The GREAT Scholarship

Green’s unique opportunity to provide opportunities for its kids
What is GREAT?

 Provides $2,500 scholarships to first-generation college
students
 Students have to live in Green
 Have to attend Green Local Schools for at least two years
 Have to graduate from Green High School
 Have to carry a cumulative 2.5 GPA in High School
 Receive the $2,500 for each of their years in college,
whether two or four-year institutions
 Have to maintain consecutive enrollment and 2.5 GPA in
college
What is GREAT’s Cost?

 Budgets $100,000 first year
 Assumes 40 students receive the
Scholarship
 Will likely be fewer
Who Grants the Money?

 GREAT Scholarship Board
 Five members
Three from city, two from GLS
 Board has authority to establish
procedures to apply and grant the money
how they see fit (direct to student or
school)
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?

 First Generation students are most at risk for
never starting or completing college
 Cost is a primary reason
 Over the course of the GREAT Scholarship, the
City of Green would be providing a little more
than one year’s tuition at Kent or UA
 The money will make a HUGE difference for our
students
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?
Overall economic benefit to students AND the community
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?

Not going to college costs you
$500,000 over your lifetime

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/344/6186/843.full
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?

https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/education-pays-2013-full-report.pdf
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?

https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/education-pays-2013-full-report.pdf
Why do the GREAT Scholarship?

https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/education-pays-2013-full-report.pdf
Why Do the GREAT Scholarship?
More than just economic benefits
More than Economics

 The likelihood of reporting health to be very good or
excellent is 44 percent greater.
 The likelihood of being a regular smoker is 3.9 times
lower.
 The incidence of obesity and heavy drinking are
significantly lower.
 The likelihood of exercising, having a healthy diet,
wearing seat belts and seeking preventative medical care
are significantly higher.
 The incidence of a disability making it difficult to live
independently is 3.6 times lower.
More than Economics

 Life expectancy at age 25 is seven years longer (for those
having at least some college compared to those never
having gone to college).
 Reliance on expensive forms of banking and credit is
significantly lower.
 The probability of being in prison or jail is 4.9 times
lower.
 The probability of being married is 21 percent higher and
the probability of being divorced or separated is 61
percent lower.
 The likelihood of being happy is significantly higher
Social Benefits as Well

 Lifetime taxes are, conservatively, $273,000 (215 percent) greater
in present discounted value.
 Lifetime government expenditures are about $81,000 (39 percent)
lower in present value.
 The lifetime total fiscal effect is roughly $355,000 in present value.
 Crime is significantly lower.
 Volunteering is 2.3 times more likely.
 The estimated value of volunteer labor is 4.1 times ($1,300
annually) greater.
 Employment in the nonprofit sector is twice as likely.
Social Benefits as Well

 Annual cash donations to charities are $900 (3.4 times) higher.
 Total philanthropic contributions are $3,600 (4.7 times) higher.
 Voting and political involvement are significantly higher.
 Participation in school, community, service, civic and religious
organizations is substantially (1.9 times) higher.
 Leadership in these organizations is particularly (3.2 times)
greater.
 Attendance at community meetings is 2.6 times greater.
 Neighborhood interactions and trust are significantly higher.
First Generation Students More at-risk to
Not See these Benefits
Percent of Students Enrolled Immediately after High School
90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
College Educated Parent(s) Some College High School or lower

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2013/11/12/the-economic-value-of-education
First Generation Students More at-risk to
Not See these Benefits
 Disproportionately overrepresented among most disadvantaged
groups
 More likely to delay college entry, need remedial coursework,
and drop out of college
 Report lower educational expectations than their peers as early
as 8th grade
 Often begin college less academically prepared than other
students
 Are less likely to take algebra, considered the “gateway” to
advanced math courses in high school and associated with 4-
year college enrollment

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2013/11/12/the-economic-value-of-education
First Generation Students More at-risk to
Not See these Benefits
 Are less likely to take college courses in academic areas
such as mathematics, science, and computer science and
more likely to focus on vocational/technical fields
 Tend to apply to and attend less selective colleges that
are closer to home
 More likely to work while in college and live off campus,
negatively affecting college academic and social
integration outcomes
 Are not more likely to receive help from their schools in
applying to colleges

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2013/11/12/the-economic-value-of-education
First Generation Students More at-risk to
Not See these Benefits

 From 1980 to 2013, workers with no
college have seen a net loss of 9.3
million jobs in the manufacturing
sector.
 But workers with at least some college
have seen a net increase of 2.5 million
manufacturing jobs.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2013/11/12/the-economic-value-of-education
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big Difference!
Would Cover Significant Portions of College Costs for Students and Families Least
able to Cope

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2013/11/12/the-economic-value-of-education
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big
Difference
 State funding for public institutions has declined since
the 1980s
 Today, students and their families are contributing a
greater share of college revenue than a generation ago,
while the share borne by states and local government
funding has fallen sharply
 Tuition constitutes twice the share of college revenue as
20 years ago

https://www.treasury.gov/connect/blog/Documents/20121212_HigherEducation_ExecSumm_vFINAL.pdf)
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big
Difference
 State funding per student also declined over this period,
to $8,655 from $10,726 per student.
 In-state posted tuition at public four-year institutions
rose an average of 67 percent between 2000 and 2011
after adjusting for inflation.
 This cost shift from states and local governments to
students and families has contributed to the sharp
increase in student lending over the last decade.

https://www.treasury.gov/connect/blog/Documents/20121212_HigherEducation_ExecSumm_vFINAL.pdf)
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big
Difference

https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/data/statistical-profiles/FY17_Tuition_and_Fees_Survey_FINAL_0.pdf
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big
Difference

https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/data/statistical-profiles/FY17_Tuition_and_Fees_Survey_FINAL_0.pdf
GREAT Scholarship Makes a Big
Difference

https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/uploads/data/statistical-profiles/FY17_Tuition_and_Fees_Survey_FINAL_0.pdf
The GREAT Scholarship
A Great Opportunity
The GREAT Scholarship is a Great
Opportunity
 Previous Mayors and City Councils have been
fantastic financial stewards of our community
 We regularly have $4-5 million remaining in our
GRF each year
 Taking between 1.5 percent and 2.5 percent of
that surplus will ensure that as many as 100
students in Green will have opportunities for
future success
The GREAT Scholarship is a Great
Opportunity

Annual, fully funded cost will
be paid for if just one student
graduates college that
otherwise wouldn’t have