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Grade 6 Social Studies: LESSON 1 (5 DAYS

)

EA/Assistance:

GLOs:​ Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority, Identity, Culture, and Community

SLOs:​ 6-KC-002 Compare responsibilities and rights of citizens of Canada at the time of Confederation to those of
today. 6-KH-034 Identify the prime ministers of Canada from 1867 to 1914 and give examples of their
achievements.

Resources: ​Chapter 6 PDF, Forgotten Four Facebook Worksheets

Activate:​ Tell the students that they will cover some of the vocabulary as they read, and later in my
placement, they will have a jeopardy day where these will be used again.

List the following words on the board and have the kids type them up, with the letters (K--for know what
it means, H--for I have a hunch about what it means, S--for I’ve seen it before, and N--for I have never
seen it before in my life). Then, they will create Vocab Overview Guides for the words.

Imperialists: ​Canada should be led by Britain
Nationalists:​ Canada should have more control over their own country, not necessarily independent.
Boer:​ Dutch settlers who colonized South Africa during 17th century.
Urbanization: ​Growth of towns and cities.

*This might be all we finish in class, since Karen is finishing up chapter 5 as well.
*It took about 3 days to read the chapter.

Acquire: ​Explain to the students that the next few chapters are going to be covering Canada becoming
more and more independent. Read Chapter 6, go over the vocabulary as we go along.

*This part will probably be finished in 2 classes.

Apply: ​Forgotten Four Facebook Profiles. Students will make a profile for each of the “Forgotten Four”
prime ministers outlining their life aside from being prime minister, any accomplishments as prime
minister, any quotes they might have, and the period of time that they were in office. Much of this
should be able to be found in the book,

They will have 2 days in class to work on it.

Closing: ​Explain that this is the end of the second section of their text, and the next part will cover
even more change over a fairly short period of time.

Next Step:​ Section 3, Chapter 7: World War I.

Assessment: ​FOR Learning. They are only covering a small portion of the chapter because
there was not much information on the four prime ministers in the textbook, yet the textbook
said they were important.
Grade 6 Social Studies: Mini-Lesson (1 DAY)

EA/Assistance:

GLOs:​ ​Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority

SLOs: ​KG-039 Identify major causes and events of the First World War, KG-040 Describe
Canada’s involvement in the First World War and identify its impact on Canadian individuals
and communities.

Resources: ​Crash Course Who Started World War I:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pFCpKtwCkI&t=354s

Activate:​ Students will be able to work on finishing up their “Forgotten Four Facebook”
assignment while they watch the video.

Acquire: ​Crash Course Who Started World War I. This is answering a question that the
students had about how WWI began, and doesn’t go into the textbook chapter before they
leave for spring break.

Apply: ​Discuss as a group whether they think that World War I would be a good thing for
Canada to get into.

Closing: ​Explain that we will be getting into Canada’s involvement in the war AFTER spring
break.

Next Step:​ We will begin reading Chapter 7 after spring break.

Assessment: ​FOR learning. The students will be discussing what they have seen.
Grade 6 Social Studies: LESSON 2 (2 DAYS)

EA/Assistance:

GLOs:​ ​Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority, Identity, Culture, and
Community

SLOs: ​KG-039 Identify major causes and events of the First World War, KG-040 Describe
Canada’s involvement in the First World War and identify its impact on Canadian individuals
and communities.

Resources: ​Excerpts from WWI soldiers, Social Studies text

Activate:​ Have the students do a Word Splash as a group about what they already know
about World War I. Then have them fill in their Vocab Overview Guide.

Acquire: ​Explain that the war was important and exciting at first but it wasn’t expected to last
very long. Have them read a few letters home/short bios from Canadian soldiers.

Apply:

Closing: ​Explain that this was a very controversial time for Canada because there were some
that thought that the war was just what Canada needed, while others thought that they weren’t
really part of it. However, it managed to bring Canada more together as a country.

Next Step:​ We will read through the chapter on World War I.

Assessment: ​FOR learning. The students will be filling out an inquiry chart based on the
letters from the soldiers to help them further understand what they are reading.
When did What What did What was Other New
the soldier information the soldier their life Interesting Questions
enlist? was the want like? (ie Facts: I Have:
soldier included in when did
telling the a reply they enlist/
person letter? where are
receiving they from?
the letter?

Source 1

Source 2

Source 3
Ralph Gooding Ball was born in Hilldale, Alberta in September, 1900. Ball lied about his age and ​enlisted
in Victoria, British Columbia in September, 1916​. He was discharged on compassionate grounds in
January, 1918 at the request of his parents after the deaths of his two brothers, Herbert and Samuel. The
collection currently consists of two letters, one photograph, and one clipping.

F. Coy., 1st Can. Res. Batt.,

South Camp, Seaford, Sussex

Army P.O. London, Eng.

Aug. 19th 1917

Dear Uncle Sam,-

Just a few lines to let you know that I am well and I hope you are the same. I have just written to Edie and
I have quite a few more to write so I will have to make them short. They have not had any orders yet
about sending me back, but I am expecting them any time now.

Had a letter from Earl today. He said he took a walk through the country on the crutches, the other day. I
hope he won't have to go back to France again. Some nights we can hear the guns from France, when
there is a bombardment on, and it makes me shiver to think what the boys are going through out there. It
was a hard blow to me when I got the letter with the sad news of Dear Sammy's death and it is hard for
me to think that I have no brother left now.

I would like to go to France to get some revenge, but I would rather go back to Canada than stick around
here for a couple of years. I wish they would get conscription in Canada. They aught to send an army into
Quebec and drive those French Canadians to the recruiting office at the point of their bayonets.

Well it is getting late, so I will have to close for this time, hoping to be back in Sunny Alberta soon. Good
night.

From your loving Nephew,

Ralph
Raymond Harlan Brewster was born in Boston in 1893 and later moved to Victoria, British Columbia. At
the time of ​his enlistment in May, 1917 ​his father, Harlan Brewster, was the Premier of the province.
Brewster served overseas and ​was killed November 1, 1918​.

April 8, 1918

Dear Margorie and Flow

How are Ray's two little sweethearts to-night? I hope you are both feeling well and strong. I suppose
Victoria is beginning to look summery again? How is school getting on?

Well dears I expect to be away to France before very long now, probably about a week. I'll try and catch a
nice little Kaiser for you.

It has been quite wet over here the last few days, thus making it a bit chilly and muddy. But we should
worry about a little mud. I just wish I could take you both in my arms and cuddle you for a long time,
wouldn't it go fine?

Would like awfully will to get some nice letters from you folks, telling me just what you are doing, and
everything in general. Don't you think you could manage to write me one now and then? Please try. If you
knew how lonely and lovesome I get sometimes I am sure you would. Tell Auntie that if she is sending a
parcel sometime, that I would like to have some date cookies, a fruit cake, and some sugar.

I must close for to night dears, as I have to be up at 5.30 in the morning. With heaps of love

Your brother

Ray

XX OO
George Albert Charles Broome was born in London, England in 1897 and emigrated to Melfort,
Saskatchewan sometime prior to the war. Broome ​enlisted in March, 1915​. He went to England in the fall
of 1915 and then to France early in 1916, where he was wounded. He returned to active duty and was
wounded at Vimy Ridge, April 9, 1917. Broome was paralyzed and invalided back to England, where ​he
died in a military hospital November 7, 1917​, at the age of 20. The collection consists of 27 letters both
from and to George Broome, three photographs, and miscellaneous related materials such as telegrams,
his personal effect certificate, and his CEF death certificate. The materials cover the period from 1915 to
1921.

Dear Mother

I received a letter from you last week dated Aug 8. It took over a week to come from London. I expect it
was held up in the mail office here. I am sorry you did not receive any letters for so long but I was pretty
sick in July and did not write much to anybody. I tryed to write to you regularly but might have missed a
week or two.

I do not like this place much. They have no system for handling cases like mine. I also miss my
acquaintances there. I was between two fellows the same as myself and they were both very nice. When
the sisters referred to us we were the three bears, the three babies and other pet names but we always
were together. I miss them to talk to and I miss all the sisters. It is surprising the friends one makes in a
place like that.

I do not know how long I will be here. I will probably leave next month. I am getting my Board in a few
days. I can tell you the decision now. It will be "permanantly unfit for military service" but it takes a lot of
redtape for them to write it out.

I am expecting Grandpa tomorrow. He said he would come down to see me. Edie Fisher says she will be
down on Sunday. I was looking for her yesterday but she did not come. I have not heard when Uncle
intends coming down. I had a letter from Aunt Marg. I expect they are away. She said they were going for
a few days.

I am feeling pretty well. I can feel a little now in my right knee and shin. I am getting along slowly.

Congratulate Ethel for me. I am very pleased to hear she passed but more pleased to know she has a
good education and as a teacher she will have ample chances of improving her learning. Education is a
great thing these days. I wish I was more learned.

Well I must close now. I am looking forward to your letters to know how you like your new home. Give my
love to Father and the kids and Goodbye with love from

Your loving son

George Broome
Grade 6 Social Studies: LESSON 3 (5 DAYS)

EA/Assistance:

GLOs:​ Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority, Identity, Culture, and Community

SLOs: ​KH-036 Identify the prime ministers of Canada from 1914 to 1945 and give examples of their achievements.
KG-039 Identify major causes and events of the First World War. KG-040 Describe Canada’s involvement in the
First World War and identify its impact on Canadian individuals and communities. Include: internment of
ethnocultural groups.

Resources: ​Chapter 7 PDF up to “Forgotten Heros”, Vocab Overview Slides and Worksheet, World
War I Christmas Truce video: ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KHoVBK2EVE

Activate:​ Tell the students that they will cover some of the vocabulary as they read, and later in my
placement, they will have a jeopardy day where these will be used again.
List the following words on the board and have the kids type them up, with the letters (K--for know what
it means, H--for I have a hunch about what it means, S--for I’ve seen it before, and N--for I have never
seen it before in my life). Then, they will create Vocab Overview Guides for the words.

Trenches​: long and narrow ditches

Artillery​: a military detachment or branch of the armed forces that uses large-caliber guns.

Front​: the furthest position that an army has reached and where the enemy is or may be engaged.

Rallies​: mass meeting of people making a political protest or showing support for a cause.

Conscription​: Forced enlistment into the armed forces.

Intern​: confine (someone) as a prisoner, especially for political or military reasons.

Allies​: Britain, France, Russia, Italy and the United States

*This takes 1 class once they know how to use the worksheet

Acquire: ​Explain that this is going to be where Canadian identity really starts to get disputed because
they want to be their own country but at the same time, they are jumping when Britain tells them to,
which in this case, is to war. Read Chapter 7 UP TO “Forgotten Heros”.

Apply: ​Google Classroom Quick Write: Why do you think that the Canadian military was seen to be so
strong, even though they weren’t as well equipped?

Closing: ​Explain that Canada was kind of discounted by other countries during and after the war, so
many of the people who played a part in Canada’s participation in the war have been forgotten.

Next Step:​ Chapter 7 starting with Canada’s Forgotten Heros and move on through the rest of the
chapter.

Assessment: ​FOR Learning. They are only covering a small portion of the chapter because
there was not much information on the four prime ministers in the textbook, yet the textbook
said they were important.
Grade 6 Social Studies: LESSON 4 (7 DAYS)

EA/Assistance: ​Need to have more visuals because Justina cannot read or write.

GLOs:​ ​Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority, Identity, Culture, and
Community

SLOs: ​KG-040 Describe Canada’s involvement in the First World War and identify its impact
on Canadian individuals and communities. KG-039 Identify major causes and events of the
First World War.

Resources:​ Google Classroom Assignment

Activate:​ Explain that we are going to be moving forward with the less told stories of World
War I.

Acquire: ​Continue reading Chapter 7 up to the end of the Forgotten Heroes and Aboriginal
Soldiers.

Apply: ​Forgotten Heroes Assignment: Consider the heroes mentioned in the chapter.
Choose a person/group of people that either deserve to have more mention as heroes for
Canada/World War I because what they did was such a big deal to you OR choose a
person/group of people that you believe are being made a bigger deal than they actually are.
Another thing to consider is whether you think that someone else was worth remembering
more than someone else. You need to research these people to some extent to give
evidence for the stance that you take. This assignment needs to be 3 paragraphs, minimum 7
sentences per paragraph. You will be given 3 days IN CLASS to work on this assignment and
it will be marked 2 days after that whether you are done or not.

Next Step:​ We will continue on with the chapter.

Assessment: ​OF Learning. These students have done a LOT of work learning about World
War I and take what they have learned to heart. This will tap into that and make them
develop an opinion about what they have learned.
Forgotten Heroes Rubric:

Definitive Answers Student does not Student gives an Student gives an
answer the questions answer but insightful answer
posed to them. summarizes that flows through
information rather their entire
than defending their assignment.
point of view.

Length Assignment is Assignment is Assignment is
over/under by 50% of over/under by 25% of spot-on with length,
given length. given length or has without using filler
filler information to information to
bring it barely to the supplement.
length required.

Evidence Little to no evidence Some evidence given Evidence is
is provided defending to back up their point integrated into the
student’s point of of view, but assignment backing
view. sometimes irrelevant up specific points of
or fragmented. view.
Grade 6 Social Studies: LESSON 5 (4 DAYS)

EA/Assistance: ​Need to have more visuals because Justina cannot read or write.

GLOs:​ ​Historical Connections, Global Interdependence, Power and Authority, Identity, Culture, and
Community

SLOs: ​KG-040 Describe Canada’s involvement in the First World War and identify its impact
on Canadian individuals and communities. KG-039 Identify major causes and events of the
First World War.

Resources:​ Halifax Infosheets
http://www.cbc.ca/history/EPISCONTENTSE1EP12CH2PA3LE.html
Halifax Explosion Heritage Minute video: ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rw-FbwmzPKo
Google Form Quiz: World War I

Activate:​ Explain to the kids that some of the things that they will learn about in World War I
was not necessarily just about the war and soldiers; there was a lot of things that the war
affected for people at home.

Acquire: ​Read the rest of the chapter, filling in with Halifax Explosion video and stories about
family who had to be put in an internment camp because they came from Germany after
World War II. People were paranoid because a country was an enemy to their country and
they didn’t know who could actually be trusted.

Apply: ​There will be a test at the end of the chapter because this will be the last bit of
information that they will be covering with me before Karen is back to teaching. There will be
a KAHOOT! Review with the kids the day before the test so they know what they should be
brushing up on before the test.

Closing: ​Explain that this war changed the world and Canada saw a lot of that change.

Next Step:​ Karen will teach them after this.

Assessment: ​FOR and OF learning. The students will be doing a review prior to the test, so I
will see how much they each struggle with the information (beauty of having my desk in the
back of the classroom because I can see the red screens when they get something wrong
and can document how many and who).
Halifax Explosion Infosheet
IN DECEMBER 1917​, Halifax, Nova Scotia, was the hub of the Dominion of Canada. World War I had brought activity
and prosperity to the port. The harbour was crowded with wartime shipping. Convoys of ships loaded with war
supplies of food, munitions and troops gathered in Bedford Basin ready for the voyage to Europe with heavily-armed
warships as escorts. Neutral vessels anchored in the harbour, their crews forbidden to land for fear any might supply
information to the enemy. New railway lines and terminals were almost completed, made necessary to carry the extra
traffic handled by the staff of the Intercolonial Railway. The population was swollen with troops, some awaiting
embarkation for Europe, some garrisoned there, their families, and people who had come to benefit from the plentiful
employment.

Devastated house, north section of Duffus Street, Halifax

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Charles A. Vaughan Collection, N-14,024

At 7.30 a.m. on December 6, the French ship ​Mont-Blanc​ left her anchorage outside the mouth of the harbour to join
a convoy gathering in Bedford Basin. She was loaded with 2,300 tons of wet and dry picric acid, 200 tons of TNT, 10
tons of gun cotton and 35 tons of benzol: a highly explosive mixture. At the same time the Norwegian vessel Imo, in
ballast, set off from the Basin bound for New York to pick up a cargo of relief supplies for Belgium. At the entrance to
the Narrows, after a series of ill-judged manoeuvres, the Imo struck the ​Mont-Blanc​ on the bow. Although the collision
was not severe, fire immediately broke out on board the ​Mont-Blanc​. The captain, pilot and crew, expecting the ship
to blow up immediately, launched the lifeboats and took refuge on the Dartmouth shore.

IMO on the Dartmouth Shore

MMA MP 207.1.184/270 (photograph only)

The ship burned for twenty minutes, drifting until it rested against Pier 6, in the Richmond district, the busy, industrial
north end of Halifax. The spectacle was thrilling, and drew crowds of spectators, unaware of the danger. Only a
handful of naval officers and a railway dispatcher had learned of ​Mont-Blanc's​ explosive cargo and there was little
time to spread a warning.
Explosion
Just before 9.05 a.m., the ​Mont-Blanc​ exploded. Not one piece of her remained beside the dock where she had
finished her voyage. Fragments rained on the surrounding area, crashing through buildings with enough force to
embed them where they landed.

Clock found in explosion wreckage

Artifact: NSM #Z3887, Photo: MMA, N-15,066

Churches, houses, schools, factories, docks and ships were destroyed in the swath of the blast. Children who had
stopped on their way to school, workmen lining the windows, families in their homes, sailors in their ships, died
instantly. Injuries were frightful, blindness from the splintering glass adding to the shock and bewilderment. The
captain, pilot and five Imo crew members were killed. All from the ​Mont-Blanc​ survived, apart from one man who later
died from his wounds.

The Silliker Car Works

MMA, Charles A. Vaughan Collection, N-14,014
Rescue
Mercifully, rescue began quickly, with the thousands of well-disciplined troops and naval strength available. City
officials speedily arranged for volunteer help: relief committees had been formed by the afternoon of the disaster.
Word went out to the surrounding areas and they responded with commendable speed. Hospitals and places of
shelter were soon overcrowded. All possible buildings-even ships in the harbour-were commandeered, and some of
the injured and homeless sent by rail to other cities.

YMCA Emergency Hospital

MMA Kitz Collection, N-14,014

News of the disaster reached Boston the same morning. That very night a train loaded with supplies, together with
medical personnel and members of the Public Safety Committee, left for Halifax. Help poured in from all over Canada
and many parts of the world, with the continuing generosity of Massachusetts unforgettable. Each Christmas the
huge tree that glitters on Boston Common is a thank-you gift from the people of Nova Scotia.

1,630 homes were completely destroyed, many by fires that quickly spread following the explosion; 12,000 houses
were damaged; 6,000 people were left without shelter. Hardly a pane of glass in Halifax and Dartmouth was left
intact.

The death toll rose to just over 1,900. About 250 bodies were never identified; many victims were never found.
Twenty-five limbs had to be amputated; more than 250 eyes had to be removed; 37 people were left completely blind.
Hospitals treated well over 4,000 cases, and private doctors hundreds more.
Temporary Housing Supplied by Massachusetts Relief

MMA Charles A. Vaughan Collection, N-14,174 and N-14,127

The Dominion Government appointed the Halifax Relief Commission on January 22, 1918. It handled pensions,
claims for loss and damage, rehousing and the rehabilitation of explosion victims. It was disbanded only in June,
1976. Pensions are now paid by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Result
As a result of the tragedy certain benefits accrued to the city. Medical treatment, social welfare, public health and
hospital facilities increased and improved. Regulations relating to the harbour were tightened, making it as safe as
human errors of judgment would permit. The Hydrostone development, built as relief housing, still stands, an early
example of a very high standard of urban development.

Hennessey and Kane Places, Hydrostone Development Temporary Housing Supplied by Massachusetts
Relief

MMA Charles A. Vaughan Collection, N-14,174 and N-14,127

The official enquiry opened less than a week after the explosion. The captain and pilot of the ​Mont-Blanc​ and the
naval commanding officer were charged with manslaughter and released on bail. Later the charges were dropped,
because gross negligence causing death could not be proved against any one of them. In the Nova Scotia District of
the Exchequer Court of Canada in April, 1918, the ​Mont-Blanc​ was declared solely to blame for the disaster. In May,
1919, on appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, both ships were judged equally at fault. The Privy Council in
London, at that time the ultimate authority, agreed with the Supreme Court's verdict.

Thus no blame was ever laid in the largest man-made explosion until the atomic age, when its effects were studied by
Oppenheimer in calculating the strength of the bombs for Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Memorial at Fort Needham, Halifax

Photo courtesy of Dennis Jarvis © All Rights Reserved

Many gravestones, artifacts and monuments in the cities of Halifax and Dartmouth are reminders of the explosion.
The most impressive is the Memorial Bell Tower on Fort Needham, overlooking the explosion site. Hanging there is a
carillon of bells, donated in 1920 to the United Memorial Church, which was built to replace two churches destroyed
in the explosion. The presentation was made by a young girl who had lost her entire family in the blast, her mother,
father and four brothers and sisters. At 9 a.m. on December 6, every year, a service is held there in memory of the
victims of the Explosion. The bells ring out and can be heard across the Narrows in north Dartmouth, all around Fort
Needham, and in the areas devastated by the Halifax Explosion of 1917.

Written by Janet F. Kitz