267 195 3.9675 0.723262 16 0.70576 1426 750

PHLA-3C 2) 9A LD2e 310 7.5 36 0.1255 0.512283 9 -4.1 272 183 4.3085 0.726148 17 0.70714 1412 756
2)
LD540-8-1-2 10A LD2d 315 7.4 40 0.1116 0.512312 21 -2.9 176 644 0.7914 0.711267 16 0.70772 1189 581

LD540-8-1-5 2) 10A LD2d 315 8.8 52 0.1014 0.512289 24 -2.9 181 635 0.8254 0.711366 32 0.70767 1117 556

LB-371-1 2) 10A LD2d 315 11.5 67 0.1043 0.512357 18 -1.7 210 665 0.9147 0.711071 17 0.70697 1054 461

LD540-1/2D 2) 10A LD2c 315 19.4 118 0.0994 0.512354 18 -1.8 132 1355 0.2810 0.707319 26 0.70612 1016 443

LDT1-1 1) 11 LD2a 315 13.0 93 0.0871 0.512398 5 -0.2 1100 14 227.4643 1.818855 8 0.79913 870 332
1)
LDBERG-1 12 LD2d (carbonate 315 7.0 41 0.1019 0.512277 4 -3.2 256 39 19.0031 0.776512 14 0.69132 1137 578
rich)

Z-19 1) 14 shoshonitic flow 300 16.0 102 0.0933 0.512208 6 -4.4 154 920 0.4848 0.708946 14 0.70688 1142 632

Th. Seifert
1)
C-6-I 14 ultrapotassic flow 270 11.0 60 0.1101 0.512233 7 -4.9 171 396 1.2501 0.714015 12 0.70921 1283 710

1)
RON-4215-76 16 LD2d (?) (altered) 300 35.0 252 0.0840 0.512188 6 -4.4 5 2940 0.0039 0.710925 14 0.71091 1087 607

1)
RON-432673-3 16 LD2d 300 5.9 35 0.1007 0.512252 7 -3.8 91 321 0.8207 0.711018 14 0.70751 1157 610

RON-8029-84 1) 16 LD2a 300 7.9 47 0.1007 0.512223 5 -4.4 117 79 4.2875 0.725175 10 0.70687 1195 656

RON-4209-75 1) 16 LD2d (?) (altered) 300 15.0 99 0.0919 0.512212 5 -4.3 26 204 0.3717 0.709234 14 0.70765 1125 617

Pr-LD-1/10 1) Pribram mica-lamprophyre 300 14.0 82 0.1029 0.512573 5 2.4 69 1044 0.1913 0.705817 8 0.70500 759 103
(Fig. 1)

Dub-LD-1/12 1) Pribram- mica-lamprophyre 300 16.0 74 0.1315 0.512316 6 -3.8 184 421 1.2653 0.713893 12 0.70849 1452 749
south
(Fig. 1)

Byt-LD-1/7 1) Pribram- mica-lamprophyre 300 9.0 45 0.1203 0.512422 7 -1.3 114 620 0.5323 0.709241 10 0.70697 1125 428
south (altered)
(Fig. 1)

Haj-LD-1/3 1) Pribram- mica- and feldspar- 300 9.2 42 0.1331 0.512567 5 1.1 101 470 0.6221 0.708500 10 0.70584 1036 166
south phyric lamprophyre
(Fig. 1)

Kra-LD-1/7 1) Krasna mica-lamprophyre 300 18.0 70 0.1552 0.512230 6 -6.3 408 315 3.7497 0.733150 14 0.71714 2191 1489
Hora
(Fig. 1)
Table A11 Whole rock Pb isotope compositions for lamprophyres of the Erzgebirge and MVSEB (localities see Table A2) and areas for comparison.

206
Sample # Locality Type Age Pb U Th Pb/204Pb 207
Pb/204Pb 208
Pb/204Pb 206
Pb/204Pb(T) 207
Pb/204Pb(T) 208
Pb/204Pb(T)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm)

LDBE-1 2) 1A LD2a 315 20.48 9.70 87.0 19.760 15.654 41.532 19.275 15.628 40.953

LDBE-2 2) 1A LD2a 315 43.85 12.92 76.0 18.744 15.576 39.472 18.268 15.551 38.893
2)
LDBE-6 1A LD2a 315 35.44 12.68 76.0 18.829 15.599 39.668 18.349 15.574 39.089

LDBE-4563 1) 1A LD2d 315 33.24 0.64 1.8 17.929 15.556 38.011 17.448 15.531 37.432
1)
LDBE-4562 1A LD2f 315 136.60 29.39 120.0 18.413 15.627 38.756 17.923 15.601 38.177

LDBE-4560 1) 1A LD2a 315 44.72 11.09 63.4 18.823 15.632 39.696 18.336 15.606 39.117

Appendix - Table A10 and A11


1)
LDBE-4545 1A LD2a 315 117.46 15.78 94.3 18.703 15.642 39.483 18.212 15.616 38.904

LDBE-5 2) 1A LD2b 315 24.51 2.25 12.0 18.384 15.577 38.561 17.904 15.552 37.982
2)
LDFG-1 1B strongly 315 2235.00 3.59 9.0 18.113 15.564 38.150 17.633 15.539 37.571
altered
lamprophyre

LDHALSB-5395 1) 1B LD2d 315 15.37 0.92 4.6 18.192 15.562 38.330 17.713 15.537 37.751

LDHALSB-1 1) 1B LD2e 315 19.38 3.83 11.0 18.567 15.637 39.021 18.076 15.611 38.442
1)
LDKVB-1 1C LD2a 315 27.03 11.30 63.5 19.014 15.659 39.703 18.523 15.633 39.124

KRUPKA-626 1) 3 LD2a 315 10.76 7.28 38.0 20.803 15.731 42.055 20.307 15.705 41.476
2)
1H1-90 4A LD3 310 20.64 0.89 4.8 19.119 15.620 38.618 18.645 15.595 38.049

1H1-93 2) 4A LD3 310 30.24 42.90 4.7 19.093 15.616 38.549 18.619 15.591 37.980
2)
1H1-155-2 4A LD3 310 186.10 1.10 5.4 18.631 15.598 38.335 18.157 15.573 37.766

1-HG-1-1 1) 4A LD3 310 10.55 2.02 7.5 18.539 15.618 38.849 18.060 15.593 38.280
2)
WH7-1 4B altered 315 2.79 1.66 7.2 19.685 15.627 40.231 19.205 15.602 39.652
minette with
carbonate
inclusions

4H3-10 2) 4B altered type 315 29.10 1.88 9.3 22.773 15.848 43.674 22.258 15.821 43.095
LD2a
1)
GFZ Potsdam, analyst: St. Littmann; 2) IPGG St. Petersburg, analyst: B. Belyatsky
Ages (T) are calculated on the basis of geochronological and relatively age relationship data; n.a. - not analyzed

265
locality: B.C. = Ag-Pb-Zn-Cu district Kokanee range, British Columbia, Canada
Table A11 (continued)
206
Pb/204Pb 207
Pb/204Pb 208
Pb/204Pb 206
Pb/204Pb(T) 207
Pb/204Pb(T) 208
Pb/204Pb(T)

266
Sample # Locality Type Age Pb U Th
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm)

L1-1 2) 4B LD2c (low- 315 20.79 3.37 13.1 18.528 15.601 38.654 18.044 15.576 38.075
phyric)

G2-1A 1) 4C LD2a 315 18.83 7.80 21.9 19.386 15.664 39.747 18.896 15.638 39.168
2)
G2-1A 4C LD2a 315 81.07 6.11 29.6 18.209 15.557 38.307 17.731 15.532 37.728

G2-1C 1) 4C LD2a 315 120.98 6.56 29.6 18.204 15.583 38.356 17.721 15.558 37.777

G1-8 2) 4C LD2c 315 16.98 8.42 36.3 19.812 15.671 40.524 19.323 15.645 39.945
2)
G1-13 4C LD2c 315 15.91 10.95 n.a. 20.273 15.660 41.622 19.788 15.634 41.043

LDWOLK-1 2) 4C LD2c 315 32.87 9.79 22.0 18.577 15.580 38.522 18.091 15.554 37.934
2)
ABF-1 4C LD2c 320 85.82 5.61 24.9 18.094 15.541 38.230 17.611 15.516 37.642

ABF-3A 2) 4C LD2c 320 48.31 4.87 21.2 18.149 15.539 38.258 17.667 15.514 37.670
2)
A1-7 5 LD2c 320 9.96 4.51 n.a. 19.449 15.636 39.928 18.958 15.610 39.340

A2-2 2) 5 LD2c 320 9.93 3.81 18.1 19.258 15.626 39.776 18.767 15.600 39.188
2)
A6-10 5 LD2c 320 24.13 4.51 19.9 18.223 15.339 38.119 17.785 15.316 37.531

Th. Seifert
LDVG-2A 1) 6A LD1b 330 6.00 6.60 15.2 21.622 15.777 40.810 21.094 15.749 40.204
2)
11402 6B LD1a 330 3.44 5.28 16.0 23.274 15.826 43.554 22.738 15.798 42.948

E-5000 2) 6B LD1a 330 12.12 4.92 15.0 18.927 15.591 38.934 18.426 15.564 38.328
2)
E-521 6B LD1a 330 17.97 24.57 13.0 36.864 16.883 62.498 36.864 16.883 61.892

E-5-1910-1 2) 6B LD1a 330 5.57 4.81 14.0 21.135 15.809 41.507 20.599 15.781 40.901
1)
SV-13-L 7 LD2c 315 8.95 8.32 43.6 23.005 15.862 41.982 22.487 15.835 41.403

SV-11-L 1) 7 LD2c 315 7.00 8.90 42.2 22.500 15.820 44.504 21.990 15.793 43.925

SV-15-L 1) 7 LD2f 315 7.96 4.21 14.5 20.068 15.681 39.886 19.579 15.655 39.307
1)
ST-6-L 7 LD2c 315 8.15 4.86 27.7 19.793 15.670 41.007 19.305 15.644 40.428

ST-1-L 1) 7 LD3 315 23.20 3.83 19.8 18.580 15.598 38.797 18.098 15.573 38.218
1)
EV-6-L 7 LD2c 315 9.47 5.05 20.4 19.250 15.618 39.534 18.769 15.593 38.955

LD540-8-1-2 2) 10A LD2d 315 15.04 2.57 41.0 18.523 15.599 38.832 18.040 15.574 38.253
2)
LB-371-1 10A LD2d 315 27.21 6.21 27.0 18.733 15.609 38.981 18.250 15.584 38.402

LD540-6-2M 2) 10A LD2c 300 11.67 8.78 45.4 20.004 15.684 40.796 19.538 15.660 40.245
2)
LC-371-1 10A LD2c 300 26.53 6.74 33.0 18.874 15.648 39.173 18.408 15.624 38.622

LDQ-6-2-1 2) 10B LD2a 315 39.07 10.98 n.a. 18.774 15.625 38.845 18.288 15.599 38.266
Table A11 (continued)
206
Sample # Locality Type Age Pb U Th Pb/204Pb 207
Pb/204Pb 208
Pb/204Pb 206
Pb/204Pb(T) 207
Pb/204Pb(T) 208
Pb/204Pb(T)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm)

LDT1-1 1) 11 LD2a 315 4.68 4.34 28.6 21.480 15.781 43.861 20.975 15.754 43.282
2)
LDT1-1 11 LD2a 315 4.50 4.54 28.6 20.832 15.691 42.356 20.343 15.665 41.777

LDBERG-1 1) 12 LD2d 315 4.11 5.08 16.4 20.244 15.732 40.951 19.745 15.706 40.372
(carbonate-
rich)

Z-19 1) 14 shoshonitic 300 32.45 2.67 17.0 18.549 15.637 38.704 18.082 15.613 38.153
flow

C-6-I 1) 14 ultrapotassic 270 21.65 3.07 10.0 18.672 15.642 38.653 18.253 15.620 38.158
flow

RON-4215-76 1) 16 LD2d (?) 300 15.57 20.07 135.0 20.812 15.772 42.964 20.332 15.747 42.413

Appendix - Table A11


(altered)

RON-4326-73-3 1) 16 LD2d 300 11.00 1.80 13.9 18.622 15.655 38.885 18.152 15.630 38.334

RON-8029-84 1) 16 LD2a 300 10.00 3.01 20.1 19.170 15.679 39.443 18.700 15.654 38.892
1)
RON-4209-75 16 LD2d (?) 300 15.00 5.70 29.8 19.228 15.690 39.602 18.756 15.665 39.051
(altered)

Pr-LD-1/10 1) Pribram mica- 300 16.46 4.46 18.9 19.037 15.621 39.014 18.577 15.597 38.463
(Fig. 1) lamprophyre

Dub-LD-1/12 1) Pribram- mica- 300 14.80 10.70 28.2 19.656 15.653 39.370 19.194 15.629 38.819
south lamprophyre
(Fig. 1)

Byt-LD-1/7 1) Pribram- mica- 300 14.12 7.32 24.2 19.513 15.646 39.338 19.051 15.622 38.787
south lamprophyre
(Fig. 1) (altered)

Haj-LD-1/3 1) Pribram- mica- and 300 4.44 2.61 9.0 19.616 15.649 39.704 19.154 15.625 39.153
south feldspar-
(Fig. 1) phyric
lamprophyre

Kra-LD-1/7 1) Krasna mica- 300 19.79 25.70 72.4 22.093 15.789 41.427 21.612 15.764 40.876
Hora lamprophyre
(Fig. 1)

BC96-L7 1) B.C. mica- 50 18.50 10.96 n.a. 19.004 15.643 38.870 18.707 15.346 38.583
lamprophyre

267
268
Table A11 (continued)
206
Sample # Locality Type Age Pb U Th Pb/204Pb 207
Pb/204Pb 208
Pb/204Pb 206
Pb/204Pb(T) 207
Pb/204Pb(T) 208
Pb/204Pb(T)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm)

BC96-L15/1 1) B.C. mica- 50 36.44 9.71 n.a. 18.794 15.594 38.859 18.661 15.461 38.572
lamprophyre

Th. Seifert
BC96-L16H/1 1) B.C. mica- 50 11.69 3.39 n.a. 19.035 15.617 39.098 18.889 15.471 38.811
lamprophyre

BC96-L166 1) B.C. mica- 50 12.07 3.29 n.a. 18.798 15.606 38.836 18.662 15.470 38.549
lamprophyre

BC96-L33/1 1) B.C. mica- 50 28.61 2.17 n.a. 17.996 15.512 38.314 17.959 15.475 38.027
lamprophyre
Table A12 Whole rock Nd and Sr isotope compositions for late-Variscan granites and monzonites in the Erzgebirge and rhyolites in the Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
Locality see Figure 2.
147
Sample # Locality Type Age Sm Nd Sm/144Nd 143
Nd/144Nd 2 Nd(T) Rb Sr 87
Rb/86Sr 87
Sr/86Sr 2 87
Sr/86Sr(T)
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (m) (ppm) (ppm) (m)

ALT-2 1) II post-collisional A- 310 8,1 26,0 0,1874 0,512488 5 -2,5 1750 12 422,1875 2,821921 12 0.95936 *)
type granite

31007 1) 4B F-rich microgranite 325 0,4 0,8 0,3025 0,512057 7 -15,7 2460 452 15,7560 0,786604 10 0,71372
2)
Z-20137 4A late-collisional type 325 3,0 10,2 0,1735 0,512377 16 -4,1 574 17 102,4620 1,163174 26 0.68922 *)
'Eibenstock granite'
(type III Pobershau)

Z-21076 2) 4A -"- 325 1,7 5,4 0,1942 0,512444 17 -3,6 795 11 225,4380 1,696078 46 0.65328 *)

Z-20135 2) 4A -"- 325 7,7 31,6 0,1473 0,512345 9 -3,6 606 37 48,7098 0,928058 18 0.70274 *)
2)
SZU1/78 Nr. 1 about 7 km late-collisional type 325 2,3 7,8 0,1763 0,512393 14 -3,9 723 16 139,3400 1,322276 31 0.67774 *)
SE from 4A 'Eibenstock granite'

Appendix - Table A11 and A12


(type III Satzung)

SZU1/78 Nr. 3 2) -"- -"- 325 3,0 11,5 0,1560 0,512341 12 -4,1 640 20 96,8355 1,131469 22 0.68354 *)

SZU270/1 -"- granite dike (type V 320 0,8 2,1 0,2305 0,512548 8 -3,1 785 20 124,0783 1,248635 33 0.68354 *)
Satzung)

SZU336/1 -"- -"- 320 2,0 5,7 0,2142 0,512507 9 -3,2 914 15 197,9822 1,577787 48 0.67611 *)

SZU287/1 -"- -"- 320 1,2 4,3 0,1679 0,512353 13 -4,3 732 39 56,2304 0,949986 31 0.69389 *)
1)
GSEIF-1 IV post-collisional A- 310 5,7 21,0 0,1664 0,512415 5 -3,1 445 41 31,4213 0,852452 10 0,71383
type granite

E-602 1) 6B late-collisional type 325 0,9 2,1 0,2462 0,512523 9 -4,3 1210 22 159,2250 1,390464 10 0.65394 *)
'Eibenstock granite'
(Ehrenfriedersdorf
main granite)

ED-281 1) 6B Li-F microgranitic 310 1,3 3,4 0,2330 0,512472 9 -4,6 1670 54 89,5306 1,182462 8 0.78748 *)
dike

MON-1 1) VI monzonite intrusion 310 7,2 45,0 0,0962 0,512266 5 -3,2 239 306 2,2648 0,721585 14 0,71159

AUGB-1 1) VII post-collisional 300 15,0 49,0 0,1831 0,512436 6 -3,4 714 18 114,8350 1,169982 10 0.67974 *)
rhyolitic stock

GRT1/1 1) XII late-collisional type 325 2,5 9,1 0,1663 0,512354 6 -4,2 589 16 106,5722 1,186226 10 0.69326 *)
'Eibenstock granite'
(main intrusive
stage of the
Eibenstock granitic
intrusion)

GRGOT 1) XII post-collisional A- 310 9,3 36,0 0,1558 0,512446 4 -2,1 265 21 36,5321 0,888441 14 0.72727 *)
type granite
1)
GFZ Potsdam, analyst: St. Littmann; 2) IPGG St. Petersburg, analyst: B. Belyatsky
Ages (T) are calculated on the basis of geochronological and relatively age relationship data;

269
*) 87Sr/86Sr(T) is not realistic (probably overprinting by high-temperature Rb-enriched greisen- and/or autometasomatic fluids).
270
Table A13 Whole rock Pb isotope compositions for late-Variscan granites and monzonites in the Erzgebirge and rhyolites in the Sub-
Erzgebirge basin. Locality see Figure 2.
206 207 208 206 207 208
Sample # Locality Rock type Age Pb U Th Pb/ Pb/ Pb/ Pb/ Pb/ Pb/
204 204 204 204 204 204
(Ma) (ppm) (ppm) (ppm) Pb Pb Pb Pb(T) Pb(T) Pb(T)
1)
ALT-2 II post-collisional A-type granite 310 25.82 16.08 28.0 18.912 15.623 38.656 18.435 15.146 36.841
1)
31007 4B microgranite 325 5.16 15.68 5.2 28.504 16.108 39.252 not calculably ( = 0)
2)
Z-20137 4A late-collisional type 'Eibenstock granite' 325 15.26 27.31 13.0 22.951 15.807 38.535 16.689 9.545 36.630
(type III Pobershau)

Z-21076 2) 4A -"- 325 8.149 49.14 n.a. 29.392 16.135 38.683 6.444 -6.813 36.778
2)
Z-20135 4A -"- 325 15.19 21.38 17.0 22.543 15.782 39.584 17.584 10.823 37.679
2)
SZU1/78 Nr. 1 about 7 late-collisional type 'Eibenstock granite' 325 9.003 10.49 12.0 25.343 15.943 38.743 24.921 15.521 36.838
km SE (type III Satzung)
from 4A

Th. Seifert
SZU1/78 Nr. 3 2) -"- -"- 325 13.52 14.31 13.0 26.060 16.000 38.912 22.182 12.122 37.007
1)
GSEIF-1 IV post-collisional A-type granite 310 17.88 17.12 41.0 19.192 15.629 39.019 18.716 15.153 37.204

E-602 1) 6B late-collisional type 'Eibenstock granite' 325 5.17 26.10 5.1 38.121 16.653 39.302 not calculably ( = 0)
(Ehrenfriedersdorf main granite)

ED-281 1) 6B Li-F microgranitic dike 310 9.03 32.33 5.9 31.382 16.283 39.316 not calculably ( = 0)
2)
E521-6 6B Li-F aplitic dike crosscut LD1-type 310 4.460 0.0425 13.0 44.899 17.046 39.941 44.857 17.004 38.126
lamprophyric dike

MON-1 1) VI monzonite intrusion 310 119.16 4.97 25.0 18.170 15.591 38.381 17.692 15.113 36.566
1)
AUGB-1 VII post-collisional rhyolitic stock 300 6.67 14.38 49.0 23.086 15.842 40.834 22.597 15.353 39.079
1)
GRT1/1 XII late-collisional type 'Eibenstock granite' 325 11.47 24.20 12.4 26.586 16.038 38.973 26.019 15.471 37.068
(main intrusive stage of the Eibenstock
granitic intrusion)

GRGOT 1) XII post-collisional A-type granite 310 16.56 15.90 60.0 20.317 15.704 40.143 19.832 15.219 38.328
1)
GFZ Potsdam. analyst: St. Littmann; 2) IPGG St. Petersburg, analyst: B. Belyatsky
Ages (T) are calculated on the basis of geocronological and relatively age relationship data; n.a. - not analyzed
Appendix - Table A13 and A14 271

Table A14 Initial Sr, Nd, and Pb compositions of Saxothuringian lamprophyres and mafic volcanics, and lamprophyres for
comparison (see Tables A10, A11). Averages of different mantle-derived rocks from the literature. Samples with a
probably significant overprinting by post-magmatic fluids are excluded.
87
Type Sr/86Sr(T) Nd(T) (n)

LD1-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 0.70595 and 0.70745 -2.5 and -1.3 2

LD2-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 0.70401 to 0.71038 -6.4 to -0.2 20

LD3-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 0.70424 to 0.70946 -2.7 to -1.8 4

lamprophyres Ronneburg 0.70687 to 0.71091 -4.4 to -3.8 4

mafic volcanics Sub-Erzgebirge basin 0.70688 and 0.70921 -4.9 and -4.4 2

lamprophyres Pribram (-south) (CBM) 0.70500 to 0.70849 -3.8 to 2.4 4

lamprophyre Krasna Hora (CBM) 0.71714 -6.3 1


1)
CAL 0.70680 -1.2 (72, 56)

AL 1) 0.70460 3.0 (54, 20)


1)
UML 0.70460 3.8 (32, 11)

LL 2) 0.70450 to 0.72150 -7.3 to -25.9 194

orangeites 3) 0.70740 to 0.71090 -6.2 to -13.4 58


4)
carbonatites 0.70200 to 0.70540 -0.4 to 3.8

206
Type Pb/204Pb(T) 207
Pb/204Pb(T) 208
Pb/204Pb(T) (n)

LD1-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 18.426 to 22.738 15.564 to 16.883 38.328 to 42.948 5

LD2-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 17.448 to 22.487 15.316 to 15.835 37.432 to 43.925 38

LD3-type lamprophyres (Erzgebirge) 18.060 to 18.645 15.573 to 15.595 37.766 to 38.280 5

lamprophyres Ronneburg 18.152 to 20.332 15.630 to 15.747 38.334 to 42.413 4

mafic volcanics Sub-Erzgebirge basin 18.082 and 18.253 15.613 and 15.620 38.153 and 38.158 2

lamprophyres Pribram (-south) (CBM) 18.577 to 19.194 15.597 to 15.629 38.463 to 39.153 4

lamprophyre Krasna Hora (CBM) 21.612 15.764 40.876 1

lamprophyres Kokanee Range, B.C., Canada 17.959 to 18.889 15.346 to 15.475 38.027 to 38.811 5

CAL 1) 18.5 15.68 38.8 29


1)
AL 19.6 15.66 39.3 8

UML 1) 18.9 15.55 38.6 6


2)
LL 14.23 to 18.82 15.01 to 15.80 35.84 to 39.20 55

orangeites 3) 17.06 to 18.24 15.44 to 15.62 37.44 to 38.23 51

carbonatites 4) 17.46 to 42.00 15.45 to 17.43 39.10 to 40.60 (21, 21, 11)
1) 2) 3) 4)
(n) = number of samples. Sources: cf. Rock (1991); cf. Mitchell and Bergman (1991); cf. Mitchell (1995); Nelson et al. (1988).
272 Th. Seifert

Table A15 K-Ar analytical data for phlogopite from representative lamprophyre
samples (number refers to sample localities shown in Figure 2).
40
Sample Locality Lamprophyre K (wt.%) Ar rad Date 2 sigma
type (ng) (Ma) (Ma)
1)
LDBE-1 1A LD2a 7.45 0.06 168.5 1.5 300 6
2)
LDBE-6 1A LD2a 7.34 99.4 318.6 3.4

LDBE-8 1) 1A LD2a 7.19 0.06 175.5 1.5 322 6

LDWOLK-1 1) 4C LD2c 6.13 0.05 153.0 1.5 328 7


1)
LDWOLK-Q 4C LD2c 3.66 0.03 81.7 1.0 296 7
1)
LD-540-8-1-2 10A LD2d 7.40 0.06 179.5 1.5 320 6
1)
LD-540-8-1-5 10A LD2d 7.23 0.06 166.0 1.5 304 6

LB-371-1 1) 10A LD2d 7.16 0.06 158.5 1.5 294 6


1) 2)
analyst: Dr. B. Belyatsky. analyst: Dr. F. Henjes-Kunst
Appendix - Table A15 and A16 273

Table A16 40Ar-39Ar analytical data for phlogopite or feldspar1 from representative
lamprophyre samples (locations and descriptions see Tab. A2). Analyst:
L.W. Snee, US Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado.

40
Temp ArR 2 39
ArK 38
ArCl 37
ArCa 36
ArAt % %39ArK Age+Error 3
(C) Rad (Ma)

#LDBE-6, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 321.20.6 Ma;


Plateau date: 323.70.6 Ma (steps 9-11; 53.4%); J=0.007200, 0.12%; wt. 39.4 mg
650 0.29675 0.03521 0.00044 0.02655 0.00088 53.2 1.0 106.3 0.8
750 0.64061 0.02377 0.00016 0.00589 0.00014 93.8 0.7 319.9 0.8
800 1.5618 0.05624 0.00018 0.00115 0.00020 96.3 1.6 328.8 0.5
850 2.3726 0.08621 0.00031 0.00078 0.00023 97.2 2.5 326.1 0.5
900 3.4216 0.12450 0.00044 0.00061 0.00014 98.8 3.6 325.7 0.5
950 4.8176 0.17620 0.00052 0.00079 0.00013 99.2 5.1 324.2 0.5
1000 5.5671 0.20458 0.00073 0.00094 0.00007 99.6 5.9 322.8 0.5
1050 9.8135 0.37126 0.00156 0.00346 0.00014 99.6 10.7 314.3 0.5
1100 p 15.582 0.57111 0.00201 0.00231 0.00029 99.4 16.4 323.6 0.5
1150 p 16.216 0.59460 0.00194 0.00271 0.00019 99.6 17.1 323.4 0.5
1200 p 18.835 0.68893 0.00236 0.00698 0.00025 99.6 19.8 324.2 0.9
1250 12.863 0.46936 0.00182 0.01226 0.00020 99.5 13.5 324.9 0.7
1300 2.0458 0.07224 0.00037 0.00461 0.00007 99.0 2.1 334.8 0.7

#G2-1A, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 314.50.5 Ma;


Plateau date: 315.40.5 Ma (steps 9-11; 50.2%); J=0.007277, 0.12%; wt. 35.6 mg
650 0.0414 0.00320 0.00010 0.00101 0.00020 41.5 0.1 163 4
750 1.4893 0.06980 0.00151 0.04816 0.00048 91.3 2.4 260.4 0.4
850 6.4510 0.24429 0.00753 0.01142 0.00041 98.1 8.5 317.1 0.5
900 5.2535 0.19968 0.00618 0.00233 0.00013 99.2 7.0 316.0 0.5
950 5.1220 0.19453 0.00581 0.00331 0.00006 99.6 6.8 316.2 0.5
1000 5.2262 0.19823 0.00568 0.00570 0.00005 99.7 6.9 316.6 0.5
1050 5.9358 0.22435 0.00579 0.00807 0.00010 99.5 7.8 317.6 0.5
1100 7.7712 0.29516 0.00692 0.01035 0.00009 99.6 10.3 316.2 0.5
1150 p 10.824 0.41180 0.01072 0.01648 0.00012 99.6 14.3 315.7 0.5
1200 p 18.336 0.69880 0.02236 0.02983 0.00015 99.7 24.3 315.2 0.5
1300 p 8.6899 0.33108 0.01074 0.04023 0.00006 99.8 11.5 315.3 0.5

#ABF-1, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 323.60.7 Ma;


No plateau; Weighted mean date: 326.00.7 Ma;
Isochron date: 326.51.2 Ma (steps 3-11); J=0.010467, 0.12%; wt. 21.4 mg
600 0.0179 0.00470 0.00037 0.00097 0.00060 9.2 0.2 70 9
700 0.6402 0.05330 0.00146 0.00634 0.00026 89.2 1.8 213.7 1.3
800 w 2.1811 0.11380 0.00201 0.00662 0.00030 96.1 3.9 329.9 1.0
900 w 3.9547 0.20837 0.00267 0.00742 0.00014 98.9 7.2 326.9 1.0
1000 w 4.9335 0.25754 0.00346 0.01453 0.00014 99.1 8.9 329.7 0.8
1050 w 3.6483 0.19076 0.00301 0.01349 0.00014 98.8 6.6 329.2 0.5
1100 w 5.8402 0.30475 0.00492 0.01511 0.00007 99.6 10.6 329.8 0.6
1150 w 8.1910 0.43035 0.00562 0.01834 0.00007 99.7 14.9 327.7 0.5
1200 w 17.936 0.95672 0.00992 0.03987 0.00015 99.7 33.2 323.2 0.5
1250 w 5.9094 0.31519 0.00329 0.02376 0.00006 99.7 10.9 323.2 0.6
1400 w 0.84887 0.04635 0.00051 0.00849 0.00007 97.6 1.6 316.4 0.5
274 Th. Seifert

Table A16 (continued)

Temp (C) 40
ArR 2 39
ArK 38
ArCl 37
ArCa 36
ArAt % %39ArK Age+Error 3
Rad (Ma)

#ABF-3A, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 321.80.7 Ma;


No plateau; Weighted mean date: 325.20.6 Ma;
Isochron date: 325.90.9 Ma (steps 3-11); J=0.010440, 0.12%; wt. 18.6 mg
600 0.0134 0.00690 0.00038 0.00383 0.00059 7.2 0.3 37 2
700 0.4099 0.04520 0.00110 0.01256 0.00024 85.3 1.7 163 2
800 w 1.8804 0.09716 0.00144 0.00425 0.00034 94.8 3.7 332.0 0.5
900 w 3.6761 0.19166 0.00223 0.00393 0.00013 98.9 7.4 329.3 0.5
1000 w 5.3216 0.27713 0.00307 0.00712 0.00014 99.2 10.7 329.6 0.5
1050 w 3.7818 0.19672 0.00247 0.00837 0.00014 98.9 7.6 330.0 0.5
1100 w 6.5665 0.34404 0.00439 0.00950 0.00012 99.4 13.2 327.8 0.5
1150 w 10.327 0.55043 0.00514 0.01072 0.00012 99.6 21.2 322.7 0.5
1200 w 12.758 0.68265 0.00553 0.01179 0.00009 99.7 26.2 321.5 0.5
1250 w 3.4842 0.18604 0.00147 0.00653 0.00006 99.4 7.2 322.2 0.6
1400 w 0.4325 0.02300 0.00019 0.00485 0.00009 94.2 0.9 323.6 1.9

#LD2-WOLK-Q, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 320.50.5 Ma;


Isochron date: 327.01.1 Ma (steps 3-10); J=0.010427, 0.12%; wt. 26.1 mg
600 0.07628 0.01072 0.00090 0.00195 0.00078 24.9 0.4 129.1 0.5
700 0.55416 0.08430 0.00053 0.01394 0.00019 90.5 3.3 119.7 1.0
800 w 2.9567 0.15324 0.00105 0.00468 0.00049 96.0 6.0 330.7 0.5
900 w 5.9355 0.30601 0.00165 0.00483 0.00015 99.2 12.1 332.3 0.5
1000 w 6.1453 0.31778 0.00175 0.01179 0.00010 99.5 12.5 331.4 0.5
1050 w 3.6016 0.18614 0.00103 0.01039 0.00009 99.2 7.3 331.5 0.5
1100 w 11.746 0.61395 0.00351 0.02556 0.00012 99.7 24.2 328.1 0.5
1150 w 12.552 0.66559 0.00379 0.04196 0.00015 99.6 26.2 323.8 0.5
1250 w 2.8519 0.15177 0.00103 0.03238 0.00006 99.3 6.0 322.8 0.5
1400 w 0.9267 0.04967 0.00032 0.02454 0.00003 98.9 2.0 320.7 0.7

#LD540-8-1-2, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 321.90.5 Ma; No plateau;


Weighted mean date: 322.80.5 Ma (steps 3-12); J=0.007133, 0.12%; wt. 41.4 mg
650 0.1584 0.01130 0.00024 0.00168 0.00069 43.7 0.3 172 2
750 5.1991 0.19328 0.00200 0.01410 0.00082 95.5 5.8 316.6 0.5
800 w 5.6695 0.20618 0.00179 0.00225 0.00025 98.7 6.2 323.1 0.5
850 w 5.8440 0.21396 0.00166 0.00179 0.00012 99.3 6.4 321.1 0.5
900 w 5.7461 0.20903 0.00150 0.00200 0.00008 99.6 6.2 323.0 0.5
950 w 5.1981 0.18833 0.00143 0.00281 0.00007 99.6 5.6 324.2 0.5
1000 w 5.1107 0.18472 0.00176 0.00523 0.00008 99.5 5.5 324.9 0.5
1050 w 6.9576 0.25121 0.00283 0.00587 0.00009 99.6 7.5 325.2 0.5
1100 w 8.3109 0.30155 0.00315 0.00658 0.00008 99.7 9.0 323.8 0.5
1150 w 18.9581 0.69221 0.00598 0.01208 0.00026 99.6 20.7 321.9 0.5
1200 w 21.4734 0.78350 0.00483 0.01327 0.00022 99.7 23.4 322.1 0.5
1250 w 2.9568 0.10804 0.00087 0.01176 0.00003 99.7 3.2 321.7 0.5
1350 w 0.2012 0.00790 0.00008 0.00265 0.00004 95.0 0.2 300.5 1.7
Appendix - Table A16 275

Table A16 (continued)

Temp 40
ArR 2 39
ArK 38
ArCl 37
ArCa 36
ArAt % Rad %39ArK Age+Error 3
(C) (Ma)

#LD540-8-1-5, Phlogopite, Total-gas date: 321.10.5 Ma;


Plateau date: 321.90.5 Ma (steps 9-11; 55.7%); J=0.007175, 0.12%; wt. 43.5 mg
650 0.69515 0.03845 0.00057 0.00804 0.00093 71.7 1.1 220.0 0.3
750 2.6287 0.09564 0.00107 0.01007 0.00034 96.2 2.7 324.7 0.6
800 3.8765 0.14206 0.00143 0.00276 0.00023 98.2 4.1 322.6 0.5
850 5.5772 0.20564 0.00163 0.00246 0.00013 99.3 5.9 320.8 0.5
900 6.5770 0.24202 0.00165 0.00253 0.00010 99.5 6.9 321.4 0.5
950 6.4957 0.23744 0.00153 0.00339 0.00006 99.7 6.8 323.3 0.5
1000 6.3797 0.23276 0.00186 0.00700 0.00009 99.6 6.7 323.9 0.5
1050 6.7227 0.24544 0.00269 0.00847 0.00011 99.5 7.0 323.7 0.5
1100 p 10.278 0.37711 0.00380 0.01134 0.00011 99.6 10.8 322.2 0.5
1150 p 14.893 0.54693 0.00495 0.01420 0.00009 99.8 15.7 321.9 0.5
1200 p 27.829 1.02240 0.00644 0.02126 0.00018 99.8 29.3 321.8 0.5
1250 2.5198 0.09284 0.00087 0.01698 0.00003 99.6 2.7 321.0 0.5
1350 0.43057 0.01597 0.00033 0.00769 0.00001 99.5 0.5 319.0 0.8
#E5000-6, Plagioclase, Total-gas date: 310.70.5 Ma;
No plateau; Isochron date (steps 1-4): 2792; J=0.031671, 0.12%; wt. 101.4 mg
700 0.5482 0.04780 0.00504 0.01150 0.00100 65.0 1.7 559 2
900 4.0800 0.73226 0.00181 0.15191 0.00051 96.3 25.5 293.2 0.4
1050 3.6128 0.66264 0.00225 0.24672 0.00036 97.0 23.1 287.4 0.5
1200 4.0811 0.76782 0.00226 0.23727 0.00039 97.1 26.8 280.7 0.4
1350 3.9635 0.57482 0.00855 0.16588 0.00072 94.7 20.0 356.3 0.5
1450 0.74114 0.08394 0.00272 0.04964 0.00025 90.7 2.9 444.8 0.8

#E5000-6, K-feldspar, Total-gas date: 285.60.8 Ma;


No plateau; J=0.031733, 0.12%; wt. 30.7 mg
600 0.35824 0.07207 0.00106 0.01706 0.00046 72.3 2.7 264.2 0.4
700 0.69961 0.13284 0.00024 0.02899 0.00014 94.4 4.9 278.8 1.3
800 1.3030 0.23868 0.00044 0.05995 0.00012 97.2 8.8 288.2 0.4
850 1.0811 0.19706 0.00036 0.07278 0.00007 97.9 7.3 289.5 1.6
900 0.79705 0.14579 0.00025 0.07283 0.00005 98.0 5.4 288.6 1.7
950 1.0426 0.19248 0.00024 0.10425 0.00007 98.0 7.1 286.1 1.3
1000 1.0496 0.19687 0.00034 0.11066 0.00008 97.7 7.3 282.0 0.4
1050 1.1851 0.22517 0.00063 0.11868 0.00010 97.4 8.3 278.6 0.4
1100 1.3847 0.26768 0.00073 0.12784 0.00013 97.1 9.9 274.2 1.0
1150 1.3261 0.25548 0.00094 0.13195 0.00011 97.5 9.4 275.1 0.4
1200 1.3991 0.26239 0.00121 0.14443 0.00013 97.2 9.7 282.0 0.5
1250 1.7616 0.30738 0.00105 0.11718 0.00012 97.8 11.3 301.4 0.4
1300 0.97373 0.16825 0.00069 0.10097 0.00010 96.9 6.2 304.2 0.4
1350 0.23289 0.03943 0.00042 0.08352 0.00007 92.0 1.5 310 4
1400 0.06824 0.01045 0.00021 0.05527 0.00005 82.8 0.4 340 3
276 Th. Seifert

Table
TableA16
A16(continued)
(continued)

1
Ninety-nine percent pure phlogopite or feldspar was separated from rock samples by standard mineral separation
procedures. Grains sizes were between 250-125 micrometers. All samples were cleaned with reagent-grade acetone,
alcohol, and deionized water and air-dried. All samples were wrapped in aluminum foil packages and encapsulated
in silica glass vials with uence standards adjacent to each sample. The standards for this experiment are MMhb-1
hornblende and Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) sanidine with age of 28.03 Ma calibrated internally against MMhb1
hornblende standard (percent K = 1.555, 40ArR = 1.624 x 10 -9 mole/gm, Samson and Alexander (1987), and K-Ar age =
523.12.6 Ma; age reevaluated by Renne et al. (1998)). For irradiation, an aluminum canister was loaded with the
silica vials. Samples were irradiated in four different irradiation packages, two of which were irradiated for 30 hours,
one for 40 hours and one for 129 hours. All irradiations were done in the TRIGA reactor at the U.S. Geological Survey
in Denver, Colorado. The samples and standards were analyzed in the Denver Argon Geochronology Laboratory
of the U.S. Geological Survey using a Mass Analyser Products 215 rare-gas mass spectrometer on a Faraday-cup
collector. All samples were heated in a double-vacuum low-blank resistance furnace for 20-minute heating intervals
at each temperature, in a series of 6 to 15 steps, to a maximum of 1450 C, and analyzed using the standard stepwise
heating technique described by Snee (2002). Each standard was degassed to release argon in a single step at 1350 C.
For every argon measurement, ve isotopes of argon (40Ar, 39Ar, 38Ar, 37Ar, and 36Ar) are measured. Detection limit at
the time of this experiment was 2x10 -17 moles of argon.

2
Abundance of all isotopes including 40ArR (Radiogenic 40Ar), 39ArK (irradiation-produced K-derived 39Ar), 38Ar Cl
(irradiation-produced Cl-derived 38Ar), 37Ar Ca (irradiation-produced Ca-derived 37Ar), and 36ArAt (atmospheric 36Ar)
is measured in volts and calculated to ve decimal places. Voltage may be converted to moles using 1.160 x 10-12
moles argon per volt signal. The value (40ArR /39ArK) may be directly calculated from 40ArR and 39ArK in the table.
All isotopic abundances have been corrected for mass discrimination. Mass discrimination was determined by
calculating the 40Ar/36Ar ratio of aliquots of atmospheric argon pipetted from a xed reservoir on the extraction line;
the ratio during this experiment was 298.9, which was corrected to 295.5 to account for mass discrimination. Final
isotopic abundances were corrected for all interfering isotopes of argon including atmospheric argon. 37Ar and 39Ar,
which are produced during irradiation, are radioactive and their abundances were corrected for radioactive decay.
Abundances of interfering isotopes from K and Ca were calculated from reactor production ratios determined by
irradiating and analyzing pure CaF2 and K 2SO4; the K 2SO4 was degassed in a vacuum furnace prior to irradiation to
release extraneous argon. Corrections for Cl-derived 36Ar were determined using the method of Roddick (1983). For
details on isotopic corrections, isochron calculations, and age calculations, see Snee (2002). Production ratios for
irradiations DD67, DD68, DD74, and DD79 used in this experiment are available in Snee (2002).

3
Apparent ages and associated errors were calculated from analytical data then rounded using associated analytical
errors. Apparent ages of each fraction include the error in J value (0.12%), which was calculated from the reproducibility
of splits of the argon from several standards. Apparent ages were calculated using decay constants of Steiger and Jger
(1977). All apparent age errors are cited at 1 sigma. Uncertainties in the calculations for apparent age of individual
fractions were calculated using equations of Dalrymple et al. (1981).

p
Fraction included in plateau date. Plateaus determined according to the method of Fleck et al. (1977).
w
Fraction included in weight-averaged date.
Appendix - Table A16 and A17 277

Table A17 40Ar-39Ar and K-Ar ages of representative phlogopite separates of lamprophyres (analytical
data see Tables A15 and A16).
40
Sample Lamprophyre Ar-39Ar age (Ma) K-Ar age
type ( 2 sigma) (Ma)
TGA PA WMA IA

LDBE-1 LD2a 300 6

LDBE-6 LD2a 321.2 0.6 323.7 0.6 318.6 3.4

LDBE-8 LD2a 322 6

G2-1A LD2a 314.5 0.5 315.4 0.5

ABF-1 LD2c 323.6 0.7 326.0 0.7 326.5 1.2

ABF-3A LD2c 321.8 0.7 325.2 0.6 325.9 0.9

LDWOLK-1 LD2c 328 7

LDWOLK-Q LD2c 320.5 0.5 327.8 0.5 327.0 1.1 296 7

LD-540-8-1-2 LD2d 321.9 0.5 322.8 0.5 320 6

LD-540-8-1-5 LD2d 321.1 0.5 321.9 0.5 304 6

LB-371-1 LD2d 294 6

Abbreviations: TGA = total gas age (errors 1), PA = plateau age (errors 1), WMA = weighted mean age (errors 1), IA =
isochron age (errors 1)

Table A18 Whole rock K-Ar analytical data from representative late-Variscan magmatites of the Erzgebirge
and Sub-Erzgebirge basin (number refers to sample localities shown in Fig. 2).
40 40
Sample Locality Rock type K (wt.%) Arrad Arrad (%) Date 2 sigma
(10-9 mol/g) (Ma) (Ma)
WH7/2 4B lamprophyre 4.90 0.08 2.627 0.051 95.9 0.3 286 7
19/18/1 4B lamprophyre 3.32 0.05 2.009 0.038 97.5 0.3 319 7
Z-17 14 shoshonitic flow 1) 2.57 0.05 1.526 0.009 97.31 0.78 313.7 1.9
1)
Z-13 14 ultrapotassic flow 6.24 0.05 3.444 0.073 96.63 2.69 293.3 6.2
Z-14 14 shoshonitic flow 1) 4.54 0.05 2.598 0.040 97.23 2.02 303.3 4.3
C-6-I 15 ultrapotassic flow 1) 6.07 0.05 3.519 0.051 99.59 1.97 306.8 4.1
C-5 XI (Wstenbrand) rhyolitic flow 5.59 0.05 2.862 0.042 98.87 1.98 273.6 3.7
F-1 VII (Grnberg) rhyolitic dike 5.48 0.05 2.904 0.026 98.03 1.16 282.5 2.4
F-4 VII (Augustusburg) rhyolitic stock 5.62 0.05 3.189 0.058 99.48 2.50 300.9 5.6
F-5 VII (Metzdorf) rhyolitic dike 5.02 0.05 2.664 0.041 99.15 2.11 282.8 4.1
F-6 VIII (Oederan) rhyolitic ignimbrite 5.53 0.05 3.262 0.052 97.64 2.12 311.8 5.2
1)
Laboratory for geochronology and isotope geochemistry, TU Bergakademie Freiberg. MVSEB
Constants from Steiger & Jger (1977).
278
Table A19 Summary of SHRIMP U-Pb zircon data for sample #G2-1C.
206 232
Grain. Pbc (%) U ppm Th ppm Th/238U 206
Pb* ppm 238
U/206Pb % 207
Pb/206Pb % 207
Pb*/206Pb* % 207
Pb*/235U % 206
Pb*/238U % error 206
Pb/238U 206
Pb/238U 207
Pb/206Pb Discordant
spot (1) Total Total (1) (1) (1) Age (Ma) (1) Age (Ma) Age (Ma) (1) %

1.1 0.18 164 146 0.92 7.12 19.75 1.4 0.0542 3.3 0.0519 3.9 0.361 4.1 0.0505 1.4 0.345 317.6 4.4 317.9 4.5 280 89 -13

2.1 0.07 205 167 0.84 9.05 19.45 1.3 0.0534 1.9 0.0517 2.7 0.366 3.0 0.05131 1.4 0.446 322.6 4.3 323.0 4.3 273 62 -18

2.2 0.11 160 190 1.23 7.12 19.31 1.4 0.0538 2.2 0.0487 3.2 0.346 3.5 0.05147 1.4 0.406 323.5 4.5 325.2 4.6 135 76 -140

3.1 -- 190 121 0.66 8.27 19.71 1.4 0.0520 2.1 0.0520 2.1 0.3641 2.5 0.05074 1.4 0.554 319.1 4.3 319.3 4.4 287 48 -11

4.1 0.09 214 165 0.80 9.72 18.94 2.2 0.0538 2.9 0.0518 3.5 0.376 4.2 0.0527 2.2 0.526 330.9 7.1 331.4 7.1 276 81 -20

5.1 0.08 118 96 0.84 5.11 19.88 2.2 0.0533 2.7 0.0495 4.0 0.341 4.6 0.0501 2.2 0.481 314.9 6.8 316.1 6.9 169 95 -86

6.1 0.09 173 167 1.00 7.64 19.47 1.4 0.0535 2.2 0.0507 2.6 0.358 2.9 0.05118 1.4 0.485 321.8 4.5 322.6 4.5 228 59 -41

6.2 0.06 482 616 1.32 20.60 20.08 1.2 0.0531 1.5 0.05402 1.7 0.3713 2.1 0.04985 1.2 0.578 313.6 3.7 313.1 3.7 372 38 16

Th. Seifert
7.1 0.39 183 143 0.81 7.80 20.12 1.4 0.0557 2.1 0.0535 2.7 0.366 3.0 0.04957 1.4 0.466 311.9 4.3 311.6 4.3 351 60 11

8.1 0.16 204 102 0.51 8.90 19.71 1.4 0.0541 2.2 0.0507 5.1 0.353 5.3 0.05053 1.5 0.274 317.8 4.5 318.6 4.5 226 120 -41

9.1 0.12 205 225 1.14 8.84 19.90 1.4 0.0536 2.2 0.0520 2.7 0.360 3.1 0.05015 1.4 0.462 315.4 4.4 315.7 4.5 285 63 -11

10.1 0.40 1194 1476 1.28 51.10 20.06 1.4 0.05585 0.94 0.0512 2.5 0.3497 2.8 0.04956 1.4 0.486 311.8 4.2 312.3 4.2 249 57 -25

11.1 1.29 214 333 1.60 9.38 19.63 1.4 0.0630 2.0 0.0558 4.9 0.388 5.1 0.05047 1.4 0.279 317.4 4.4 316.2 4.4 443 110 28

11.2 -- 174 123 0.73 7.62 19.60 1.4 0.0520 2.5 0.0520 2.5 0.366 2.9 0.05102 1.4 0.475 320.8 4.3 321.1 4.4 286 58 -12

12.1 -- 1160 393 0.35 52.50 18.98 1.1 0.05278 0.95 0.05256 0.97 0.3816 1.5 0.05266 1.1 0.752 330.8 3.6 331.0 3.6 310 22 -7

12.2 -- 265 65 0.26 12.00 18.98 1.3 0.0516 2.0 0.0516 2.0 0.3747 2.4 0.05269 1.3 0.531 331.0 4.1 331.6 4.2 266 47 -24

13.1 0.95 220 201 0.94 9.72 19.47 1.3 0.0604 1.9 0.0542 3.1 0.381 3.3 0.05097 1.3 0.383 320.5 4.0 319.9 4.0 381 69 16

9.2 0.20 276 238 0.89 11.70 20.23 1.3 0.0542 2.4 0.0519 3.0 0.353 3.3 0.0493 1.3 0.404 310.2 4.0 310.5 4.1 280 68 -11

Errors are 1-sigma; Pbc and Pb* indicate the common and radiogenic portions, respectively.
Error in Standard calibration was 0.26% (not included in above errors but required when comparing data from different mounts).
(1) Common Pb corrected using measured 204Pb.
Appendix - Table A20 to A23 279

Table A20 Summary of vapour-transfere U-Pb zircon data for lamprophyre #G2-1C.
206
Utotal Pbtotal R Utotal/Pb* Pb/238U % 207
Pb/235 U % 207
Pb/206 Pb % 206
Pb/238 U

311.2 6.2
286.8 2.0

(1) Resulting isotope ratios

Table A21 Results of single zircon evaporation measurements for lamprophyre dike #1H1-155, tin deposit Pobershau.
207 206 204 206 207 206 207
Grain # Scans Pb/ Pb(measured) Pb/ Pb(measured) Pb/ Pb(corrected) Pb/206Pb age (Ma)
Z1 71 0.0539034 0.000133820 0.0001095 0.00000473434 0.0525054 0.000132773 307.4 5.8
Z2 72 0.0539447 0.000130779 0.0001113 0.00000517996 0.0525208 0.000125839 308.1 5.5
Z4 90 0.0531861 0.000085119 0.0000504 0.00000163632 0.0526455 0.000085548 313.5 3.7
Z5 90 0.0539456 0.000056098 0.0000932 0.00000263703 0.0527845 0.000060487 319.5 2.6
Z9 90 0.0665991 0.000167948 0.0009678 0.00001185540 0.0527718 0.000181646 318.9 7.9
Weighted mean age 313.5 5.2
280 Th. Seifert

Table A22 Results of single zircon evaporation Table A23 Results of single zircon evaporation
measurements for the lamprophyre measurements for the mafic volcanic
dike #LDED-8, tin deposit sample #LDZO-1A, Oberhohndorf,
Ehrenfriedersdorf. Sub-Erzgebirge basin.

Grain # Scans Age (Ma) 2 sigma Grain # Scans Age (Ma) 2 sigma

Z15 90 334.8 11.2 Z43 90 173.1 10.3

Z3 90 345 1.7 Z58 90 258.1 13.2

Z65 90 350 16.5 Z44 90 295.2 4.8

Z70 45 478 27.1 Z1 90 299.7 7.3

Z31 90 533.5 8.8 Z69 36 409.5 15.3

Z61 26 539.3 14.7 Z78 54 430.9 13.5

Z38 45 595.2 17.9 Z7 90 438.9 6.7

Z18 54 595.5 10.7 Z55 90 445 13.7

Z5 90 605.3 3.3 Z61 90 447.8 6.7

Z43 90 613 4.4 Z72 27 455 4.7

Z32 90 631 5.8 Z64 90 508.7 6.1

Z1 90 661.2 21.4 Z8 90 516 5.4

Z52 90 881 8.4 Z6 90 1329.2 5.3

Z44 36 1444 9.9 Z62 90 1781 6.1

Z24 63 1878.8 4.4 Z73 45 1987.2 11.8

Z29 90 2045 3.8

Z40 26 2047.8 4.8

Z51 45 2126 7.6

Z41 90 2643.4 2.9

Z46 90 2669.9 2.8

Z17 81 2684.7 2.4


Table A24 Summarized geochronological data of late-Variscan magmatic events in the Erzgebirge and surrounded areas. Compiled
after literature data and this study. Sources: 1 = this study; 2 = Von Quadt (1993); 3 = Warkus et al. (1998); 4 = Kurze et al.
(1998); 5 = Wenzel et al. (1997); 6 = Rhede et al. (1996); 7 = Kempe et al. (1999); 8 = Gerstenberger et al. (1984); 9 = Kempe
(2003); 10 = Werner and Lippolt (1998); 11 = Von Seckendorff et al. (2004); 12 = Gerstenberger (1989); 13 = Seifert and
Armstrong, submitted; 14 = A. Freier and Th. Seifert, unpublished data (2000); 15 = V. Leinweber and Th. Seifert, unpublished
data (2000); 16 = Tichomirowa (1997); 17 = Hammer et al. (1999); 18 = Nasdala et al. (1998); 19 = Kempe et al. (2004). Location
see also Figure 2, Tables A2 and A8. SEB = Sub-Erzgebirge basin.
Number in Fig. 57 District/Deposit Rock type Material dated Method Age (Ma) Source
or unit

1 Ehrenfriedersdorf Sn district LD1-type lamprophyre zircon Pb-Pb 340? 1

2 Granulitgebirge Berbersdorf granite zircon U-Pb 3385 2

3 Kirchberg granite massif main intrusion type monazite U-Pb 33710 3

4 Elbtalschiefergebirge mica-lamprophyre (minette) phlogopite/biotite K-Ar 335.94.0 4


(Elbe Valley Zone)

Appendix - Table A24


5 Meissen monzonite-granite mica-lamprophyre (minette) phlogopite/biotite K-Ar 330.93.9 4
massif (Elbe Valley Zone)

6 Meissen monzonite-granite hornblende-monzonite amphibole K-Ar 333.77.0 4


massif (Elbe Valley Zone)

7 Meissen monzonite-granite hornblende-monzonite amphibole Ar-Ar 329.11.4 to 330.41.4 5


massif (Elbe Valley Zone)

8 Bergen granite massif main intrusion type monazite, xenotime, U-Th-Pb, 33313 6
uraninite chemical dating

9 Altenberg Sn district Altenberg granite porphyry zircon Pb-Pb 3338 7

10 Eibenstock granite massif 'Older intrusion 1/2' type whole rock Rb-Sr 3325 8

11 Kirchberg granite massif main intrusion type uraninite U-Th-Pb, 3305 9


chemical dating

12 Ehrenfriedersdorf Sn district main granite intrusion type whole rock Rb-Sr 3285 8

13 Marienberg, Wolkenstein LD2c-type lamprophyre phlogopite K-Ar 3287 1


subdistrict (#LDWOLK-1)

14 Marienberg, Wolkenstein LD2c-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 327.80.5 1


subdistrict (#LDWOLK-Q)

14 " " " K-Ar 2967 1

15 Marienberg, Gehringswalde LD2c-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 326.00.7 1


subdistrict (#ABF-1)

281
Table A24 (continued)

282
Number in Fig. 57 District/Deposit Rock type Material dated Method Age (Ma) Source
or unit

16 Marienberg, Gehringswalde LD2c-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 325.20.6 1


subdistrict (#ABF-3A)

17 Eibenstock granite massif 'Younger intrusion 3' type whole rock Rb-Sr 3257 8

18 Eibenstock granite massif 'Younger intrusion 1/2' type whole rock Rb-Sr 3231 8

19 Lauenstein area lamprophyre (kersantite) phlogopite/biotite Ar-Ar 324.82.8 10

20 Freiberg southern subdistrict LD2a-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 323.70.6 1


(#LDBE-6)

20 " " " K-Ar 318.63.4 1

21 Freiberg southern subdistrict LD2a-type lamprophyre phlogopite K-Ar 3226 1


(#LDBE-8)

22 St. Michaelis, Freiberg lamprophyre (minette) biotite (phlogopite) Ar-Ar 3234 11


southern subdistrict

23 Rabenau area, Elbe Valley lamprophyre (kersantite) biotite Ar-Ar 3243 11


Zone

Th. Seifert
24 Eibenstock granite massif main intrusion type whole rock Rb-Sr 32412 12

25 Luchsbachweg area lamprophyre (minette) phlogopite/biotite Ar-Ar 3241.9 10


(Western Erzgebirge)

26 Satzung, southern part of the main intrusion type (similar monazite U-Pb 3234 3
Marienberg district to type Eibenstock main
granite)

27 Mhlleithen-Gottesberg main intrusion stage of the zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) 3223 13


Sn district Eibenstock granite

28 Mhlleithen-Gottesberg main intrusion stage of the zircon Pb-Pb 325.73.7 14


Sn district Eibenstock granite

29 Ehrenfriedersdorf Sn district main intrusion type (similar zircon Pb-Pb 3225 15


to type Eibenstock main
granite)

30 Auerhammer granite, Aue- main intrusion type monazite U-Pb 3226 3


Schwarzenberg area

31 Pobershau Sn district main intrusion type (similar monazite U-Pb 3213 3


to type Eibenstock main
granite)

32 Eibenstock granite massif main intrusion type monazite U-Pb 3213 3

33 Schlema U deposit LD2d-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 322.80.5 1


(#LD-540-8-1-2)

33 " " " K-Ar 3206 1


Table A24 (continued)
Number in Fig. 57 District/Deposit Rock type Material dated Method Age (Ma) Source
or unit

34 Schlema U deposit LD2d-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 321.90.5 1


(#LD-540-8-1-5)

34 " " " K-Ar 3046 1

35 'Weisser Stein'; Aue- lamprophyre (kersantite) biotite Ar-Ar 320.11.9 10


Schwarzenberg area

36 Mhlleithen-Gottesberg LD2a-type lamprophyre zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) 3203 13


Sn district (#LDT1-1)

36 " " " Pb-Pb 3162.7 13

37 Niederbobritzsch granite, main intrusion type zircon Pb-Pb 3206 16


Freiberg district

38 Ehrenfriedersdorf Sn district main granite intrusion type whole rock Rb-Sr 3184 12

Appendix - Table A24


39 Marienberg, Gehringswalde LD2a-type lamprophyre zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) 317.72.7 1
subdistrict (#G2-1C)

40 Marienberg, Gehringswalde LD2a-type lamprophyre phlogopite Ar-Ar 315.40.5 1


subdistrict (#G2-1A)

41 Griesbach, SW of Zschopau lamprophyre (minette) biotite Ar-Ar 3163 11

42 Mhlleithen-Gottesberg microgranitic dike with A- zircon Pb-Pb 312.54.6 13


Sn district type affinity (#GRGOT)

43 Pobershau Sn district LD3-type lamprophyre zircon Pb-Pb 313.55.2 1


(#1H1-155-1)

43 " " " " 309.56.9 1

44 Freiberg southern subdistrict LD2a-type lamprophyre phlogopite K-Ar 3006 1


(#LDBE-1)

45 Schlema U deposit LD2d-type lamprophyre phlogopite K-Ar 2946 1


(#LB-371-1)

46 Altenberg Sn district granite type 'Aussengranit' whole rock Rb-Sr 3053 12

47 Altenberg Sn district granite type 'Aussengranit' zinnwaldite K-Ar 292 12

48 Altenberg Sn district granite type 'Aussengranit' biotite K-Ar 2855 17

49 Schellerhau granite massif main intrusion type biotite K-Ar 29510 17


(Eastern Erzgebirge)

283
50 Kirchberg granite massif, lamprophyre (kersantite) biotite Ar-Ar 2953 11
Hirschfeld area
284 Th. Seifert

Table A24 (continued)


Number in Fig. 57 District/Deposit Rock type Material dated Method Age (Ma) Source
or unit

51 Henneberg granite massif, lamprophyre (kersantite) biotite Ar-Ar 2972 11


'Thringer Schiefergebirge',
eastern Thuringia

52 Zwickau-Oberhohndorf, shoshonitic flow (#LDZO- zircon Pb-Pb 296.63.9 1


SEB 1A)

52 " " - lithostratigraphy* between 294 and 290 1

53 Marienberg, Lauta lamprophyre (#WH7/2) whole rock K-Ar 2867 1


subdistrict

54 Marienberg, Lauta lamprophyre (#19/18/1) whole rock K-Ar 3197 1


subdistrict

55 Zwickau-Friedrichsgrn, shoshonitic flow (#Z-17) whole rock K-Ar 313.71.9 1


SEB

55 " " - lithostratigraphy* between 294 and 290 1

56 Zwickau-Schedewitz, SEB ultrapotassic flow (#Z-13) whole rock K-Ar 293.36.2 1

56 " " - lithostratigraphy* between 294 and 290 1

57 Zwickau-Cainsdorf, SEB shoshonitic flow (#Z-14) whole rock K-Ar 303.34.3 1

58 Seifersdorf, SEB ultrapotassic flow (#C-6-I) whole rock K-Ar 306.84.1 1

58 " " - lithostratigraphy* between 294 and 290 1

59 Wstenbrand, SEB rhyolitic flow (#C-5) whole rock K-Ar 273.63.7 1

59 " " - lithostratigraphy* about 294 1

60 Grnberg, Central Saxonian rhyolitic dike (#F-1) whole rock K-Ar 282.52.4 1
Lineament/SEB

61 Augustusburg, Central rhyolitic stock (#F-4) whole rock K-Ar 300.95.6 1


Saxonian Lineament/SEB

62 Metzdorf, Central Saxonian rhyolitic dike (#F-5) whole rock K-Ar 282.84.1 1
Lineament/SEB

63 Oederan, Central Saxonian rhyolitic ignimbrite (#F-6) whole rock K-Ar 311.85.2 1
Lineament/SEB

64 Chemnitz, SEB 'lower series' of rhyolitic zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) 2785 18


volcanics

64 " " - lithostratigraphy* between 294 and 290 1

65 Chemnitz-Zeisigwald, SEB rhyolitic ignimbrite (#C-1, - lithostratigraphy* 289 1


#C-2, #C-3, #C-7)

66 Eibenstock granite massif rhyolitic dike zircon Pb-Pb 2905 19

66 " " " U-Pb (SHRIMP) 2978 19

* Lithostratigraphic ages for samples #C-5, #LDZO-1A, #Z-17, #Z-13, #C-6-I and 'lower series' of rhyolitic rocks (see Fig. 26).
Appendix - Table A25 285

Table A25 Major and trace element analyses of late-collisional acidic (sub)volcanic magmatites
with geochemical S-type signature. Major elements in weight percent (wt.%), trace
elements in parts per million (ppm). Au and Hg in parts per billion (ppb).
Sample # Z 20137 Z 20130 Z 20131 Z 2015 4U4/A1 3U6/A1 31007 SZU 1/78 NR.1

Locality (arabic 4A 4A 4A 4A 4B 4B 4B Satzung


number in Fig. 2)

Rock type grE grE grE grE gr rd grd grE

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 75.60 74.80 75.10 73.30 75.20 73.50 71.80 75.20

TiO2 0.11 0.07 0.08 0.17 0.07 0.01 0.01 0.09

Al2O3 13.00 13.70 13.70 13.70 13.40 14.90 16.10 12.80

Fe2O3 1.58 1.11 1.52 1.77 1.46 1.53 0.60 1.61

MnO 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.09 0.05 0.05

MgO 0.20 0.12 0.12 0.17 0.32 0.17 0.10 0.22

CaO 0.58 0.42 0.39 0.61 0.89 1.11 0.52 0.66

Na2O 3.17 3.21 3.12 3.35 3.12 4.04 4.11 3.33

K2O 4.83 4.87 4.70 4.74 4.21 3.35 3.89 4.63

P2O5 0.24 0.29 0.29 0.20 0.27 0.62 0.62 0.27

LOI 0.70 1.20 1.00 0.75 1.05 1.20 1.80 1.00

Total 100.10 99.80 100.10 98.80 100.00 100.60 99.70 99.90


+ -- 0.80 0.20 0.50 0.70 -- -- --
H2O

CO2 -- 0.07 0.06 0.18 0.22 -- -- --

Trace elements (ppm)

S 110 220 60 60 50 730 140 110

Cl 148 < 100 167 199 < 100 102 < 100 122

F 2920 1960 3080 2490 4230 10000 -- 4530

Analytical methods: Major and trace element contents were measured at the Activation Laboratories Ltd., Ancaster,
Ontario, Canada. Methods: XRF (major elements, Cl, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba), ICP (Sc, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ag, Sr, Y, Mo, Li,
Be), ICP-MS (Ga, In, Ti, Bi, REE), INAA (Cr, As, Au, Sb, Cs, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U), WET chemical (Hg, F), Colum (CO2)
and LECO methods (S).

Legend
rock types: gr = granite; grE = main intrusive stage granite type Eibenstock; grA = granite of the Aue-Schneeberg granite
massif; grK = granite of the Kirchberg granite massif; grB = granite of the Bergen granite massif; grd = microgranitic dike;
rd = rhyolitic dike.
Localities (see also Fig. 2): 4A - Pobershau, 4B - Lauta, Marienberg, 5 - Frohnau, Annaberg, 6A - Ehrenfriedersdorf, 8 -
Breitenbrunn, 9A - Tellerhuser, 10A - Niederschlema, 10B - Schneeberg, 11 - Mhlleithen.
Sample description see the end of the table.
286 Th. Seifert

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # SZU 1/78 NR.3 SZU 270/1 SZU 287/1 GREI SZU 287/1 SZU 1/78 NR.2

Locality (arabic Satzung Satzung Satzung Satzung Satzung


number in Fig. 2)

Rock type grE grd grd grE grE

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 73.60 73.40 68.10 74.40 75.50

TiO2 0.13 0.07 0.16 0.23 0.10

Al2O3 13.60 14.70 16.00 13.20 13.50

Fe2O3 1.90 1.14 1.63 1.60 1.53

MnO 0.03 0.04 0.03 0.03 0.03

MgO 0.22 0.14 0.26 0.35 0.15

CaO 0.53 0.75 0.72 0.61 0.50

Na2O 3.24 3.50 4.52 3.07 3.22

K2O 4.86 4.16 4.89 4.13 4.55

P2O5 0.26 0.37 0.39 0.22 0.26

LOI 0.80 1.25 1.45 1.35 0.80

Total 99.20 99.50 98.20 99.20 100.20


+ 0.60 0.80 0.50 0.50 0.40
H2O

CO2 0.13 0.10 0.20 0.15 0.05

Trace elements (ppm)

S 110 300 90 70 70

Cl 235 117 138 122 256

F 4580 2150 2800 3000 4760


Appendix - Table A25 287

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # SZU 336/1 ANA 2 ANA 3 ANA 5 ANA 6 E 610 E 612 E 604 E 602

Locality (arabic number Satzung 5 5 5 5 6A 6A 6A 6A


in Fig. 2)

Rock type grd grE grE grE grE grE grE grE grE

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 74.00 73.20 76.40 74.60 75.40 72.60 74.20 75.20 73.80

TiO2 0.05 0.06 0.08 0.04 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.04 0.04

Al2O3 14.50 14.40 13.40 15.10 13.40 15.40 14.60 14.00 14.30

Fe2O3 1.28 1.11 1.33 1.06 1.20 0.98 1.35 1.04 1.05

MnO 0.02 0.02 0.02 < 0.01 0.03 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.02

MgO 0.14 0.08 0.11 0.08 0.09 0.06 0.08 0.14 0.07

CaO 0.61 0.59 0.45 0.44 0.50 0.72 0.68 0.43 0.63

Na2O 3.37 3.52 3.55 3.79 3.45 3.94 3.74 3.07 3.52

K2O 4.76 4.10 4.07 4.02 4.24 3.96 3.76 4.53 4.07

P2O5 0.36 0.41 0.34 0.42 0.44 0.62 0.51 0.31 0.46

LOI 0.95 1.05 0.60 0.85 1.00 1.00 0.85 1.15 1.05

Total 100.00 98.60 100.40 100.40 99.80 99.40 99.80 99.90 99.00
+ 0.50 0.60 0.40 0.50 0.50 0.70 0.50 0.80 0.50
H2O

CO2 0.17 0.07 0.16 0.11 0.22 0.03 0.01 < 0.01 0.03

Trace elements (ppm)

S 60 90 < 50 100 70 260 90 200 130

Cl 113 124 149 282 235 171 139 103 154

F 4910 11800 6960 10200 4620 11000 13300 2350 12400


288 Th. Seifert

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # E 507 E 508/2-2 E 508/2-4 E 516 E 515 ED 281 G 3005/1 G 3011/2

Locality (arabic 6A 6A 6A 6A 6A 6A 9A 9A
number in Fig. 2)

Rock type grE grE grE grE grE grd grE grE

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 70.00 74.40 73.50 73.50 73.70 75.30 77.50 72.00

TiO2 0.04 0.03 0.03 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.11 0.13

Al2O3 16.80 15.10 15.60 15.50 15.80 15.20 12.00 14.30

Fe2O3 0.77 1.09 0.98 1.01 0.72 0.41 1.43 1.62

MnO 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.05 0.02 0.03 0.02

MgO 0.06 0.07 0.06 0.05 0.14 0.06 0.19 0.18

CaO 0.61 0.59 0.55 0.60 0.27 0.55 0.54 0.56

Na2O 3.80 3.60 3.67 4.50 4.56 4.40 2.52 3.40

K2O 5.23 3.49 3.82 3.14 3.36 3.49 4.40 5.34

P2O5 0.63 0.43 0.39 0.58 0.67 0.47 0.27 0.26

LOI 0.70 0.90 0.85 1.05 1.00 0.40 1.20 1.05

Total 98.70 -- -- -- -- 100.30 100.20 98.90


+ 0.40 -- -- -- -- -- 0.60 0.70
H2O

CO2 < 0.01 -- -- -- -- < 0.01 0.21 0.17

Trace elements (ppm)

S 60 100 100 100 < 100 100 80 80

Cl 188 -- -- -- -- < 100 251 178

F 14600 -- -- -- -- -- 5690 4090


Appendix - Table A25 289

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # G 3011/1 G 3023/1 G 910/2 G 910/5 G 206/15 G 224/2 G 224/1 ZSCHO 4
Locality (arabic 9A 9A 8 8 8 8 8 10B
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type grE grE grE grE grE grE grE grA

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 77.90 77.80 70.80 72.90 75.40 75.80 75.20 76.60

TiO2 0.15 0.09 0.07 0.08 0.11 0.06 0.06 0.08

Al2O3 11.50 11.30 16.30 14.20 13.10 13.90 13.90 12.50

Fe2O3 1.76 1.33 1.01 1.08 1.30 1.08 1.02 0.28

MnO 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01 < 0.01

MgO 0.21 0.38 0.11 0.08 0.28 0.12 0.10 0.12

CaO 0.55 0.75 0.46 0.51 0.71 0.46 0.35 0.40

Na2O 2.67 2.74 3.62 3.47 3.10 3.64 3.58 3.71

K2O 4.08 4.08 6.56 4.68 4.47 3.77 3.92 4.52

P2O5 0.24 0.26 0.37 0.42 0.29 0.36 0.29 0.07

LOI 1.00 0.95 0.60 0.60 1.15 0.75 0.70 0.55

Total 100.10 99.70 99.90 98.10 99.90 100.00 99.10 98.80


+ 0.70 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.70 0.50 0.50 0.10
H2O
CO2 0.09 0.46 0.04 0.14 0.15 < 0.01 < 0.01 0.06

Trace elements (ppm)

S 70 60 80 140 140 50 50 150

Cl 141 154 439 402 362 202 168 161

F 3870 2780 4910 10500 4080 10900 10300 < 20


290 Th. Seifert

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # AUE 1 G SCHNEE 1 G GLEESB 1 G GLEESB 2 G WEIHI SCHT 371/1

Locality (arabic 10B 10B 10B 10B 10B 10A


number in Fig. 2)
Rock type grA grA grA grA grA grd
Major elements (wt.%)
SiO2 70.40 75.60 71.90 75.80 76.10 75.20
TiO2 0.30 0.08 0.31 0.17 0.15 0.11
Al2O3 15.10 13.00 14.40 13.50 12.90 13.10
Fe2O3 1.87 1.14 1.79 1.24 1.13 0.87
MnO 0.04 0.01 0.03 0.02 0.03 0.04
MgO 0.59 0.21 0.60 0.32 0.27 0.29
CaO 1.39 0.50 0.82 0.36 0.67 0.65
Na2O 3.61 2.93 3.22 3.18 3.24 3.57
K2O 4.86 4.11 5.33 4.41 4.57 4.64
P2O5 0.26 0.32 0.27 0.16 0.09 0.10
LOI 1.15 1.20 0.85 0.75 0.45 1.15
Total 99.60 99.10 99.60 -- 99.60 99.70
+ 0.80 -- -- -- -- 0.60
H2O
CO2 0.02 0.04 < 0.01 -- 0.06 0.44
Trace elements (ppm)
S 90 < 50 < 50 < 100 110 60
Cl 165 227 137 -- < 100 128
F 767 5940 951 < 999 138 147
Appendix - Table A25 291

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # A 371/1 G BLAU 1 G BLAU 2 G CARLF 1 G OBERC 1 G KIRCH 1
Locality (arabic 10A Blauenthal Blauenthal Carlsfeld Obercrinitz Kirchberg
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type grd grE grE grE grK grK

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 75.30 77.20 74.20 74.70 77.40 75.90

TiO2 0.05 0.05 0.07 0.12 0.12 0.12

Al2O3 14.30 13.50 13.20 14.20 12.60 12.40

Fe2O3 0.35 0.99 1.12 1.41 0.93 0.80

MnO < 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.03 < 0.01

MgO 0.16 0.13 0.15 0.19 0.23 0.28

CaO 0.38 0.38 0.36 0.32 0.63 0.54

Na2O 3.44 3.16 2.96 2.76 3.35 3.30

K2O 5.54 3.55 4.60 5.07 4.68 4.87

P2O5 0.30 0.32 0.33 0.26 0.03 0.03

LOI 0.45 0.85 1.10 0.85 0.40 0.75

Total 100.30 100.10 98.10 99.90 100.40 99.00


+ -- -- -- -- -- --
H2O

CO2 0.05 0.01 < 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.09

Trace elements (ppm)

S 90 < 50 50 < 50 < 50 < 50

Cl 621 351 331 619 154 183

F 115 7540 7240 3470 273 164


292 Th. Seifert

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # G KIRCH 2 G PECHT 1 G BERG 1 G ZOB 362/1 GRT1/1
Locality (arabic Kirchberg Kirchberg Bergen Zobes 11
number in Fig. 2)
Rock type grK grK grB grB grE

Major elements (wt.%)

SiO2 77.00 74.20 72.60 74.30 74.74

TiO2 0.24 0.25 0.31 0.20 0.10

Al2O3 12.00 13.10 13.70 13.50 13.69

Fe2O3 1.38 1.50 2.02 1.24 1.57

MnO 0.03 0.03 0.06 0.05 0.018

MgO 0.42 0.48 0.54 0.35 0.12

CaO 1.19 0.85 1.25 0.98 0.36

Na2O 3.02 3.26 3.42 3.38 3.31

K2O 4.01 4.93 4.37 4.65 5.23

P2O5 0.10 0.13 0.15 0.12 0.28

LOI 0.65 0.70 0.50 0.75 0.89

Total 100.10 99.50 99.00 99.60 100.31


+ -- -- -- -- --
H2O

CO2 0.11 0.06 0.01 0.02 --


Trace elements (ppm)

S 50 70 < 50 50 --

Cl 124 154 148 107 --

F 502 622 1120 890 3500


Appendix - Table A25 293

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # Z 20137 Z 20130 Z 20131 Z 2015 4U4/A1 3U6/A1 31007 SZU 1/78 NR.1
Locality (arabic number 4A 4A 4A 4A 4B 4B 4B Satzung
in Fig. 2)
Rock type grE grE grE grE gr rd grd grE
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 2 2 2 2 2 2 <1 2
V 8 <2 <2 4 <2 9 11 6
Cr <2 3 4 6 4 11 <2 5
Ni <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 2
Co 2 1 2 3 <1 1 <1 2
Cu 2.2 1.5 1.8 2.2 3.8 435.0 9.0 1.8
Zn 38.1 32.7 46.0 59.2 34.6 254.0 85.0 43.4
Ga 29 29 28 29 27 45 54 32
As 7.5 4.0 4.2 4.1 2.0 430.0 5.4 11.0
Pb 8 <2 <2 7 <2 3 <2 7
Ag 0.9 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.4 3.0 0.8 0.7
Au <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2
Hg <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 9 9 9
Sb 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.6 2.7 1.4 0.9
Rb 496 657 640 534 708 806 2460 646
Sr < 10 31 49 54 49 182 193 < 10
Y 6 11 11 18 14 3 1 6
Zr 79 53 48 92 56 44 42 77
Nb 16 17 17 17 16 38 62 21
Mo <1 <1 <1 2 <1 1 <1 <1
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 6.9 < 0.5 < 0.5
Sn 25 22 21 26 34 317 295 30
Cs 31.6 27.7 42.4 38.9 36.4 72.4 58.0 65.9
Li 193 105 188 189 219 342 1410 332
Be 19 6 10 9 8 8 5 13
Ba 140 37 48 98 38 230 1210 130
Hf 2.9 2.0 1.9 3.0 2.2 1.9 2.1 2.9
Ta 2.5 3.6 3.7 1.4 3.8 18.0 28.0 4.9
W 9 7 8 5 10 28 53 15
Tl 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.5 3.8 6.2 17.3 5.0
Bi 1.3 1.7 1.8 < 0.5 1.3 13.2 3.3 4.4
Th 13 7 8 17 8 6 5 12
U 31.5 26.4 30.8 18.5 29.1 22.9 12.7 32.1
La 7.6 3.8 4.2 13.8 5.7 0.5 0.8 10.1
Ce 20.6 9.5 11.1 33.7 13.8 1.4 1.0 25.4
Pr 2.5 1.0 1.3 3.6 1.5 0.2 0.2 3.0
Nd 8.9 3.8 4.6 14.4 5.8 0.7 0.8 10.7
Sm 2.7 1.6 1.9 4.4 1.9 0.4 0.2 3.0
Eu 0.12 0.07 < 0.05 0.18 0.08 0.07 0.23 0.13
Gd 2.3 1.7 2.2 4.2 2.1 0.4 0.5 2.5
Tb 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.8 0.5 0.1 < 0.1 0.4
Dy 1.7 2.3 2.5 4.4 2.8 0.6 0.3 2.0
Ho 0.20 0.34 0.36 0.64 0.51 0.07 0.05 0.28
Er 0.4 0.8 0.7 0.9 1.3 0.2 0.1 0.6
Tm < 0.1 < 0.1 < 0.1 0.1 0.2 < 0.1 < 0.1 < 0.1
Yb 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.7 1.4 0.2 < 0.1 0.5
Lu < 0.05 0.07 0.06 0.11 0.19 < 0.05 < 0.05 0.07

Zr+Ce+Y 106 74 70 144 84 48 44 108


294 Th. Seifert

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # SZU 1/78 NR.3 SZU 270/1 SZU 287/1 GREI SZU 287/1 SZU 1/78 NR.2
Locality (arabic number Satzung Satzung Satzung Satzung Satzung
in Fig. 2)
Rock type grE grd grd grE grE
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 3 2 3 3 3
V 5 <2 8 9 3
Cr <2 5 10 9 2
Ni <1 <1 <1 <1 <1
Co 2 2 1 2 3
Cu 3.5 6.7 2.9 2.4 3.0
Zn 65.2 30.5 256.0 154.0 58.1
Ga 30 35 36 25 26
As 4.3 13.0 3.7 3.9 16.0
Pb 11 2 <2 3 <2
Ag 0.4 0.2 0.4 < 0.1 0.5
Au <2 <2 <2 <2 <2
Hg <5 <5 <5 <5 <5
Sb 1.8 0.9 1.0 0.7 1.2
Rb 726 865 726 649 808
Sr 47 55 65 64 51
Y 19 9 7 19 16
Zr 83 45 51 131 76
Nb 20 41 34 18 22
Mo 1 2 1 <1 1
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5
Sn 36 21 48 23 31
Cs 72.6 37.2 47.2 31.1 58.3
Li 304 123 183 176 274
Be 11 3 4 3 6
Ba 75 117 162 223 81
Hf 3.1 2.1 2.7 4.7 2.7
Ta 4.6 17.0 9.8 2.9 3.9
W 20 11 15 12 18
Tl 4.6 4.5 4.2 3.9 4.1
Bi 0.6 1.5 4.5 1.3 2.5
Th 13 5 8 19 11
U 37.3 31.4 13.1 16.4 31.7
La 12.5 2.4 5.2 24.2 10.7
Ce 29.9 6.1 11.9 54.5 25.9
Pr 3.2 0.6 1.3 5.6 2.7
Nd 12.5 2.5 4.5 21.9 10.6
Sm 3.6 0.9 1.5 5.0 3.3
Eu 0.22 0.07 0.25 0.44 0.12
Gd 3.5 1.2 1.3 4.8 3.1
Tb 0.7 0.3 0.3 0.8 0.6
Dy 3.9 1.7 1.7 4.2 3.5
Ho 0.65 0.26 0.26 0.70 0.54
Er 1.6 0.7 0.7 1.9 1.3
Tm 0.2 0.1 < 0.1 0.3 0.2
Yb 1.4 0.8 0.6 1.7 1.1
Lu 0.18 0.10 0.09 0.21 0.14

Zr+Ce+Y 132 60 70 205 118


Appendix - Table A25 295

Table A25 (continued)


Sample # SZU 336/1 ANA 2 ANA 3 ANA 5 ANA 6 E 610 E 612 E 604 E 602
Locality (arabic number Satzung 5 5 5 5 6A 6A 6A 6A
in Fig. 2)
Rock type grd grE grE grE grE grE grE grE grE
Trace elements (ppm; Au and Hg in ppb)
Sc 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3
V <2 3 3 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2
Cr 4 5 4 5 5 2 2 6 3
Ni <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1 <1
Co 2 2 2 2 <1 2 <1 2 2
Cu 3.3 5.3 3.3 3.2 4.0 2.3 1.7 4.0 5.5
Zn 36.1 58.2 43.5 31.6 48.1 38.0 60.9 26.6 45.5
Ga 31 40 31 36 33 42 43 39 36
As 7.6 2.8 14.0 4.8 5.6 1.6 1.3 250.0 150.0
Pb <2 <2 2 <2 4 <2 <2 2 <2
Ag 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.2 0.8 0.4 0.5 1.1 0.4
Au <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2 <2
Hg <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 <5 24 <5
Sb 0.7 0.9 1.7 1.4 1.1 0.7 1.3 1.2 1.2
Rb 775 1340 959 791 1030 1250 1580 1400 1210
Sr 41 54 38 47 43 77 77 50 55
Y 9 6 13 8 11 5 9 8 6
Zr 50 41 64 37 55 32 48 49 41
Nb 24 26 23 28 26 30 32 31 28
Mo <1 <1 <1 1 <1 <1 <1 <1 9
In < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 < 0.5 1.4 < 0.5
Sn 24 57 28 32 28 21 43 372 31
Cs 41.2 53.8 111.0 90.0 64.0 46.9 87.4 37.5 59.8
Li 192 772 473 249 348 522 786 237 551
Be 16