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Where Do Immigrants Settle?

Teacher:Rachel Vos and Hannah Hougen Date: February 23, 2017 Big Idea: Michigan Immigration Thread: Geography

I. Objectives
What is the main focus of this lesson?

Students will explore an interactive map of the United States to try to determine where immigrants are most concentrated in
Michigan. They will compare this to the United States as a whole, and try to determine some pull factors that would bring
immigrants to those locations.

How does this lesson tie in to your units Big Idea?

In this lesson, students will explore where in Michigan immigrants tend to settle and try to think of reasons (pull factors) they
would settle in certain places.

What are your objectives for this lesson? (As many as needed.) I ndicate connections to applicable national or state standards.
Include any themes or major concepts from the thread (themes of geography, Core Principles of Economics, etc)
- 4 - G1.01.1 Identify questions geographers ask in examining the United States.
- Objective: Students will be able to identify and ask the question, To where and why do people immigrate?
- 4 - G1.0.4 Use maps to describe elevation, climate, and patterns of population density in the United States
- Objective: Students will be able to use a US map divided by counties to identify immigration patterns.
- 4 - G4.0.1 Use a case study or story about migration within or to the United States to identify push and pull factors (why they
left, why they came) that influenced the migration.
- Objective: Students will be able to identify push and pull factors from a video story of someone who immigrated
to Detroit, MI.
4 - G4.0.3 Describe some of the movements of resources, goods, people, jobs, and information to, from, or within the
United States, and explain the reasons for the movements.
- Objective: Students will be able to describe push and pull factors that would cause movements of people and jobs
in the United States.

II. Before you start


Students will need a basic knowledge of what push and pull factors are, based on what they
learned in the Introductory lesson.
Prerequisite knowledge and skills.
Students will need to be able to use a computer to explore an interactive map of the United
States.
Students will need to be able to work with a partner/small group.
Formative: Students will investigate the interactive map of the United States. We will ask
Assessment students questions during the activity and after they have completed the worksheet to go
(formative and summative) along with it.
Summative: Students will watch a video of someone who immigrated to Detroit, and they will
identify possible push and pull factors in the story.
Universal Design for Learning Networks/Domains (see UDL Guidelines)
RECOGNITION STRATEGIC AFFECTIVE
Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means of Expression (Action) Multiple Means of Engagement
Options for Perception Options for action/interaction Options for recruiting interest

Options for Language/Symbols Options for Expression Options for Sustaining Effort & Persistence
We will use an interactive map, show a We will allow students to work with
video, and have students fill out a partners to organize push and pull factors
worksheet. and to explore the interactive map of the
United States.
Options for Comprehension Options for Executive Function Options for Self Regulation
We will activate students background
knowledge of push and pull factors.

-Computers for at least half the class


- Link for the interactive US map: http://maps.gcir.org/
Materials-what materials (books, - Worksheet for students to follow along with
handouts, etc) do you need for this -Projector/Screen/Speakers
lesson and do you have them? - Detroit Digital Stories Link : https://digitaldetroitstories.wordpress.com/
- Slips of paper with push and pull factors (14 factors)
-Sticky notes for exit tickets
Students should be able to work in partnerships. Students should be able to see the screen
Do you need to set up your while video is playing. There should be enough computers readily accessible for at least half
classroom in any special way for of the students.
this lesson? If so, describe it.

III. The Plan


Time The description of (script for) the lesson, wherein you describe teacher activities and student
Parts
activities (indicate in parenthesis where you are addressing standards and themes)
Motivation - Pair students up with each other, so that everyone has a partner (or two, if needed). Give each
(Opening/ partnership a slip of paper naming either a push or a pull factor. Have the students talk with
Introduction/ their partner about whether they think it is a push or pull factor.
Engagement) - After giving the students time to talk with their partners, have each group take turns coming up
10 to the front of the board and identifying their factor as either push or pull. The students will
have to explain their reasoning for assigning it as so. If the class disagrees, have them explain
their reasoning and vote as a class, where they think a certain factor might fit.
- Physically sort the push/pull factor slips into two columns on the whiteboard in the front of the
room.
- Ask the students, Why do you think these push pull factors are important?
- Give students time to talk with their partner/table and then call on students to answer.
- 4 - G1.01.1 Identify questions geographers ask in examining the United States.
- Objective: Students will be able to identify and ask the question, To where
and why do people immigrate?
- Today, we are going to learn more about the role that these factors have in determining where
immigrants settle when they get to the United States.
Development - Pull up the GCIR website (http://maps.gcir.org/) on the whiteboard so all the students can see
it. Walk through how the site functions with the students, paying particular attention to
10 Michigan. Show students how the coloration of the counties will look different based on the
number of immigrants there. Also show students that they can see numerical data if they look
to the lower right sidebar.
- Pass out the GCIR worksheet to the students. On this sheet, we are going to start by focusing
on Michigan and where immigrants settle in Michigan. We are then going to look at other
states in the US and see if we can notice any patterns about where immigrants tend to settle in
the United States.
- Have the partnerships take turns getting a computer to use for this activity.
- Give the students time to explore the website and complete the worksheet. While monitoring,
the teacher can ask questions like: What are you noticing about where immigrants settle? Are
you seeing any patterns? Why do you think immigrants would settle in this area?
- 4 - G1.0.4 Use maps to describe elevation, climate, and patterns of population density
in the United States
- Objective: Students will be able to use a US map divided by counties to
identify immigration patterns.
- Call the students back together after 10-15 minutes. Ask partnerships to share what they
10 discovered in their exploration. Ask similar questions in this whole class discussion. What
patterns are you noticing? Why do you think immigrants would settle in this area? What factors
do you think would contribute to this?
4 - G4.0.3 Describe some of the movements of resources, goods, people, jobs, and information
to, from, or within the United States, and explain the reasons for the movements.
- Objective: Students will be able to describe push and pull factors that would cause
movements of people and jobs in the United States.
- Pull up the clips of Detroit immigrant stories. Show the clips to the students.
- Ask the students, What do you think the push and pull factors were that led up to this
10 migration?
- Let students talk with a partner about what factors could have possibly contributed to the
migration.
- 4 - G4.0.1 Use a case study or story about migration within or to the United States to identify push
and pull factors (why they left, why they came) that influenced the migration.
- Objective: Students will be able to identify push and pull factors from a video story of
someone who immigrated to Detroit, MI.
5 Closure - Give each student a sticky note. As an exit ticket, have students write about how they think
they might feel if they migrated to a new area.
Explain how this lesson supports your Big Idea. What is the takeaway?
In this lesson, we want students to be able to identify push and pull factors that might cause someone to move to a new area. We
want them to discuss push and pull factors that might influence someones decision to migrate to Michigan, specifically, and how
the population of immigrants in Michigan compares with the population of immigrants in other states in the US.