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Miles Traveled in

a Week
Vs. Age

By: Matt Kennelly


Ashley Rouda
Tara Anderson
Introduction/Hypothesis

In the project Matt, Ashley, and Tara are doing, our

project is based on how many miles a person drive in

correlation to their age. The hypothesis is the people older

than 30, compared to the more miles they drive in a week,

with a correlation of r=6.00, the strength is moderate

meaning its somewhat valid with a positive direction. We

ended up getting the data from a sample survey because not

everyone on Matts facebook answered to the survey.

Data Set

Population is the group of individuals being studied. In

the project we are doing the population is people off of Matt

Kennellys facebook. Sample is a part of the population from

which we actually collect data. The project sample is from

Matt Kennellys facebook, but only the ones that can drive.

Variables are defined as any characteristics of individuals.

The explanatory variable (x-axis) would be the samples age,

the response variable (y-axis) would be the miles they travel


in their car for a week. We chose these as the explanatory

and response variable this way because their age influences

the miles they travel in a week. The older they get the more

miles they travel. If they were switched then it would be

saying that because of the miles they travel that they in

response are older.

Interpret r & r^2

Correlation (r) describes the direction and strength

of a straight line relationship, the correlation for this data is

0.385. The coefficient of determination (r^2) is the variation

in the values of y that us explained by the least squares

regression line of y and x, the coefficient of determination

for our data is r^2 is 0.148. If r= 0.385, the correlation is

positive meaning as x increases, y increases. The correlation

of 0.385 means the correlation is moderate meaning the

correlation is somewhat valid. Since r= 0.385, then r^2= 0.148

meaning any prediction has a 14.8% variation.


Scatter Plot and Data table

Age to Mileage Correlation


Age Mileage
21 150
Age vs Miles a Week
25 150
26 160 3010
y = 18.930x - 196.447
33 130 r = 0.148
2510
46 150 Miles a Week r= 0.385
26 300 2010
data points
27 170 1510
23 200 Age to Milage
1010
18 100 Regression Line
510
19 500
10
25 600
18 38 58 78
63 2500 Age
63 25
20 50
18 250
17 400
22 200
18 500
16 300
48 100
27 150
38 150
50 3000
19 250
32 100
36 1000
19 500
34 150
41 350
31 150
40 100
43 100
46 80
Prediction

The Least square regression line is a straight line that

predicts they value for a given x value. The equation of

regression line is, y= 18.930x 196.447. To create the

prediction plug 30 in for x to find y. When you plug in 30 you

solve and get 371,453. This number is the amount predicted

that a 30 year old would travel in one week. Using the

coefficient to find the variation with r^2 being equal to 0.148

resulting in the variation being 14.8%. The validity would be

somewhat valid.

Lurking Variables

Lurking variables are variables that are not included as an

explanatory or response variable in the analysis but can affect

the interpretation of relationships between variables. In our

scatterplot we can infer that the lurking variables are, (50,

3000) and (63, 25). These are not close to the other data

points we received, making them a lurking variable.


Conclusion/Hypothesis

Our hypothesis was that if you are older than the age of

30, the more miles they will drive in a week. Our hypothesis

was, incorrect. The regression line, along with the data points

showed us that people under 30 drive more miles in a week. If

the driver is 30 years old then the miles they drive in a week

I predict will be 371,453, with a 14.8% variation.

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