adolescence / ˌæd.əˈles.

ns / noun [ U ]
ə

the period of time in a person's life when they are developing into an adult:
She had a troubled adolescence.
yet another novel about the joys and sorrows of adolescence
adulthood / ˈæd.ʌlt.hʊd / / əˈdʌlt- / noun [ U ]
the part of someone's life when they are an adult:
People in England legally reach adulthood at 18.
Responsibility, I suppose, is what defines adulthood.
Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

bond / bɒnd / / bɑːnd / noun [ C ] (CONNECTION)
B2 a close connection joining two or more people:
the bond(s) of friendship/love
There has been a close bond between them ever since she saved him from
drowning.
In societies with strong family bonds (= relationships) , people tend to live longer.

© Cambridge University Press 2013
Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

brotherhood / ˈbrʌð.ə.hʊd / / -ɚ- / noun [ C , + sing/pl verb ]
(ORGANIZATION)
(the members of) a particular organization:
The various groups eventually fused into a single brotherhood.

© Cambridge University Press 2013
Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition

character / ˈkær.ɪk.tə r
/ / ˈker.ɪk.tɚ / noun (PERSON)
C2 [ C ] a person, especially when you are describing a particular quality that they
have:
She's a curious character - I don't really know what to think of her.
There were one or two strange-looking characters hanging around the bar.
C1 [ C ] INFORMAL someone whose behaviour is different from most people's,
especially in a way that is interesting or funny:
He's quite a character/ a real character, is Ted - he's 70 now and still riding that
motorbike.
Word partners for character (QUALITY)
a distinct / distinctive character • change the character of sth • in sb's character
• out of character
Word partners for character (IN A STORY)
the central / leading / main character • a minor character • play a character •
depict / portray a character • a character based on sb

hʊd / / -ðɚ. © Cambridge University Press 2013 . His outspoken views would frequently bring him into conflict with the president. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . in connection with sth B2 on the subject of something: They want to talk to you in connection with an unpaid tax bill.ðə. girlhood © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . → COMPARE boyhood .hʊd / noun [ C or U ] B1 the time when someone is a child: She had an unhappy childhood./ noun [ U ] the state or time of being a father: Fatherhood is a lifelong responsibility. They're sisters.4th Edition fatherhood / ˈfɑː.4th Edition conflict / ˈkɒn.4th Edition childhood / ˈtʃaɪld. B2 fighting between two or more groups of people or countries: We wish to avoid conflict between our countries if at all possible. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . It was an unpopular policy and caused a number of conflicts within the party. Childhood is not always a happy time.flɪkt / / ˈkɑːn.© Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . are they? I knew their surname was the same. but I never made (= thought of) the connection.4th Edition connection / kəˈnek./ noun [ C or U ] B2 an active disagreement between people with opposing opinions or principles: There was a lot of conflict between him and his father.ʃ n / noun (RELATION) ə B2 [ C ] the state of being related to someone or something else: The connection between smoking and heart disease is well known.

tʃə r / / -tʃɚ / noun (LIFE) ./ noun [ U ] the state or time of being a mother: I don't feel ready for motherhood yet. [ + to infinitive ] Her first instinct was to run. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .ə. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . without having to think or learn about it: All his instincts told him to stay near the car and wait for help. Did you form any close/lasting friendships in college? I value her friendship above anything else.ʃɪp / noun [ C or U ] B1 a situation in which two people are friends: Their friendship goes back to when they were at school together. The play follows the interactions of three very different characters.4th Edition motherhood / ˈmʌð.4th Edition instinct / ˈɪn. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .təˈræk.hʊd / / -ɚ. It is instinct that tells the birds when to begin their migration.stɪŋkt / noun [ C or U ] C2 the way people or animals naturally react or behave.4th Edition nature / ˈneɪ. FIGURATIVE Bob seems to have an instinct for (= is naturally good at) knowing which products will sell./ noun [ C or U ] C1 an occasion when two or more people or things communicate with or react to each other: There's not enough interaction between the management and the workers.ʃ n / ə / -t t̬ɚ.4th Edition friendship / ˈfrend. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .4th Edition interaction / ˌɪn. Language games are usually intended to encourage student interaction.

4th Edition parent / ˈpeə. and processes that happen or exist independently of people. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . plants. mountains. rocks.ʃɪp / noun [ C ] (CONNECTION) ə B2 the way in which two things are connected: . a nature article/book/programme Nature the force that is responsible for physical life and that is sometimes spoken of as a person: Feeling tired-out is Nature's way of telling you to rest. the sea. in the world and all the features. etc. and growth: her love of nature This new technique of artificially growing cells copies what actually happens in nature. the production of young animals or plants.rənt / / ˈper. forces. FORMAL Britain enjoys friendly relations with Canada. such as the weather. etc. Nature gave these tiny creatures the ability to reproduce quickly when food is abundant.] nature • the exact / precise / true nature of sth • the changing / complex / political / serious nature of sth • alter / change / reflect the nature of sth © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .4th Edition relationship / rɪˈleɪ. ə nt / noun [ C ] (MOTHER/FATHER) A1 a mother or father of a person or an animal: I'm going to meet Richard's parents for the first time this weekend.] in nature • of a [confidential/similar.A2 [ U ] all the animals.4th Edition relation / rɪˈleɪ.ʃ n. Word partners for nature (LIFE) the forces of / laws of nature • a nature lover • be found in nature • in nature • nature conservation Word partners for nature (TYPE) the nature of sth • [different/temporary.ʃ n / noun (FRIENDSHIP) ə relations [ plural ] B2 the way in which two people or groups of people feel and behave towards each other: Relations between him and his new wife are rather strained. etc. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .

ə. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .bləns / noun [ C or U ] C2 the fact that two people or things look like each other or are similar in some other way: There was a clear family resemblance between all the brothers.Scientists have established the relationship between lung cancer and smoking. businesses.4th Edition sibling / ˈsɪb.tɪv / / -t t̬ɪv / noun [ C ] B1 a member of your family: I haven't got many blood relatives (= people related to me by birth rather than by marriage) . All her close/distant relatives came to the wedding. etc.4th Edition rivalry / ˈraɪ. These prices bear no resemblance to (= are completely different from) the ones I saw printed in the newspaper.ri / noun [ C or U ] ə C2 a situation in which people. .4th Edition resemblance / rɪˈzem. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . There was great sibling rivalry (= competition) between Peter and his brother. There's fierce rivalry for the job/ to get the job. Word partners for relationship have / maintain a relationship • end / establish / form a relationship • a relationship breaks down • a close / good / personal / special / strong relationship • a long-term / serious / stable relationship • a relationship with sb • a relationship between sb/sth and sb/sth • be in a relationship © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .4th Edition relative / ˈrel.lɪŋ / noun [ C ] FORMAL C2 a brother or sister: I have four siblings: three brothers and a sister.v l. compete with each other for the same thing: There's such rivalry among/between my three sons.

/ noun [ C or U ] the part of your character that affects your moods and the way you behave: a fiery temperament © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . teenage / -eɪdʒ / adjective [ before noun ] ( ALSO teenaged . He urged governments worldwide to break diplomatic ties with the new regime.mənt / ə / -pɚ. I no longer feel any ties with my home town.ə.ə.4th Edition temperament / ˈtem.4th Edition ˈ blood ˌ ties noun [ plural ] the relationships that exist by birth rather than through marriage © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .4th Edition tie / taɪ / noun [ C ] (CONNECTION) ties C2 [ plural ] the friendly feelings that people have for other people.ɪŋ / noun [ C usually singular ] . Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .mənt / / -prə.p r.4th Edition upbringing / ˈʌpˌbrɪŋ.dʒə / / -dʒɚ / noun [ C ] ( INFORMAL teen ) r A2 a young person between 13 and 19 years old: The magazine is aimed at teenagers and young adults. or special connections with places: Family ties are weaker if you move a long way away.© Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . / -eɪdʒd / .4th Edition teenager / ˈtiːnˌeɪ. INFORMAL teen ) B1 a teenage nephew © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .

ˈ knit / ˌkləʊsˈnɪt / / ˌkloʊs. especially by their parents. especially in a kind. especially in relation to the effect which this has on how they behave and make moral decisions: Is it right to say all the crimes he committed were simply the result of his upbringing? → SEE ALSO bring sb up Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .n l / ə / -ˈtɝː.B2 the way in which someone is treated and educated when they are young.4th Edition maternal / məˈtɜː.4th Edition ˌ close.ɪŋ / noun [ C usually singular ] B2 the way in which someone is treated and educated when they are young. loving way: maternal instincts She is very maternal towards her staff. especially by their parents./ adjective behaving or feeling in the way that a mother does towards her child. maternally / -i / adverb © Cambridge University Press 2013 .4th Edition ADJECTIVE upbringing / ˈʌpˌbrɪŋ. especially in relation to the effect which this has on how they behave and make moral decisions: Is it right to say all the crimes he committed were simply the result of his upbringing? → SEE ALSO bring sb up © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . → COMPARE paternal related to a mother's side of the family: Her maternal grandmother (= mother's mother) is still alive./ adjective describes a group of people in which everyone helps and supports each other: a close-knit family/community © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .

FORMAL There wasn't enough space to accommodate the files. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .dɪŋ / / -ˈwɔːr. SPECIALIZED describes a substance that keeps the same chemical or atomic state © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .ə. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . After several part-time jobs. The hospital said she was in a stable condition (= not likely to get worse) following the operation.mə./ verb [ T ] (FIND A PLACE FOR) to provide with a place to live or to be stored in: New students may be accommodated in halls of residence.4th Edition accommodate / əˈkɒm. or done something well: Is it a rewarding job? Textbook writing can be an intellectually and financially rewarding activity./ adjective giving a reward.4th Edition parental / pəˈren.4th Edition stable / ˈsteɪ.Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .4th Edition rewarding / rɪˈwɔː. he's now got a stable job in a bank.deɪt / / -ˈkɑː. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .t l / ə / -t t̬ ə l / adjective connected with parents or with being a parent: parental advice/influence The government repeatedly stressed its support for parental choice in the selection of a child's school. C1 describes someone who is mentally healthy: She seems more stable these days. especially by making you feel satisfied that you have done something important or useful.bl l̩ / adjective C1 firmly fixed or not likely to move or change: If the foundations of the house aren't stable.4th Edition . collapse is possible.

larger. or stronger form: It became clear that he wasn't developing like all the other little boys. They have no children of their own. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .bl l̩ / / -ˈdʊr.4th Edition break down (COMMUNICATION) — phrasal verb with break / breɪk / verb ( broke . but they're hoping to adopt. This exercise is designed to develop the shoulder and back muscles. or discussion breaks down. broken ) If a system. relationship. She's already had to endure three painful operations on her leg. The fear is that these minor clashes may develop into all-out confrontation.4th Edition develop / dɪˈvel. Over time.lɪʃ / verb (START) .rə. or painful: We had to endure a nine-hour delay at the airport. I'm looking for a job which will enable me to develop my skills/talents. She had the child adopted (= she gave her baby to someone else to look after) .4th Edition endure / ɪnˈdjʊə / / -ˈdʊr / verb [ T ] (EXPERIENCE) r B2 to suffer something difficult. their acquaintance developed into a lasting friendship. endurable / -ˈdjʊə. unpleasant.əp / verb [ I or T ] (GROW) B1 to (cause something to) grow or change into a more advanced.4th Edition establish / ɪˈstæb. it fails because there is a problem or disagreement.ə.adopt / əˈdɒpt / / -ˈdɑːpt / verb [ T or I ] (TAKE CHILD) B2 to take another person's child into your own family and legally take care of him or her as your own child: They've adopted a baby girl.bl l̩ / adjective © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . → COMPARE foster verb (TAKE CARE OF) © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary .

and external bodies. or organization: There is a strong need to establish effective communication links between staff.t ns / noun [ C usually singular . country. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . or other characteristics with someone or something: We don't really have much in common. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . parents.ɪt / verb [ I or T ] (FROM DEAD PERSON) C2 to receive money.4th Edition inherit / ɪnˈher.4th Edition inherit / ɪnˈher.mən / noun (SHARED) have sth in common B1 to share interests.ən / / ˈkɑː. experiences.ɪ. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . C1 [ T often passive ] to start having a relationship with. pupils. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . she feels torn between her family and her work. from someone after they have died: Who will inherit the house when he dies? All her children will inherit equally. or communicating with another person. These methods of working were established in the last century.4th Edition inheritance / ɪnˈher.ɪt / verb [ T ] (QUALITY) C2 to be born with the same physical or mental characteristics as one of your parents or grandparents: Rosie inherited her red hair from her mother.B2 [ T often passive ] to start a company or organization that will continue for a long time: The brewery was established in 1822. in common with sb/sth C1 in the same way as someone or something: In common with many mothers. a house.4th Edition common / ˈkɒm. company. U ] (FROM DEAD ə PERSON) . etc.

especially young children or plants. .təˈrækt / / -t t̬ɚˈækt / verb [ I ] B2 to communicate with or react to: Dominique's teacher says that she interacts well with the other children.4th Edition interact / ˌɪn. a carefully nurtured garden to help a plan or a person to develop and be successful: As a record company director. and help them to develop: She wants to stay at home and nurture her children.4th Edition relate / rɪˈleɪt / verb [ T ] (CONNECT) C2 to find or show the connection between two or more things: Researchers are trying to relate low exam results and/to/with large class sizes. It is important to educate children before they become sexually active.tʃə r / / ˈnɝː. © Cambridge University Press 2013 COUMPOUND NOUNS active / ˈæk. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . It's interesting at parties to see how people interact socially.C2 money or objects that someone gives you when they die: The large inheritance from his aunt meant that he could buy his own boat. She's very active in (= involved in) local politics.tʃɚ / verb [ T ] FORMAL (HELP DEVELOP) to take care of. feed. Both of his parents were very politically active.tɪv / adjective (INVOLVED) B2 involved in a particular activity: Enemy forces remain active in the mountainous areas around the city. We are studying how these two chemicals interact. and protect someone or something. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . At 21 she came into her inheritance (= it was given to her) . his job is to nurture young talent .4th Edition nurture / ˈnɜː.

etc. MPs have demanded his immediate resignation.di. An immediate result/effect of the war was a breakdown of law and order. C1 describes something or someone that is close to. grandparents.4th Edition striking / ˈstraɪ. → COMPARE extended family © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . or wife © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . aunts. and uncles. uncles. or is a cause of or an effect of. but does work to help it) . in addition to parents and children → COMPARE nuclear family © Cambridge University Press 2013 Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . but not including aunts. husband.kɪŋ / adjective . She's an active member of her trade union (= not only belongs to it. He takes a more active role in the team nowadays. Dioxin is a poison that takes immediate effect. children.ət / adjective B2 happening or done without delay or very soon after something else: We must make an immediate response. such as your parents. grandfathers. something or someone else: There are few facilities in the immediate area.4th Edition immediate / ɪˈmiː. etc. B2 in the present or as soon as possible: We have no immediate plans.4th Edition ex ˌ tended ˈ family noun [ C usually singular . Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary . + sing/pl verb ] a family unit that includes grandmothers. the immediate future the period of time that is coming next your immediate family your closest relations.4th Edition ˌ nuclear ˈ family noun [ C ] SPECIALIZED a family consisting of two parents and their children.

St Peter's Church is a striking example of modern architecture. B2 very unusual or easily noticed. © Cambridge University Press 2013 Family Gathering Stable Upbringing Play a role . but he's not as striking as his brother. Her husband is strikingly handsome . Their production of Macbeth was the most visually striking performance I've ever seen. They gave a strikingly original performance of the play. strikingly / -li / adverb Her latest novel is strikingly different from her earlier work. There are striking similarities between the two cases. and therefore attracting a lot of attention: She bears a striking resemblance to her mother. more attractive than usual: He's quite good-looking. There's a striking contrast between what he does and what he says he does.