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9500 MPR-E

Microwave Packet Radio

Rel. 1.2.0

User Guide
3DB 18528 DFAA
Issue 1
March 2009
Alcatel, Lucent, Alcatel-Lucent and the Alcatel-Lucent logo are trademarks of Alcatel-Lucent.

All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

The information presented is subject to change without notice. Alcatel-Lucent assumes no


responsibility for inaccuracies contained herein.

Copyright 2009 Alcatel-Lucent

3DB 18528 DFAA


Issue 1
Status: RELEASED

All rights reserved.


Passing on and copying of this document,
use and communication of its contents is not permitted
without written authorization from Alcatel-Lucent.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF FIGURES ......................................................................................................................... 5

LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................... 13

PREFACE......................................................................................................................................... 15
Preliminary Information.............................................................................................................. 15
Applicability................................................................................................................................. 16
Scope ........................................................................................................................................... 16
History.......................................................................................................................................... 16
Handbook Structure ................................................................................................................... 17
General on Alcatel-Lucent Customer Documentation ............................................................ 18

1 SAFETY........................................................................................................................................ 21
1.1 EMC-EMF-ESD Norms and Equipment Labeling .............................................................. 21
1.1.1 Safety Rules ................................................................................................................... 21
1.1.2 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC norms) .................................................................. 26
1.1.3 Equipment protection against electrostatic discharges................................................... 27
1.1.4 Cautions to avoid equipment damage ............................................................................ 28

2 PRODUCT INFORMATION AND PLANNING ............................................................................. 29


2.1 Purpose and Function ......................................................................................................... 30
2.1.1 Innovative solutions ........................................................................................................ 30
2.1.2 Description ...................................................................................................................... 32
2.1.3 MSS Purpose, Function and Description ........................................................................ 33
2.1.4 ODU V2 .......................................................................................................................... 35
2.1.5 MSS-ODU cable (Interfaces and Traffic) ........................................................................ 36
2.1.6 Antennas......................................................................................................................... 36
2.2 Radio capacity, channelling and modulation .................................................................... 37
2.3 Standard Features ............................................................................................................... 38
2.4 Radio Configurations .......................................................................................................... 38
2.5 Typical System Configurations .......................................................................................... 39
2.6 Environmental & Electrical Characteristics ...................................................................... 42
2.6.1 Outdoor Units (6 to 15 GHz) ........................................................................................... 42
2.6.2 Outdoor Units (18 to 38 GHz) ......................................................................................... 44
2.6.3 System Parameters ........................................................................................................ 46
2.6.4 Minimizing Latency Latency contribution for a 9500 MPR-E Cloud ............................. 47
2.7 Parts Lists............................................................................................................................. 49
2.8 Functional description ........................................................................................................ 63
2.8.1 MSS (Indoor Unit) ........................................................................................................... 63
2.8.2 ODU................................................................................................................................ 69
2.8.3 Protection schemes ........................................................................................................ 73
2.8.4 Radio Transmission Features ......................................................................................... 74
2.8.5 TMN communication channels ....................................................................................... 77
2.8.6 Traffic profiles ................................................................................................................. 78
2.8.7 Quality Of Services (QoS) .............................................................................................. 82
2.8.8 Cross-connection ............................................................................................................ 85
2.8.9 Synchronization for PDH/DATA ...................................................................................... 86

3 NE MANAGEMENT BY SOFTWARE APPLICATION ................................................................. 89


3.1 Network Element Overview................................................................................................. 89
3.1.1 Main view ........................................................................................................................ 89
3.1.2 NE Configuration area .................................................................................................... 90
3.1.3 Status & Alarms area ...................................................................................................... 91

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3.1.4 Supervision Function ...................................................................................................... 92
3.1.5 Menu bar......................................................................................................................... 92
3.2 Main View.............................................................................................................................. 95
3.2.1 Tab-panels ...................................................................................................................... 95
3.2.2 Main Tool Bar Area ......................................................................................................... 97
3.2.3 Severity Alarm Area ........................................................................................................ 97
3.2.4 Domain Alarm Synthesis Area ........................................................................................ 98
3.2.5 Management State Control Area .................................................................................... 98
3.2.6 Selection Criteria ............................................................................................................ 99
3.3 How to configure a new equipment ................................................................................... 101
3.4 Menu Configuration ............................................................................................................. 102
3.4.1 Menu NE Time ................................................................................................................ 102
3.4.2 Menu Network Configuration .......................................................................................... 103
3.4.3 Menu Alarm Severities.................................................................................................... 109
3.4.4 Menu System Settings .................................................................................................... 109
3.4.5 Menu Cross connections ................................................................................................ 111
3.4.6 Menu Profile Management.............................................................................................. 132
3.5 Menu Diagnosis ................................................................................................................... 138
3.5.1 Alarms............................................................................................................................. 138
3.5.2 Log Browsing .................................................................................................................. 145
3.5.3 Remote Inventory ........................................................................................................... 148
3.5.4 Abnormal Condition List.................................................................................................. 149
3.5.5 Summary Block Diagram View ....................................................................................... 150
3.5.6 Current Configuration View............................................................................................. 157
3.6 Menu Supervision ................................................................................................................ 158
3.6.1 Access State ................................................................................................................... 158
3.6.2 Restart NE ...................................................................................................................... 159
3.6.3 MIB Management ........................................................................................................... 159
3.6.4 SW Licence..................................................................................................................... 160
3.7 Menu SW Download............................................................................................................. 161
3.7.1 Server Access Configuration .......................................................................................... 161
3.7.2 Init Sw Download ............................................................................................................ 162
3.7.3 Sw Status ........................................................................................................................ 163
3.8 Tab-panel Equipment........................................................................................................... 165
3.8.1 General ........................................................................................................................... 165
3.8.2 Starting From Scratch ..................................................................................................... 167
3.8.3 Tab panels in the Resource Detail Area.......................................................................... 168
3.8.4 Alarms tab-panel............................................................................................................. 168
3.8.5 Settings tab-panel ........................................................................................................... 169
3.8.6 Remote Inventory tab-panel............................................................................................ 171
3.8.7 How to configure a new equipment ................................................................................ 171
3.9 Tab-panel Protection Schemes........................................................................................... 173
3.9.1 Equipment Protection Management ............................................................................... 175
3.9.2 Rx Radio Protection Management .................................................................................. 177
3.9.3 HSB Protection Management ......................................................................................... 178
3.10 Tab-panel Synchronization ............................................................................................... 180
3.10.1 How to synchronize ...................................................................................................... 180
3.11 Tab-panel Connections...................................................................................................... 182
3.12 PDH VIEW for PDH DOMAIN (this menu opens with double click on a PDH unit)....... 183
3.12.1 PDH Unit configuration ................................................................................................. 183
3.13 RADIO VIEW for RADIO DOMAIN (this menu opens with double click
on a Radio unit).................................................................................................................. 190
3.13.1 General information on the Radio domain menu .......................................................... 190
3.13.2 Alarms........................................................................................................................... 190

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3.13.3 Settings......................................................................................................................... 191
3.13.4 Measurement................................................................................................................ 197
3.13.5 Loopback ...................................................................................................................... 199
3.14 CORE VIEW for CORE and ETHERNET DOMAIN (this menu opens with
double click on a Core unit).............................................................................................. 202
3.14.1 Core domain ................................................................................................................. 202
3.15 Performance Monitoring tool............................................................................................ 208
3.15.1 CORE unit performances.............................................................................................. 209
3.15.2 MD300 unit performances ............................................................................................ 214

4 INSTALLATION............................................................................................................................ 229
4.1 Hardware Installation........................................................................................................... 229
4.1.1 Power consumption ........................................................................................................ 229
4.1.2 Rack Installation ............................................................................................................. 230
4.1.3 Outdoor Unit Installation (ODU) ...................................................................................... 245
4.1.4 Indoor Unit Installation (IDU)........................................................................................... 275
4.1.5 Antenna Alignment ......................................................................................................... 316
4.2 Software local copy ............................................................................................................. 324
4.2.1 Getting Started ................................................................................................................ 325
4.2.2 PC Characteristics .......................................................................................................... 325
4.2.3 Download Software Package (SWP) to PC .................................................................... 325
4.2.4 Download Craft Terminal (CT) and TCO Suite Software to PC ...................................... 329
4.2.5 Configure PC Network Card to Connect to NE ............................................................... 335
4.2.6 Download Software Package to NE................................................................................ 339

5 PROVISIONING............................................................................................................................ 347
5.1 Provisioning by WebEML.................................................................................................... 347
5.1.1 Start WebEML................................................................................................................. 347
5.1.2 Provisioning Radio .......................................................................................................... 350
5.2 Provisioning by Provisioning tool...................................................................................... 386
5.2.1 Start Provisioning tool ..................................................................................................... 386

6 MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLE-CLEARING ............................................................................ 405


6.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 405
6.2 Maintenance Philosophy..................................................................................................... 406
6.3 Personal Computer (PC)/Laptop ........................................................................................ 406
6.4 Troubleshooting................................................................................................................... 406
6.4.1 Before Going to Site Checklist ........................................................................................ 406
6.4.2 Troubleshooting Basics................................................................................................... 407
6.4.3 Troubleshooting Path Problems...................................................................................... 412
6.4.4 Troubleshooting Configuration Problems........................................................................ 414
6.4.5 Troubleshooting Ethernet Problems ............................................................................... 414
6.4.6 Troubleshooting TMN Problems ..................................................................................... 415
6.5 Card Removal and REPLACEMENT ................................................................................... 417
6.5.1 Core Card Removal and Replacement Core Protected Radio .................................... 419
6.5.2 Core Flash Card Removal and Replacement ................................................................. 419
6.6 Replacement procedure of Core B card with Core E card............................................... 420
6.6.1 Core replacement from Rel. 1.1.0................................................................................... 420
6.6.2 Core replacement from Rel. 1.1.1................................................................................... 421
6.7 Upgrade From Not Protected To A Protected Radio ........................................................ 422
6.7.1 1+0 Adaptive Modulation to 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation ....................................... 422
6.7.2 1+0 Static Modulation to 1+1 HSB Static Modulation...................................................... 423
6.7.3 1+0 to 1+1 Frequency Diversity ...................................................................................... 423
6.8 Downgrade from Protected to a Not Protected Radio...................................................... 424
6.8.1 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation to 1+0 in Adaptive Modulation ................................... 424

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6.8.2 1+1 HSB in Static Modulation to 1+0 Static Modulation.................................................. 425
6.8.3 1+1 FD to 1+0 ................................................................................................................. 425
6.9 Cleaning................................................................................................................................ 426

7 LINEUP AND COMMISSIONING ............................................................................................... 427


7.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 428
7.1.1 General ........................................................................................................................... 428
7.1.2 SafetyEMCEMFESD norms and cautions to avoid equipment damage ................... 429
7.1.3 Conventions.................................................................................................................... 429
7.1.4 Summary of the lineup, commissioning, and acceptance phases ................................ 430
7.1.5 General information about test bench drawings ............................................................. 431
7.2 Commissioning of STATION A phase 1 (Turn up).......................................................... 432
7.2.1 Turnon preliminary operations ...................................................................................... 432
7.2.2 Powering up the MSS(s) with ODU(s) connected........................................................... 433
7.3 Commissioning of STATION B phase 1 (Turn up).......................................................... 433
7.4 Fine antenna alignment and preliminary checks Stations A & B ................................. 433
7.4.1 Fine antenna alignment .................................................................................................. 433
7.4.2 Preliminary checks.......................................................................................................... 434
7.5 End of commissioning phase 1 (Turn up) in STATION A ................................................. 438
7.6 Commissioning station A phase 2 (acceptance test) .................................................... 439
7.6.1 Installation and cabling visual inspection ........................................................................ 441
7.6.2 System configuration ...................................................................................................... 441
7.6.3 P32E1 unit ...................................................................................................................... 447
7.6.4 CORE unit....................................................................................................................... 449
7.6.5 NE configuration ............................................................................................................. 450
7.6.6 Hop E1 stability test ........................................................................................................ 451
7.6.7 Ethernet Traffic stability test............................................................................................ 452
7.6.8 Data/Time settings .......................................................................................................... 456
7.7 Commissioning station B Phase 2 (acceptance Test) ................................................... 457
7.8 Final operations ................................................................................................................... 457
7.9 Annex A: fine antenna alignment ....................................................................................... 457

ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................................ 459

CUSTOMER DOCUMENTATION FEEDBACK.............................................................................. 463

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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1. Multiservice Aggregation Layer ......................................................................................... 30
Figure 2. Service Awareness ............................................................................................................ 31
Figure 3. Packet Node ...................................................................................................................... 31
Figure 4. Service-driven Packet Adaptive Modulation ...................................................................... 32
Figure 5. Naming Convention ........................................................................................................... 32
Figure 6. MSS-8 shelf ....................................................................................................................... 33
Figure 7. MSS-4 shelf ....................................................................................................................... 33
Figure 8. MSS-8 block diagram ........................................................................................................ 34
Figure 9. MSS-4 block diagram ........................................................................................................ 35
Figure 10. ODU V2 ........................................................................................................................... 35
Figure 11. TDM Over Ethernet Packet Node - Mapping of 32 E1 on Ethernet ................................. 39
Figure 12. TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Transport 32 E1 Access, 1 Radio Direction ............ 39
Figure 13. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop N1 Packed Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access,
1 Back Link, 1 Haul Link ................................................................................................. 40
Figure 14. TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access,
2 Back Links.................................................................................................................... 40
Figure 15. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access,
1 back Link and 2 Haul Links .......................................................................................... 41
Figure 16. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop NN Packet Node-ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access,
2 Haul Links and 2 Back Links........................................................................................ 41
Figure 17. Power Distribution Architecture ....................................................................................... 64
Figure 18. Core unit .......................................................................................................................... 64
Figure 19. Core unit .......................................................................................................................... 65
Figure 20. PDH Access unit.............................................................................................................. 66
Figure 21. PDH Access unit.............................................................................................................. 67
Figure 22. Modem unit ...................................................................................................................... 67
Figure 23. Modem unit ...................................................................................................................... 68
Figure 24. 9500 MPR-E ODU 300 housing....................................................................................... 69
Figure 25. ODU 300 block diagram .................................................................................................. 70
Figure 26. 9500 MPR-E Packet Node Full Protection (Radio).......................................................... 73
Figure 27. 9500 MPR-E Packet Node Full Protection (Radio).......................................................... 73
Figure 28. Available loopbacks ......................................................................................................... 76
Figure 29. Traffic profiles .................................................................................................................. 78
Figure 30. Traffic profiles .................................................................................................................. 79
Figure 31. E1 Traffic.......................................................................................................................... 79
Figure 32. E1 Traffic.......................................................................................................................... 80
Figure 33. E1 Traffic.......................................................................................................................... 81
Figure 34. QoS in the Core unit ........................................................................................................ 82
Figure 35. QoS in the Modem unit .................................................................................................... 83
Figure 36. Cross-connection............................................................................................................. 85
Figure 37. Synchronization ............................................................................................................... 88
Figure 38. NETO main view: initial screen ........................................................................................ 89
Figure 39. NETO main view: reduced screen ................................................................................... 90
Figure 40. NETO NE Configuration View: NE Information................................................................ 90
Figure 41. NETO NE Configuration View: NE Description................................................................ 91
Figure 42. NETO NE Configuration View: Command Buttons .......................................................... 91
Figure 43. Main View: Status & Alarms............................................................................................. 91
Figure 44. NETO List Management .................................................................................................. 93
Figure 45. MSS-8 Main view............................................................................................................. 95
Figure 46. MSS-4 Main view............................................................................................................. 96
Figure 47. General System Configuration panel............................................................................... 109
Figure 48. Main Cross-Connections View......................................................................................... 111

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List of Figures 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 5/464
Figure 49. Cross-connections Example ............................................................................................ 112
Figure 50. Creating cross-connection between PDH and radio........................................................ 113
Figure 51. Cross-connections buttons .............................................................................................. 113
Figure 52. Segregated Port View (default configuration) .................................................................. 114
Figure 53. ......................................................................................................................................... 115
Figure 54. ......................................................................................................................................... 115
Figure 55. Segregated Ports............................................................................................................. 115
Figure 56. Actual coloured view example ......................................................................................... 117
Figure 57. PDH-Radio configuration dialog ...................................................................................... 118
Figure 58. Completed PDH-radio cross-connection ......................................................................... 119
Figure 59. Radio-radio configuration dialog ...................................................................................... 120
Figure 60. Completed radio-radio cross-connection ......................................................................... 121
Figure 61. Radio-Ethernet configuration dialog (ranges) .................................................................. 122
Figure 62. Radio-Ethernet configuration dialog (values)................................................................... 123
Figure 63. Completed radio-Ethernet cross-connection ................................................................... 124
Figure 64. PDH-Ethernet configuration dialog .................................................................................. 125
Figure 65. Completed PDH-Ethernet cross-connection.................................................................... 126
Figure 66. No protection ................................................................................................................... 126
Figure 67. 1+1 radio protection between NE B and C ...................................................................... 127
Figure 68. 1+1 EPS protection in NE A............................................................................................. 127
Figure 69. PDH-radio cross-connection modification........................................................................ 128
Figure 70. Modifying a Radio-Radio cross-connection ..................................................................... 129
Figure 71. Modifying a Radio-Ethernet cross-connection ................................................................. 130
Figure 72. Modifying a PDH-Ethernet cross-connection................................................................... 131
Figure 73. Login window ................................................................................................................... 132
Figure 74. Login Failed ..................................................................................................................... 132
Figure 75. Profiles Management....................................................................................................... 133
Figure 76. Create User ..................................................................................................................... 134
Figure 77. Delete user confirmation.................................................................................................. 135
Figure 78. Confirm Administrator Password to Delete a User .......................................................... 135
Figure 79. Change Password of User by Admin............................................................................... 136
Figure 80. Change User Password................................................................................................... 136
Figure 81. Cross-connection (Main) block diagram .......................................................................... 150
Figure 82. 1+0 block diagram (PDH unit) (without Core protection) ................................................. 151
Figure 83. 1+0 block diagram (PDH unit) (with Core protection) ...................................................... 152
Figure 84. 1+1 block diagram (PDH units) (without Core protection) ............................................... 152
Figure 85. 1+1 block diagram (PDH units) (with Core protection) .................................................... 153
Figure 86. 1+0 block diagram (Radio unit) (without Core protection) ............................................... 154
Figure 87. 1+0 block diagram (Radio unit) (with Core protection) .................................................... 154
Figure 88. 1+1 FD block diagram (Radio units) (without Core protection)........................................ 155
Figure 89. 1+1 FD block diagram (Radio units) (with Core protection)............................................. 155
Figure 90. 1+1 Hot Standby block diagram (Radio units) (without Core protection) ......................... 156
Figure 91. 1+1 Hot Standby block diagram (Radio units) (with Core protection) .............................. 156
Figure 92. Panel 1 (Committed software) ......................................................................................... 163
Figure 93. Panel 2 (Stand by software)............................................................................................. 163
Figure 94. SW units details ............................................................................................................... 164
Figure 95. Equipment View (starting from scratch) with MSS-8........................................................ 167
Figure 96. Expected Equipment Type Configuration ........................................................................ 169
Figure 97. Protection Example.......................................................................................................... 170
Figure 98. SFP plug-in enabling ....................................................................................................... 172
Figure 99. Protection scheme screen ............................................................................................... 174
Figure 100. 1+1 PDH unit block diagram .......................................................................................... 174
Figure 101. 1+1 Radio unit block diagram (FD) ................................................................................ 175
Figure 102. 1+1 Radio unit block diagram (HSB) ............................................................................. 175

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Figure 103. Synchronization Settings view ....................................................................................... 180
Figure 104. Synchronization ............................................................................................................. 181
Figure 105. Cross-Connections View ............................................................................................... 182
Figure 106. 9500 MPR-E applications .............................................................................................. 188
Figure 107. 9500 MPR-E applications .............................................................................................. 188
Figure 108. Radio unit without Adaptive Modulation settings ........................................................... 192
Figure 109. Radio unit with Adaptive Modulation settings ................................................................ 193
Figure 110. Loopback ....................................................................................................................... 200
Figure 111. Core Main view............................................................................................................... 202
Figure 112. Core Main view (with optical SFP Ethernet port#5) ....................................................... 203
Figure 113. Performance Monitoring tool welcome screen ............................................................... 208
Figure 114. Tool bar .......................................................................................................................... 209
Figure 115. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table ......................................................................................... 210
Figure 116. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table display (at port level)....................................................... 210
Figure 117. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table display (all enabled ports) ............................................... 211
Figure 118. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table ......................................................................................... 212
Figure 119. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table display (at port level) ....................................................... 213
Figure 120. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table display (all enabled ports) ............................................... 214
Figure 121. MD300 unit performance screen ................................................................................... 214
Figure 122. Radio sections ............................................................................................................... 215
Figure 123. Current Data Table (15 Min) .......................................................................................... 216
Figure 124. Current Data Table (15 Min) display .............................................................................. 217
Figure 125. Alarm Data Table (15 Min) ............................................................................................. 217
Figure 126. History Data Table (15 Min) ........................................................................................... 219
Figure 127. Threshold creation ......................................................................................................... 220
Figure 128. Threshold change .......................................................................................................... 221
Figure 129. Threshold association.................................................................................................... 222
Figure 130. Adaptive Modulation performances ............................................................................... 223
Figure 131. Current Data Table (15 min) .......................................................................................... 223
Figure 132. History Data Table (15 min) ........................................................................................... 224
Figure 133. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table ......................................................................................... 225
Figure 134. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table Performance display ....................................................... 225
Figure 135. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue ..................................................................................... 227
Figure 136. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue (Queue #01) ................................................................ 227
Figure 137. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue (all queues) ................................................................. 228
Figure 138. Fixing the Rack to Floor (1) ........................................................................................... 231
Figure 139. Fixing the Rack to Floor (2) ........................................................................................... 232
Figure 140. Floor file drilling template............................................................................................... 233
Figure 141. Example of securing rack assembly to computer floor .................................................. 234
Figure 142. Laborack ........................................................................................................................ 235
Figure 143. MSS-8 Subrack.............................................................................................................. 236
Figure 144. MSS-4 Subrack.............................................................................................................. 236
Figure 145. Fixed Subrack with screw .............................................................................................. 237
Figure 146. Subrack grounding point................................................................................................ 237
Figure 147. Mechanical Support (Two brackets) .............................................................................. 238
Figure 148. Installation kit to fix the mechanical support .................................................................. 239
Figure 149. MSS 8 Fixed on wall mounting ...................................................................................... 239
Figure 150. Top Rack Unit (T.R.U.) ................................................................................................... 240
Figure 151. Top Rack Unit - Front/Rear ............................................................................................ 240
Figure 152. Top Rack Unit - Fixed to rack......................................................................................... 240
Figure 153. TRU Connections .......................................................................................................... 242
Figure 154. TRU Grounding position on Laborack ........................................................................... 242
Figure 155. ETSI Rack - Ground connection .................................................................................... 243
Figure 156. Laborack - Ground connection ...................................................................................... 243

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List of Figures 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 7/464
Figure 157. 2W2C Connector and Cable (#DB18271AAAA)............................................................ 243
Figure 158. Battery Access Card on subrack ................................................................................... 244
Figure 159. ODU and Mounting Collar.............................................................................................. 246
Figure 160. Andrew Pole Mount and ODU Mounting Collar ............................................................. 246
Figure 161. Radio Waves Pole Mount and Mounting Collar ............................................................. 247
Figure 162. Precision Pole Mounting and ODU Mounting Collar...................................................... 247
Figure 163. Andrew ODU Collar and Polarization Rotator................................................................ 248
Figure 164. Radio Waves Polarization Rotator ................................................................................. 249
Figure 165. ODU orientation for Vertical or Horizontal Polarization .................................................. 249
Figure 166. Remote Mount ............................................................................................................... 251
Figure 167. Remote Mount: front view.............................................................................................. 252
Figure 168. Remote Mount: rear view............................................................................................... 252
Figure 169. Remote Mount with an ODU installed: front view .......................................................... 253
Figure 170. Remote Mount with an ODU installed: rear view ........................................................... 253
Figure 171. Remote Mount with an ODU installed and flexible waveguide ...................................... 254
Figure 172. Remote Mount with the 1+1 coupler installed................................................................ 254
Figure 173. Remote Mount with the 1+1 coupler and one ODU installed......................................... 255
Figure 174. Flexible Waveguide Hanger Assembly .......................................................................... 256
Figure 175. Coupler fitted to Antenna ............................................................................................... 262
Figure 176. Coupler Installation with ODUs ...................................................................................... 262
Figure 177. Coupler Installation with ODUs: Rear View ................................................................... 263
Figure 178. Locations for Cable Grounds and Surge Suppressors .................................................. 266
Figure 179. BGZX Surge Suppressor ............................................................................................... 267
Figure 180. Cable Grounding at building entry ................................................................................. 268
Figure 181. Installation of the Suppressor on the ODU .................................................................... 269
Figure 182. BGXZ Suppressor Installation on an ODU .................................................................... 272
Figure 183. Protection Panel 32E1 SCSI 68 - 1.0/2.3 75 ohm (Front/Rear) (3DB16104AAAA) ....... 278
Figure 184. Protection Panel RJ45 120 ohm (Front/Rear) (1AF15245ABAA) ................................. 278
Figure 185. Protection Panel 32E1 SCSI 68 - 1.6/5.6 75 ohm (Front).............................................. 278
Figure 186. Protection Panel 32E1 BNC 75 ohm (Front).................................................................. 278
Figure 187. Connector support 1.6/5.6 75 ohm Panel 1U (3CC08061AAAA) .................................. 278
Figure 188. Connector support BNC 75 ohm Panel 1U (3CC08061ABAA)...................................... 278
Figure 189. Support 19 Inch modules 120 ohm Panel 3U (3CC07810AAAA).................................. 279
Figure 190. E1 Protection SCSI 68/Sub-D 37 (Front/Rear) (3DB16102AAAA) ................................ 279
Figure 191. Core Card ...................................................................................................................... 280
Figure 192. Radio Access Card ........................................................................................................ 280
Figure 193. 32xE1 Access Card ....................................................................................................... 280
Figure 194. Installation subrack and 3 cord N/QMA Kit .................................................................... 282
Figure 195. Installation Card ............................................................................................................. 282
Figure 196. Installation Accessory .................................................................................................... 282
Figure 197. Connection Cables ........................................................................................................ 283
Figure 198. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U................. 285
Figure 199. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U................. 285
Figure 200. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 ............... 286
Figure 201. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 ............... 286
Figure 202. Repeater 2x1+0 with QMA for Acome cable 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards
internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 ...................................................................................... 287
Figure 203. Repeater 2x1+0 with QMA for Acome cable 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards
internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 ...................................................................................... 287
Figure 204. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U................. 288
Figure 205. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U................. 288
Figure 206. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U.................... 289
Figure 207. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U.................... 289

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Figure 208. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms
BNC 2x1U with cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37) .................................... 290
Figure 209. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms
BNC 2x1U with cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37) .................................... 290
Figure 210. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms
BNC 2x1U with cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37) .................................... 291
Figure 211. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms ...................... 292
Figure 212. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms ...................... 292
Figure 213. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms ...................... 293
Figure 214. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.6/5.6 2U.......... 294
Figure 215. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.6/5.6 2U.......... 294
Figure 216. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U ............ 295
Figure 217. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U ............ 295
Figure 218. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U ............ 296
Figure 219. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U ............ 296
Figure 220. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U.................... 297
Figure 221. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U.................... 297
Figure 222. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U.................... 298
Figure 223. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms ........................... 299
Figure 224. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms ........................... 299
Figure 225. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 3U .................. 300
Figure 226. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 3U .................. 300
Figure 227. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U......................... 301
Figure 228. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U......................... 301
Figure 229. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms
1.0/2.3 1U ..................................................................................................................... 302
Figure 230. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms
1.0/2.3 1U ..................................................................................................................... 302
Figure 231. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms
RJ45 2U ........................................................................................................................ 303
Figure 232. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms
RJ45 2U ........................................................................................................................ 303
Figure 233. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected with 2 cords 3CC52157AAAA (2 PBA PDH)
towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U ............................................................................ 304
Figure 234. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected with 2 cords 3CC52157AAAA (2 PBA PDH)
towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U ............................................................................. 304
Figure 235. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms. 305
Figure 236. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms. 305
Figure 237. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U...................................................................................................... 306
Figure 238. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U...................................................................................................... 306
Figure 239. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U 307
Figure 240. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U 307
Figure 241. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal
DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U ............................................................................................. 308
Figure 242. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U...................................................................................................... 308
Figure 243. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U...................................................................................................... 309
Figure 244. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF
120 Ohms 3U................................................................................................................ 310
Figure 245. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF
120 Ohms 3U................................................................................................................ 310

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Figure 246. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF
120 Ohms 3U................................................................................................................. 311
Figure 247. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms. 312
Figure 248. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms. 312
Figure 249. Checking Feedhead Flange with a Spirit level............................................................... 320
Figure 250. Indicative head-on signal pattern for a parabolic antenna ............................................. 322
Figure 251. Example Tracking Path Signals ..................................................................................... 323
Figure 252. Example Tracking Path Signals on the First Side Lobe................................................. 323
Figure 253. Provisioning Sequence .................................................................................................. 350
Figure 254. Enable SFP optical plug-in ............................................................................................ 351
Figure 255. Enable Spare Core Card................................................................................................ 352
Figure 256. Enabling E1 Access Card .............................................................................................. 353
Figure 257. Enabling E1 Access Card on the same row (to implement protected configuration) ..... 354
Figure 258. Enabling E1 Access Card protection ............................................................................. 355
Figure 259. Enabling Radio Modem Card......................................................................................... 356
Figure 260. Enabling Radio Modem Card on the same row (to implement protected configuration) 357
Figure 261. Enabling Radio Modem Card protection ........................................................................ 358
Figure 262. Enabling Fan Unit .......................................................................................................... 359
Figure 263. Core Card Provisioning (Ethernet ports 1-4) ................................................................. 360
Figure 264. Core Card Provisioning (Ethernet port 5) ...................................................................... 361
Figure 265. E1 Access Card Provisioning TDM2TDM ...................................................................... 362
Figure 266. E1 Access Card Provisioning TDM2ETH ...................................................................... 363
Figure 267. Access Card Details ...................................................................................................... 364
Figure 268. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Presetting Mode (Sheet 1 of 2) ................................ 365
Figure 269. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Presetting Mode (Sheet 2 of 2) ................................ 366
Figure 270. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 1 of 3)................ 368
Figure 271. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 2 of 3)................ 369
Figure 272. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 3 of 3)................ 370
Figure 273. Provisioning Master with Free Run Local Oscillator as Primary Source........................ 372
Figure 274. Provisioning Slave with Radio Port as Primary Source ................................................. 373
Figure 275. Provisioning NTP protocol ............................................................................................. 374
Figure 276. NE Time Provisioning .................................................................................................... 375
Figure 277. PDH-to-Radio Cross-connect ........................................................................................ 377
Figure 278. PDH-To-ETH Cross-connect.......................................................................................... 378
Figure 279. ETH-To-Radio Cross Connect ....................................................................................... 379
Figure 280. Radio-To-Radio Cross Connect ..................................................................................... 380
Figure 281. System Setting............................................................................................................... 381
Figure 282. Local Configuration Provisioning ................................................................................... 382
Figure 283. Ethernet Configuration Provisioning .............................................................................. 383
Figure 284. IP Static Routing Provisioning........................................................................................ 384
Figure 285. OSPF Static Routing Provisioning ................................................................................. 385
Figure 286. TCO Main Menu ............................................................................................................ 386
Figure 287. Provisioning Tool Connectivity ....................................................................................... 387
Figure 288. Provisioning Tool Connectivity ....................................................................................... 387
Figure 289. Provisioning Tool Screen (off-line working).................................................................... 388
Figure 290. Provisioning Tool Screen (direct connection to the NE)................................................. 388
Figure 291. Configuration Options Screen........................................................................................ 389
Figure 292. Core Configuration (Sheet 1 of 2).................................................................................. 390
Figure 293. Core Configuration (Sheet 2 of 2).................................................................................. 391
Figure 294. E1 Configuration ............................................................................................................ 392
Figure 295. Radio Provisioning (without Adaptive Modulation) ........................................................ 393
Figure 296. Radio Provisioning (with Adaptive Modulation) ............................................................. 394
Figure 297. Synchronization Configuration....................................................................................... 395
Figure 298. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 1 of 6) ........................................................... 396

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10/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 List of Figures
Figure 299. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 2 of 6) ........................................................... 397
Figure 300. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 3 of 6) ........................................................... 398
Figure 301. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 4 of 6) ........................................................... 399
Figure 302. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 5 of 6) ........................................................... 400
Figure 303. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 6 of 6) ........................................................... 401
Figure 304. Network Configuration ................................................................................................... 402
Figure 305. Trusted Managers screen .............................................................................................. 403
Figure 306. Typical Report Panel...................................................................................................... 404
Figure 307. Relative positions of stations A and B ........................................................................... 429
Figure 308. ODU(s) alarm status ...................................................................................................... 434
Figure 309. Transmit power check.................................................................................................... 435
Figure 310. Received power check................................................................................................... 436
Figure 311. Power measurements .................................................................................................... 437
Figure 312. Received power details.................................................................................................. 437
Figure 313. IF Cable loopback.......................................................................................................... 444
Figure 314. Loopback control in the CT............................................................................................ 445
Figure 315. Protection command (Main)........................................................................................... 446
Figure 316. Protection command (Spare) ......................................................................................... 446
Figure 317. Test bench for tributary functionality check .................................................................... 448
Figure 318. Tributary alarm status monitoring .................................................................................. 449
Figure 319. Test bench for hop stability test ..................................................................................... 451
Figure 320. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with 1
additional PC and 1 Ethernet cable .............................................................................. 453
Figure 321. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with 2 additional PCs ..... 454
Figure 322. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with
2 Ethernet Data Analyzers ............................................................................................ 455

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12/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 List of Figures
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1. Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Static Modulation) ........................... 37
Table 2. Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Adaptive Modulation)...................... 37
Table 3. ODU Characteristics............................................................................................................ 70
Table 4. RSSI Table .......................................................................................................................... 71
Table 5. Waveguide Flange Data ...................................................................................................... 72
Table 6. Command priority list........................................................................................................... 177
Table 7. Command priority list........................................................................................................... 178
Table 8. Command priority list........................................................................................................... 179
Table 9. Waveguide Flange Data ...................................................................................................... 257
Table 10. Pin Function: Tributaries 1-16 ........................................................................................... 313
Table 11. Pin Function: Tributaries 17-32.......................................................................................... 314
Table 12. Modem Profiles In Adaptive Modulation............................................................................ 367
Table 13. Alarm Matrix ...................................................................................................................... 408
Table 14. Troubleshooting Ethernet Problems ................................................................................. 415
Table 15. TMN Network Troubleshooting ........................................................................................ 416
Table 16. Test and commissioning instruments ................................................................................ 428

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9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0 User Guide
14/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 List of Tables
PREFACE

Preliminary Information
WARRANTY

Any warranty must be referred exclusively to the terms of the contract of sale of the equipment to
which this handbook refers to.

AlcatelLucent makes no warranty of any kind with regards to this manual, and specifically disclaims
the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. AlcatelLucent will not
be liable for errors contained herein or for damages, whether direct, indirect, consequential, inci-
dental, or special, in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.

INFORMATION

The product specification and/or performance levels contained in this document are for information
purposes only and are subject to change without notice. They do not represent any obligation on the
part of AlcatelLucent.

COPYRIGHT NOTIFICATION

The technical information of this manual is the property of AlcatelLucent and must not be copied,
reproduced or disclosed to a third party without written consent.

SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS

The safety recommendations here below must be considered to avoid injuries on persons and/or
damage to the equipment:

1) Service Personnel
Installation and service must be carried out by authorized persons having appropriate technical
training and experience necessary to be aware of hazardous operations during installation and
service, so as to prevent any personal injury or danger to other persons, as well as prevent-
damaging the equipment.

2) Access to the Equipment


Access to the Equipment in use must be restricted to Service Personnel only.

3) Safety Rules
Recommended safety rules are indicated in Chapter 1 from page 21.

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Preface 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 15/464
Local safety regulations must be used if mandatory. Safety instructions in this handbook should
be used in addition to the local safety regulations. In case of conflict between safety instructions
stated in this manual and those indicated in local regulations, mandatory local norms will pre-
vail. Should not local regulations be mandatory, then safety rules stated in this manual will pre-
vail.

SERVICE PERSONNEL SKILL

Service Personnel must have an adequate technical background on telecommunications and in par-
ticular on the equipment subject of this handbook.

An adequate background is required to properly install, operate and maintain equipment. The fact
of merely reading this handbook is considered as not enough.

Applicability
This handbook applies to the following productrelease:

PRODUCT

9500 MPR-E

PRODUCT RELEASE

9500 MPR-E 1.2.0

Scope
This document aims to describe the hardware and software functionalities of the 9500 MPR-E.

This document is intended to the technicians involved in Planning, in Operation and Maintenance and in
Commissioning of the 9500 MPR-E.

History

ISSUE DATE DESCRIPTIONS

01 February 2009

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16/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Preface
Handbook Structure
This handbook has been edited according to the Alcatel standardized drawing-up guides" complying with
such suggestion.

This handbook is divided into the main topics described in the table of contents:

PREFACE It contains general information as preliminary information, hand-


book scope, history. Furthermore, it describes the handbook struc-
ture and the customer documentation.

SAFETY This section includes all the safety instructions.

PRODUCT INFORMATION This section provides the equipment description (at system, MSS
AND PLANNING and ODU levels), introduces the basic information regarding the
9500 MPR-E Rel.1.2 HW architecture, and gives its technical char-
acteristics.

NE MANAGEMENT BY This section gives the description and use of the SW tools available
SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS for the NE management.

INSTALLATION This section provides whole information regarding Equipment hard-


ware installation, according to AlcatelLucent WTD LAB. rules.
Moreover, it contains the whole operative information on:
provisioning of equipment items (P/Ns, equipping rules)
their physical position in the system
unit assembly and front panel drawings, with the description
on the access point usage (connectors, visual indicators, but-
tons).
This section provides also the whole operative instructions for the
preparation of the Craft Terminal for the LineUp and Commission-
ing of the two NEs making up the radio link.

PROVISIONING This section gives all the instructions to provision (to configure) the
NE.

MAINTENANCE AND This section contains the whole logical and operative information for
TROUBLE-CLEARING the equipment maintenance and system upgrade.

LINE-UP AND This section provides all the instructions for the line-up and com-
COMMISSIONING missioning of the NE.

ABBREVIATIONS The abbreviation list is supplied.

CUSTOMER DOCUMENTA- It contains info regarding customer opinions collection about this
TION FEEDBACK documentation.

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Preface 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 17/464
General on Alcatel-Lucent Customer Documentation
This paragraph describes in general the AlcatelLucent Customer Documentation system, details the
association between the product levels and the associated documentation, and explains Customer Doc-
umentation characteristics as well as the policies for its delivery and updating.

CustomerIndependent Standard Customer Documentation

a) Definition
Standard Customer Documentation, referred to hereafter, must be always meant as plantindepen-
dent and is always independent of any Customization.
Plantdependent and/or Customized documentation, if envisaged by the contract, is subjected to
commercial criteria as far as contents, formats and supply conditions are concerned.
N.B. Plantdependent and Customized documentation is not described here.

b) Aims of standard Customer Documentation


Standard system, hardware and software documentation is meant to give the Customer personnel
the possibility and the information necessary for installing, commissioning, operating, and maintain-
ing the equipment according to AlcatelLucent Laboratory design and Installation Dept. choices. In
particular:
the contents of the chapters associated to the software applications focus on the explanation
of the manmachine interface and of the operating procedures allowed by it;
maintenance is described down to faulty PCB location and replacement.
N.B. No supply to Customers of design documentation (like PCB hardware design andproduction
documents and files, software source programs, programming tools, etc.) is envisaged.

Product levels and associated Customer Documentation

a) Products
A product is defined by the network hierarchical level where it can be inserted and by the whole
of performances and services that it is meant for.
E.g. 9500 MPR-E is a product.

b) Product-releases
A product evolves through successive productreleases, which are the real products marketed
for their delivery at a certain productrelease availability date. A certain productrelease performs
more functionalities than the previous one.
E.g. Rel.1.0 and Rel.2.0 are two successive productreleases of the same product.
A productrelease comprehends a set of hardware components and at least one Software Pack-
age (SWP); as a whole, they identify the possible network applications and the equipment perfor-
mances that the specific productrelease has been designed, engineered, and marketed for.

c) Configurations and Network Elements


In some cases, a productrelease includes different possible configurations which are distin-
guished from one another by different Network Element (NE) types and, from the management
point of view, by different SWPs.

d) SWP releases, versions, and CDROMs


Each SWP is distributed by means of a specific SWP CDROM.
A SWP is identified by its Denomination, P/N (Part Number) and CS (Change Status), that
are printed on the CDROMs label:
the first and second digits of the Denomination (e.g. 2.0) correspond to the HW product
release number;
the third digit of the of the Denomination (e.g. 2.0.2) identifies the Version Level of the
SWP.

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18/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Preface
A SWP with new Version Level, providing main features in addition to those of the previous Ver-
sion Level SWP, is distributed by means of a SWP CDROM having new Denomination,P/
N (Part Number), and CS restarting from 01
A SWP patch version, if any, is created to correct SW bugs, and/or to add minor features, andis
distributed by means of a SWP CDROM, that can be identified:
by the same P/N of the former CDROM, but with an incremented CS number
(e.g.CS=02 instead of previous CS=01)
or by a new P/N, and CS restarting from 01.

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9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0 User Guide
20/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Preface
1 Safety

1.1 EMC-EMF-ESD Norms and Equipment Labeling


This section describes the equipment labeling and the norms mandatory or suggested that must be con-
sidered to avoid injuries on persons and/or damage to the equipment.

Safety Rules

Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC norms)

Equipment protection against electrostatic discharges

Cautions to avoid equipment damage

1.1.1 Safety Rules

1.1.1.1 General Rules

Before carrying out any installation, turn-on, tests or operation and maintenance operations, read carefully
the related sections of this Manual, in particular:

Hardware Installation

Commissioning

Maintenance and Upgrade

Observe safety rules

When equipment is operating nobody is allowed to have access inside on the equipment parts which
are protected with Cover Plate Shields removable with tools.

In case of absolute need to have access inside, on the equipment parts when it is operating this is
allowed exclusively to service personnel, where for Service Personnel or Technical assistance is
meant :
"personnel which has adequate Technical Knowledge and experience necessary to be aware
of the danger that he might find in carrying out an operation and of the necessary measure-
ments to reduce danger to minimum for him and for others".
The Service Personnel can only replace the faulty units with spare parts.
The Service Personnel is not allowed to repair: hence the access to the parts no specified is
not permitted.
The keys and/or the tools used to open doors, hinged covers to remove parts which give access
to compartments in which are present high dangerous voltages must belong exclusively to the
service personnel.

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Safety 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 21/464
For the eventual cleaning of the external parts of the equipment, absolutely do not use any inflam-
mable substance or substances which in some way may alter the markings, inscriptions ect.

It is recommended to use a slightly wet cleaning cloth.

The Safety Rules stated in the handbook describe the operations and/or precautions to observe to safe-
guard service personnel during the working phases and to guarantee equipment safety, i.e., not exposing
persons, animals, things to the risk of being injured/damaged.

Whenever the safety protection features have been impaired, REMOVE POWER.

To cut off power proceed to switch off the power supply units as well as cut off power station upstream
(rack or station distribution frame).

The safety rules described in this handbook are distinguished by the following symbol and statement:

1.1.1.2 Labels Indicating Danger, Forbiddance, Command

It is of utmost importance to follow the instructions printed on the labels affixed to the units and assemblies.

dangerous electrical voltages

harmful optical signals

risk of explosion

moving mechanical parts

heat-radiating Mechanical Parts

microwave radiations

Pay attention to the information stated in the following, and proceed as instructed.

Note

The symbols presented in following paragraphs are all the possible symbols that could be present on Alca-
tel-Lucent equipment, but are not all necessarily present on the equipment this handbook refers to.

Dangerous Electrical Voltages

[1] Labeling

The following warning label is affixed next to dangerous voltages (>42.4 Vp; >60 Vdc).

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22/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Safety
If it is a Class 1 equipment connected to mains, then the label associated to it will state that the equip-
ment will have to be grounded before connecting it to the power supply voltage, e.g.:

[2] Safety instructions

DANGER! Possibility of personal injury:

Carefully observe the specific procedures for installation / turn-up and commissioning / maintenance
of equipment parts where D.C. power is present, described in the relevant installation / turn-up and
commissioning / maintenance documents and the following general rules:

Personal injury can be caused by -48VDC. Avoid touching powered terminals with any exposed
part of your body.

Short circuiting, low-voltage, low-impedance, DC circuits can cause severe arcing that can
result in burns and/or eye damage. Remove rings, watches, and other metal jewelry before
working with primary circuits. Exercise caution to avoid shorting power input terminals.

Risks of Explosions: labeling and safety instructions

This risk is present when batteries are used, and it is signaled by the following label:

Therefore, slits or apertures are made to let air circulate freely and allow dangerous gasses to down flow
(battery-emitted hydrogen). A 417-IEC-5641 Norm. compliant label is affixed next to it indicating that the
openings must not be covered up.

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Safety 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 23/464
Moving Mechanical Parts: labeling and safety instructions

The following warning label is affixed next to fans or other moving mechanical parts:

Before carrying out any maintenance operation see that all the moving mechanical parts have been
stopped.

Equipment connection to earth

Terminals for equipment connection to earth , to be done according to international safety standards, are
pointed out by the suitable symbol:

The position of earth connection terminals is specified in the Hardware Installation section.

Heat-radiating Mechanical Parts: labeling and safety instructions

The presence of heat-radiating mechanical parts is indicated by the following warning label in compliancy
with IEC 417 Norm, Fig.5041:

DANGER! Possibility of personal injury:

Carefully observe the specific procedures for installation / turn-up and commissioning / maintenance of
equipment parts where heat-radiating mechanical parts are present, described in the relevant installation
/ turn-up and commissioning / maintenance documents and the following general rule:

Personal injury can be caused by heat. Avoid touching powered terminals with any exposed part of your
body.

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24/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Safety
Optical safety

The equipment contains Class 1 laser component according to IEC 60825-1 (par. 5).

CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT

The laser source is placed in the optional SFP plug-in, which has to be installed in the Core unit. The laser
source is placed in the left side of the SFP plug-in.

According to the IEC 60825-1 the explanatory label is not sticked on the equipment due to the lack of
space.

Microwave radiations (EMF norms)

Equipment emitting RF power (Reminder from site preparation procedure):

The site must be compliant with ICNIRP guidelines or local regulation if more restrictive.

The following rules should be strictly applied by Customer:

Non authorized persons should not enter the compliance boundaries, if any, for the general public.

Compliance RF boundaries, if any, related to Electro Magnetic Field exposure must be marked.

Workers should be allowed to switch-off the power if they have to operate inside compliance bound-
aries.

Assure good cable connection.

Install the antenna as high as possible from floor or area with public access ( if possible the cylinder
delimitating the compliance boundaries, if any, or the cylinder corresponding to the transmission
area directly in front of antenna with the same diameter as the antenna, more than 2 meters high).

Install the antenna as far as possible from other existing equipment emitting RF power.

Anyway remind that someone standing in front of the 9500 MPR-E antenna may cause traffic shutdown.

Place the relevant stickers:

EMF emission warning sign

On the site when applicable (when people can cross the compliance boundaries and/or the transmission
area of the antenna, i.e. roof top installation)

Warning label "Do not stand on the antenna axis"

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Safety 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 25/464
On the mast (front side)

EMF emission warning sign (Yellow and black) to be placed at bottom of antenna, visible by some-
one moving in front of the antenna (roof top installation)

On the antenna (rear side)

EMF emission warning sign, placed on the antenna.

Compliance boundaries for 9500 MPR-E transceivers with 1ft (30 cm) antenna:

Compliance boundaries

Modulation Worst configuration A (m) B (m)

4 QAM 1+0 with integrated antenna (13 GHz 1 ft. SP integrated antenna) 0,4 2,63

4 QAM 1+0 with integrated antenna (15 GHz 1 ft. SP integrated antenna) 0,4 0,55

4 QAM 1+0 with integrated antenna (18 GHz 1 ft. SP integrated antenna) 0,4 0,71

Antenna configurations:

a) 1+0 with 1ft. integrated antenna

b) 1+1 HSB with coupler and 1ft. integrated antenna

c) Configuration with separated 1 ft. antenna

1.1.2 Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC norms)


The equipment's EMC norms depend on the type of installation being carried out (cable termination,
grounding etc.,) and on the operating conditions (equipment, setting options of the electrical/electronic
units, presence of dummy covers, etc.).

Before carrying out any installation, turn-on, tests & operation and maintenance operations, read carefully
the related sections of this Manual, in particular:

Hardware Installation

Maintenance and Upgrade

The norms set down to guarantee EMC compatibility, are distinguished inside this Manual by the symbol
and term:

EMC Norms

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26/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Safety
[1] EMC General Norms - Installation

All connections (towards the external source of the equipment) made with shielded cables use
only cables and connectors suggested in this Manual or in the relevant Plant Documentation,
or those specified in the Customer's "Installation Norms" (or similar documents)

Shielded cables must be suitably terminated

Install filters outside the equipment as required

Ground connect the equipment utilizing a conductor with proper diameter and impedance

Mount shields (if utilized), previously positioned during the installation phase, but not before
having cleaned and degrease it.

Before inserting the shielded unit proceed to clean and degrease all peripheral surfaces (con-
tact springs and connection points, etc.)

Screw fasten the units to the subrack.

To correctly install EMC compatible equipment follow the instructions given.

[2] EMC General Norms - Turn-on, Tests & Operation

Preset the electrical units as required to guarantee EMC compatibility

Check that the equipment is operating with all the shields properly positioned (dummy covers,
ESD connector protections, etc.)

To properly use EMC compatible equipment observe the information given

[3] EMC General Norms - Maintenance

Before inserting the shielded unit, which will replace the faulty or modified unit, proceed to clean
and degrease all peripheral surfaces (contact springs and connection points, etc.)

Clean the dummy covers of the spare units as well.

Screw fasten the units to the subrack.

1.1.3 Equipment protection against electrostatic discharges

Before removing the ESD protections from the monitors, connectors etc., observe the precautionary mea-
sures stated. Make sure that the ESD protections have been replaced and after having terminated the
maintenance and monitoring operations.

Most electronic devices are sensitive to electrostatic discharges, to this concern the following warning
labels have been affixed:

Observe the precautionary measures stated when having to touch the electronic parts during the instal-
lation/maintenance phases.

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Safety 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 27/464
Workers are supplied with anti static protection devices consisting of:

an elasticized band worn around the wrist

a coiled cord connected to the elasticized band and to the stud on the subrack

1.1.4 Cautions to avoid equipment damage


a. Anti static protection device kit

Whenever is necessary to handle spare parts and cards out of their own box, this kit (Illustration
below) must be always warn and its termination must be connected to a grounded structure, to avoid
the possible damage of the electronic devices for electrostatic discharges.

Anti static protection device kit

b. Screw fixing

In normal operation conditions, all screws (for unit box closing, cable fixing, etc.) must be always
tightened to avoid item detachment and to ensure the equipment EMI-EMC performance.

The screw tightening torque must be:

2.8 kg x cm (0.28 Newton x m) 10 %

2.4317 in lb (0.2026 ft lb) 10 %

Exceeding this value may result in screw breaking.

c. MSS-ODU cable disconnection / connection

Before to disconnect or connect the MSS-ODU cable (at MSS or ODU side) switch off the corre-
sponding MSS Unit.

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2 Product information and planning
Purpose and Function (par. 2.1 on page 30)
Innovative solutions (par. 2.1.1 on page 30)
Description (par. 2.1.2 on page 32)
MSS Purpose, Function and Description (par. 2.1.3 on page 33)
ODU V2 (par. 2.1.4 on page 35)
MSS-ODU cable (Interfaces and Traffic) (par. 2.1.5 on page 36)
Antennas (par. 2.1.6 on page 36)

Radio capacity, channelling and modulation (par. 2.2 on page 37)

Standard Features (par. 2.3 on page 38)

Radio Configurations (par. 2.4 on page 38)

System Configurations (par. 2.5 on page 39)

Environmental and Electrical Characteristics (par. 2.6 on page 42)


Outdoor Units (6 to 15 GHz) (par. 2.6.1 on page 42)
Outdoor Units (18 to 38 GHz) (par. 2.6.2 on page 44)
System Parameters (par. 2.6.3 on page 46)

Parts Lists (par. 2.7 on page 49)

Functional description (par. 2.8 on page 63)


MSS (Indoor Unit) (par. 2.8.1 on page 63)
Power distribution (par. 2.8.1.1 on page 63)
ODU (par. 2.8.2 on page 69)
Protection schemes (par. 2.8.3 on page 73)
Radio Transmission Features (par. 2.8.4 on page 74)
TMN communication channels (par. 2.8.5 on page 77)
Traffic profiles (par. 2.8.6 on page 78)
Quality Of Services (QoS) (par. 2.8.7 on page 82)
Cross-connection (par. 2.8.8 on page 85)
Synchronization for PDH/DATA (par. 2.8.9 on page 86)

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 29/464
2.1 Purpose and Function
The 9500 Microwave Packet Radio (MPR) is a microwave digital radio that supports both PDH and packet
data (Ethernet) for migrating from TDM to IP. The 9500 MPR-E provides a generic, modular IP platform
for multiple network applications (including 2G/3G/HSDPA/WiMAX backhauling to Metro Ethernet areas)
to accommodate broadband services. The 9500 MPR-E radio family supports low, medium, and high
capacity applications using European and North American (US and Canada) data rates, frequencies,
channel plans, and tributary interfaces.

TDM/PDH Data Rates: E1

Ethernet Data Speed: 10, 100, 1000 Mb/s

RF Frequency Range: 6 to 38 GHz

2.1.1 Innovative solutions


The 9500 MPR-E innovative solutions mainly are:

[1] Multiservice aggregation layer: the capacity to use Ethernet as a common transmission layer to
transport any kind of traffic, independently by the type of interface. Ethernet becomes the conver-
gence layer.

[2] Service awareness: traffic handling and quality management, queuing traffic according to the type
of service assigned, independently by the type of interface

[3] Packet node: no service aggregation limits with all traffic aggregated in packets, in term of: capacity,
type of service requirements and type of interface

[4] Service-driven adaptive modulation: fully exploit the air bandwidth in its entirety by changing mod-
ulation scheme according to the propagation availability and allocate transport capacity, discrimi-
nating traffic by different services, only possible in a packet-based environment.

[1] Multiservice aggregation layer

Access network Packet Backhaul network


Any TDM/Ethernet interfaces Ethernet aggregation layer
nxE1 9500 MPR
GSM Aggregated traffic
2G over Ethernet

ISAM,
WiMAX

Ethernet

3G HSDPA
Voice on R99
nxE1

Single technology throughout the network: Ethernet as convergence layer

Figure 1. Multiservice Aggregation Layer

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9500 MPR-E aggregates and carries over a COMMON PACKET LAYER: TDM 2G, 3G and IP/Ethernet.
This allows sharing of common packet transmission infrastructures, regardless of the nature of carried
traffic.

Due to the nature of Ethernet, each service can be discriminated based on several parameters like quality
of service.

Mapping different access technologies over Ethernet is achieved by standardized protocols like circuit
emulation and pseudo-wire.

[2] Service awareness

SERVICE CLASSIFICATION: Voice, Broadband


INPUTS : Any interfaces (E1, Ethernet)
PACKETIZATION PROCESSING:
TDM Standard CEoEth [MEF8]
Ethernet Native

Constant bit rate services


High Priority Queue;
Revenue based on real-time
Guaranteed bit rate communication
Voice, Video Telephony
Variable bit rate services
Low Priority Queue; Revenue based on access
Remaining bit rate to contents
HiSpeed @, VideoD & Gaming

SERVICE AGGREGATION and OVERBOOKING: SERVICE QUALITY MANAGEMENT:


Service aggregation using statistical Service scheduler queuing packets according to
multiplexing, obtaining dramatic band the quality of service assigned.
reduction HIGH for real-time traffic, LOW for Broadband
Decoupling access technology from transport technology: manage services

Figure 2. Service Awareness

Service awareness means the ability to discriminate the different traffic types carried over the converged
Ethernet stream. The traffic flow can be composed by E1s and/or IP/Eth, coming from different sources,
and therefore having different requirements.

Service awareness is what allows identifying the traffic types, and in case of the non real time variable
bit rate one, optimize the band with overbooking of the radio scarce resource.

[3] Packet node

Address new data services in the best way: packet natively

Figure 3. Packet Node

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 31/464
9500 MPR-E offers a SINGLE PACKET MATRIX able to switch, aggregate and handle any of the possible
incoming traffic types with virtually no capacity limits (up to 10 GBps).

[4] Service-driven adaptive modulation

Modulation
schemes

64 QAM

Satisfaction
99.9

Capacity
16 QAM
99.99
4 QAM 99.999
9500 MPR
Time line Outage Customer unavailability
Satisfaction
Capacity

14 MHz 16 Mb/s in standard 4 QAM at


99.999% availability
14 MHz 46.9 Mb/s average capacity with
adaptive modulation (48 Mb/s peak) Voice Traffic Best Effort Traffic

Maintain the same level of quality for voice services as in the TDM network

Figure 4. Service-driven Packet Adaptive Modulation

9500 MPR-E allows to fully exploit the air bandwidth in its entirety by changing modulation scheme
according to the propagation availability, associating to the different services quality the available
transport capacity.

2.1.2 Description
The 9500 MPR-E consists of a Microwave Service Switch (MSS) and Outdoor Unit (ODU).

Figure 5. Naming Convention

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MSS and ODU are connected with a single standard coaxial cable.

2.1.3 MSS Purpose, Function and Description


The MSS shelf houses the indoor cards. It is available in two versions:

MSS-8

MSS-4

The MSS provides cross-connection, port aggregation, switching, and equipment management.

The MSS self consists of card cage and backplane in which mounts access and radio peripheral and core
control plug-in cards (see Figure 6. and Figure 7.).

Main Core Spare Core


module module

Transport Transport
module module
FANS
Transport Transport module
module module

Transport Transport
module module

Figure 6. MSS-8 shelf

Main Core Spare Core


module module
FANS
Transport Transport module
module module

Figure 7. MSS-4 shelf

The Core modules provide five Ethernet user interfaces, the local CT interface and the local debug
interface.
The Main Core and the Spare Core modules have a different role.

The Main Core is always provided (Core in 1+0 configuration). It performs key node management and
control functions, and provides various dc rails from the -48 Vdc input. It also incorporates a plug-in flash
card, which holds node configuration and license data.

The Main Core also includes the cross-connection matrix, which implements all the cross-connections
between the Transport modules, between the Ethernet user ports and between the Ethernet user ports
and the Transport modules. The matrix is a standard Ethernet switch, based on VLAN, assigned by the
LCT.

The Spare Core is an optional unit to provide aggregated traffic protection and control platform protection.

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 33/464
The following Transport modules are supported:

TDM 32E1/DS1 local access module: provides the external interfaces for up to 32xE1 tributaries,
manages the encapsulation/reconstruction of PDH data to/from standard Ethernet packets and
sends/receives standard Ethernet packets to/from both Core modules; it contains the switch for the
EPS Core protection and the DC/DC converter unit.

ODU 300 Radio Interface module: sends/receives standard Ethernet packets to/from both Core
modules, manages the radio frame (on Ethernet packet form) generation/termination, the interface
to/from the alternate Radio module (for RPS management), the cable interface functions to ODU;
it contains the logic for the EPS Core protection, the RPS logic and the DC/DC converter unit.

For each radio direction, one radio interface module in the MSS and one associated ODU has to be
provisioned in case of 1+0 radio configuration. Two radio interface modules and two associated ODUs
have to be provisioned in case of 1+1 radio configurations.

According to the transport modules installed different configurations can be implemented.

A simplified block diagram of the MSS is shown in Figure 8. for MSS-8 and in Figure 9. for MSS-4.

CORE MODULE

TRANSPORT Flash
PSU Controller
MODULE RAM
TRANSPORT
MODULE
TRANSPORT
MODULE
1 GbEth
TRANSPORT
MODULE
ETHERNET
TRANSPORT
SWITCH
MODULE
TRANSPORT
MODULE
LIU

4x10/100/1000
Ethernet ports

Figure 8. MSS-8 block diagram

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CORE MODULE

TRANSPORT Flash
PSU Controller
MODULE RAM
TRANSPORT
MODULE

1 GbEth

ETHERNET
SWITCH

LIU

4x10/100/1000
Ethernet ports

Figure 9. MSS-4 block diagram

2.1.4 ODU V2
The ODU V2 (ODU) is a microprocessor controlled transceiver that interfaces the MSS with the antenna.

Transmitter circuits in the ODU consists of cable interface, modulator, local oscillator, upconverter/mixer,
power amplifier, and diplexer.

Receive circuits consist of diplexer, low-noise amplifier, local oscillator, downconverter/mixer, automatic
gain control, and cable interface.

The microprocessor manages ODU frequency, transmit power alarming, and performance monitoring.
Power is provided by -48Vdc from the MSS to the ODU DC-DC converter.
The ODU is frequency dependent.

Figure 10. ODU V2

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 35/464
2.1.5 MSS-ODU cable (Interfaces and Traffic)
A single 50 ohm coaxial cable connects a ODU300 Radio Interface to its ODU. The max. cable length
is up to 150 m. The ODU cable is provided within a cable kit, which includes cable ties, cable ground kits,
and type N crimp connectors.

At the ODU end it connects to a lightning surge suppressor, which is fastened directly to the ODU
connector.

The ODU cable carries DC power (-48 Vdc) for the ODU and five signals:

Tx telemetry

Reference signal to synchronize the ODU IQ Mod/Demod oscillator

311 MHz IQ modulated signal from the ODU300 Radio Interface (transmit IF)

Rx telemetry

126 MHz IQ modulated signals from the ODU (receive IF)

Signal extracting and merging is carried out in N-Plexers within the ODU300 Radio Interface and ODU.

2.1.6 Antennas
Antennas for direct mounting an ODU are available in diameters from 0.3 m to 1.8 m, depending on the
frequency band.

A polarization rotator is included within the antenna collar, and direct-mounting equal or unequal loss
couplers are available for single antenna protected operation.

Antenna mounts are designed for use on industry-standard 115 mm OD pipe-mounts.

An ODU can also be used with standard antennas via a remote-mount kit and flexible waveguide.

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2.2 Radio capacity, channelling and modulation

Channel Spacing Modulation E1 Equivalent Capacity (TDM2TDM)

4 QAM 4 E1

7 MHz 16 QAM 8 E1

64 QAM 13 E1

4 QAM 8 E1

14 MHz 16 QAM 18 E1

64 QAM 27 E1

4 QAM 18 E1

16 QAM 37 E1

28 MHz 32 QAM 48 E1

64 QAM 56 E1

128 QAM 68 E1

56 MHz 128 QAM 136 E1

Table 1. Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Static Modulation)

ChannellingSpacing Modulation Equivalent capacity E1 (Note)

4 QAM 18 E1

28 MHz 16 QAM 37 E1

64 QAM 56 E1

4 QAM 8 E1

14 MHz 16 QAM 18 E1

64 QAM 27 E1

4 QAM 4 E1

7 MHz 16 QAM 8 E1

64 QAM 13 E1

Table 2. Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Adaptive Modulation)

Note

The total capacity associated to the TDM2TDM and TDM2Eth profiles is always
the capacity relevant to the lowest modulation scheme (4 QAM if the Adaptive Modulation
is in the 4/16/64 QAM range and 4 QAM if the Adaptive Modulation is in the 4/16 QAM range).

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2.3 Standard Features
More radio and site scalability and flexibility for installation teams:

Limited need for factory presetting channel frequency or bandwidth

Interchangeable hardware units

Supports cellular mobile networks, and microcellular network back and common carrier, private
carrier and data networks, and utility haul applications.

2G, 2.5G, and 3G network compatible

Intelligent indoor nodal unit that supports up to six outdoor units

Universal ODU that is capacity and modulation independent

Flexible aggregate capacity sharing between E1 and Ethernet

Adaptive packet transport that improves performance for priority services

Output power agility

ATPC

Adaptive Modulation

Packet-based internal cross-connect

TDM MEF8 encapsulation

Electrical and optical GE interfaces

Software-based configuration

Multiservice Switching Capacity greater than 10Gb/s

Radio throughput greater than 2Gb/s

Termination of 192xE1 in circuit emulation

No single point of failure

2.4 Radio Configurations


1+0

1+1 Hot-Standby (HS) (unbalanced coupler: 1.5/6.5dB)

1+1 Hot-Standby Space Diversity (HSSD) (no combiner)

1+1 Frequency Diversity (FD) (homo-polar)

1+1 Frequency Diversity (FD) (hetero-polar)

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2.5 Typical System Configurations
TDM Over Ethernet Packet Node - Mapping of 32 E1 on Ethernet (Figure 11.)

TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Transport - 32 E1 Access, 1 Radio Direction (Figure 12.)

TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop N1 Packet Node - Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 1 Back Link, 1
Haul Link (Figure 13.)

TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 2 Back Links (Figure
14.)

TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 2 Haul Links and 1
back Link (Figure 15.)

TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop NN Packet Node - Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 2 Haul Links and
2 back Links (Figure 16.)

Figure 11. TDM Over Ethernet Packet Node - Mapping of 32 E1 on Ethernet

Figure 12. TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Transport 32 E1 Access, 1 Radio Direction

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 39/464
Figure 13. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop N1 Packed Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 1 Back
Link, 1 Haul Link

Figure 14. TDM and Ethernet Terminal Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 2 Back Links

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Figure 15. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop Packet Node-Ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 1 back Link
and 2 Haul Links

Figure 16. TDM and Ethernet Add/Drop NN Packet Node-ethernet and 32 E1 Local Access, 2 Haul
Links and 2 Back Links

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 41/464
2.6 Environmental & Electrical Characteristics
Outdoor Units (6 to 15 GHz) (par. 2.6.1)

Outdoor Units (18 to 38 GHz) (par. 2.6.2)

System Parameters (par. 2.6.3)

2.6.1 Outdoor Units (6 to 15 GHz)

L6/U6 7 GHz 8 GHz 10 GHz 11 GHz 13 GHz 15 GHz


GHz

System

Frequency 5.925 - 7.125 - 7.725 - 10.0- 10.7 - 12.75 - 14.4 -


Range, GHz 6.425 7.9 8.5 10.68 11.7 13.25 15.35
6.425 -
7.11

T-R Spacings 252.04, 154, 119, 126, 91, 490, 530 266 315,
supported MHz 340 161, 151.614, 230,143. 420,
168, 266, 5, 350 490,
196, 245 311.32 644,
728

Maximum Tuning 56 56 140 165 165 84 245


Range
(dependent upon
T-R spacing),
MHz

Antenna
Interface

Waveguide Type R70 R84 (WR R84 (WR R100 R100 R120 R140
(WR137) 112) 112) (WR90) (WR90) (WR75) (WR62)

Flange Type UDR70 UDR84 UDR84 UDR100 UDR100 UBR120 UBR140

Mating Flange PDR70 PDR84 PDR84 PDR100 PDR100 PBR120 PBR140


Type or or or or or or or
CDR70 CDR84 CDR84 CDR100 CDR100 CDR120 CDR140

System Gain [1]

System Gain at 7 MHz QPSK 122.0 dB 122.0 dB 122.0 dB 119.0 dB 117.0 dB 116.0 dB 115.0 dB
10-6 BER

7 MHz 16 QAM 112.5 dB 112.5 dB 112.5 dB 109.5 dB 108.0 dB 107.0 dB 105.5 dB

7 MHz 64 QAM 105.0 dB 105.0 dB 105.0 dB 102.0 dB 100.5 dB 99.5 dB 98.0 dB

13.75 / QPSK 118.5 dB 118.5 dB 118.5 dB 115.5 dB 114.0 dB 113.0 dB 111.5 dB


14 MHz

13.75 / 16 QAM 110.0 dB 110.0 dB 110.0 dB 107.0 dB 105.0 dB 104.0 dB 102.5 dB


14 MHz

13.75 / 64 QAM 102.5 dB 102.5 dB 102.5 dB 99.5 dB 97.5 dB 96.5 dB 95.5 dB


14 MHz

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27.5 / 28 QPSK 115.5 dB 115.5 dB 115.5 dB 112.5 dB 111.0 dB 110.0 dB 108.5 dB
MHz

27.5 / 28 16 QAM 107.0 dB 107.0 dB 107.0 dB 104.0 dB 102.0 dB 101.0 dB 99.5 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 32 QAM 103.0 dB 103.0 dB 103.0 dB 100.0 dB 98.0 dB 97.0 dB 95.5 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 64 QAM 99.5 dB 99.5 dB 99.5 dB 96.5 dB 94.5 dB 93.5 dB 92.0 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 128 94.5 dB 94.5 dB 94.5 dB 91.5 dB 89.5 dB 88.5 dB 87.0 dB


MHz QAM

55 / 56 128
MHz QAM

Transmitter
Specifications

Power Output, QPSK 28.5 28.5 28.5 26.0 24.0 23.0 22.0
nominal dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

16 QAM 26.5 26.5 26.5 24.0 22.0 21.0 20.0


dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

32 QAM 26.0 26.0 26.0 23.5 21.5 20.5 19.5


dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

64 25.5 25.5 25.5 23.0 21.0 20.0 19.0


QAM[2] dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

128 24.5 24.5 24.5 22.0 20.0 19.0 18.0


QAM dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

Receiver
Specifications
[1]

Threshold at 10-6 7 MHz QPSK -93.5 -93.5 -93.5 -93.0 -93.0 -93.0 -93.0
BER dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

7 MHz 16 QAM -86.0 -86.0 -86.0 -85.5 -86.0 -86.0 -85.5


dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

7 MHz 64 QAM -79.5 -79.5 -79.5 -79.0 -79.5 -79.0 -79.0


dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

13.75 / QPSK -90.0 -90.0 -90.0 -89.5 -90.0 -90.0 -89.5


14 MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

13.75 / 16 QAM -83.5 -83.5 -83.5 -83.0 -83.0 -83.0 -82.5


14 MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

13.75 / 64 QAM -77.0 -77.0 -77.0 -76.5 -76.5 -76.5 -76.5


14 MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

27.5 / 28 QPSK -87.0 -87.0 -87.0 -86.5 -87.0 -87.0 -86.5


MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

27.5 / 28 16 QAM -80.5 -80.5 -80.5 -80.0 -80.0 -80.0 -79.5


MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

27.5 / 28 32 QAM -77.0 -77.0 -77.0 -76.5 -76.5 -76.5 -76.0


MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

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27.5 / 28 64 QAM -74.0 -74.0. -74.0 -73.5 -73.5 -73.5 -73.0
MHz dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

27.5 / 28 128 -70.0 -70.0 -70.0 -69.5 -69.5 -69.5 -69.0


MHz QAM dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm dBm

55 / 56 128
MHz QAM

All specifications are referenced to the ODU antenna flange, and are typical values unless otherwise
stated, and are subject to change without notice.

For Guaranteed values (over time and operational range) subtract 2 dB from Power Output, add 2dB to
Threshold values, and subtract 4dB from System Gain values.

[1] System Gain and Rx Threshold values are for BER=10-6. Values for BER=10-3 are improved by 1dB.

[2] 10 GHz Power Output and System Gain specifications are reduced by 1.5 dB and 3 dB respectively
for 91 MHz T-R option.

2.6.2 Outdoor Units (18 to 38 GHz)

18 GHz 23 GHz 26 GHz 28 GHz 38 GHz

System

Frequency Range, GHz 17.7 - 19.7 21.2 - 24.52 - 27.5 - 29.5 37.0 -
23.632 26.483 39.46

T-R Spacings supported 1010, 1008, 1008 1008 1260


MHz 1092.5 1200,
1232

Maximum Tuning Range 380 370 360 360 340


(dependent upon T-R
spacing), MHz

Antenna Interface

Waveguide Type R220 R220 R220 R320 R320


(WR42) (WR42) (WR42) (WR28) (WR28)

Flange Type UBR220 UBR220 UBR220 UBR320 UBR320

Mating Flange Type PBR220 PBR220 PBR220 PBR320 PBR320

System Gain [1]

System Gain at 10-6 7 MHz QPSK 112.0 dB 111.5 dB 106.5 dB 106.0 dB 108.0 dB
BER

7 MHz 16 QAM 103.0 dB 102.0 dB 97.0 dB 97.0 dB 98.5 dB

7 MHz 64 QAM 93.5 dB 94.5 dB 89.5 dB 89.0 dB 90.5 dB

13.75 / 14 QPSK 109.0 dB 108.0 dB 103.0 dB 103.0 dB 104.5 dB


MHz

13.75 / 14 16 QAM 100.0 dB 99.0 dB 94.0 dB 93.5 dB 95.0 dB


MHz

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13.75 / 14 64 QAM 92.5 dB 91.5 dB 86.5 dB 86.0 dB 87.5 dB
MHz

27.5 / 28 QPSK 106.0 dB 105.0 dB 100.0 dB 100.0 dB 101.5 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 16 QAM 97.0 dB 96.0 dB 91.0 dB 90.5 dB 92.0 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 32 QAM 93.0 dB 92.0 dB 87.0 dB 86.5 dB 88.0 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 64 QAM 89.5 dB 88.5 dB 83.5 dB 83.0 dB 84.5 dB


MHz

27.5 / 28 128 QAM 84.5 dB 83.5 dB 78.5 dB 78.0 dB 79.5 dB


MHz

55 / 56 128 QAM 80.0 dB 79.5 dB 74.5 dB 73.5 dB 75.0 dB


MHz

Transmitter
Specifications

Power Output, nominal QPSK 19.5 dBm 19.5 dBm 15.5 dBm 15.0 dBm 17.5 dBm

16 QAM 17.5 dBm 17.5 dBm 13.5 dBm 13.0 dBm 15.5 dBm

32 QAM 17.0 dBm 17.0 dBm 13.0 dBm 12.5 dBm 15.0 dBm

64 QAM[2] 16.5 dBm 16.5 dBm 12.5 dBm 12.0 dBm 14.5 dBm

128 QAM 15.5 dBm 15.5 dBm 11.5 dBm 11.0 dBm 13.5 dBm

Receiver
Specifications [1]

Threshold at 10-6 BER 7 MHz QPSK -92.5 dBm -92.0 dBm -91.0 dBm -91.0 dBm -90.5 dBm

7 MHz 16 QAM -85.5 dBm -84.5 dBm -83.5 dBm -84.0 dBm -83.0 dBm

7 MHz 16 QAM -79.0 dBm -78.0 dBm -77.0 dBm -77.0 dBm -76.0 dBm

13.75 / 14 QPSK -89.5 dBm -88.5 dBm -87.5 dBm -88.0 dBm -87.0 dBm
MHz

13.75 / 14 16 QAM -82.5 dBm -81.5 dBm -80.5 dBm -80.5 dBm -79.5 dBm
MHz

13.75 / 14 64 QAM -76.0 dBm -75.0 dBm -74.0 dBm -74.0 dBm -73.0 dBm
MHz

27.5 / 28 QPSK -86.5 dBm -85.5 dBm -84.5 dBm -85.0 dBm -84.0 dBm
MHz

27.5 / 28 16 QAM -79.5 dBm -78.5 dBm -77.5 dBm -77.5 dBm -76.5 dBm
MHz

27.5 / 28 32 QAM -76.0 dBm -75.0 dBm -74.0 dBm -74.0 dBm -73.0 dBm
MHz

27.5 / 28 64 QAM -73.0 dBm -72.0 dBm -71.0 dBm -71.0 dBm -70.0 dBm
MHz

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27.5 / 28 128 QAM -69.0 dBm -68.0 dBm -67.0 dBm -67.0 dBm -66.0 dBm
MHz

55 / 56 128 QAM -64.5 dBm -64. dBm -63. dBm -62.5 dBm -61.5 dBm
MHz

All specifications are referenced to the ODU antenna flange, and are typical values unless otherwise
stated, and are subject to change without notice.

For Guaranteed values (over time and operational range) subtract 2 dB from Power Output, add 2dB to
Threshold values, and subtract 4dB from System Gain values.

[1] System Gain and Rx Threshold values are for BER=10-6. Values for BER=10-3 are improved by 1dB.

[2] 10 GHz Power Output and System Gain specifications are reduced by 1.5 dB and 3 dB respectively
for 91 MHz T-R option.

2.6.3 System Parameters

General

Operating Frequency 6 - 38 GHz


Range

Capacity Range Options 18x, 37x, 48x, 68x, 136x E1


(E1)

Capacity Range Options 40, 80, 100, 150, 300 Mbit/s


(Ethernet)

Modulation Options 16, 32, 128 QAM

Error Correction FEC, Reed Solomon Decoding

Error Correction 24 tap T/2 equalizer

Radio Path Protection Options

Non Protected, 1+0

Protected Hot Standby,


1+1

Space Diversity, 1+1

Frequency Diversity, 1+1

Standards Compliance

EMC MSS-8 EN 301 489-1, EN 301 489-4


EN 55022 Class B)

Operation ODU300 ETS 300 019, Class 4.1

Operation MSS-8 ETS 300 019, Class 3.2

Storage ETS 300 019, Class 1.2

Transportation ETS 300 019, Class 2.3

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Safety IEC 60950-1/EN 60950-1

Radio Frequency EN 302 217 Classes 2, 4 & E5

Water Ingress ODU300 IEC 60529 (IPX6)

Environmental

Operating Temperature MSS-8 Guaranteed -5 to +55 C

ODU Guaranteed -33 to +55 C

Humidity MSS-8 Guaranteed 0 to 95%, non-condensing

ODU Guaranteed 0 to 100%

Fault and Configuration Management

Protocol SNMP

Interface, electrical Ethernet 10/100/1000 Base-T

Interface, electrical physical RJ-45

Interface, optical Ethernet 1000 Base-LX or


1000Base-SX

Interface, optical physical SFP

Local/remote Configuration and Support Craft Terminal


Tool

Routing Protocols supported Static and dynamic routing, OSPF

Network Management Alcatel-Lucent 1350 OMS

2.6.4 Minimizing Latency Latency contribution for a 9500 MPR-E Cloud

2.6.4.1 E1 to E1 Single Hop - TDM2TDM (Static Modulation)

TDM2TDM Delay [ms]

Mod Chan Min Typ Max

4QAM 7MHz 3,0 3,5 3,8

4QAM 14MHz 3,3 3,5 3,8

4QAM 28MHz 3,1 3,3 3,5

16QAM 7MHz 2,8 3,4 3,7

16QAM 14MHz 2,9

16QAM 28MHz 2,7

32QAM 28MHz 2,9

64QAM 7MHz 3,1 3,6 3,9

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64QAM 14MHz 3,2 3,5 3,7

64QAM 28MHz 2,9 3,3 3,5

128QAM 28MHz 2,8

128QAM 56MHz 2,6 3,1

2.6.4.2 Ethernet to Ethernet Single Hop (Static Modulation)

Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet


Delay Delay Delay
[ms] [ms] [ms]

Modem Profile ETH P2P Modem Profile ETH P2P Modem Profile ETH P2P
Frame Frame Frame

4QAM 7MHz 64 1,697 4QAM 7MHz 512 2,062 4QAM 7MHz 1024 2,495

4QAM 14MHz 64 0,872 4QAM 14MHz 512 1,061 4QAM 14MHz 1024 1,250

4QAM 28MHz 64 0,449 4QAM 28MHz 512 0,532 4QAM 28MHz 1024 0,637

16QAM 7MHz 64 0,874 16QAM 7MHz 512 1,042 16QAM 7MHz 1024 1,252

16QAM 14MHz 64 0,417 16QAM 14MHz 512 0,509 16QAM 14MHz 1024 0,616

16QAM 28MHz 64 0,208 16QAM 28MHz 512 0,258 16QAM 28MHz 1024 0,314

64QAM 7MHz 64 1,200 64QAM 7MHz 512 1,325 64QAM 7MHz 1024 1,458

64QAM 14MHz 64 0,606 64QAM 14MHz 512 0,668 64QAM 14MHz 1024 0,733

64QAM 28MHz 64 0,311 64QAM 28MHz 512 0,346 64QAM 28MHz 1024 0,379

16QAM 14MHz 64 0,417 16QAM 14MHz 512 0,509 16QAM 14MHz 1024 0,616

16QAM 28MHz 64 0,208 16QAM 28MHz 512 0,258 16QAM 28MHz 1024 0,314

128QAM 28MHz 64 0,255 128QAM 28MHz 512 0,287 128QAM 28MHz 1024 0,321

128QAM 56MHz 64 0,133 128QAM 56MHz 512 0,154 128QAM 56MHz 1024 0,174

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2.7 Parts Lists

APR Name APR Code Remarks

Core E Card 3DB18326ABXX

MSS-8 slot shelf 3DB18485AAXX

MSS-4 slot shelf 3DB18219ABXX

Fan Card 3DB18134BAXX To be used in MSS-8

FAN1 Module 3DB18218ACXX To be used in MSS-4

E1 Access Card 3DB18126ADXX

Modem 300 3DB18136ACXX To be used with 56 MHz


bandwidth (no adaptive
modulation)

Modem 300EN 3DB18538AAXX To be used with bandwidth up


to 28 MHz (with ot without
adaptive modulation)

Front plate 3DB18163ABXX

SPF plug-in 1000Base-Lx 1AB187280040 To be installed in the Core E card

SPF plug-in 1000Base-Sx 1AB187280045 To be installed in the Core E card

SFP 1000 SX 1AB383760001 To be installed in the Core E card

APR name License String APR Code

Flash Cards 1.2.0

MPR Memory L6TD-120 R/6Cap040 3DB18283ADAA

MPR Memory M1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap080 3DB18284ADAA

MPR Memory M2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap080 3DB18285ADAA

MPR Memory M6TD-120 R/6Cap080 3DB18501ADAA

MPR Memory H1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap100 3DB18286ADAA

MPR Memory H2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap100 3DB18287ADAA

MPR Memory H6TD-120 R/6Cap100 3DB18502ADAA

MPR Memory V1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap150 3DB18288ADAA

MPR Memory V2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap150 3DB18289ADAA

MPR Memory V6TD-120 R/6Cap150 3DB18489ADAA

MPR Memory E1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap300 3DB18290ADAA

MPR Memory E2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap300 3DB18291ADAA

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MPR Memory E6TD-120 R/6Cap300 3DB18490ADAA

MPR Memory L6SA-120 R/6Cap040/TDM2Eth 3DB18283BDAA

MPR Memory M1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap080/TDM2Eth 3DB18284BDAA

MPR Memory M2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap080/TDM2Eth 3DB18285BDAA

MPR Memory M6SA-120 R/6Cap080/TDM2Eth 3DB18501BDAA

MPR Memory H1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap100/TDM2Eth 3DB18286BDAA

MPR Memory H2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap100/TDM2Eth 3DB18287BDAA

MPR Memory H6SA-120 R/6Cap100/TDM2Eth 3DB18502BDAA

MPR Memory V1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap150/TDM2Eth 3DB18288BDAA

MPR Memory V2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap150/TDM2Eth 3DB18289BDAA

MPR Memory V6SA-120 R/6Cap150/TDM2Eth 3DB18489BDAA

MPR Memory E1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap300/TDM2Eth 3DB18290BDAA

MPR Memory E2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap300/TDM2Eth 3DB18291BDAA

MPR Memory E6SA-120 R/6Cap300/TDM2Eth 3DB18273BDAA

MPR Memory I1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap060 3DB18579ADAA

MPR Memory I2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap060 3DB18580ADAA

MPR Memory I6TD-120 R/6Cap060 3DB18581ADAA

MPR Memory I1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap060/TDM2Eth 3DB18582ADAA

MPR Memory I2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap060/TDM2Eth 3DB18583ADAA

MPR Memory I6SA-120 R/6Cap060/TDM2Eth 3DB18584ADAA

MPR Memory A1TD-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap130 3DB18585ADAA

MPR Memory A2TD-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap130 3DB18586ADAA

MPR Memory A6TD-120 R/6Cap130 3DB18587ADAA

MPR Memory A1SA-120 R/5Cap040/1Cap130/TDM2Eth 3DB18588ADAA

MPR Memory A2SA-120 R/4Cap040/2Cap130/TDM2Eth 3DB18589ADAA

MPR Memory A6SA-120 R/6Cap130/TDM2Eth 3DB18590ADAA

MPR Memory A1TD-120A R/5Cap040/1Cap130/6modAdp 3DB18591ADAA

MPR Memory A2TD-120A R/4Cap040/2Cap130/6modAdp 3DB18592ADAA

MPR Memory A6TD-120A R/6Cap130/6modAdp 3DB18593ADAA

MPR Memory A1SA-120A R/5Cap040/1Cap130/TDM2Eth/ 3DB18594ADAA


6modAdp

MPR Memory A2SA-120A R/4Cap040/2Cap130/TDM2Eth/ 3DB18595ADAA


6modAdp

MPR Memory A6SA-120A R/6Cap130/TDM2Eth/6modAdp 3DB18596ADAA

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MPR Memory L6TD-120A R/6Cap040/6modAdp 3DB18562ADAA

MPR Memory M2TD-120A R/4Cap040/2Cap080/6modAdp 3DB18563ADAA

MPR Memory M6TD-120A R/6Cap080/6modAdp 3DB18564ADAA

MPR Memory V1TD-120A R/5Cap040/1Cap150/6modAdp 3DB18565ADAA

MPR Memory L6SA-120A R/6Cap040/TDM2Eth/6modAdp 3DB18566ADAA

MPR Memory M2SA-120A R/4Cap040/2Cap080/TDM2Eth/ 3DB18567ADAA


6modAdp

MPR Memory M6SA-120A R/6Cap080/TDM2Eth/6modAdp 3DB18569ADAA

MPR Memory V1SA-120A R/5Cap040/1Cap150/TDM2Eth/ 3DB18568ADAA


6modAdp

RTUs 1.2.0

MPR TR-40Mb RTU 3DB18491AAAA

MPR TR-60Mb RTU 3DB18491ABAA

MPR TR-80Mb RTU 3DB18491ACAA

MPR TR-100Mb RTU 3DB18491ADAA

MPR TR-125Mb RTU 3DB18491AEAA

MPR TR-150Mb RTU 3DB18491AFAA

MPR TR-300Mb RTU 3DB18491AGAA

MPR TR-ADMOD RTU 3DB18491AHAA

MPR NE-TDMoETH RTU 3DB18491AKAA

SW 1.2.0

9500 MPR-E 1.2.0 TDM 3DB18554ACAA


Operating System

9500 MPR-E 1.2.0 SA 3DB18555ACAA


Operating System

MPR-E 1.2.0 TCO 3.1.0 3DB18497AEAA


User Manual CD ROM EN

TCO SW Suite rel 3.1.0 3DB18557ADAA

9500 MPR-E 1.2 SNMP 3DB18556ABAA

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ALCATEL PDM ALCATEL APR Freq. TRsp Frequency Description
CODES CODES (MHz) Range

3DB23214AAAA01 3DB23214AAXX 6 GHz 160/170 6.540-6.610 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/
170MHz, 6540-6610MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23214ABAA01 3DB23214ABXX 6.710-6.780 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/


170MHz, 6710-6780MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23214ACAA01 3DB23214ACXX 6.590-6.660 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/


170MHz, 6590-6660MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23214ADAA01 3DB23214ADXX 6.760-6.830 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/


170MHz, 6760-6830MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23214AEAA01 3DB23214AEXX 6.640-6.710 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/


170MHz, 6640-6710MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23214AFAA01 3DB23214AFXX 6.800-6.870 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 160/


170MHz, 6800-6870MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23215AAAA01 3DB23215AAXX 6 GHz 252 5930-6020 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,
5930-6020MHZ, HHP, TX LOW

3DB23215ABAA01 3DB23215ABXX 5989-6079 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,


5989-6079MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23215ACAA01 3DB23215ACXX 6078-6168 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,


6078-6168MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23215ADAA01 3DB23215ADXX 6182-6272 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,


6182-6272MHZ, HP TX HIGH

3DB23215AEAA01 3DB23215AEXX 6241-6331 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,


6241-6331MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23215AFAA01 3DB23215AFXX 6330-6420 ODU 300, 06GHz, T-R 252MHz,


6330-6420MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23216AAAA01 3DB23216AAXX 6 GHz 340 6430-6590 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R


0340MHZ, 6430-6590MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23216ABAA01 3DB23216ABXX 6770-6930 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R


0340MHZ, 6770-6930MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23216ACAA01 3DB23216ACXX 6515-6675 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R


0340MHZ, 6515-6675MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23216ADAA01 3DB23216ADXX 6855-7015 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R


0340MHZ, 6855-7015MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

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3DB23216AEAA01 3DB23216AEXX 6600-6760 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R
0340MHZ, 6600-6760MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23216AFAA01 3DB23216AFXX 6940-7100 ODU 300, 06GHZ, T-R


0340MHZ, 6940-7100MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23026BAAA01 3DB23026BAXX 7 GHz 154/161 7424-7488 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/
0161/0168MHz, 7424-7488MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23026ABBA01 3DB23026BBXX 7480-7544 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/


0161/0168MHz, 7480-7544MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23026ACAA01 3DB23026ACXX 7512-7568 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/


0161/0168MHz, 7512-7568MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23026ADAA01 3DB23026ADXX 7582-7649 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/


0161/0168MHz, 7582-7649MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23026AEAA01 3DB23026AEXX 7638-7705 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/


0161/0168MHz, 7638-7705MHZ,
HHP, TX HIGH

3DB23026AFAA01 3DB23026AFXX 7666-7726 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154/


0161/0168MHz, 7666-7726MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23027AAAA01 3DB23027AAXX 7 GHz 154 7184-7240 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154MHz,
7184-7240MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23027ABAA01 3DB23027ABXX 7338-7392 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0154MHz,


7338-7394MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028AAAA01 3DB23028AAXX 7 GHz 161 7114-7170 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,
7114-7170MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028ABAA01 3DB23028ABXX 7125-7184 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7125-7184MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028ACAA01 3DB23028ACXX 7170-7230 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7170-7230MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028ADAA01 3DB23028ADXX 7209-7268 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7209-7268MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028AEAA01 3DB23028AEXX 7247-7306 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7247-7306MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028AFAA01 3DB23028AFXX 7275-7331 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7275-7331MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028AGAA01 3DB23028AGXX 7282-7342 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7282-7342MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028AHAA01 3DB23028AHXX 7299-7355 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7299-7355MHZ, HP, TX LOW

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3DB23028AIAA01 3DB23028AIXX 7331-7391 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,
7331-7391MHZ, HP TX HIGH

3DB23028AJAA01 3DB23028AJXX 7334-7390 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7334-7390MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028AKAA01 3DB23028AKXX 7367-7426 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7367-7426MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028ALAA01 3DB23028ALXX 7408-7467 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7408-7467MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028AMAA01 3DB23028AMXX 7460-7516 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7460-7516MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028ANAA01 3DB23028ANXX 7495-7551 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7495-7551MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028BOAA01 3DB23028BOXX 7549-7601 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7549-7601MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028BPAA01 3DB23028BPXX 7598-7655 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7598-7655MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028BQAA01 3DB23028BQXX 7633-7690 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7633-7690MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23028BRAA01 3DB23028BRXX 7710-7767 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7710-7767MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028BSAA01 3DB23028BSXX 7759-7816 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7759-7816MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23028ATAA01 3DB23028ATXX 7795-7851 ODU 300, 07GHz, T-R 0161MHz,


7795-7851MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23184BAAA01 3DB23184BAXX 7298-7358 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0161MHZ, 7298-7358MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23185BAAA01 3DB23185BAXX 7459-7519 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0161MHZ, 7459-7519MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23186AAAA01 3DB23186AAXX 7 GHz 168 7443-7527 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0168MHZ, 7443-7527MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23186ABAA01 3DB23186ABXX 7611-7695 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0168MHZ, 7611-7695MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23186ACAA01 3DB23186ACXX 7499-7583 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R 0161/


0168MHZ, 7499-7583MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23186ADAA01 3DB23186ADXX 7667-7751 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R 0161/


0168MHZ, 7667-7751MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23188AAAA01 3DB23188AAXX 7 GHz 196 7107-7191 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0196MHZ, 7107-7191MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

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3DB23188ABAA01 3DB23188ABXX 7303-7387 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R
0196MHZ, 7303-7387MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23188ACAA01 3DB23188ACXX 7163-7247 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0196MHZ, 7163-7247MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23188ADAA01 3DB23188ADXX 7359-7443 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0196MHZ, 7359-7443MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23189AAAA01 3DB23189AAXX 7 GHz 245 7428-7512 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7428-7512MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23189ABAA01 3DB23189ABXX 7673-7757 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7673-7757MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23189ACAA01 3DB23189ACXX 7512-7596 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7512-7596MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23189ADAA01 3DB23189ADXX 7757-7841 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7757-7841MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23189AEAA01 3DB23189AEXX 7568-7652 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7568-7652MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23189AFAA01 3DB23189AFXX 7813-7897 ODU 300, 07GHZ, T-R


0245MHZ, 7813-7897MHZ, HP,
TX High

3DB23029AAAA01 3DB23029AAXX 8 GHz 119 8282-8321 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/
0126MHz, 8282-8321MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23029ABAA01 3DB23029ABXX 8307-8349 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/


0126MHz, 8307-8349MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23029ACAA01 3DB23029ACXX 8338-8377 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/


0126MHz, 8338-8377MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23029ADAA01 3DB23029ADXX 8405-8444 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/


0126MHz, 8405-8444MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23029AEAA01 3DB23029AEXX 8426-8468 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/


0126MHz, 8426-8468MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23029AFAA01 3DB23029AFXX 8461-8496 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0119/


0126MHz, 8461-8496MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 55/464
3DB23030AAAA01 3DB23030AAXX 8 GHz 151 8204-8275 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0151MHz,
8204-8275MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23030ABAA01 3DB23030ABXX 8274-8345 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0151MHz,


8274-8345MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23030ACAA01 3DB23030ACXX 8355-8426 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0151MHz,


8355-8426MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23030BDAA01 3DB23030BDXX 8425-8496 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0151MHz,


8425-8496MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23031AAAA01 3DB23031AAXX 8 GHz 208 8050-8148 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0208MHz,
8050-8148MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23031ABAA01 3DB23031ABXX 8148-8246 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0208MHz,


8148-8246MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23031ACAA01 3DB23031ACXX 8258-8356 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0208MHz,


8258-8356MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23031ADAA01 3DB23031ADXX 8356-8454 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0208MHz,


8356-8454MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23032AAAA01 3DB23032AAXX 8 GHz 266 7898-8021 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0266MHz,
7898-8021MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23032ABAA01 3DB23032ABXX 8010-8133 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


8010-8133MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23032ACAA01 3DB23032ACXX 8164-8287 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


8164-8287MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23032ADAA01 3DB23032ADXX 8276-8399 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


8276-8399MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23033AAAA01 3DB23033AAXX 8 GHz 305/311 7725-7859 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0305/
0311MHz, 7725-7859MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23033ABAA01 3DB23033ABXX 7844-7980 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0305/


0311MHz, 7844-7980MHZ, HP,
TX LOW

3DB23033ACAA01 3DB23033ACXX 8025-8171 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0305/


0311MHz, 8025-8171MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23033BDAA01 3DB23033BDXX 8145-8287 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0305/


0311MHz, 8145-8287MHZ, HP,
TX HIGH

3DB23034AAAA01 3DB23034AAXX 8 GHz 310 7905-8045 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0310MHz,
7905-8045MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23034ABAA01 3DB23034ABXX 8045-8185 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0310MHz,


8045-8185MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23034ACAA01 3DB23034ACXX 8215-8355 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0310MHz,


8215-8355MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

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56/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Product information and planning
3DB23034ADAA01 3DB23034ADXX 8355-8495 ODU 300, 08GHz, T-R 0310MHz,
8355-8495MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23035AAAA01 3DB23035AAXX 11 GHz 490/500/ 10675-10835 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/
530 0500/0530MHz, 10675-
10835MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23035ABAA01 3DB23035ABXX 10795-10955 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 10795-
10955MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23035ACAA01 3DB23035ACXX 10915-11075 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 10915-
11075MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23035ADAA01 3DB23035ADXX 11035-11200 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 11035-
11200MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23035AEAA01 3DB23035AEXX 11200-11345 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 11200-
11345MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23035AFAA01 3DB23035AFXX 11310-11465 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 11310-
11465MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23035AGAA01 3DB23035AGXX 11430-11585 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 11430-
11585MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23035AHAA01 3DB23035AHXX 11550-11705 ODU 300, 11GHz, T-R 0490/


0500/0530MHz, 11550-
11705MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23036AAAA01 3DB23036AAXX 13 GHz 266 12751-12835 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,
12751-12835MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23036ABAA01 3DB23036ABXX 12807-12891 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


12807-12891MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23036ACAA01 3DB23036ACXX 12835-12919 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


12835-12919MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23036ADAA01 3DB23036ADXX 12891-12975 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


12891-12975MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23036AEAA01 3DB23036AEXX 13017-13101 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


13017-13101MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23036AFAA01 3DB23036AFXX 13073-13157 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


13073-13157MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23036AGAA01 3DB23036AGXX 13101-13185 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


13101-13185MHZ, HHP, TX
HIGH

3DB23036AHAA01 3DB23036AHXX 13157-13241 ODU 300, 13GHz, T-R 0266MHz,


13157-13241MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 57/464
3DB23037AAAA01 3DB23037AAXX 15 GHz 315 14627-14788 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0315MHz,
14627-14788MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23037ABAA01 3DB23037ABXX 14760-14914 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0315MHz,


14760-14914MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23037ACAA01 3DB23037ACXX 14942-15103 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0315MHz,


14942-15103MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23037ADAA01 3DB23037ADXX 15075-15229 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0315MHz,


15075-15229MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23038AAAA01 3DB23038AAXX 15 GHz 420 14501-14648 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,
14501-14648MHZ, HHP, TX
LOW

3DB23038ABAA01 3DB23038ABXX 14641-14788 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,


14641-14788MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23038ACAA01 3DB23038ACXX 14781-14928 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,


14781-14928MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23038ADAA01 3DB23038ADXX 14921-15068 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,


14921-15068MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23038AEAA01 3DB23038AEXX 15061-15208 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,


15061-15208MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23038AFAA01 3DB23038AFXX 15201-15348 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0420MHz,


15201-15348MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23039AAAA01 3DB23039AAXX 15 GHz 475/490 14627-14873 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0475/
0490MHz, 14627-14873MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23039ABAA01 3DB23039ABXX 15117-15348 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0475/


0490MHz, 15117-15348MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23039ACAA01 3DB23039ACXX 14500-14660 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0475MHz,


14500-14660MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23039ADAA01 3DB23039ADXX 14975-15135 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0475MHz,


14975-15135MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23039AEAA01 3DB23039AEXX 14403-14634 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0490MHz,


14403-14634MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23039AFAA01 3DB23039AFXX 14893-15124 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0490MHz,


14893-15124MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23040AAAA01 3DB23040AAXX 15 GHz 728 14501-14697 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0644/
0728MHz, 14501-14697MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23040ABAA01 3DB23040ABXX 15145-15348 ODU 300, 15GHz, T-R 0644/


0728MHz, 15145-15348MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

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58/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Product information and planning
3DB23041AAAA01 3DB23041AAXX 18 GHz 340 18580-18660 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,
18580-18660MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23041ABAA01 3DB23041ABXX 18660-18740 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,


18660-18740MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23041ACAA01 3DB23041ACXX 18740-18820 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,


18740-18820MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23041ADAA01 3DB23041ADXX 18920-19000 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,


18920-19000MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23041AEAA01 3DB23041AEXX 19000-19080 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,


19000-19080MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23041AFAA01 3DB23041AFXX 19080-19160 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 0340MHz,


19080-19160MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23042AAAA01 3DB23042AAXX 18 GHz 1008/ 17700-18060 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/
1010/ 1010/1092/1120MHz, 17700-
1092/ 18060MHZ, HP, TX LOW
1120

3DB23042ABAA01 3DB23042ABXX 17905-18275 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 17905-
18275MHZ, HHP, TX LO

3DB23042ACAA01 3DB23042ACXX 18110-18490 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 18110-
18490MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23042ADAA01 3DB23042ADXX 18330-18690 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 18330-
18690MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23042AEAA01 3DB23042AEXX 18710-19070 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 18710-
19070MHZ, HHP, TX HI

3DB23042AFAA01 3DB23042AFXX 18920-19290 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 18920-
19290MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23042AGAA01 3DB23042AGXX 19130-19510 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 19130-
19510MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23042AHAA01 3DB23042AHXX 19340-19700 ODU 300, 18GHz, T-R 1008/


1010/1092/1120MHz, 19340-
19700MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23062ACAA01 3DB23062ACXX 18 GHz 1560 17700 - EAH-18-1560-031 ODU300v2


18140 18GHz(1560)

3DB23062ADAA01 3DB23062ADXX 19260 - EAH-18-1560-032 ODU300v2


19700 18GHz(1560)

3DB23043AAAA01 3DB23043AAXX 23 GHz 600 22140-22380 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 0600MHz,
22140-22380MHZ, HP, TX LOW

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 59/464
3DB23043ABAA01 3DB23043ABXX 22740-22980 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 0600MHz,
22740-22980MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23044AAAA01 3DB23044AAXX 23 GHz 1008 21952-22312 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,
21952-22312MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23044ABAA01 3DB23044ABXX 22002-22337 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,


22002-22337MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23044ACAA01 3DB23044ACXX 22232-22592 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,


22232-22592MHZ, HP, TX LOW

3DB23044ADAA01 3DB23044ADXX 22960-23320 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,


22960-23320MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23044AEAA01 3DB23044AEXX 23010-23345 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,


23010-23345MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23044AFAA01 3DB23044AFXX 23240-23600 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1008MHz,


23240-23600MHZ, HP, TX HIGH

3DB23045AAAA01 3DB23045AAXX 23 GHz 1200/ 21200-21570 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/
1232 1232MHz, 21200-21570MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23045ABAA01 3DB23045ABXX 21475-21845 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 21475-21845MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23045ACAA01 3DB23045ACXX 21750-22120 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 21750-22120MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23045ADAA01 3DB23045ADXX 22030-22400 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 22030-22400MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23045AEAA01 3DB23045AEXX 22400-22770 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 22400-22770MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23045AFAA01 3DB23045AFXX 22675-23045 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 22675-23045MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23045AGAA01 3DB23045AGXX 22950-23320 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 22950-23320MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23045AHAA01 3DB23045AHXX 23320-23600 ODU 300, 23GHz, T-R 1200/


1232MHz, 23230-23600MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23259AAAA01 3DB23259AAXX 26 GHz 1008 24549-24909 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 24549-24909MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23259ABAA01 3DB23259ABXX 25557-25917 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 25557-25917MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

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60/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Product information and planning
3DB23259ACAA01 3DB23259ACXX 24817-25177 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R
1008MHZ, 24817-25177MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23259ADAA01 3DB23259ADXX 25825-26185 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 25825-26185MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23259AEAA01 3DB23259AEXX 25085-25445 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 25085-25445MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23259AFAA01 3DB23259AFXX 26093-26453 ODU 300, 26GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 26093-26453MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23213AAAA01 3DB23213AAXX 28 GHz 1008 27500-27870 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 27500-27870MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23213ABAA01 3DB23213ABXX 27820-28190 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 27820-28190MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23213ACAA01 3DB23213ACXX 28140-28510 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 28140-28510MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23213ADAA01 3DB23213ADXX 28508-28878 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 28508-28878MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23213AEAA01 3DB23213AEXX 28828-29198 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 28828-29198MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23213AFAA01 3DB23213AFXX 29148-29518 ODU 300, 28GHZ, T-R


1008MHZ, 29148-29518MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB48245AAAA01 3DB48245AAXX 32 GHz 812 ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 31800-32050MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB48245ABAA01 3DB48245ABXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 32612-32862MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB48245ACAA01 3DB48245ACXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 31978-32228MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB48245ADAA01 3DB48245ADXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 32790-33040MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB48245AEAA01 3DB48245AEXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 32340-32590MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB48245AFAA01 3DB48245AFXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 33152-33402MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 61/464
3DB48245AGAA01 3DB48245AGXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R
0812MHZ, 32151-32401MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB48245AHAA01 3DB48245AHXX ODU 300, 32GHZ, T-R


0812MHZ, 32963-33213MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258AAAA01 3DB23258AAXX 38 GHz 1260 37028-37368 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37028-37368MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258ABAA01 3DB23258ABXX 38288-38628 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 38288-38628MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258ACAA01 3DB23258ACXX 37308-37648 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37308-37648MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258ADAA01 3DB23258ADXX 38568-38908 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 38568-38908MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258AEAA01 3DB23258AEXX 37588-37928 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37588-37928MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258AFAA01 3DB23258AFXX 38848-39188 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 38848-39188MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258AGAA01 3DB23258AGXX 37868-38208 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37868-38208MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258AHAA01 3DB23258AHXX 39128-39468 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 39128-39468MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258AIAA01 3DB23258AIXX 37251-37526 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37251-37526MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258ALAA01 3DB23258ALXX 38511-38786 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 38511-38786MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

3DB23258AMAA01 3DB23258AMXX 37058-37478 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 37058-37478MHZ,
HP, TX LOW

3DB23258ANAA01 3DB23258ANXX 38318-38738 ODU 300, 38GHZ, T-R


1260MHZ, 38318-38738MHZ,
HP, TX HIGH

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2.8 Functional description

2.8.1 MSS (Indoor Unit)


The MSS incorporates the baseband processing and offers tributaries interfaces as well as supervision.

The MSS is frequencyindependent.

The MSS-8 is made of:

1 subrack (MSS shelf)

1 or 2 Core Modules (Working & Spare)

up to 6 Transport Modules.

1 Fans unit

The MSS-4 is made of:

1 subrack (MSS shelf)

1 or 2 Core Modules (Working & Spare)

up to 2 Transport Modules.

1 Fans unit

There are two types of Transport Modules:

32xE1 Local Access Module

ODU 300 Radio Module.

In the right part of MSS shelf there are two sub-D 2-pole power supply connectors.

2.8.1.1 Power distribution

The system receives the Battery input through 2 power connectors mounted on the Subrack structure and
connected directly to the Backplane.

In addiction there is the power that turns on all DC/DC converters of the boards.

Each board receives the Battery input (via Backplane) and provides adaptation to the customer central
power bus.

The input voltage range is from -19.2 to -72 Vdc.

Each board, in which a DC/DC converter is mounted, is provided with fuses and diodes on all the lines,
in order to be fully independent from the other ones.

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 63/464
Power Distribution Architecture

Batt. A Batt. B
19,2 to 72 V 19,2 to 72 V

3,3 V parall. FROM CORE (SPARE)

CORE
(MAIN) 3,3 V
EEPROM

FAN UNIT
32E1

9500 MPR-E
RADIO

ODU 300
RADIO

BACK PLANE

Figure 17. Power Distribution Architecture

2.8.1.2 Core unit

Flash
PSU Controller
RAM

Ref out
6 x CK ref to
TMN-RF
Framer each plug in
Sync Ck
FPGA selector 6 x CK ref from
(Corona) each plug in

Ref in
6 X GbEth ETHERNET
+ SWITCH
1 GbEth for sp
CORE (ctrl)

LIU LIU

4x10/100/1000 Ethernet TMN


Ethernet (Local / Remote)

Figure 18. Core unit

Based on packet technology with 8 GbEth serial internal interfaces between Core and peripherals
(jumbo frames 9728 bytes allowed)

4x10/100/1000 Eth embedded interface (RJ45)

1 of these can be used for service channel.

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Macro Functions

Controller

Layer 2+ Eth Switch, VLAN management & MAC based

Ethernet MAC learning

x-connect function for PDH and Data payload traffic;

For any packetized flow, the switch will be in charge to manage the EPS also.

QoS management.

Selection of the synchronization Ck to be distributed to all plug-in.

The Core unit has the option to equip a 1000 optical intrerface in the SFP slot.

Two modules are available:

1000BASE-LX

1000BASE-SX

The flash card stores the licence type, the equipment software, the equipment MIB and the equipment
MAC address.

Figure 19. Core unit

Warning: The optional SFP plug-in, which has to be installed in the Core unit, contains a Class 1 laser
source. The laser source is placed in the left side of the SFP plug-in.
According to the IEC 60825-1 the explanatory label is not sticked on the equipment due to the lack of
space.

User Guide 9500 MPR-E Rel. 1.2.0


Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 65/464
2.8.1.3 32xE1 Local Access Module

32 E1 module

wk core
FPGA
32 E1 sp core
LIUs (Ceres) CES
wk core

sp core

Figure 20. PDH Access unit

In the TX direction, the E1 PDH card (E1 Access) processes and encapsulates up to 32 E1 input lines
into an Ethernet packet that is sent to the core card(s). In the RX direction, the E1 Access card extracts
data from the Ethernet data packets and processes the data to provide up to 32 E1 output lines.

The 32xE1 Local Access Module performs the following macro functions:

Termination of 32 E1 signals (32 E1 bi-directional interfaces according ITU-T G.703 on the front
panel)

Framed E1 bi-directional alarm management

Bi-directional Performance Monitoring on Framed E1

Encapsulation/Extraction of those PDH data flows into/from standard Ethernet packets Inter
Working Function

Reconstruction of the original PDH Timing meeting G823/824 Req.

Selection of the Active Core

Sending/getting those std Eth packets to the CORE module

Communication with the Controller for provisioning and status report

The module communicates with the Core modules through two GbEth Serial copper bi-directional
interfaces on the backplane. The spare core in not implemented.

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E1 E1
17-32 1-16

Figure 21. PDH Access unit

2.8.1.4 ODU 300 Radio Module

FPGA
(Guinnes)
AIR FRAMER
I
PDH/Data DAC IF TX
EPS
management TX TX Q
MODULATOR DAC
IDU/ODU
communication
311 Mhz /2
MODEM
ASIC
IF cable
AIR deFRAMER interface
PDH/Data I
RPS ADC
management IF RX
RX RX
Q
DEMOD ADC
ODU/IDU
communication

126 Mhz /2

Analog Chain

GbE Serial from/to Alternate


Radio Board for RPS

Figure 22. Modem unit

In Tx direction, the MODEM 300 Module generates the IF signal to be sent to an MXC Out Door Unit.
Such signal contains a Constant Bit Rate signal built with the Ethernet packets coming from the Core;
those packets are managed in a different way depending on their own native nature.

Digital Framer

Classification of incoming packets from the Core (QoS)

Fragmentation

Air Frame Generation (synchronous with NE clock)

Digital Modulator

TX Analog Chain

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 67/464
DAC & low pass filtering

Modulation to 311 MHz IF TX

In Rx direction, the MODEM 300 Module terminates the IF signal coming from the MXC Out Door Unit
extracting the original CBR and then the original Ethernet packets to be given the Core which distributes
them to the proper Module.

RX Analog Chain

126 MHz IF RX demodulation to I & Q

low pass filtering & ADC

Digital Demodulator

Carrier & CK recovery

Equalisation

Error Correction

Digital Deframer

RPS (hitless)

Defragmentation

Transmitter connected to the antenna

Figure 23. Modem unit

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2.8.2 ODU
The ODUs include a waveguide antenna port, Type-N female connector for the ODU cable, a BNC female
connector (with captive protection cap) for RSSI access, and a grounding stud.

The ODUs, are designed for direct antenna attachment via a 9500 MPR-E-specific mounting collar
supplied with the antennas.

ODU polarization is determined by the position of a polarization rotator fitted within the antenna mounting
collar.

A remote ODU mounting kit is also available as an option. These may be used to connect an ODU to a
standard antenna, or to a dual-polarized antenna for co-channel link operation.

ODUs are fixed for Tx High or Tx Low operation.

Where two ODUs are to be connected to a single antenna for hot-standby or frequency diversity
configurations, a direct-mounting coupler is used. They are available for equal or unequal loss operation.
Equal loss is nominally 3.5/3.5 dB. Unequal is nominally 1.5/6.5 dB.

The ODU assembly meets the ASTME standard for a 2000 hour salt-spray test, and relevant IEC, UL,
and Bellcore standards for wind-driven rain.

The ODU housing comprises:

Cast aluminium base (alloy 380)

Pressed aluminium cover (sheet grade alloy 1050).

Base and cover passivated and then polyester powder coated

Compression seal for base-cover weatherproofing

Carry-handle

Figure 24. 9500 MPR-E ODU 300 housing

ODUs are frequency-band specific, but within each band are capacity-independent up to their design
maximums. Main ODU performance characteristics are summarized in Table 3.

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Product information and planning 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 69/464
Table 3. ODU Characteristics
Frequency Bands 6 to 38 GHz

Capacity 18 to 136xE1

Modulation Options 16QAM, 32QAM, 128QAM

Bandwidths supported 14, 28, 56 MHz

Tx Power High power, with a maximum 20 dB power control range

Tuning Range Typically 230 MHz for bands to 15 GHz, 360 MHz 18 GHz and above

2.8.2.1 ODU 300 block diagram

Figure 25.shows the ODU 300 block diagram.

MSS

Figure 25. ODU 300 block diagram

The quadrature modulated 311 MHz IF signal from the MSS is extracted at the N-Plexer and passed via
a cable AGC circuit to an IQ demodulator/modulator.

Here the 311 MHz IF is demodulated to derive the separate I and Q signals using the 10 MHz
synchronizing reference signal from the MSS.

These I and Q signals modulate a Tx IF, which has been set to a specific frequency between 1700 and
2300 MHz, such that when mixed with the Tx local oscillator signal (TXLO) in the subsequent mixer stage,
provides the selected transmit frequency. Both the IF and Tx local oscillators are synthesizer types.

Between the IQ modulator and the mixer, a variable attenuator provides software adjustment of Tx power.

After the mixer, the transmit signal is amplified in the PA (Power Amplifier) and passed via the diplexer
to the antenna feed port.

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A microprocessor in the ODU supports configuration of the synthesizers, transmit power, and alarm and
performance monitoring. The ODU microprocessor is managed under the NCC microprocessor, with
which it communicates via the telemetry channel.

A DC-DC converter provides the required low-voltage DC rails from the -48 Vdc supply.

In the receive direction, the signal from the diplexer is passed via the LNA (Low Noise Amplifier) to the
Rx mixer, where it is mixed with the receive local oscillator (RXLO) input to provide an IF of between 1700
and 2300 MHz. It is then amplified in a gain-controlled stage to compensate for fluctuations in receive
level, and in the IF mixer, is converted to a 126 MHz IF for transport via the ODU cable to the MSS.

The offset of the transmit frequencies at each end of the link is determined by the required Tx/Rx split.
The split options provided are based on ETSI plans for each frequency band. The actual frequency range
per band and the allowable Tx/Rx splits are range-limited within 9500 MPR-E to prevent incorrect user
selection.

A power monitor circuit is included in the common port of the diplexer assembly to provide measurement
of transmit power. It is used to confirm transmit output power for performance monitoring purposes, and
to provide a closed-loop for power level management over the specified ODU temperature and frequency
range.

2.8.2.2 RSSI Monitoring Point

The ODU has a capped BNC female connector to access RSSI during antenna alignment.

There is a linear relationship of voltage to RSSI, as shown in the table below; an RSSI of 0.25 Vdc is
equivalent to -10 dBm RSSI, and each additional 0.25 Vdc RSSI increase thereafter corresponds to a 10
dBm decrease in RSSI.

The lower the voltage the higher RSSI and better aligned the antenna is.

The RSSI figures in dBm are identical to the RSL figures displayed in A9500 MXC Craft Terminal.

Table 4. RSSI Table


Units Measurement

BNC (Vdc) 0.25 0.5 0.75 1.0 1.25 1.5 1.75 2.0 2.25 2.5

RSSI (dBm) -10 -20 -30 -40 -50 -60 -70 -80 -90 -100

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2.8.2.3 Waveguide Flange Data

Table 5. lists the antenna port flange types used with the ODU 300, plus their mating flange options and
fastening hardware for remote mount installations.

UDR/PDR flanges are rectangular; UBR/PDR flanges are square.

On the ODU, the two flange styles are:

UDR. 6-hole or 8-hole (6/8 bolt holes depending on frequency range/waveguide type), flush-face
flange with threaded, blind holes.

UBR. 4-hole flush-face flange with threaded, blind holes.

The corresponding mating flange styles are:

PDR. 6-hole or 8-hole flange with gasket groove and clear holes.

PBR. 4-hole flange with a gasket groove and clear holes.

All fastening hardware is metric.

Table 5. Waveguide Flange Data


Freq Radio Waveguide Waveguide Spring Bolts Bolt Thread Hole Bolt Length
Band Flange Mating Type Washers Reqd Type Spec Depth Required
Flange Reqd mm
6 GHz UDR70 PDR70 WR137 8 x M5 8 M5x0.8 6H 10 Flange thickness +
Hole depth - 2mm
7/8 GHz UDR84 PDR84 WR112 8 x M4 8 M4x0.7 6H 8 Flange thickness +
Hole depth - 2mm
10/11 GHz UDR100 PDR100 WR90 8 x M4 8 M4x0.7 6H 8 Flange thickness +
Hole depth - 2mm
13 GHz UBR120 PBR120 WR75 4 x M4 4 M4x0.7 6H 8 Flange thickness +
Hole depth - 2mm
15 GHz UBR140 PBR140 WR62 4 x M4 4 M4x0.7 6H 8 Flange thickness +
Hole depth - 2mm
18/23/26 UBR220 PBR220 WR42 4 x M3 4 M3x0.5 6H 6 Flange thickness +
GHz Hole depth - 2mm
28/32/38 UBR320 PBR320 WR28 4 x M3 4 M3x0.5 6H 6 Flange thickness +
GHz Hole depth - 2mm

2.8.2.4 ODU Coupler

The ODU coupler is used in the 1+1 HSB or 1+1/2+0 FD co-polar configurations.

The coupler can be equal type (3 dB/3 dB insertion loss) or unequal type (1.5 dB on the main path/6 dB
on the secondary path).

The couplers are connected between the cabinets and the antenna.

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2.8.3 Protection schemes
Supported Protection types:

[1] RPS (Radio Protection Switching) Hitless for each radio direction (RPS-RX)
RPS is distributed in 9500 MSS modules before termination of 9500 MSS frame.

[2] EPS (Equipment Protection Switching) for each module type


Both Working and Spare modules send its own signal to the Core. Core selects the best signal.

[3] HSB (Hot StandBy)


Spare ODU module is powered off.

2 3

2 1
Legend:
1 RPS 2 EPS 3 HSB

Figure 26. 9500 MPR-E Packet Node Full Protection (Radio)

2
Legend: 2 EPS

Figure 27. 9500 MPR-E Packet Node Full Protection (Radio)

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2.8.3.1 RPS Switching Criteria

The switching criteria are:

Early Warning

High BER

Dem Fail

Loss of Frame (LOF) on the radio signal coming from the direct way

Loss of Frame (LOF) on the radio signal coming from the cross way

2.8.3.2 EPS Switching Criteria

The switching criteria are:

Peripheral Card Fail (switching off of the peripheral included)

Peripheral Card Missing

LOS of all the tributaries (of course only in case of PDH local access peripheral protection) managed
via SW.

2.8.3.3 HSB Switching Criteria

The switching criteria are :

Radio Interface Peripheral Card Fail (switching off of the peripheral included)

Radio Interface Peripheral Card Missing

MSS-ODU cable loss

ODU TX chain alarm (this is an OR of the following alarms: LOS at ODU input, modFail, txFail, ODU
card fail)

2.8.4 Radio Transmission Features

2.8.4.1 Frequency Agility

The Frequency Agility feature gives the Operator the possibility to set via ECT the frequency of a single
Transceiver within a chosen subband to select the RF working channel. This implies benefits for spare
parts, order processing and frequency coordination.

2.8.4.2 Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC)

The Automatic Transmit Power Control (ATPC) function automatically increases or decreases the trans-
mit output power upon request from the opposite terminal. The opposite terminal constantly monitors
Receive Signal Level (RSL), receive signal quality, and aggregate Bit Error Rate (BER) of the receive sig-
nal.

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When ATPC Enabled is checked on the Modem Card Settings screen, the transmit output will remain at
it's lowest level until a fade occurs (or a receive circuit alarm is detected). When the change in RSL is
detected at the receive end, a command is sent to the transmit end to increase power in 1 dB steps to
it's highest level. After the fade is over, the receive end commands the transmit power to decreases in 1
dB steps to the lowest level.

The ATPC range (high and low limits) is variable, determined by link distance, link location, and link fre-
quency. When ATPC Enabled is checked, the range values are shown in parenthesis (minimum - max-
imum) following ATPC Range.

When ATPC Enabled is not checked on the Modem Card Settings screen, the transmit output will always
operate at it's highest level.

2.8.4.3 Transmitted power control: RTPC function

The capability to adjust the transmitted power in a static and fixed way (RTPC = Remote Transmit Power
Control) has been introduced for those countries where, due to internal rules, the ATPC function is not
accepted or for those hops in which due to the short length and interface problems, a fixed reduced
transmitted power is preferred. The range of the possible attenuation depends on the frequency band
involved. The setting of the transmitted power can be performed locally through ECT.

Output power is band and modulation dependent.

2.8.4.4 Power Monitoring

The ODU incorporates a detector for Tx power measurement. It is used to provide measurement of
forward power as a performance parameter, and to provide a calibration input for transmitter operation
over temperature and output range.

Viewed Tx power ranges always match the capabilities of the ODU for a given modulation. When
modulation is changed, the CT automatically adjusts/restricts Tx Power to be within valid range.

2.8.4.5 Adaptive Equalization

Adaptive equalization (AE) is employed to improve reliability of operation under dispersive fade
conditions, typically encountered over long and difficult paths.

This is achieved through a multi-tap equalizer consisting of two registers, one with feed-forward taps, the
other with feed-back taps. Each of these registers multiply successive delayed samples of the received
signal by weighting-coefficients to remove propagation induced inter-symbol interference.

2.8.4.6 Link identifier

The amount of microwave links, especially in urban areas puts the problem of possible interferences
during installation and turn-on phase.

The digital frame incorporates link identity coding capabilities to prevent the capture of an unwanted
signal.

Link identifier management can be enabled or disabled by the management systems.

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2.8.4.7 MSS loopbacks

To facilitate the installation/commissioning and the remote maintenance one loopback is available.

As the activation of a loopback affects the traffic, the presence of a loopback is indicated to the
management systems as an abnormal condition.

The loopback is "loop and continue" type (the signal sent after the loopback execution is the same signal
sent back).

The loopback supported by the Radio board is shown in the following figure.

PDH board RADIO board

CORE MODEM
LIU FPGA FPGA SWITCH FPGA
NxE1 SerDes

Figure 28. Available loopbacks

1) IF Radio loopback: is implemented in the analog IF part of the ODU 300 Radio Module, the traf-
fic received from switch side is redirected toward the switch itself; this loopback can be acti-
vated only on the aggregate traffic. When this loop is enabled the expected behaviour is the
following:

TDM2TDM flows: before transmitting the packets towards the switch, the FPGA looking
the VLAN will rebuild the right Ethernet header.

TDM2ETH flows: before transmitting the packets towards the switch, the FPGA looking
the VLAN will rebuild the right Ethernet header.

Data flows: simply are redirect toward the switch without any change

2.8.4.7.1 Loopback activation

The loopback can be activated by each management system (local or remote). The activation command
permits to define the duration of the loopback (time-out).

The time-out period starts at the activation time and expires at the end of the period spontaneously in the
NE, a part for the case in which another reconfiguration of the time-out period is requested at the operator
interface during the activation time. In this case, if the loopback point is still active because the activation
time-out is not expired yet, the time-out period is reconfigurable and the specified time range starts again
from the new updated activation date, overwriting the previous activation date and time-out values.

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2.8.4.7.2 Loopback life time

In order to avoid the risk of a permanent disconnection from ECT/NMS of a remote NE after the execution
of a loopback, a time-out mechanism is supported.

The management system's operator has to provide the time range of the loopback time-out period
expressed in hours/minutes starting from the time of the loopback activation.

A default time-out period may be suggested at the operator interface, even if it could be modified on user-
needs basis.

After the NE reset, the activation of each loopback point is lost and must be recreated again if needed,
starting with a new time-out period.

In order to avoid the risk of a permanent disconnection from ECT/NMS of a remote NE after the execution
of a loopback, a time-out mechanism is supported.

The management system's operator has to provide the time range of the loopback time-out period
expressed in hours/minutes starting from the time of the loopback activation.

A default time-out period may be suggested at the operator interface, even if it could be modified on user-
needs basis.

After the NE reset, the activation of each loopback point is lost and must be recreated again if needed,
starting with a new time-out period.

2.8.5 TMN communication channels


On 9500 MPR-E Network Element two types of TMN communication channels are present:

TMN channel carried by 64 kbits/sec channel inside Radio frame;

TMN channel carried by Ethernet frames in Ethernet tributary 4 (on the front panel of the Core
module).

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2.8.6 Traffic profiles
Three kinds of traffic profiles have been identified:

[1] TDM2TDM (9500 MPR-E 9500 MPR-E, internal TDM)

[2] TDM2Eth (9500 MPR-E TDM to Ethernet)

[3] DATA (Ethernet to Ethernet)

Profiles 1 and 2 meet MEF8 standard.

Figure 29. Traffic profiles

Case 1

The E1 stream is inserted in Node 1 and extracted in Node 2. In this case the two IWFs used to packetize
the traffic for the Ethernet switch in the Core module are both internal to the 9500 MPR-E network. The
Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2TDM in Node 1 and Node 2. The Cross connections to be implemented
are PDH-Radio type.

Case 2

The E1 stream is inserted in Node 1 and extracted in Node 2. One IWF is inside the 9500 MPR-E, but
the second IWF is external to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2ETH in
Node 1 and Node 2. The Cross connections to be implemented are PDH-Radio type in Node 1 and Radio-
Eth type in Node 2

Case 3

The E1 stream is inserted/extracted in Node 1. One IWF is inside the 9500 MPR-E, but the second IWF
is external to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2ETH in Node 1 and Node
2. The Cross connections to be implemented are PDH-Eth type in Node 1.

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Figure 30. Traffic profiles

Cases 4 and 5

In these cases Ethernet packets enter Node 1 and are extracted in Node 2. In case 4 the Ethernet packets
encapsulate the E1 stream; in case 5 the packets are native Ethernet packets. None of the IWFs belongs
to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is ETH2ETH in Node 1 and Node 2. No Cross
connections must be implemented. The path is automatically implemented with the standard auto-
learning algorithm of the 9500 MPR-E Ethernet switch.

2.8.6.1 TDM2TDM

E1 traffic packetized only internally to 9500 MPR-E equipment.

RADIO

E1
BTS RADIO
RADIO

PDH

E1
E1
BTS
BSC

E1
BTS

Figure 31. E1 Traffic

Flow Id present (user defined)

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Intermediate node configuration (E1 provisioning):

node by node (building Cross-connection tables based on Flow Id)

Bandwidth guaranteed (according to QoS Highest Queue Priority association)

No flooding-autolearning necessary

Both the IWFs belong to 9500 MPR-E and the packets are not supposed to exit the 9500 MPR-E network.

The IWF parameters listed above, have predetermined values and dont need to be provisioned.

Mac addresses are determined as consequences of the cross connections.

Payload size is fixed to 122 bytes

ECID will be the same value as Flow Id (ECID = Emulated Circuit Identifier)

TDM clock source: clock recovery differential,

Flow Id provisioned by ECT/NMS

2.8.6.2 TDM2Eth

E1 traffic both internal and external to 9500 MPR-E equipment.

E1
BTS

PSN

Eth Eth E1
E1
BTS BSC

E1
BTS

Figure 32. E1 Traffic

Flow Id present (user defined)

All the parameters must be configured compliant with the MEF8 standard

Adaptive or differential clock recovery supported

Bandwidth guaranteed (according to QoS Highest Queue Priority association)

Destination MAC added before going into whole network (MEF8 compliant)

Only one of the IWFs belongs to 9500 MPR-E and the packets are supposed to exit the 9500 MPR-E
network.

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MAC addresses: in all involved nodes are determined as consequences of the cross connections;
the only exception is the Ethernet Terminal Node (the node where the TDM2ETH traffic goes through
an user Ethernet port). In such ETN the source address is the node Mac address, the destination
Mac address will be provisioned by ECT/NMS.

Payload size: can be chosen (by ECT/NMS) between 256 and 1024 bytes

ECID: provisioned by ECT/NMS, 2 different values may be used for each direction (ECID = Emulated
Circuit Identifier)

TDM clock source is provisioned by ECT/NMS: clock recovery adaptive, clock recovery differential,
clock loopback (TDM line in)

Flow Id is provisioned by ECT/NMS (One Vlan is assigned to each bi-directional circuit emulated E1
flow)

For this case the expected latency for 1 hop depends only on the payload size: 3.5 msec for 256 bytes,
6.5 msec for 1024 bytes.

2.8.6.3 ETH2ETH

None of the IWFs belongs to 9500 MPR-E.

None of the parameters listed in the previous slide has to be configured (the 9500 MPR-E is transparent).

PSN
WiMAX
(NodeB) Eth Eth
Eth
Eth
RNC

PSN
WiMAX Eth
Eth
(NodeB) RNC
WiMAX
(NodeB) Eth

Figure 33. E1 Traffic

Any packet belonging to an Eth2Eth TDM flow is treated as any other Ethernet packet with the only
exception of giving it an higher priority based on the MEF 8 Ethertype.

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2.8.7 Quality Of Services (QoS)
The QoS function inside 9500 MPR-E is the result of a distributed implementation in the switch and Radio
Interface module. Both those QoS functions are properly configured in order to get the wished behavior
on Ethernet flows that will be transmitted towards the Radio.

2.8.7.1 QoS in the Core unit

Figure 34. QoS in the Core unit

The figure shows an overview of the QoS implementation inside the switch.

The Quality of Service feature of the Ethernet switch provides four internal queues per port to support four
different traffic priorities. Typically the high-priority traffic experiences less delay than that low-priority in
the switch under congested conditions.

For each egress port according to method of QoS classification configured in the switch, the packets are
assigned to each queue. The higher priority queue is reserved for TDM flows; the remaining queues are
shared by all Ethernet flows according the classification mechanism configured by CT/NMS.

For generic Ethernet flows in the switch the priority of each packet can be assigned according to the
information in:

IEEE 802.1p: the packet is examined for the presence of a valid 802.1P user-priority tag. If the tag
is present the correspondent priority is assigned to the packet
.
802.1P priority Queue

111, 110 Q5 (higher priority)

101 Q4

100 Q3

011, 000 Q2

010, 001 Q1

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DiffServ: each packet is classified based on DSCP field in the IP header to determine the priority.

DiffServ priority Queue

111000, 110000, 101110, 101000 Q5 (higher priority)

100110, 100100, 100010, 100000 Q4

011110, 011100, 011010, 011000 Q3

010110, 010100, 010010, 010000 Q2


001110, 001100, 001010, 001000
000000

All remaining values Q1

Scheduler

The scheduler algorithm cannot be configured. HQP scheduler algorithm is used on queues Q8, Q7 and
Q6.

Deficit Weighted Round Robin (DWRR) is used on the other queues with the following weights:

QUEUE WEIGHT

Q5 (higher priority) 16

Q4 8

Q3 4

Q2 2

Q1 1

2.8.7.2 QoS in the Modem unit

Figure 35. QoS in the Modem unit

In the figure is shown an overview of the QoS implementation inside the Radio Interface module.

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The QoS feature provides eight internal queues to support different traffic priorities. The QoS function can
assign the packet to one of the eight egress transmit queues according to the information inside the packet
as 802.1P field, DiffServ field, Ethertype or 802.1Q VLAN_ID.

QoS based on IEEE std. 802.1p

When 802.1p QoS mechanism is adopted, the reference is the standard IEEE 802.1D-2004 Annex G
User priorities and traffic classes that defines 7 traffic types and the corresponding user priority values.

Considering that in the Radio Interface module for generic Ethernet traffic there are five egress queues
the mapping 802.1p value to queue is the following:

802.1p priority Queue

111, 110 Q5 (higher priority)

101 Q4

100 Q3

011, 000 Q2

010, 001 Q1

QoS based on DiffServ

DiffServ priority Queue

111000, 110000, 101110, 101000 Q5 (higher priority)

100110, 100100, 100010, 100000 Q4

011110, 011100, 011010, 011000 Q3

010110, 010100, 010010, 010000

001010, 001100, 001010, 001000, 000000 Q2

All remaining values Q1

QoS based on VLAN_ID

The VLAN_ID classification is always enabled, when a packet with VLAN is received the Radio Interface
module search inside the local memory if the VLAN_ID has been configured. If the query is positive the
packet is sent to the queue assigned to the VLAN_ID itself; if the query is negative the packet follow the
classification flow described above in the flow chart.

Inside the Radio Interface module up to 4096 VLAN can be assigned and to each one is associated one
egress priority queue. This association in release 1.0 is predefined:

For the VLAN_IDs used to configure TDM2TDM flows the egress priority queue is Q8;

For the VLAN_IDs used to configure TDM2ETH flows the egress priority queue is Q7

For the VLAN_IDs used to configure internal control traffic flows the egress priority queue is Q6.

Scheduler

The scheduler algorithm implemented inside the Radio Interface module is High Queue Pre-empt: when
a packet arrives in the higher priority queue it is immediately transmitted.

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2.8.8 Cross-connection

SLOT 3 (PDH) SLOT 4 (RADIO)

SLOT 5 SLOT 6 (RADIO)

SLOT 7 SLOT 8

ETH 4
ETH 1

ETH 2

ETH 3
Figure 36. Cross-connection

The cross-connections between slots and between slot and Ethernet user ports are realized with a Layer-
2 Ethernet Switch inside the Main Core.

The decision made by the switch to forward the received packet is based on the destination MAC address.

2.8.8.1 E1 Cross-connection

Each E1 can be cross connected independently.

E1 can be cross connected to any of the following interfaces:

Radio interface

Ethernet interface

Each E1 (board #, port #) must be associated to a signal flow ID.

2.8.8.2 Ethernet Cross-connection

Ethernet cross connection is based on Ethernet switching (level 2).

According to destination address each packet is switched to the correct port, as reported in an Address
Resolution Table (ART).

If destination address is not present in the ART a flooding mechanism is foreseen.

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2.8.9 Synchronization for PDH/DATA

2.8.9.1 Synchronization

TDM data flow is fragmented and the fragments are transmitted over a Packet Switched Network (PSN);

The received fragments need to be reassembled in the original TDM data flow at the original bit rate

Two main methods can be used to recover at the RX site, the original bit rate:

Differential clock recovery: recalculation of the original clock based of the Delta respect to a
reference clock that is available at both TX and RX site (Differential: used in case of clock
distribution on the whole network. Its more reliable than Adaptive; also used in TDM2TDM traffic
(MPR to MPR)).

Adaptive clock recovery: based on the average rate at which the packets (fragments) arrive at RX
site (Adaptive: simpler network, but performances depends on the PDV (Packet Delay Variation)
in the Network. Always used when the reference clock isnt distributed on the whole network).

Note

In meshed networks (rings) do not close the synchronisation configuration.

2.8.9.1.1 Differential clock recovery

End End
System1 System2
IWF PSN
PSN IWF

Common reference clock IS available at both Ends.

IWF system, at RX side, generate output clock based on RTP TimeStamps which are sent together with
each Fragments.

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2.8.9.1.2 Adaptive clock recovery

End End
System1 System2
IWF PSN
PSN IWF

Common reference clock is NOT available at both Ends.

IWF system, at RX side, generate output clock based on data arrival rate: TDM clock is slowly adjusted
to maintain the average fill level of a jitter buffer at its midpoint.

2.8.9.2 Synchronization interface

Each Network Element must have a reference clock (NEC), which will be distributed to each board of the
NE. Such clock is a 25 MHz generated in the CORE Module in the Clock Reference Unit (CRU) function.

The NEC also provides a Sync Out port on the Core Module.

The NEC is locked to a Synchronization Source.

The sources can be:

[1] Free Run Local Oscillator.

[2] Any E1 available at input traffic interfaces (the specific E1 port has to be chosen)

[3] A specific synchronization signal available from the dedicated Sync-In port, which can be configured
according to the following options:

a) 2.048 MHz, electrical levels according G.703, clause 13


b) 5 MHz, + 6 dBm into 50 , sine-wave
c) 10 MHz, + 6 dBm into 50 , sine-wave.

[4] The Symbol Rate of the Rx signal of any available Radio direction (the specific Radio Port has to
be chosen).

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Figure 37. Synchronization

All the NEC has to be configured as Master or Slave.

Only one Master is allowed in the network.

If Master,
The Restoration Mode can be Revertive and Not Revertive
The Primary sources must be chosen among 1), 2) or 3).
If the selected Master Primary Source is 1)
then the Master Secondary Source doesn't need to be selected because the Primary is
never supposed to fail.
If the selected Master Primary Source is 2) or 3)
then Master Secondary Source must be selected among 1), 2) or 3).

If Slave,
The Restoration Mode is fixed to Revertive.
The Primary Source must chosen between 3) and 4)
Slave primary sources is allowed to be 3) for full indoor configuration and future Piling
configuration
The Secondary Source can be chosen among 1), 2) or 3).

Each Module will mute its own Synchronization clock in case of Fail Alarm.

For each available sync source, the CRU detects the signal Degrade Alarm on each available sync
source. Such Signal Degrade alarm raises also in case of muted (missing) clock.

The Signal Degrade Alarm relevant to the selected Synchronization Source, or the relevant Card Fail,
causes the switching of the Synchronization Source.

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3 NE Management by software application

3.1 Network Element Overview


The Network Element Overview (NETO) is the starting point of the CT application.

NETO functions require to know the NE identity by means of the related IP Address.

Only one NE can be managed in a NETO session.

User Interface is provided by the NETO Main View described below.

3.1.1 Main view


When NETO starts, the main view screen is shown in Figure 38.

Figure 38. NETO main view: initial screen

This screen has three specific areas:

NE Configuration area: displays NE general information (left side);

Status & Alarms area: reports supervision status and alarms (right side);

Discovered NEs: in the lower part is shown the list of the discovered NEs. With a double click on
a row the IP address of the NE in the row automatically is written in the NE Info field

"Show" and "Alarm Monitor" buttons are enabled when a NE is supervised only. Supervision starts as
soon as the operator writes an IP address in the specific field and press the "OK" button.

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NETO Main view can also be reduced by using the shrink glass ( ) button in the Menu Bar.

Figure 39 shows the reduced NETO view, allowing the operator to save screen space while continuously
checking supervision and alarms status. Gray icons mean that supervision is not active. The magnifying
glass ( ) button allows to show the normal NETO main view (see Figure 38).

The alarm severity icon (shown in Figure 38 and Figure 39) appears in operating system "tray bar", close
to system clock and other system software icons.

Figure 39. NETO main view: reduced screen

This icon also has a specific tooltip, visible when mouse cursor is moved over it, that will show: name of
application, NE IP address, and highest severity alarms number. The tray-bar icon is present in the Win-
dows system bar (in the lower part of the screen). The tray-bar icon takes the color of the most severe
alarm. The tray-bar icon is not interactive and does not present any menu or executable command if
clicked either with left or right mouse button.

3.1.2 NE Configuration area


The panel is divided in three sections:

[1] NE Info section, containing information related to NE addressing;

[2] NE Description section, with information about NE characteristics;

[3] Command Buttons section, providing buttons to manage NETO functions.

3.1.2.1 NE Information

This area is related to wanted NE identification (Figure 40).

Figure 40. NETO NE Configuration View: NE Information

"IP Address" field displays the actual NE IP address used by NETO functions.

"OK" button will start supervision on specified NE, if reachable. Keyboard shortcut "Alt + o" behaves as
clicking on "OK" button with mouse.

Whether the IP address is correctly written, other than clicking on "OK" button, supervision process will
start on specified NE by pressing "enter" (carriage return) key on keyboard.

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3.1.2.2 NE Description

This area contains some parameters displaying general information about the supervised NE (Figure 41).

Figure 41. NETO NE Configuration View: NE Description

Parameters can be read and modified (and applied to NE using the "Apply" button).

Please note that changing these labels values will also automatically update NETO window title content:
window title will always contain "Site Name" of supervised NE. Keyboard shortcut "Alt + a" behaves the
same as clicking on "Apply" button with mouse.

3.1.2.3 Command Buttons

Figure 42 shows command buttons available through NETO.

Figure 42. NETO NE Configuration View: Command Buttons

"Show" button will start WebEML (JUSM/CT) application on a supervised NE.

"Alarm Monitor" button starts AM application. Both buttons will be enabled when NE is supervised only.
For more details refer to par. 6.3.1.1.

"Exit" button will close NETO, stopping a possibly running supervision and closing all related applications.

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + S" behaves as clicking on "Show" button with mouse. Keyboard shortcut "Alt +
m" behaves as clicking on "Alarm Monitor" button with mouse. Key-board shortcut "Alt + E" behaves as
clicking on "Exit" button with mouse.

3.1.3 Status & Alarms area


Information on supervision status and active alarms are shown in this area (Figure 43).

Figure 43. Main View: Status & Alarms

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Round-shaped icons change their colours according to current NETO functions and situation. With
respect to "Supervision" status:

green colour means that supervision function is ongoing,

red colour means that NE link does not work,

gray icons mean that supervision is not active (to be started).

Alarm synthesis contains the list of the alarms listed by severity: whether an icon is not gray, means that
such kind of severity contains one alarm at least. "Alarm Monitor" button shown in Figure 42 opens the
Alarm Monitor application external tool.

3.1.4 Supervision Function


The supervision function allows operator registering a new manager inside NE MIB and performing cyclic
(periodic) monitoring on connection.

To start supervision, the operator must specify NE IP address in the "IP Address" field and then simply
press "OK" button.

If supervision succeeds, screen is updated with information retrieved from NE and supervision icon
changes its colour from gray to green stating NE is correctly supervised.

When a supervision error, a link down or other problems arise during supervision, icon will become red.
Alarm Synthesis area will be updated as well. Clicking on "Show" button, NETO will open the WebEML
(JUSM/CT) for MPR equipment.

To close an ongoing supervision, simply click on "Exit" button (this will also close NETO) or change NE
IP address and click "OK" button to start supervision procedure on a different NE (this will stop previous
supervision).

3.1.5 Menu bar

(New)

(Open)

NETO can manage and organize a list of available NEs by showing operator a table containing such data.

Using both (New) and (Open) icons, the operator will be able to open NEs table modal window
(see Figure 44).

"Open" icon allows opening a previously saved file containing a list of NEs.

"New" icon allows creating a new list, specifying the file name containing its data, only when those data
will be saved. Window allows the operator managing its NEs data by:

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"Get Current" button is used to read information from main NETO view. This operation will always
add a new line in NE list table with all information related to currently supervised NE. This happens
even though a NE with corresponding IP address is still present in the list;

"New" button, adding a new NE from scratch. This allows the operator to fill the "IP Address" field
only with its needed NE.

"Remove" button, removing a selected NE;

"Set Current" button, filling main NETO view IP address with datum from selected NE. The operator
must pre-viously select a valid line in NEs table and then click on "Set Current" button so filling NETO
main win-dow data. This operation will automatically close the NE list window but does not start
supervision on set NE;

"Save" button, saving table list in a specified file.

All data are saved in a custom XML format called "NETO" and this structured file will contain all data shown
in Figure 38 related to all NEs added to the list.

Figure 44. NETO List Management

The operator can have its own NEs lists repository, containing all .NETO files that it produced with NEs
information inside. To close this window click on "Close" button. The operator can see the data related
to NEs as shown in Figure 44. As for NETO main window, even NE list window allows using keyboard and
hotkeys to perform operations. Through:

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + g" behaves as clicking on "Get Current" button with mouse;

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + s" behaves as clicking on "Set Current" button with mouse;

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + n" behaves as clicking on "New" button with mouse;

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + r" behaves as clicking on "Remove" button with mouse;

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + v" behaves as clicking on "Save" button with mouse;

Keyboard shortcut "Alt + c" behaves as clicking on "Close" button with mouse.

(Magnifying glass)

NETO Main view can also be reduced by using the shrink glass ( ) button.

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Suggested usage sequence for NETO interface and NE list

1) Fill NETO main view "IP Address" field with NE IP address;

2) Start supervision by clicking "Ok" button;

3) Open the NEs table (any method, through "New" or "Open" button);

4) Click on "Get Current";

5) "Save" the list and "Close" the list window.

This operation will produce a clean and up-to-date NEs table list. The NE table lists are not updated, if
the operator will modify, NE site name site location or even IP address. Such data are used for references
purposes, but the operator must take care to keep them updated.

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3.2 Main View
The Main View Area manages all domains from which the operator can start. It is organized with tab pan-
els, e.g. many windows placed one upon another. Each window is selectable (placing it on top of the oth-
ers) with a tab shown on the top.

Two Main views are possible according to the MSS version:

MSS-8 (refer to Figure 45)

MSS-4 (refer to Figure 46)

3.2.1 Tab-panels
Each tab-panel represents a set of functions. The following tab-panels are present:

Equipment (to manage the equipment configuration)

Schemes (to manage the protection schemes in 1+1 configuration)

Synchronization (to manage the synchronization)

Connections (to manage the cross-connections)

The following figure shows the Main view organization.

Figure 45. MSS-8 Main view

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Figure 46. MSS-4 Main view

Each tab-panel consists of three areas:

Resource-Tree Area: displays all the available resources of the NE.

Resource-List Area: may be represented by: Tabular View or Graphical View.

Tabular View: displays a tabular representation of the selected resource. As default, no tabular
element is shown.

Graphical View: displays a graphical representation of the selected resource. As default, no


tabular element is shown.

Resource-Detail Area: displays detailed information of a selected item in the Resource List area.
As a default, no entry view is displayed as a consequence of the default behavior of the Resource
List area.

Figure 45. is the entry point of the application and provides basic diagnostic and configuration functions.
Following multiple main views are available:

Equipment view, for Equipment configuration;

Radio view, for Radio domain (double click on a Radio unit);

PDH view, for PDH domain (double click on a PDH unit);

Core view, for Core and Ethernet domain (double click on a Core unit).

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Navigation from main view to multiple main views (related to the equipment components) can be done
by simply double-clicking on the component graphical representation. Such operation will open a new win-
dow containing selected secondary view. Starting from main view, the operator will also see all slots and
ODUs layout. Each slot contains schematics of available board (if present) together with status and other
details. Slots schematics will in fact contain usual alarms information with a clarifying coloured icon that
reports the same icon visible in tree view.

Other icons are:


On the right of the unit front panel, a new icon could be a check mark ( ) or a switch symbol ( ).
: it means the slot is active;

: it means the slot is in stand-by mode.


As shown in Figure 45., an X-shaped icon ( ) will be added on the left to slots when some cross
connections are related to it.

3.2.2 Main Tool Bar Area


This area contains a selection of handy quick-access buttons for common features.

Left arrow to previous screen;


Second button: not operative;
Right arrow to next screen;
Block Diagram View (refer to par. 3.5.5 on page 150);
Current Configuration View (refer to par. 3.5.6 on page 157);
Cross-Connections (refer to par. 3.4.5 on page 111);
Segregated ports (refer to par. 3.4.5.1.4 on page 114);
Performance Monitoring tool (refer to par. 3.15 on page 208).

3.2.3 Severity Alarm Area


The CT provides an alarm functionality that informs the operator on the severity of the different alarms
in the NE as well as on the number of current alarms. There are five different alarm severity levels. In the
CT these different levels are associated with colors.

Red: Critical alarm (CRI).

Orange: Major alarm (MAJ).

Yellow: Minor alarm (MIN).

Cyan: Warning alarm (WNG).

Blue: Indeterminate (IND).

N.B. The meaning of the icons in the Severity alarm synthesis is:

[1] CRI - Critical alarm


Synthesis of alarms that needs immediate troubleshooting (typical: NE isolation).

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[2] MAJ - Major (Urgent) alarm
Synthesis of alarms that needs immediate troubleshooting.

[3] MIN - Minor (Not Urgent) alarm


Synthesis of alarms for which a deferred intervent can be decided.

[4] WNG - Warning alarm


Synthesis of alarms due to failure of other NE in the network.

[5] IND - Indeterminate alarm


Synthesis of alarms not associated with the previous severities. Not operative.

Each alarm severity is represented by an alarm icon situated in the top left hand corner of the view. These
alarm icons are constantly represented on the different Equipment views (NE view, Board view or Port
view) so that the operator is always aware of the alarms occurring in the system.

Furthermore the shape of the alarm icons in the alarm panel gives an indication of the occurrence of
alarms.

An alarm icon with a circle inside it (and a number at the bottom of the icon) indicates that alarms of the
number and the type defined by the icon are occurring.

An alarm icon with a rectangle inside it indicates that no alarms of the type defined by the icon are occur-
ring.

An alarm icon grayed out indicates that spontaneous incoming alarm notification have been inhibited.

3.2.4 Domain Alarm Synthesis Area


This area contains the bitmaps (more than one) representing the alarms per domain. Each bitmap indi-
cates the number of alarm occurrences for each domain.

The meaning of the icons in the Domain alarm synthesis area is:

[1] EXT - External Point (Housekeeping alarm)


Not implemented in the current release.

[2] EQP Equipment alarm


Synthesis of alarms of the Equipment domain.

[3] TRNS Transmission alarm


Synthesis of alarms of the Transmission domain.

3.2.5 Management State Control Area


The different management states concerning the NE are also represented via icons located in the top right
corner of the equipment views. These icons are (from up to down):

[1] Icon with a key symbol: Local Access state: indicates whether the NE is managed by a craft terminal
or by the OS

[2] COM icon: Operational state: indicates whether or not the communication with the OS is established.

[3] SUP icon: Supervision state: indicates whether or not the NE is under OS supervision.

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[4] OS icon: OS isolation.

[5] NTP Server Status icon.

[6] AC icon: abnormal condition state: indicates whether some abnormal conditions have been recog-
nized. The operator can visualize them with the Diagnosis Abnormal condition list menu.

N.B. As for the alarm icons, a rectangular management state icon represents the stable state while
a circular icon shape represents an unstable management state.

The meaning of the icons in the Management State Control Panel is:

[1] Local Access State


GREEN LED: Indicates that the Crat Terminal has the OS permission to manage the NE (granted).
CYAN LED: Indicates that the Crat Terminal has not the OS permission to manage the NE (denied).

[2] COM NE rechable/unreachable


GREEN LED: Identifies the Enable operational state of the connection between NE and Craft Ter-
minal (link down).
RED LED: Identifies the Disable operational state of the connection between NE and Craft Terminal
(link down).

[3] SUP Supervision state


GREEN LED: NE is under supervision
BROWN LED: NE is not under supervision
Used in the OS.

[4] OS OS isolation

[5] NTP Network Timing Protocol


BROWN LED: Protocol disabled
GREEN LED: Protocol enabled, but the two servers are unreachable.
CYAN LED: Protocol enabled and one of the two servers is reachable.

[6] AC Abnormal Condition


GREEN LED: Normal operating condition.
CYAN LED: Detection of an ABNORMAL operative condition. Type: switch forcing.

3.2.6 Selection Criteria


Each tree node consists of possibly three symbols and a label. The first optional symbol indicates structure
state: if symbol is , three can be expanded showing its contained lower levels. Tree structure can be
collapsed if symbol is . With no symbol, node represents a tree leaf. Second symbol is the graphical
representation of resource itself. Third symbol is alarm status of component. The operator can select
resource by clicking with mouse to perform the action dependent on click type. Resource Detail Area
related to the selected item is displayed.

Each resource listed above may be selected by using the mouse by a:

Single left click;

Double left click

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Single left click:

By a single left click the resource is highlighted. This selection causes the activation of the resource list
area, e.g., every time the operator selects a resource in the resource tree area the corresponding data
are displayed in the Resource list area.

Double left click:

Double click operation on resource tree items allows the operator expanding tree structure, so activating
the display/update of resource list area, that will display same information as for single click operation.
As soon as a node is expanded, another double click on such node would collapse tree structure to its
closed view.

Button Policy

The possible buttons for selection are the following:

Apply this button activates the modify, but it does not close the window

Cancel this button closes the window without modifying the parameters displayed in the window

OK this button activates the modify and closes the window

Close this button closes the window

Help this button provides the help management for the functions of the supporting window.

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3.3 How to configure a new equipment
The recommended sequence to configure the NE is the following:

[1] Enable the plug-in units: refer to TAB-PANEL EQUIPMENT (Equipment)

[2] Configure the Core unit: refer to CORE VIEW for CORE and ETHERNET DOMAIN (this menu
opens with double click on a Core unit) (Core domain)

[3] Configure the Radio unit: refer to RADIO VIEW for RADIO DOMAIN (this menu opens with double
click on a Radio unit) (Settings)

[4] Configure the PDH unit: refer to PDH VIEW for PDH DOMAIN (this menu opens with double click
on a PDH unit) (PDH unit configuration)

[5] Configure the Synchronization: refer to TAB-PANEL SYNCHRONIZATION (Synchronization)

[6] Configure the NE time: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (NE Time)

[7] Configure the System parameters: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (System Settings)

[8] Create the Cross-connections: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (Xconnections)

[9] Configure IP/SNMP: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (Network Configuration)

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3.4 Menu Configuration

3.4.1 Menu NE Time


The NE local time can be displayed and/or re-aligned to the OS time basis.

From the Configuration pull down menu, select the NE Time option.

The following dialogue box opens, from which the local NE time can be set.

The NE Time dialogue box displays the current NE time and the current OS time.

To re-align the NE time to the OS time, click on the Set NE Time With OS Time check box and click the
Apply pushbutton to validate.

The Refresh pushbutton causes the refresh of the screen.

The NTP Status field is a read-only field, which shows the configuration regarding the NTP (Network Time
Protocol), if the protocol has been enabled and configured in Menu Configuration Network Config-
uration NTP Configuration.

The NTP Status field shows:

status of NTP (enabled/disabled);

IP address of the Main Server, which distributes the time to all the NEs in the network;

IP address of the Spare Server (if any), which replaces the Main Server in case of failure.

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Note: If a change of Change Time Zone on the PC is applied with the JUSM opened, in order to make
it updated on CT Close/Open the JUSM application and Read Time another time.

3.4.2 Menu Network Configuration


To get access the Network Configuration option select the Configuration pull down menu.

The Network Configuration allows to perform the following operations:


Local Configuration: defines the local virtual NE address

NTP Configuration: defines the Network Time Protocol

Ethernet Configuration: defines the configuration parameters necessary to manage the local NE
providing a LAN Ethernet interface

IP Configuration: which comprises:

IP static routing configuration: defines the Host/Network destination


address for IP static routing

OSPF Area configuration: defines the Open Shortest Path First address

IP Point-To-Point Configuration: defines the IP address of the interfaces


which use the PPP protocol (not implemented)

Routing information: shows a summary of the information relevant to the routing which has been
configured.

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3.4.2.1 Local Configuration

Select the Configuration pull down menu.

Select the Network Configuration option and then, from the cascading menu, the Local Configuration
option.

The dialogue box opens, which allows to configure the local IP address of the NE.

This local IP address is the IP address associated to a virtual interface and to the other interfaces which
use the PPP protocol (the TMN-RF channels).

Default IP address: 10.0.1.2

Fixed default mask: 255.255.255.255

Apply button is used to perform a configuration change of the data contained in the dialogue box and
closes it; the dialogue is visible until the end of the operations and a wait cursor is displayed.

Close button closes the dialogue.

Help button provides some useful information on the dialogue.

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3.4.2.2 NTP Configuration

This menu allows to enable the NTP (Network Time Protocol).

Put a check mark in the NTP protocol field to enable the protocol and write in the Main Server address
field the IP address of the server, which is in charge to distribute the time to all the NEs in the network.
In the Spare Server address field write the IP address of the Spare Server, if any.

The Server reachability field is a read-only field, which shows the reachability of the NTP servers. The
following information can appear:

"Main server reachable"

"Spare server reachable"

"None servers reachable"

"Both servers reachable"

Click on Refresh to update the screen.

Click on Apply to send to the NE the NTP Configuration.

3.4.2.3 Ethernet Configuration

This menu is not implemented.

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3.4.2.4 IP Static Routing Configuration

By selecting IP static routing configuration a dialog-box opens, which allows to configure the param-
eters for IP Static Routing Configuration.

The following fields and data are present:

[1] IP Address: allows to define the IP address necessary to reach a specific Host

[2] IP Mask: allows to define the IP Mask to reach a network

[3] Default Gateway IP Address: allows to define the address of the next hop gateway

[4] Interface type: allows to use point to point interfaces made available by the NE.

Apply button is used to perform a configuration change of the data contained in the complete table and
close the view; the view is visible until the end of the operations and a wait cursor is displayed.

New button is used to insert a new page.

Delete button is used to delete the selected page.

Close button closes the dialogue without changing of the data.

In the Host or Network Address Choice field select:

Host to address to a single IP address;

Network to address to a range of IP addresses.

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This is the IP interface to a host or network. Typically used at a spur to interface a host over the RF path.
In this scenario, the Default Gateway IP Address is 0.0.0.0 and the IP Mask (greyed out) is 0.0.0.0. Also
typically used at an end terminal in a radio link for interface with the network.

In the Default Gateway or Point to Point I/F Choice select:

Default Gateway IP Address for the Ethernet interface;

Point to Point Interface Index for the NMS channels

WARNING: No pending (open) static routes are allowed.


The default software uses first the static routes and then the dynamic routes. An open
static route is always considered as a preferential path.

If in the screen the Default Gateway IP Address check box has been selected, write in the Default Gate-
way IP Address field below the relevant IP address.
By pressing Create pushbutton it is possible to create new or change existing IP static routes.

3.4.2.5 OSPF Area Configuration

By selecting OSPF Area Configuration a dialog-box opens, which allows to configure the parameters
for OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) Area Table Configuration.

The following fields and data are present:

OSPF Area IP Address

OSPF Area Range Mask

OSPF Area Stub

The fields give a synthetical information that includes all the addresses (specific to a NE and to a Network)
in an Area.

Apply button is used to perform a configuration change of the data contained in the complete RAP table
and close the view; the view is visible until the end of the operations and a wait cursor is displayed.

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New button is used to insert a new page.

Delete button is used to delete the selected page.

Close button closes the dialogue without changing of the data.

WARNING: Area 0 is not managed.

WARNING: If the area is a Stub area the functionalities of the Remote Craft Terminal are not fully
guaranteed.

WARNING: When the area is a Stub area, all the interfaces (NMS and Ethernet) must be defined
Stub".

By pressing Create pushbutton a new screen opens.

N.B. 3 areas max. can be created.

In this new screen write the IP address, the IP mask and select the flag (True/False).

3.4.2.6 IP Point to Point Configuration

This menu is not implemented.

3.4.2.7 Routing Information

Select the Configuration pull down menu. Select the Network Configuration and then from the cas-
cading menu, the Routing information option.

A dialog-box opens: this screen is a read-only screen and displays the routing parameters currently active
on the NE.

The pushbutton Refresh allows to refresh the information shown in the screen.

The Close button closes the dialogue without changing of the data.

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3.4.3 Menu Alarm Severities
This menu is not implemented in the current release.

3.4.4 Menu System Settings


This menu allows the system configuration, providing the setting of some parameters for the NE setup.

The NE configuration tab-panel has 5 fields:

1) Tributary Port Configuration

2) Quality Of Service

3) DHCP

4) Event and Alarm Log

5) NE MAC Address

Figure 47. General System Configuration panel

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[1] Tributary Port Configuration

This field allows to set the suitable impedance of the E1 stream (Unbalanced 75 ohms/Balanced 120
ohm). To activate the new impedance, click on Apply.

[2] Quality Of Service

This field allows to set the suitable Quality Of Service (Disabled/DiffServ/802.1p). To activate the new
value, click on Apply.

The Ethernet switch provides a Quality of Service mechanism to control all streams. If the QoS is
disabled, all traffic inside the switch has the same priority; this means that for each switch port there
is only one queue (FIFO) therefore the first packet that arrives is the first that will be transmitted.

The following values are available:

IEEE std 802.1p: the packet is examined for the presence of a valid 802.1P user-priority tag.
If the tag is present the correspondent priority is assigned to the packet;
DiffServ: each packet is classified based on DSCP field in the IP header to determine the pri-
ority.

[3] DHCP

The DHCP server configures automatically IP address, IP mask and default gateway of the PC
Ethernet interface used to reach the NE.

The PC must be configured to get automatically an IP address.

The DHCP server uses an address pool of only one IP address, defined according to the NE Ethernet
port IP address:

NE Ethernet port IP address plus one, if this address is not a direct broadcast address,
otherwise NE Ethernet port IP address minus one.

The IP mask is set to the mask of the NE local Ethernet port and the default gateway is set to the
NE IP address.

The lease time is fixed to 5 minutes.

To activate the DHCP server, select Enabled and click on Apply.

[4] Event and Alarm Log

As default the Logging is enabled. If set to "Disabled" the events are not sent to the Event Log
Browser application.

[5] NE MAC Address

This field is a read-only field, which shows the MAC address of the NE. This MAC address must be
used in the cross-connection with TDM2Eth profile.

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3.4.5 Menu Cross connections

3.4.5.1 Main Cross Connection View

The Main view (refer to Figure 48.) is a graphical representation of Cross-connectable slots. Slots and
Ethernet ports (represented by connectors) are arranged according to the equipment configuration:

There are a maximum of 5 Ethernet ports placed on the bottom, ordered from 1 to 5 from left to right.
Port 4 is visible only when set to transport mode. If Ethernet port 4 is set to TMN, icon 4 is not
shown. Port 5 is visible if in the Core unit has been installed and enabled the SFP optical plug-in.

There are a maximum of 6 (PDH/Radio) slots (placed as in the MSS sub-rack).

When two units are protected, the 2 protected slots are linked by a dashed line, (e.g.: Slot#5 RADIO is
protected with Slot#6 RADIO).

Figure 48. Main Cross-Connections View

Note

Ethernet port#5 will appear only if the optional optical SFP plug-in has been installed and
enabled in the Core unit. To enable the SFP plug-in go to the Setting tab-panel of
the Core unit in the Equipment tab-panel.

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3.4.5.1.1 Connectors

The connectors representing the MSS slots are start- and end-point for actual cross-connections. By
using the mouse drag-and-drop operations the operator can create cross-connections through these
points. These connectors have specific icons:

identifies Ethernet RJ-45 connector (Ethernet ports);

identifies PDH slots;

identifies Radio slots.

The connectors have different colours depending on the associated slots state:

White: a connector able to accept a cross-connection and has no active cross-connection yet;

Green: a connector able to accept a cross-connection and already has one active cross-connection
at least;

Blue: a connector not able to accept a cross-connection.

After a cross-connection creation between the points, their state will change and a line will be drawn
between the two cross-connected points (see Figure below).

Figure 49. Cross-connections Example

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3.4.5.1.2 Graphical Area

This area contains a panel and various components representing NE cross-connectable slots (or con-
nectors). The operator can directly edit with the mouse this graphical area to visually create and modify
cross-connections between available connectors: the Figure below shows an example of ongoing cross-
connections configuration.

Figure 50. Creating cross-connection between PDH and radio

Some steps (modification dialogs, see paragraph below) would differ depending on cross-connection
types.

3.4.5.1.3 Buttons

Figure 51. Cross-connections buttons

At the bottom in the menu there are three buttons:

Apply: will apply changes (if any) to NE. After theyve been applied it will update graphical state by
performing a refresh; if the operation completes without errors the sub-sequent refresh wont pro-
duce any visual change (in other words, the state of the NE will be consistent with what is shown
in the GUI) anyway, clicking on Apply button will show a progress dialog.

Refresh: reload the data from the NE and update the graphical state; any modification performed
and not applied will be lost.

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Close: close the cross-connection view, and return to the caller (JusmMainView), any modification
performed and not applied will be lost.

Help: opens the Help On Line.

3.4.5.1.4 Segregated port view

From the Cross Connection view by pressing Alt+W the Segregated Port view opens.

Figure 52. Segregated Port View (default configuration)

In the default configuration (shown in Figure 52.) all the slots and Ethernet ports in Core unit are cross-
connectedable each other (all the slots/ports are not segregated).

To go back to the Cross Connection View press Alt+W.

3.4.5.1.4.1 How to segregate slots or ports

Double click on a slot icon or an Ethernet port icon and select the slots/ports that can be connected (this
means that the not selected slots/ports cannot be connected; they are segregated).

Example: with a double click on the icon of Slot#7 RADIO Figure 53. opens.

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Figure 53.

To segregate Slot#7 RADIO from Ethernet ports#2, #3, #4, #5 in the Core unit, click on the relevant square
to remove the check mark, as show in Figure 54.

Figure 54.

By clicking OK the Segregated Port view opens, which now shows (with dashed lines) the segregated
ports, as shown in Figure 55.

Figure 55. Segregated Ports

With the mouse pointer on a dashed line the following message will appear: "Dashed lines mean that these
ports cannot be cross-connected".

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3.4.5.2 How to create a cross-connection

A cross-connection between two points is performed by:

1) Moving the mouse pointer on the source slot;

2) Press the left button and, while keeping button pressed, move mouse pointer onto destination slot;

3) Release the left button.

If the action involves two cross-connectable slots, a dialog will appear allowing the operator to setup a
cross-connection. Looking at Figure 56., it is possible to see different aspects of configuration created by
the operator:

Slot#8 PDH is cross-connected to Slot#7 radio;

Slot#4 PDH is cross-connected to Slot#7 radio;

Slot#3 PDH is cross-connected to Ethernet Port#1;

Slot#5 RADIO (and Slot#6 RADIO) are cross-connected to Ethernet Port#2;

Slot#8 PDH is cross-connected to Ethernet Port#4;

Slot#4 PDH (blue) could not accept more cross-connections;

Slot#3 PDH (green) could accept more cross-connections;

Radio slots#5 and #6 (green) could accept more cross-connections.

Each connection line is coloured according to slots types it connects (as shown in Figure 56.):

PDH-Radio connection: black line;

PDH-Eth connection: blue line;

Radio-Radio connection: red line;

Radio-Eth line: green line.

These colours will be applied to the graphical area, when the operator releases the mouse button above
cross-connection destination slot.

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Figure 56. Actual coloured view example

3.4.5.2.1 Creation Dialogs

When connecting two linkable slots through a cross-connection, a dialog will appear, close to the desti-
nation point. This dialog contains connection information, depending on start- and end-point of connection
itself. Each cross-connection has different parameters and required data and information will depend on
ongoing cross-connecting. Dialog boxes can ask for specific Flow Ids through a set of checkboxes, a field
to fill-in external (incoming) Flow Ids, Ethernet parameters and so on. All the dialog boxes have a specific
title describing the building cross-connection; this states both slots numbers and types (in Figure 50.:
Slot#3 PDH is cross-connected with third radio slot).

The Ok button will visually save the current modifications (this means that data are graphically saved
only, not sent to the NE!).

The Cancel button will graphically discard ongoing cross-connection, keeping the previous graphical.

3.4.5.2.2 Information Dialogs

By using the right-click button, the operator can gain information about the graphical representation of the
cross-connections. This information can be obtained on both connectors and connection lines. The oper-
ator can perform different actions in the area, depending on target and mouse-click type:

Connector, right click: a dialog with information about all selected tributaries for that connector will
appear.

Line, right click: a dialog with information about selected tributaries for that line will appear.

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3.4.5.2.3 Possible Cross-Connections

The Cross-connections to be implemented are:

[1] PDH-Radio

[2] Radio-Radio

[3] Radio-Eth

[4] PDH-Eth

After a cross-connection has been created, two cross-connected slots are visually linked by a line: a line
in the context of this application represents a bundle of flows, which share same source and destination
entity.

[1] PDH Radio

By dragging a connection between a PDH slot and a radio slot, the operator will see the configuration dia-
log in Figure 57.

Configuration parameters will ask to specify Flow ID number, as associated in PDH slot.

Once correctly completed the cross-connection configuration and clicked on OK button, the operator will
see a black line describing the PDH-radio cross-connection defined (see Figure 57.).

Figure 57. PDH-Radio configuration dialog

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Figure 58. Completed PDH-radio cross-connection

[2] Radio Radio

By dragging a connection between two different radio slots, the operator will see the configuration dialog
in Figure 59.

To create other cross-connections drag other lines between the two radio slots and repeat the operations.

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Figure 59. Radio-radio configuration dialog

Configuration parameters will introduce Flow ID number, as coming from remote radio signal, and a
parameter related to profile and TDM Clock Source. The operator has to fill in data to complete the cross-
connection configuration. The operator can use ranges and values.

To create in one shot several cross-connections the operator can use in the Flow Id field the notation
[n-m] to create all Flow IDs from n to m, both included. If the operator wants to specify different Flow Ids
grouping them without using ranges, commas can used to separate values.

For example:

by entering in the FlowId field 10-15 in one shot will be created all the cross connections from FlowId
10 to FlowId 15 (10 and 15 included);

by entering in the FlowId field 10, 200, 250 in one shot will be created the cross connections with
FlowId 10, FlowId 200 and FlowId 250.

It is not possible to merge the two solutions (ranges and values) by writing [n-m],[a-b], ... and so on. Based
on used input style (ranges or values), the operator will see two different confirmation dialogs.

Once correctly completed the cross-connection configuration and clicked on OK button, the operator will
see a red line describing the Radio-Radio cross-connection defined (see Figure 60.).

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Figure 60. Completed radio-radio cross-connection

[3] Radio Ethernet

By dragging a connection between a Radio slot and an Ethernet port, the operator will see the configu-
ration dialog in Figure 61.

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Figure 61. Radio-Ethernet configuration dialog (ranges)

By using [n-m] the operator will specify adding all Flow IDs from n to m, both included. If the operator wants
to specify different Flow Ids grouping them without using ranges, it can use commas to separate values,
as in Figure 62.

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Figure 62. Radio-Ethernet configuration dialog (values)

It is not possible to merge the two solutions (ranges and values) by writing [n-m],[a-b], and so on. Based
on used input style (ranges or values), the operator will see two different confirmation dialogs.

Once correctly completed the cross-connection configuration and clicked on OK button, the operator will
see a green line describing the Radio-Ethernet cross-connection defined.

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Figure 63. Completed radio-Ethernet cross-connection

[4] PDH Ethernet

By dragging a connection between a PDH slot and an Ethernet port, the operator will see the configuration
dialog in Figure 64.

To create other cross-connections drag other lines between the PDH slot and the Ethernet port and repeat
the operations.

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Figure 64. PDH-Ethernet configuration dialog

Configuration parameters will introduce Flow ID number, as associated in PDH slot, and all parameters
related to such Flow ID. The operator has to put the correct MAC address to complete the cross-con-
nection configuration.

Once correctly completed the cross-connection configuration and clicked on OK button, the operator will
be able to see a green line describing the PDH-Ethernet cross-connection defined (see Figure 65.).

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Figure 65. Completed PDH-Ethernet cross-connection

Considering a connection to Ethernet ports, when a port reaches its full capacity, the operator will see a
specific report.

WARNING: Cross-Connections with TDM2Eth Service Profile

In these types of cross-connections the destination MAC address of the adjacent NE (unicast address in
case of unprotected configurations, multicast address in case of protected configurations) must be
inserted during the cross-connection creation. In the following figures are given 3 examples.

Figure 66. No protection

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Figure 67. 1+1 radio protection between NE B and C

Figure 68. 1+1 EPS protection in NE A

Note

The unicast MAC address of the NE is shown in the System Settings menu (Bridge Address)

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To assign the multicast MAC address of a NE start from the unicast MAC address and change a digit in
the first pair of digits in order to generate an odd binary number: example change the first pair of the
address from 00 to 01.

3.4.5.3 How to modify a cross-connection

An existing cross-connection can be modified by double-clicking with the left mouse button on its symbolic
line.

Now from the screen you have to delete the cross-connections by removing the check mark from the rel-
evant Flow Id box and create again a new cross-connections.

3.4.5.3.1 PDH-Radio

In Figure 69., the operator is modifying a previously created cross-connection (in this case Slot#7 PDH
and Slot#5 radio): this action brings up a dialog almost like the creation one, but with some differences
in allowed actions:

Previously assigned tributaries (703 in the example) are active and selected;

Tributaries assigned to another cross-connection (706, 709 and others) are not active and not
selected.

Figure 69. PDH-radio cross-connection modification

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3.4.5.3.2 Radio-Radio

The operator can click on a specific (red) line in order to modify connection parameters. With a double
click with the mouse on the connection line, the dialog window shown in Figure 70. will appear.

Figure 70. Modifying a Radio-Radio cross-connection

Remove the check mark and create again a cross-connection.

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3.4.5.3.3 Radio-Ethernet

The operator can click on specific (green) line in order to modify connection parameters. With a double
click with the mouse on the connection line, the dialog window shown in Figure 71. can be managed by
the operator.

Figure 71. Modifying a Radio-Ethernet cross-connection

Remove the check mark and create again a cross-connection.

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3.4.5.3.4 PDH-Ethernet

The operator can click on specific (blue) line in order to modify connection parameters. With a double click
with the mouse on the connection line, the dialog window shown in Figure 72. can be managed by the
operator.

Figure 72. Modifying a PDH-Ethernet cross-connection

Remove the check mark and create again a cross-connection.

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3.4.6 Menu Profile Management

3.4.6.1 Introduction

After the Start Supervision, each time the operator performs the Show Equipment action, the following
Dialog screen is displayed after the window with JUSM start-up message and before the window with load-
ing bar indicating JUSM start-up progress.

Figure 73. Login window

The operator has to insert the operator name and related password: by clicking on the Apply button, the
parameters are sent to NE.

The default Operator Name is initial.

The default Password is adminadmin.

According to the operator authentication (correct couple username/password) managed by the NE, the
operator will be authorized or not to continue. If the login parameters are not correct, an error message
(Figure 74.) will be displayed, while the Login window is still open for a new attempt. After 3 consecutive
failed attempts the login procedure is closed and JUSM does not start.

Figure 74. Login Failed

On the contrary if the user name and password are correct, JUSM will be started and the operator will be
allowed to perform the actions according to the right related to his profile.

WARNING:The NE rejects usernames and passwords that do not meet the following rules:

Password length: the length must be not less than eight (8) characters under any cir-
cumstances. Moreover the password length must be not longer than 20 characters.

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Password composition: the password can include full ASCII characters set (UPPER/
lower case, numeric and special characters).

Username length: the length must be not longer than 20 characters.

By clicking on the Cancel button, the login procedure is stopped and the JUSM does not start.

3.4.6.2 User Profiles Management

If the operator right allows the profiles management, the operator can perform some actions on the pro-
files.

Under Configuration menu, the Profiles Management menu displays two items:

Users Management

Change Password

These items will be enabled according to the right of user profile recognised at login.

3.4.6.3 User Management

By clicking on Users Management the window displayed in Figure 75. appears.

The operator can perform the following actions:

Create a new User by clicking on the Create button

After the selection of a user in the table, its possible:

Delete an existing User (the Admin user cannot be deleted) by clicking on the Delete button

Change PW (by Administrator) by clicking on the Change PW button.

Figure 75. Profiles Management

By clicking on the Cancel button the Profiles Management window closes.

By clicking on the Help button the help browser will display the help-on-line pages dedicated to this func-
tion.

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3.4.6.4 How to Create a New User

By clicking on the Create button, the following window appears and allows the user Administrator to create
a new user.

Figure 76. Create User

In this dialog box the operator has to insert the parameters to define the new user and his profile rights:

1. AdminPassword: the password of Administrator for confirmation and validation.

2. UserName: the specific name to be assigned to the new User (if it exists, the action will be failed).

3. Profile: the specific profile to be assigned to the new User.

The supported profiles are:

Administrator: full access also for security parameters


Operator: person in charge to operate at network level, not at radio side; dangerous operations
that require NE reconfiguration at radio site are not permitted including backup/restore and
restart NE features; could change own password
CraftPerson: person in charge for installation and the maintenance at radio site; full access to
NE but not for security parameters, only for own password
Viewer: only to explore the NE

Supported operations by the profiles:

Administrator profile: All the NE parameters are accessible both in writing and reading mode.
Also the management of user accounts is allowed (create/delete user accounts and change
of all passwords).
Operator profile: Full reading access to NE parameters. For writing mode the following param-
eters are allowed to change:
ATPC configuration (enabled, disabled)
Performance Monitoring management
start/stop CD
threshold tables configuration
reset
archiving (only for NMS system)
CraftPerson profile: This operator has the same priviledges of the Administrator, but cannot
manage the user accounts
Viewer profile: This operator can only read and can change his own password.

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4. Password: the specific password to be assigned to the new User.

5. Confirm Password: again the specific password to be assigned for confirmation and validation.

By clicking on Apply button, at first JUSM performs a syntax check of each field: if there are some errors,
JUSM will display the specific message and allows the operator to correct them. If all parameters are cor-
rect, all parameters are sent to NE; after to have automatically closed the window, a message with result
of the action will be displayed.

By clicking on Cancel button, the Create User window closes and no action will be performed.

3.4.6.5 How to Delete a User

After the selection of a User in the Profile Table, by clicking on the Delete button, at first a confirmation
dialog (Figure 77.) will be displayed; then the window to confirm the administrator password will be dis-
played (Figure 78.).

Figure 77. Delete user confirmation

Figure 78. Confirm Administrator Password to Delete a User

By clicking on the Apply button, a message with the result action will be displayed after to have closed
automatically the window above. If the operator clicks on Cancel button the window will closes and no
action is performed.

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3.4.6.6 Change the Password (by the Administrator)

The Administrator User can change the password of another user: select the user in the Profile Table and
then click on Change PW button. The following dialog box is displayed:

Figure 79. Change Password of User by Admin

The admin has to insert his password and the new password for selected user in the two text fields.

By clicking on Apply button, at first JUSM performs a syntax check of each field: if there are some errors,
JUSM will display the specific message and allows the operator to correct them. If all parameters are cor-
rect, all parameters are sent to NE; after to have automatically closed the window, a message with result
of the action will be displayed.

By clicking on Cancel button, the window will be closed.

3.4.6.7 Change Password (by the User)

If the operator wants to change his password, he has to select the Change Password menu item. The
following dialog will be displayed:

Figure 80. Change User Password

The operator has to insert the current password and the new password in the two text fields.

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By clicking on Apply button, at first JUSM performs a syntax check of each field: if there are some errors,
JUSM will display the specific message and allows the operator to correct them. If all parameters are cor-
rect, all parameters will be sent to NE; after to have automatically closed the window, a message with result
of the action will be displayed.

By clicking on Cancel button, the window closes.

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3.5 Menu Diagnosis

3.5.1 Alarms
This menu opens the Alarms Monitor application.

Alarms Monitor is an application which allows to display and store the alarms of all the NEs requiring it.
Alarms Monitor can be also started by clicking on the Alarms Monitor button on Neto.

On the left side of the application, below each NE, two global lists of alarms are displayed:

CURRENT_ALARM shows all the equipment alarms currently present,

ALARM_LOG shows all the equipment alarms currently present and the history of the alarms (i.e.
cleared alarms).

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Note

When an alarm is no longer active it disappears from the two global lists and it is displayed in the
ALARM_LOG list as a cleared alarm

Each global list has some default filters (5 filters for the CURRENT_ALARM list and 8 filters for the
ALARM_LOG list), as follows:

CRI contains all the alarms having a CRITICAL severity

MAJ contains all the alarms having a MAJOR severity

MIN contains all the alarms having a MINOR severity

WRG contains all the alarms having a WARNING severity

IND contains all the alarms having an INDETERMINATE severity

CLR contains all the alarms which are in the CLEARED state, that is, which are no longer active (this
filter is available within the list ALARM_LOG only).

For each list and for each filter, the number of active alarms is shown inside brackets.

These two lists can be filtered using customized filters provided by means of the menu Filters Add a
Filter.

Single clicking on a filter or on a global list on the left part of the screen shows up on the right side the
relevant tab panel with all the alarms.

Note

When the application is opened for the first time, only the tab-panels of the
two global lists are displayed on the right part of the window

At the top right, the field Synthesis shows the number of active alarms for any severity.

The alarms have a different color according to their severity and their state.

Red: CRITICAL alarm

Brown: MAJOR alarm

Yellow: MINOR alarm

Blue: WARNING alarm

White: INDETERMINATE alarm (Note that the equipment has no alarm having such severity)

Green: CLEARED alarm (alarm no longer active).

Within the tab-panel, each alarm is provided with the information below.

Time & Date: date and time of the alarm. The format of date and time is yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss.

Probable cause: name of the probable cause of the alarm.

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Alarm Type: alarm class (TRS = Transmission Alarm alarm not created inside the equipment, but
generated by a connected equipment or due to transmission/propagation problems; EQUIPMENT:
inside alarm of the equipment).

Friendly Name: object of the equipment where the alarm occurred.

Severity: alarm severity.

Add Text: not available.

Specific problem: for some alarms, additional information is provided about the involved resource
(for instance, when a threshold alarm is raised, it states the specific threshold exceeded)

Right-clicking on an alarm row opens the menu shown in the following figure.

Navigate to USM: to navigate to the object involved with the selected alarm and to open the relevant
window. Note: this option is available in the CURRENT_ALARM global list and in the relevant filters
only.

Export Alarm: to create a file containing alarms data. Alarms have to be selected by means of the
menu Select All. Generated file formats are CSV, HTML and XML.

Print current view: it is possible to print the list of the alarms. The Print Dialog box is shown to
choose the printer and set Print range and Copies number.

Select: to select all the alarm of the list (All) or to select none (None) for further use, e.g. to export
alarms to a file.

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The Menu Bar provides the following menus:

File

Filters

Help

A) File Menu

Save Log for selected NE

This menu allows to save a file with one of the two global lists of each NE. Select the global list of a specific
NE, open the Save History menu for the selected NE and enter filename and relevant directory in the open-
ing window.

Load Log to selected NE

By means of this menu it is possible to display the global list of a certain NE previously saved.

Export Alarms

This menu allows to save a file with the alarms of the selected Log. Select the log, select "Export Alarms"
menu, choose the file format (CSV, HTML or HML) and then assign the name of the file.

B) Filters Menu

The Menu Filters provides the following menus:

Add a Filter

Delete Filters

Save Filters As

Load Filters From

Add a Filter

This menus allows to create customized logs adding some new specific filters. The windows which opens
is shown below.

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Filter Name field

Enter the filter name in the Filter Name field.

The filters can be created selecting one of the following fields (or more). To save the created filter click
on the Done pushbutton. (Clicking on the Cancel pushbutton clears the filter configuration). The created
filter appears on the left side of the application.

Scope field

Select APT (Current) to create a filter showing the current alarms only or select Log to create a filter for
current and cleared alarms.

The filter can be applied to all the NEs by selecting All or it can be applied to one or more NEs by selecting
one or more NEs using the mouse.

Alarm Type field

Select Alarm Type to create a filter for the selected type of alarm:

TRS = Transmission Alarm

EQUIPMENT = Equipment alarm

Perceived severity field

Select Perceived severity and then one or more severity levels and/or Cleared state to filter the alarm
having the selected severity levels.

Event Time field

Select Event Time and then enter the starting date (From) and the ending date (To) to filter the alarms
created during that specific time frame only.

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Probable Cause field

Select Probable Cause and then choose a specific alarm (one or more) to filter these particular alarms
only.

Resource field

Put a check mark on the Resource box and write the object name the alarms of which have to be filtered
(if required).

Delete Filters ...

When this menu is selected, the window shown below opens.

By means of this menu the filters previously created can be canceled. Default filters cannot be canceled.

Select one specific NE (or more NEs) in the Scope column, select a specific filter (or more filters) in the
Filters column and then click on the Done pushbutton.

Clicking on the Cancel pushbutton all the selections are cleared.

Save Filters As ...

A default filter, or a filter previously created by means of the Add a filter menu can be saved to be used
for some other LCTs.

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Select in the Scope and Filters columns a specific filter to be saved, enter the filter name in the Name
field, select the Folder where to save the file relevant to filter and then click on the Done pushbutton.

Clicking on the Cancel pushbutton all the selections are cleared.

Load Filters From ...

A filter previously saved can be loaded on the LCT by means of the following menu.

Click on Browse to navigate and then choose the filter file to be loaded. The Scope and the Loaded Fil-
ters columns will show respectively the NE list and the filters list made available by the selected file.

Entering some characters in the Filters Prefix field and then clicking on the Done pushbutton, the inserted
characters are attached before the names of the Loaded Filters. For instance entering <Vim>, the names
of the filters change from APT to VimAPT.

C) Help Menu

This menu shows the Product Version.

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3.5.2 Log Browsing
In the Diagnosis pull-down menu select the Log Browsing option.

Alarm Log option is not available in the current release.

Software Trace Log option is reserved to the Alcatel-Lucent technicians.

Event Log option opens the Event Log browser application.

3.5.2.1 Event Log Browser

Event Log Browser is an application which allows to display all the events occurred in the NE.

An event is meant to be:

a configuration change
a change of the value of an attribute
an automatic switchover
a manual operation carried out by the operator.

The opening window is shown below.

The following information is provided for each event:

Time: date and time of occurrence of the event. The format is week day/month/day hh:mm:ss. Ref-
erence Time (CEST) year.

Notification ID: a unique identifier for the event.

Explanation: a statement built with the event log data to explain what the event represents.

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The Menu Bar provides the following menus:

File

Help

A) File Menu

The Menu File makes available the following menus:

Refresh Tables

Export

Print

Exit

Refresh Tables

By means of this menu the event log is refreshed.

A refresh may be executed as well clicking on the relevant pushbutton below the menu bar.

Export

This menu allows to export the alarm table as a file.

The file can have the HTML format or the CSV format. The file can store all the events (All entries) or
only those selected by means of the pointer of the mouse (Selection).

The Export may be executed as well clicking on the relevant pushbutton below the menu bar.

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Print

It is possible to print the event list (all or just the selected ones). The Print Dialog box shows up allowing
to choose the printer and set print range and number of copies.

The print may be executed as well clicking on the relevant pushbutton below the menu bar.

B) Help Menu

This menu shows the Product Version.

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3.5.3 Remote Inventory
This screen is a read-only screen, which shows all the information on the equipment.

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3.5.4 Abnormal Condition List
The Abnormal Condition List option in the Diagnosis menu displays all the abnormal conditions cur-
rently active in the NE.

An abnormal condition is generated each time a non usual condition is present in the NE, detected auto-
matically (i.e. automatic Tx mute) or as consequence of management systems operation (i.e. force switch-
ing, loopbacks, manual Tx mute).

In the following, the list of the events which cause an abnormal condition:

Forced switch (EPS, RPS, TPS)

Lockout (EPS, RPS, TPS)

Loopback activation

Local radio Tx mute (manual)

Local radio Tx mute (automatic)

Remote radio Tx mute (manual)

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3.5.5 Summary Block Diagram View
The Summary Block Diagram View of the Diagnosis menu displays a global logical view (strictly
related to the physical implementation) highlighting a synthesis of all the alarms and statuses present in
the system.

3.5.5.1 Main Block diagram view

Figure 81. shows an example of the Main block diagram view.

Figure 81. Cross-connection (Main) block diagram

Each block has its Alarm indicator (coloured ball icon) that shows the alarm status (different colors
according to the alarm severity).

In the Main view the current configuration of the PNU is shown, with the equipped units (PDH or Radio),
with the protection schemes and with the cross-connections implemented between the different units and
the different Ethernet ports, if any.

On the RADIO slot icon there is the symbol because on this unit it is possible to activate a loopback
and the symbol because it is also possible to activate a Performance monitoring. If these symbols are
green, it means that the loopback is active or the Perfomance monitoring has been activated.

By clicking on an object it s possible to navigate to specific views. In detail:

by clicking on the Abnormal Condition List box, it is possible to navigate to the Abnormal Condition
List menu;

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by clicking on the NMS Interfaces box, it is possible to navigate to the NMS view in the Core unit;

by clicking on the Ethernet icon in the Cross Connection Matrix, it is possible to navigate to the
Ethernet port view in the Core unit;

by clicking on a PDH slot icon in the Cross Connection Matrix, it is possible to navigate to the sec-
ondary view for the PDH unit;

by clicking on a Radio slot icon in the Cross Connection Matrix, it is possible to navigate to the sec-
ondary view for the Radio unit;

The Refresh button will close all secondary windows, updating the main view one, and re-opening all
previously opened secondary windows, with updated content views.

All diagrams are automatically refreshed. According to the following figures, bold light green lines update
according to the actually NE working way; alarm icons update as well.

The green line is the current active path.

3.5.5.2 PDH unit secondary view

Depending on the configuration, different diagrams are shown to the operator (see Figure 82. to Figure
85.), describing the actual NE status and working mode.

Figure 82. 1+0 block diagram (PDH unit) (without Core protection)

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Figure 83. 1+0 block diagram (PDH unit) (with Core protection)

Figure 84. 1+1 block diagram (PDH units) (without Core protection)

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Figure 85. 1+1 block diagram (PDH units) (with Core protection)

3.5.5.3 Radio unit secondary view

Depending on the configuration, different diagrams are shown to the operator (see Figure 86. to Figure
91.), describing the actual NE status and working mode.

Loopback icons ( ) are shown in green colour ( ) whenever a loopback is active.

Performance monitoring icons ( ) are shown in green whenever a PM is active.

Switch block (EPS Core, RPS TX, RPS Rx, ) are updated according to the signal path, following
light green-coloured line.

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Figure 86. 1+0 block diagram (Radio unit) (without Core protection)

Figure 87. 1+0 block diagram (Radio unit) (with Core protection)

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Figure 88. 1+1 FD block diagram (Radio units) (without Core protection)

Figure 89. 1+1 FD block diagram (Radio units) (with Core protection)

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Figure 90. 1+1 Hot Standby block diagram (Radio units) (without Core protection)

Figure 91. 1+1 Hot Standby block diagram (Radio units) (with Core protection)

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3.5.6 Current Configuration View
This screen is a read-only screen, which shows the current configuration of the NE.

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3.6 Menu Supervision

3.6.1 Access State


The NE can be managed by the OS or by the Craft Terminal. To control the competition of the OS and
the CT, a Local Access Control (LAC) is available.

If the LAC is "access denied", it means that the OS manages the NE and the CT is not allowed to modify
the NE configuration (it can only "read"). In the view, the icon with a key symbol has a circular shape.

If the LAC is "granted", it means that the CT is allowed to manage the NE. In the view, the icon with a key
symbol has a rectangular shape.

If the LAC is "requested", it means that the CT has requested a permission from the OS and is waiting
for a replay.

However, the OS does continue to provide a certain number of services. These services include:

Alarm reception and processing,

Performance processing,

Switching back to the OS access state.

The access state of an NE can be modified from two types of views.

3.6.1.1 Requested (Switching from the OS to the Craft Terminal access state)

Select the Supervision pull down menu. Then select the Requested option from the Access State cas-
cading menu.

If the OS does not answer in a predefined time, it is assumed that the NE is in the Craft access state and
can be managed by a Craft Terminal.

3.6.1.2 OS (Switching from the Craft Terminal access state back to the OS access state)

Select the Supervision pull down menu. Then from the Access State cascading menu select the OS
option.

The NE is now managed by the OS.

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Note

The key symbol icon on the management states of the NE view indicates
whether the NE is managed by a craft terminal or by the OS

Note

Local Craft Terminal access is denied on recovery phase after a loss of communication of the NE.
When the communication with the NE is lost, the OS automatically recovers the
communication and forces the state existing before the loss of communication
(therefore, Craft Terminal access can be denied or granted).

3.6.1.3 LAC Time Out Period

When the operator asks the OS to access to the NE (by pressing Requested), after the time set in this
screen, the CT gets the control and enters the state LAC Requested only if OS cannot reach the NE.

With the Refresh button the time, which has been previously set, is shown.

3.6.2 Restart NE
The Restart operation is a software reset and can be executed in normal traffic conditions.

From the Supervision cascading menu, select the Restart NE option.

A dialogue box opens.

Click the Yes button to confirm the restart N.E. operation

Click the No button to abort the restart N.E. operation.

WARNING: After the activation of the Restart NE Command (or after the pressing of the HW reset push-
button) the supervision of the local NE and the remote NEs is lost.

3.6.3 MIB Management


This menu is not implemented in the current release.

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3.6.4 SW Licence
In this screen the following fields are present.

RMU Serial Number: in this read-only field appears the Serial Number of the Flash Card.

License Code: in this read-only field appears the type of the license written in the Flash Card.

License Key: this field is used to upgrade the license. To upgrade the license copy in this field the
code of the new license and click on Apply.

The Refresh button activates a new reading of the read-only fields.

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3.7 Menu SW Download

3.7.1 Server Access Configuration


This menu allows to configure the FTP server to be used to download the SWP to the NE.

Note

Copy the ECT directory present in the SWP CD on the FTP server

User Id and Password are the login information to access the FTP server.

In the Address field write the address of the FTP server.

In the Port field write the port to be used and in the Root Directory field write the directory into which the
software has been downloaded.

By clicking on the Set Default button a screen will appear, showing the default configuration.

The CT is the default FTP server with the following parameters:

User Id: anonymous

Password: -

Address: Local host IP address

Port: 21

Root Dir: /
Note

The System Default can be changed by writing different values in the


fields and then by clicking on button OK

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3.7.2 Init Sw Download
Through this menu the software is downloaded to the NE in order to upgrade the NE software version.

Recommended operation: Before to start the software download it is recommended to disable the ATPC
operation (if it has been enabled) and to set in RTPC mode the max. Tx power.

Follow the steps to perform this procedure:

[1] Click Add to add the available software packages on the PC.

[2] Browse to the directory where the NE software was installed and click Open.

[3] Highlight the description file (i.e. R95M.DSC) and click Open.

[4] Highlight the line and click on the Init Download button.

The Forced check box can be used to force download (i.e. the complete description file is down-
loaded to the NE).

If the Forced download is not selected, the system shall first proceed to compare the software to be
downloaded with the software present in the NE. Then only the differences are downloaded.

[5] Click Yes to begin the download process.

[6] When the SW download starts, a screen showing the in progress operation of the download appears.
The download is aborted if the Abort button is pressed.

[7] Click Ok.

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3.7.3 Sw Status
This menu displays information of the software installed in the NE.

The following information is displayed:

Name: software name

Version: software version

Operational state: enabled or disabled

Current status: committed or standby. The committed status refers to the software currently in use.

Note

The equipment software is installed on the compact flash, which has two banks.
This screen has two panels (each for one bank):
- panel 1 refers to bank 1 with the Committed software and relevant information;
- panel 2 refers to bank 2 with the Stand by software and relevant information.

Figure 92. Panel 1 (Committed software)

Figure 93. Panel 2 (Stand by software)

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By clicking on the Software Units Status button a screen opens, giving additional information on the soft-
ware package.

Figure 94. SW units details

The following information is displayed on the screen:

EC: software on the Equipment Controller

OC_R: software on the ODU Controller (Radio)

FCORO, FCERE, FGUIN: FPGA firmware version

The Flash card, which stores the NE software, contains 2 banks.

The 2 banks can store 2 different software versions. One bank will be committed (active) and the other
bank will be standby.

Note

The second bank will appear, when a new software package has been downloaded for the first time.

During download, necessary to update the software version, the download file is automatically stored in
the standby bank.

To activate the new version first check the operational status of the standby bank. If the status is enabled
(this means that download took place without errors) select Activation or Forced Activation in the Soft-
ware Management Action field and click on the Apply Action button.

By selecting Forced Activation the bank to be activated is forced to restart.

By selecting Activation the bank to be activated restarts only if the content of the two banks differs.

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3.8 Tab-panel Equipment

3.8.1 General
This chapter describes the types of functions offered to the operator for Equipment Management.

The equipment domain deals with the management of the NE as a whole and its physical components
(subrack, boards,..).

The main screen of the Equipment tab panel differs according to the configuration.

The equipment consists of one MSS and up to 6 ODU according to the configuration.

In the Resource List Area is shown a graphical representation of the Equipment.

The IDU consists of different boards according to the configuration.

A colored ball gives information on the status of the associated object (Equipment, ODU, MSS, MSS
board). The color differs according to the severity of the alarms:

Green: no alarm

White: indetermination alarm active (not operative)

Cyanic: warning alarm active

Yellow: minor alarm active

Brown: major alarm active

Red: critical alarm active

MSS level (MSS-8 or MSS-4)

In Figure 95 is shown the MSS-8.

To enter the MSS level click on the IDU object in the Resource Tree Area.

MSS-8 consists of a subrack with 9 physical slots. Refer to Figure 95.

Slot 1 Slot 2

Slot 3 Slot 4
Slot 9
Slot 5 Slot 6

Slot 7 Slot 8

Slot 1 is reserved to the Core Main Controller.

Slot 2 is reserved to the Optional Spare Core Controller.

Slot 9 is reserved to the Fans.

Slots 3 to 8 are reserved to the units: Line-PDH unit or Radio unit.

During the first configuration every slot (except slot 1) must be configured according to the station con-
figuration.

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To equip slot 2 click on the slot 2 icon. In the Resource Detail Area 3 tab-panels open. Select the Setting
tab-panel. In the type field select CORE and click on Apply.

To equip slot 3 to 8 click on the slot icon. In the Resource Detail Area 3 tab-panels open. In the Type
field select the suitable unit: Line Unit (P32E1DS1) or Radio Unit (MD300) and click on Apply.

MSS-4 consists of a subrack with 5 physical slots.

Slot 1 Slot 2
Slot 5
Slot 3 Slot 4

Slot 1 is reserved to the Core Main Controller.

Slot 2 is reserved to the Optional Spare Core Controller.

Slot 5 is reserved to the Fans.

Slots 3 and 4 are reserved to the units: Line-PDH unit or Radio unit.

During the first configuration every slot (except slot 1) must be configured according to the station con-
figuration.

To equip slot 2 click on the slot 2 icon. In the Resource Detail Area 3 tab-panels open. Select the Setting
tab-panel. In the type field select CORE and click on Apply.

To equip slot 3 and 4 click on the slot icon. In the Resource Detail Area 3 tab-panels open. In the Type
field select the suitable unit: Line Unit (P32E1DS1) or Radio Unit (MD300) and click on Apply.

Board level

To enter a board click on the object in the Resource Tree Area or double click on the board image in the
Resource Detail Area.

ODU level

To enter the ODU level click on the ODU object in the Resource Tree Area or double click on the ODU
image in the Resource Detail Area.

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3.8.2 Starting From Scratch

Figure 95. Equipment View (starting from scratch) with MSS-8

When equipment configuration panel is open starting from a scratched NE, the operator will see the panel
in figure below. The Resource Tree area contains a list of empty slots that have to be configured.

Icon is used to identify an empty slot.

To create a unit select the slot. The setting tab-panel, shown in the figure, opens.

Select the unit type in the Equipment type profile and click on Apply.

The Setting tab-panel of the SFP is shown here below.

Click on Apply on the Plug-in Type field to enable the SFP optional optical plug-in, if the plug-in has been
installed in the Core unit.

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3.8.3 Tab panels in the Resource Detail Area
For every unit there are 3 tab-panels:

Alarms

Settings

Remote Inventory

3.8.4 Alarms tab-panel


The Alarms tab panel provides the fault management, which checks the current state of alarms related
to the selected object.

The alarm tab panel has one row for each possible alarm, but only rows related to the active alarms are
highlighted. When the alarm disappears it is automatically cleared in the screen.

By putting a tick in the Include alarms from sub-nodes box the alarms currently active in the sub-nodes
of the object will also appear.

For every alarm the following information is given:

Severity: the severity associated to the alarm and assigned in the Alarm Profile

Event Time: the time of the generation of the alarm

Entity: the entity involved in the alarm

Probable Cause: the probable cause of the alarm

Managed Object Class: the class of the alarm.

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3.8.5 Settings tab-panel
In the Settings tab-panel the following fields are present:

[1] Equipment Type

[2] Alarm Profile

[3] Protection Type Configuration

[1] Equipment Type

This field lists all the units that can be installed in a specific slot.

If the user selects the expected equipment type equal to received one, the Apply button is enabled.

If the user selects an expected equipment type different from received expected equipment type, the
Apply button is enabled.

If the user applies a new expected equipment type, panel is reloaded and updated.

If protection type is 1+1, the Apply button, related to expected equipment, is disabled (Expected equip-
ment change is allowed in 1+0 configuration only).

Figure 96. Expected Equipment Type Configuration

When a board shows the check mark icon, while same-pair (same-row) one shows switch symbol
, this means pair (row) is protected. In this situation, the couple is considered as if it is one board and
each single board cannot be removed/un-configured unless removing protection.

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Check mark icon denotes active board while switch one represents stand-by board.
Same behaviour occurs when X-shaped icon , representing cross-connections, appears. PDH board
cannot be removed as well when Flow IDs are configured; this situation cannot be seen, while watching
MSS schematics as in Figure 96. An error message will be shown if the operator will try to perform such
operations.

[2] Alarm Profile

This function relates to an alarm severity profile to be assigned to the selected equipment (not imple-
mented).

[3] Protection Type Configuration

This function allows the operator to configure the NE protection type. This function is shown selecting slots
3 to 8 only.

For slots 1 and 2 (reserved to Main and Spare Core boards), protection type is configured by the system,
according to equipped Core board.

After the equipment selection, protection type list box is filled with the allowed protection types list whose
content depends on expected equipment configured:

If it is configured as P32E1DS1, allowed protection types are 1+0 and 1+1 EPS;
If it is configured as MD300, allowed protection types are 1+0, 1+1 HSB and 1+1 FD.

If the operator selects a protection type equal to received one, the Apply button is disabled. If the operator
selects a protection type different from received one, Apply button is enabled. If slot is in protection mode
(received protection type different from 1+0): Apply button related to expected-equipment is disabled
(equipment changing is allowed in 1+0 configuration only).

Figure 97. Protection Example

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Configuring a 1+1 protected board, if peer board is not configured, the CT will be in charge of applying
such configuration to un-configured peer board, before creating protection in MIB.

If the user applies a new expected protection type, both tree view and configuration panel are reloaded
and updated. With a configured 1+1 protection, involved slots are bounded by light green lines (see Figure
97.).

3.8.6 Remote Inventory tab-panel


The Remote Inventory feature stores information used to identify all product components.

The whole information related to selected equipment type can be read, if available, in the remote inventory
panel, inside the Resource Detail area. Remote inventory data wont be available for levels that do not
have remote inventory itself, as IDU Ch#1 or IDU Ch#0.

3.8.7 How to configure a new equipment


The recommended sequence to configure the NE is the following:

1) Enable the plug-in units: refer here in TAB-PANEL EQUIPMENT

2) Configure the Core unit: refer to CORE VIEW for CORE and ETHERNET DOMAIN (this menu
opens with double click on a Core unit) (file Core domain)

To enable the optional SFP plug-in select the Core unit in the Equipment tab-panel and click
on Apply in the Plug-in Type field, as shown in Figure 98.

3) Configure the Radio unit: refer to RADIO VIEW for RADIO DOMAIN (this menu opens with
double click on a Radio unit) (file Settings)

4) Configure the PDH unit: refer to PDH VIEW for PDH DOMAIN (this menu opens with double
click on a PDH unit) (file PDH unit configuration)

5) Configure the Synchronization: refer to TAB-PANEL SYNCHRONIZATION (file Synchroniza-


tion)

6) Configure the NE time: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (file NE Time)

7) Configure the System parameters: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (file System Settings)

8) Create the Cross-connections: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (file Xconnections)

9) Configure IP/SNMP: refer to MENU CONFIGURATION (file Network Configuration)

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Figure 98. SFP plug-in enabling

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3.9 Tab-panel Protection Schemes
This domain is present in 1+1 configuration only.

This domain view consists of the following areas:

Resource Tree Area: displays all the protection schemes currently implemented for every pair of
units.

Resource List Area: displays tabular information about the selected resource in tree area.

Resource Detail Area: displays, through tabbed windows, the properties done in list area. This area
enable to perform the available functions for involved resource.

By clicking on the tree root the tree will be expanded according to the protection schemes supported.

A single left click selection of an element tree causes the activation of the corresponding representation
displayed in the Resource List area.

The 1+1 implemented protection schemes are:

Equipment protection: EPS protection in Tx and Rx sides. This protection scheme can be imple-
mented for all the unit types: Radio unit, PDH unit and Core unit.

Rx Radio protection: RPS Hitless Switch in Rx side (available for the Radio unit only)

HSB protection: Hot Stand-by protection (available for the Radio unit only)

FD protection: Frequency Diversity protection (available for the Radio unit only)

Synchronization protection: This protection scheme will appear, if in the synchronization tab
panel, the Primary Source and the Secondary Source have been selected.

Note 1

For the pair of Core units (slot 1 and 2) the only protection type is the Equipment Protection.

Note 2

For the pair of Radio units the protection type are the Equipment Protection, Radio Protection and HSB
Protection or FD protection.

Note 3

For the pair of PDH units the only protection type is the Equipment Protection.

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Figure 99. Protection scheme screen

To see the current position of the switches enter the menu Diagnosis Summary Block Diagram View
and click on the icon of the equipped units.

The green line in the screen shows the current active path.

Figure 100. 1+1 PDH unit block diagram

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Figure 101. 1+1 Radio unit block diagram (FD)

Figure 102. 1+1 Radio unit block diagram (HSB)

3.9.1 Equipment Protection Management


The Equipment Protection Management is performed by selecting the Equipment Protection tree element.
This window allows a complete view of all NE resource involved in the EPS protection.
The tab-panels are:

Protection Schema Parameters

Commands

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3.9.1.1 Protection Schema Parameters

The tab-panel Schema Parameters displays the parameters that can be modify.

The parameters are:

Protection Type: this parameter is defined at creation time and it is read only. The supported type
is: 1+1, e.g. a working channel (Main) is protected by a protecting channel (Spare).

Restoration Criteria: it defines if automatic restoration from protecting to protected channel is


allowed (revertive mode) or inhibited (not revertive mode). The operator choice for Operation Type
will be applied by clicking on Apply button.

Note

The Core protection type is Revertive and cannot be changed.

3.9.1.2 Commands

To enter the Commands menu click on the Spare #0 element in the Tree view or on the Main #1 element.

The operator by the Craft Terminal can modify the state of the switch through commands Lockout, Forced
and Manual. Select the suitable command and click on Apply.

Note

On the Main#1 channel the only available commands are Manual and
Forced (only Forced for the Core protection).

On the Spare#0 channel the only available commands are Manual and
Lockout (only Lockout for the Core protection).

Lockout has higher priority than Forced: the activation forces in service Channel 1 (default channel), inde-
pendently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling ABN.

WARNING: the EPS Lockout command is not error free, even if it is raised when traffic is not on the spare
channel.

Forced has higher priority than the automatic operation: the activation of this command forces in service
Channel 0, independently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling ABN.

Automatic Switch is the normal operation condition: the position of the switch depends on the commands
generated by the logic.

Manual has the lowest priority: it is performed only if there are no alarms that can activate an automatic
switch. It cannot be performed if Lockout or Forced commands are already activated. If this command is
active, it will be removed by an incoming alarm. This command does not activate signaling ABN.

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Note

The Forced command for channel 1 is equivalent to the Lockout command for the channel 0.
In both case, the result is that the relevant channel protection path is forced to standby status.

Table 6. Command priority list


Command Priority

Lockout 1

Forced 2

Automatic switch 3

Manual 4

Note

To release a previously activated command select None and click on Apply.

3.9.2 Rx Radio Protection Management


The Radio Protection Management is performed by selecting the Rx Radio Protection element tree.

This window allows a complete view of all NE resource involved in a RPS protection.

The tab-panels are:

Protection Schema Parameters

Commands

3.9.2.1 Protection Schema Parameters

The tab-panel Protection Schema Parameters displays the parameters that can be modify.

The Schema Parameters are:

Protection Type field: defines the protection schema architecture: 1+1 hitless;

Operation Type field: the possible values are revertive (automatic restoration allowed) or notRe-
vertive (automatic restoration Inhibited).

3.9.2.2 Commands

To enter the Commands menu click on the Spare #0 element in the Tree view or on the Main #1 element.

The operator by the Craft Terminal can modify the state of the switch through commands Lockout, Forced
and Manual. Select the suitable command and click on Apply.

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Note

On the Main#1 channel the only available commands are Manual and Forced.
On the Spare#0 channel the only available commands are Manual and Lockout.

Lockout has higher priority than Forced: the activation forces in service Channel 1 (default channel), inde-
pendently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling ABN.

Forced has higher priority than the automatic operation: the activation of this command forces in service
Channel 0, independently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling ABN.

Automatic Switch is the normal operation condition: the position of the switch depends on the commands
generated by the logic.

Manual has the lowest priority: it is performed only if there are no alarms that can activate an automatic
switch. It cannot be performed if Lockout or Forced commands are already activated. If this command is
active, it will be removed by an incoming alarm. This command does not activate signaling ABN.

Note

The Forced command for channel 1 is equivalent to the Lockout command for the channel 0. In both
case, the result is that the relevant channel protection path is forced to standby status.

Table 7. Command priority list


Command Priority

Lockout 1

Forced 2

Automatic switch 3

Manual 4

Note

To release a previously activated command select None and click on Apply.

3.9.3 HSB Protection Management


The Transmission Protection Management is performed by selecting the HSB Protection element tree.

This window allows a complete view of all NE resource involved in the protection.

The tab-panels are:

Protection Schema Parameters

Commands

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3.9.3.1 Protection Schema Parameters

The tab-panel Protection Schema Parameters displays the parameters that can be modify.
The Schema parameters are:

Protection Type: this parameter is defined at creation time and it is read only. The supported type
are: 1+1 (onePlusOne) ,e.g. a working element is protected by one protecting unit.
Operation type: it defines if automatic restoration from protecting to protected unit is allowed (rever-
tive mode) or inhibited (not revertive mode). The operator choice for Operation Type will be applied
clicking on Apply button.

3.9.3.2 Commands

To enter the Commands menu click on the Spare #0 element or on the Main #1 element in the Tree view.
The operator by the Craft Terminal can modify the state of the switch through commands Lockout, Forced
and Manual. Select the suitable command and click on Apply.

Note

On the Main#1 channel the only available commands are Manual and Forced.
On the Spare#0 channel the only available commands are Manual and Lockout.

Lockout has higher priority than Forced: the activation connects to the antenna Transmitter 1 (default
transmitter), independently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling ABN.

Forced has higher priority than the automatic operation: the activation of this command connects to the
antenna Transmitter 0, independently of the possible active alarms. This command activates signaling
ABN.

Automatic Switch is the normal operation condition: the position of the switch depends on the commands
generated by the logic.

Manual has the lowest priority: it is performed only if there are no alarms that can activate an automatic
switch. It cannot be performed if Lockout or Forced commands are already activated. If this command is
active, it will be removed by an incoming alarm. This command does not activate signaling ABN.

Note

The Forced command for channel 1 is equivalent to the Lockout command for the channel 0. In both
case, the result is that the relevant channel protection path is forced to standby status.

Table 8. Command priority list


Command Priority

Lockout 1

Forced 2

Automatic switch 3

Manual 4

Note

To release a previously activated command select None and click on Apply.

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3.10 Tab-panel Synchronization
Synchronization menu allows the operator to manage the synchronization features.

Using Synchronization tab view (shown in the figure below) the operator can select and configure syn-
chronization source(s) for the equipment.

Together with Role and Restoration criteria, the operator can select Input and Output ports and can
discriminate between different possible Primary or Secondary sources, according to the Role.

Figure 103. Synchronization Settings view

The Resource list area shows the configuration summary describing current synchronization.

As for all other views, Synchronization contains Alarms tab as well and it allows discriminating synchro-
nization-specific alarms.

3.10.1 How to synchronize


Each Network Element must have a reference Clock (NEC), which will be distributed to each board of the
NE. Such clock is a 25 MHz generated in the CORE Module in the Clock Reference Unit (CRU) function.

The NEC also provides a Sync Out port on the Core Module, which can be used to synchronize other NEs.

The NEC is locked to a Synchronization Source.

The sources can be:

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[1] Free Run Local Oscillator.

[2] Any E1 available at input traffic interfaces (the specific E1 port has to be chosen)

[3] Sync-In port is a specific synchronization input, which can be configured according to the following
options:

a) 2.048 MHz, electrical levels according G.703, clause 13

b) 5 MHz, + 6 dBm into 50 , sine-wave

c) 10 MHz, + 6 dBm into 50 , sine-wave.

[4] Radio Port: Symbol Rate of the Rx signal of any available Radio direction (the specific Radio Port
has to be chosen).

Figure 104. Synchronization

ll the NEC has to be configured as Master Role or Slave Role.

Only one Master is allowed in the network.

If Master Role,

The Restoration Mode can be Revertive and Not Revertive

The Primary sources must be chosen among 1), 2) or 3).

If the selected Master Primary Source is 1)

then the Master Secondary Source doesn't need to be selected because the Primary is
never supposed to fail.

If the selected Master Primary Source is 2) or 3)

then Master Secondary Source must be selected among 1), 2) or 3).

If Slave Role,

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The Restoration Mode is fixed to Revertive.

The Primary Source must chosen between 3) and 4)

Slave primary sources is allowed to be 3) for full indoor configuration and future Piling con-
figuration

The Secondary Source can be chosen among 1), 2) or 3).

Each Module will mute its own Synchronization clock in case of Fail Alarm.

For each available sync source, the CRU detects the signal Degrade Alarm on each available sync
source. Such Signal Degrade alarm raises also in case of muted (missing) clock.

The Signal Degrade Alarm relevant to the selected Synchronization Source, or the relevant Card Fail,
causes the switching of the Synchronization Source.

3.11 Tab-panel Connections


This menu (available in the Main view) contains a summary table for all the cross-connections. This is
shown in the figure below.

In the Resource Detail Area are available two different functions usable to export and save cross-con-
nections data with different formats: hardcopy (Send To Printer) and File (Export To File).

Figure 105. Cross-Connections View

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3.12 PDH VIEW for PDH DOMAIN (this menu opens with double click on
a PDH unit)

3.12.1 PDH Unit configuration

In the Resource List Area is given the information related to the tributaries:

1) Port Number: port for a given channel and type of port

2) Signal Mode: type of frame (Unframed/Disabled)

3) Flow Id: identifier of the tributary for the cross-connection

4) Service Profile: possible profile to be associated to the tributary (TDM2TDM/TDM2Eth)

5) Payload: bytes of the payload (256/1024)

6) ECID Tx: Emulated Circuit Identifier in Tx direction

7) ECID Rx: Emulated Circuit Identifier in Rx direction

8) TDM Clock source: type of the clock to be associated to the tributary (Adaptive/Differential/
Tdmline)

Note

Columns 5, 6, 7 and 8 are only available if the Service Profile is TDM2Eth.

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For every E1 tributary two tab-panels are available:

Alarms tab-panel

Settings tab-panel

3.12.1.1 Alarms tab-panel

The Alarms tab panel provides the fault management, which checks the current state of alarms related
to the selected object.

The alarm tab panel has one row for each possible alarm, but only rows related to the active alarms are
highlighted. When the alarm disappears it is automatically cleared in the screen.

By putting a tick in the Include alarms from sub-nodes box the alarms currently active in the sub-nodes
of the object will also appear.

For every alarm the following information is given:

Severity: the severity associated to the alarm and assigned in the Alarm Profile

Event Time: the time of the generation of the alarm

Entity: the entity involved in the alarm

Probable Cause: the probable cause of the alarm

Managed Object Class: the class of the alarm.

3.12.1.2 Settings tab-panel

This tab-panel performs all available functions for a tributary port. The managed tributary types are: E1.
To define the involved ports, the interface selection in the tree view is first required; therefore the selection
of the desired tributary port in the tabular view enables the Resource Detail list to show the available func-
tions for the single one resource.

Warning: to change something in the Settings tab-panel first change the Signal Mode to Unframed.
Then, all the other fields can be changed.

In the Setting tab-panel there are the following fields:

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Port Number: identifies the ports for a given interface and type of port (read-only fields)

Signal Mode:

The possible values are:

Unframed for the unframed received signal

Disabled

The current state can be modified selecting a different signal mode value and then click on the Apply
button to send the new value to NE.

Service Profile:

The possible profiles are:

TDM2TDM

TDM2Eth

Flow Id: To implement cross-connections between line side and radio side each E1 tributary must be
associated to an identifier. Enter the Flow identifier value in the relevant field (possible values: 2 to 4080)
and press Apply.

Fields ECID Tx, ECID Rx, Payload Size and TDM Clock Source can be written only if the Service Profile
is TDM2Eth.

Note

With the TDM2TDM service profile the TDM Clock source is fixed to Differential (RTP - Real Time Protocol
is used); with the TDM2Eth service profile the TDM Clock source can be Differential (RTP - Real Time
Protocol is used) or Adaptive (RTP is not used). In the unit it is not possible to have mixed configura-
tions with service profiles using RTP and other service profiles not using RTP.

Example: if in the unit only one E1 has service profile TDM2TDM it is possible to configure other E1 with
service profile TDM2Eth only with the Differential clock source (not with the Adaptive clock source). If the
Adaptive clock source is requested the E1 must be connected to another PDH unit.

Alarm profile: Not implemented now.

Buttons:

Apply: the configuration for the selected E1 tributary will become active

Apply to All: the configuration present in the screen will be applied to all the ports.

Help: by clicking on this button the operator calls the help on line.

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3.12.1.3 General information on Circuit Emulation

9500 MPR-E performs Circuit Emulation on PDH TDM flows, and then transport those "TDM packets"
mixed to native Ethernet frames.

The Circuit Emulation IWF (inter-working function) is according the Metro Ethernet Forum implementation
agreement known as MEF 8, limited to the structure agnostic case.

MEF 8 emulated circuits is based on exchange of service parameters between two CES IWFs at either
end of the emulated circuit; if one of those IWFs belong to the 9500 MPR-E the following parameters are
defined:

MAC addresses of the two IWFs

Payload size

ECID (2 different values may be used for each direction)

TDM clock source

clock recovery adaptive,

clock recovery differential,

clock loopback (TDM line in)

VLAN (One Vlan is assigned to each bi-directional circuit emulated E1 flow)

RTP, which is optional in MEF8, is always present, but not used if the clock recovery is not differential.

The common clock for Differential clock recovery is 25 MHz.

Three different cases of MEF8 Circuit Emulation services are implemented:

1) TDM2TDM

2) TDM2ETH

3) ETH2ETH

TDM2TDM

Both the IWFs belong to 9500 MPR-E and the packets are not supposed to go out the 9500 MPR-E net-
work.

The IWF parameters listed above, have predetermined values and dont need to be provisioned.

MAC addresses are determined as consequences of the cross connections.

Payload size is fixed to 122 bytes

ECID will be the same value as Flow Id

TDM clock source: clock recovery differential,

Flow Id provisioned by ECT/NMS

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TDM2ETH

Only one of the IWFs belongs to 9500 MPR-E and the packets are supposed to go out the 9500 MPR-
E network.

MAC addresses: in all involved nodes are determined as consequences of the cross connections;
the only exception is the Ethernet Terminal Node (the node where that TDM2ETH traffic goes
through an user Ethernet port). In such ETN the source address will be the node Mac address, the
dest. mac address will be provisioned by ECT/NMS.

Payload size: can be chosen (by ECT/NMS) between 256 and 1024 bytes

ECID : provisioned by ECT/NMS, 2 different values may be used for each direction

TDM clock source will be provisioned by ECT/NMS: clock recovery adaptive, clock recovery differ-
ential, clock loopback (TDM line in)

Flow Id will be provisioned by ECT/NMS (One Vlan is assigned to each bi-directional circuit emulated
E1 flow)

For this case the expected latency for 1 hop only depends on the payload size: 3.5 msec for 256 bytes,
6.5 msec for 1024 bytes.

ETH2ETH

None of the IWFs belongs to 9500 MPR-E.

None of the above parameters has to be configured (the 9500 MPR-E is transparent).

Any packet belonging to an Eth2Eth TDM flow is treated as any other Ethernet packet with the only excep-
tion of giving it an higher priority based on the MEF 8 Ethertype.

3.12.1.4 Application examples

With 9500 MPR-E different applications can be implemented as shown in Figure 106. and Figure 107.

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Figure 106. 9500 MPR-E applications

Figure 107. 9500 MPR-E applications

Case 1

The E1 stream is inserted in Node 1 and extracted in Node 2. In this case the two IWFs used to packetize
the traffic for the Ethernet switch in the Core module are both internal to the 9500 MPR-E network. The
Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2TDM in Node 1 and Node 2. The Cross connections to be implemented
are PDH-Radio type.

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Case 2

The E1 stream is inserted in Node 1 and extracted in Node 2. One IWF is inside the 9500 MPR-E, but
the second IWF is external to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2ETH in
Node 1 and Node 2. The Cross connections to be implemented are PDH-Radio type in Node 1 and Radio-
Eth type in Node 2.

Case 3

The E1 stream is inserted/extracted in Node 1. One IWF is inside the 9500 MPR-E, but the second IWF
is external to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is TDM2ETH in Node 1 and Node
2. The Cross connections to be implemented are PDH-Eth type in Node 1.

Cases 4 and 5

In these cases Ethernet packets enter Node 1 and are extracted in Node 2. In case 4 the Ethernet packets
encapsulate the E1 stream; in case 5 the packets are native Ethernet packets. None of the IWFs belongs
to the 9500 MPR-E network. The Circuit Emulation Service is ETH2ETH in Node 1 and Node 2. No Cross
connections must be implemented. The path is automatically implemented with the standard auto-learn-
ing algorithm of the 9500 MPR-E Ethernet switch.

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3.13 RADIO VIEW for RADIO DOMAIN (this menu opens with double click
on a Radio unit)

3.13.1 General information on the Radio domain menu


The Radio domain view allows the operator to manage the resources of the radio transmission channel.

A Radio NE consists of one or two radio channels with a set of functional blocks (tributary ports, radio ports
etc).

This domain view consists of the following areas:

Resource Tree Area: displays the radio ports sorted by channel number.

Resource List Area: displays tabular information about the selected resource in tree area.

Resource Detail Area: displays, through tab windows, the object s properties selected in list area.
This area enables to execute the available functions for involved resource.

Four tab panels are present in the Resource Detail Area:

Alarms: shows the active alarms

Settings: configures the radio parameters

Measurements: performs the Tx and Rx power measurements.

Loopback: activates the loopbacks available with the equipment.

3.13.2 Alarms
The Alarms tab panel provides the fault management, which checks the current state of alarms related
to the selected object.

The alarm tab panel has one row for each possible alarm, but only rows related to the active alarms are
highlighted. When the alarm disappears it is automatically cleared in the screen.

By putting a tick in the Include alarms from sub-nodes box the alarms currently active in the sub-nodes
of the object will also appear.

For every alarm the following information is given:

Severity: the severity associated to the alarm and assigned in the Alarm Profile

Event Time: the time of the generation of the alarm

Entity: the entity involved in the alarm

Probable Cause: the probable cause of the alarm

Managed Object Class: the class of the alarm.

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3.13.3 Settings

3.13.3.1 General

To configure the Radio unit click in the Main view on the icon of the Radio unit to be configured.

The Radio Main View opens.

The Radio Main View is divided in two parts:

on the left side is present the Direction # menu

on the right side is present the Channel #1 menu (for 1+0 configuration) and Channel #1 and Channel
#0 menus (for 1+1 configuration).

Warning: to configure the Radio unit first configure the Shifter and the Tx Frequency in the Frequency
field (in the Channel menu) and click on Apply. Then configure all the other parameters.

Warning: When in an already working system, a new modem card is inserted (for example in order to cre-
ate a new radio direction) with IDU/ODU cable disconnected, the radio can be configured by using the
CT: "Shifter", "Tx frequency", "Tx power", "Capacity" values are "correctly" applied into the database (not
to ODU because it is missing). When the idu/odu cable is connected the ODU is not right configured:
Shifter value result "Undefined" and the "Tx mute" is active. It is necessary to apply again the ODU param-
eters (pushbutton Apply in CT screen).

3.13.3.2 Direction menu

This part of the screen is divided into 3 parts:

1) Mode

2) Link Identifier Configuration

3) PPP RF

1) Mode

The operation mode can be without or with the Adaptive Modulation.

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a) Operation without the Adaptive Modulation

Figure 108. Radio unit without Adaptive Modulation settings

Select in the Mode field Presettings.


Select in the Reference Channel Spacing field the suitable channel spacing to be used.
Select in the Modulation field the suitable Modulation scheme.
According to the selected Channel Spacing and to the Modulation the relevant capacity in the Capac-
ity field will appear.
To confirm the selection click on Apply.

Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Static Modulation)


Channel Spacing Modulation E1 Equivalent Capacity Capacity (Mbit/sec)
(TDM2TDM)
4 QAM 4 E1 10.88
7 MHz 16 QAM 8 E1 21.76
64 QAM 13 E1 32.64
4 QAM 8 E1 21.76
14 MHz 16 QAM 18 E1 43.52
64 QAM 27 E1 65.28
4 QAM 18 E1 43.52
16 QAM 37 E1 87.04
28 MHz 32 QAM 48 E1 111.36
64 QAM 56 E1 130.56
128 QAM 68 E1 156.80
56 MHz 128 QAM 136E1 313.60

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b) Operation with the Adaptive Modulation

Figure 109. Radio unit with Adaptive Modulation settings

The main idea behind Adaptive Modulation in Point to Point system is to adjust adaptively the modulation
as well as a range of other system parameters based on the near-instantaneous channel quality infor-
mation perceived by the receiver, which is fed back to the transmitter with the aid of a feedback channel.

The following table provides the figures in terms of radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation
in case of adaptive modulation.

Radio capacity, channelling scheme and modulation (Adaptive Modulation)


Channelling Spacing Modulation Equivalent capacity E1 (Note)

4 QAM 18 E1

28 MHz 16 QAM 37 E1

64 QAM 56 E1

4 QAM 8 E1

14 MHz 16 QAM 18 E1

64 QAM 27 E1

4 QAM 4 E1

7 MHz 16 QAM 8 E1

64 QAM 13 E1

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Note: the total capacity associated to the TDM2TDM and TDM2Eth profiles is always the capacity relevant
to the lowest modulation scheme (4 QAM if the Adaptive Modulation is in the 4/16/64 QAM range and 4
QAM if the Adaptive Modulation is in the 4/16 QAM range).

The switching between the modulation schemes is hitless and maintains the same RF channel bandwidth.

The Adaptive Modulation is available for unprotected (1+0) and Protected (1+1 HSB) Radio configuration
without ATPC.

To configure the Adaptive Modulation:

Select in the Mode field Adaptive Modulation.

Select in the Modulation Range field the Modulation range (4/16 QAM or 4/16/64 QAM) to be used
by the Adaptive Modulation.

Select in the Reference Channel Spacing field the suitable channel spacing.

Select in the Reference Mode field the spectral efficiency class to be set as reference.

Select in the Remote Threshold field how many dB the switching thresholds have to be moved from
the default value (+4 dB/-2 dB). The default value is approx. 6 dB below the 10-6 Rx threshold.

To confirm the selection click on Apply.

The Current Modulation field is a read-only field, which shows the current used modulation. The current
modulation will depend on the fading activity during the propagation.

With a check mark in the Manual Operation box it is possible to force a modulation scheme by selecting
the scheme in the Forced Modulation field.

Note

Note: If the current Modulation scheme is 4 QAM, it not possible to force to 64 QAM, but first must be
forced to 16 QAM and then to 64 QAM. Also if the current Modulation is 64 QAM, to pass to 4 QAM first
must be forced to 16 QAM and then to 4 QAM.

Warning: with the up and down arrows, below the Forced Modulation field, it is possible to increase or
decrease the part of the screen relevant to the parameters of the Adaptive Modulation.

How to change the operation mode (from operation without Adaptive Modulation to operation with
Adaptive Modulation) in 1+1 HSB configuration

Follow the procedure:

1) Mute the 2 Transmitters

2) Remove the protection scheme: enter the Equipment tab-panel, select the unit and remove the
protection scheme

3) Enter the Main Radio unit setting tab-panel: set Mode Adaptive Modulation

4) Create again the protection scheme: enter the Equipment tab-panel, select the unit and create
the protection scheme (1+1 HSB)

5) Remove the muting from the Transmitters.

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2) Link Identifier

This part allows the operator to define the expected and sent identifier values of parameters related to
the link management and, if necessary, modify them.

The operator choices will be sent to the NE by clicking on the related Apply button.

If the Link Identifier is Enabled the following fields can be written:

Expected Identifier: this field is the link identifier expected at the receiving NE

Sent Identifier: this field is the link identifier inserted on the transmitting NE.

3) PPP RF

The PPP-RF interface is a communication interface based on the use of an inframe RF proprietary 64
kbit/s channel. Through the PPP-RF interface the NE can exchange management messages with a
remote OS (or Craft Terminal) station.

The PPP-RF channel can be Enabled or Disabled.

If enabled, in the Remote Address field will appear the IP address of the remote connected NE.

In the Routing IP Protocol field enter the used IP protocol and in case of OSPF protocol select also the
associated OSPF area.

3.13.3.3 Channel menu

This menu is divided in 5 parts:

a) Frequency

b) ATPC (this menu is alternative to RTPC menu)

c) RTPC (this menu is alternative to ATPC menu)

d) Tx Mute

e) Alarm Profile

a) Frequency

The system can operate with different types of ODU according to the RF band and to the channel arrange-
ment. There are ODUs which can manage only one shifter or several predefined shifters.

In the Shifter field select the suitable shifter and press Apply.

In the Tx frequency field insert the suitable Tx frequency (the Rx frequency is automatically calculated
by using the inserted Tx frequency and the shifter) and press push-button Apply.

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b) ATPC

Note

the ATPC area is not present if the Adaptive Modulation has been selected.

The ATPC can be Enabled or Disabled.

The new value will be applied when the Apply button is pressed. If the ATPC has been enabled, the ATPC
Range and ATPC Rx Threshold parameters must be filled.

ATPC Range

The Min Tx power and Max Tx power, regarding the Tx Range in the ATPC management, can be
written in the relevant field.

When the Apply button is pressed the new values will be applied.

ATPC Rx Threshold

The value of the low power threshold can be changed by writing the new value in the field. When
the Rx power is equal to this power the ATPC algorithm starts to operate.

When the Apply button is pressed the new values will be applied.

c1) RTPC (without Adaptive Modulation)

If the ATPC is disabled the RTPC field is present.

In this field write the new value within the allowed transmitted power range. The range is shown on the
right side of RTPC area.

c2) RTPC (with Adaptive Modulation)

The operator can modify only the 4 QAM field. In this field the operator has to enter the constant power,
which will be used with 4 QAM modulation. The power range is shown on the right side and depends on
the selected reference mode.

Note

the same power value will be used by the 16 QAM and 64 QAM modulation schemes.

d) Tx Mute

The information related to the transmitter status is shown in the Tx Mute field (Off/Manual/Auto). To
squelch the transmitter select Enable and press Apply button.

The following indications will appear in the Tx Mute field:

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Off: Transmitter not squelch

Manual: Transmitter squelched due to the manual operation

Auto: Transmitter squelched due to an automatic operation

e) Alarm Profile

Not implemented in the current release.

3.13.4 Measurement
The Power Measurements capability is performed by means of the Measurement tabbed panel.

The Measurement screen allows the operator to set initial parameters for the required measurement.

"Measurement interval" fields allow the operator to set the time duration of the measurement. The default
is Days: 7, Hours: 0, Minutes: 0. A 7-day measurement interval is also the maximum allowed interval.

"Sample time" field is the period between two consecutive measurement samples. The choice is among
2, 6, 30, 60 sec.

The last section of the dialog is referred to an optional Log file.

By selecting Create File the log file is created and a default path and name for this file is displayed to the
operator. The file is stored in the MPRE_CT_V00.07.08 directory.

Note

The file name must not include the following characters: \ ? : * < > |.

The log file contains the sample value and records the measurement up to a maximum dimension (7 days
for a 2 s sample time).

By clicking on the "Start" button the screen "Power Measurement Graphic" appears.

The Power Measurement Graphic is available only if the CT is connected to the NE.

The Power Measurement Graphic screen shows the Tx and Rx measurements related to the local and
remote NE.

Through this screen the operator can see, in real time, the power transmitted by the local and remote
transmitter (Tx) and the power received by the local and remote receiver (Rx).

The top graphic screen area shows the TX curves (local and remote), while the bottom area shows the
Rx curves (local and remote). Note that the colors represent the linked end-point of the two NE; for exam-
ple, if the local TX is blue, the remote receiver will also have the same color.

The top of the screen offers all the characteristics present in the current measurement:

Radio port: gives the symbolic name associated to the radio channel being analyzed

Sample time: indicates the frequency used to send the measurement requests to NE;

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Start time: is the first request time;

Stop time: is the interval time selected in the previous parameters window, added to the start time;

Time: is the current response time;

Log File: is the complete pathname of the file where the received values are stored.

By clicking on "Show details" box, on the left side of the Power Measurement Graphic, a new table
appears; this table shows the following relevant values of the received and transmitted power:

Tx Local End

max Tx local value and date when this value was received for the first time.

min. Tx local value and its current date when this value was received for the first time.

current Tx local value and its current date.

Tx Far End

max Tx remote value and date when this value was received for the first time.

min. Tx remote value and its current date when this value was received for the first time.

current Tx remote value and its current date.

Rx Local End

max Rx local value and date when this value was received for the first time.

min. Rx local value and its current date when this value was received for the first time.

current Rx local value and its current date.

Rx Far End

max Rx remote value and date when this value was received for the first time.

min. Rx remote value and its current date when this value was received for the first time.

current Rx remote value and its current date.

Note

PTx and PRx levels software readings tolerance is:


PTx = Real Value 3dB
PRx = Real Value 5dB

WARNING:
If in the Tx end field the indication in dBm is +99, the Transmitter is off (or in HST Configuration the
transmitter is in standby).
If in the Tx end field the indication in dBm is +99 and, at the same time, in the relevant Rx end field
the information in dBm is -99, probably the supervision has been lost. The confirmation of the loss
of the supervision is given by a broken red icon in NES screen.

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3.13.4.1 How to read a Power Measurement file

Click on Read File field and press on the Select File button. The directory of the CT automatically opens
to navigate and get the power measurement file.

Note

As default the measurement files are stored in the MPRE_CT_V001.02.xx


directory and have extension .txt.

Select the desired file and click Open.

Click button Open on the right side of the Sample Time field.

The buttons in the lower part of the window allow to flow the graph within the measurement interval.

Note: The measurement file can be opened also with a standard text editor (e.g. WordPad). Go in the
directory where the txt files are stored and open the file. The measurements are shown in the tabular
mode.

3.13.5 Loopback
The functions described in this section allow to perform the test operations by loopbacks.

This domain view consists of the following areas:

Resource Tree Area: displays the object on which the loopbacks can be performed, sorted by num-
ber.

Resource List Area: displays tabular information about the loopback supported by the resource
selected in the tree area.

Resource Detail Area: displays, through tabbed windows, the properties done in list area. This area
enable to perform the available functions for the involved resource.

Note

The loopbacks can be activated on the local NE only.

In the Resource List Area are listed all the loopbacks which can be performed. In the current software
version only the IF cable loopback is available.

In this area the following information is given:

1) Interface: number of the channel and type of the loopback

2) Direction: type of the loopback

3) Activation: activation status of a loopback (Active/Not Active)

4) Activation date: date of loopback activation

5) Timeout: timeout period, if has been set.

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In Figure 110. is given the association of the loopback and the position in the block diagram of the equip-
ment provided by the Summary Block Diagram View option, available in the Diagnosis menu.

Figure 110. Loopback

3.13.5.1 How to activate a loopback

[1] Before to activate the loopback mute the Transmitter. Double click on the front panel of the Radio
unit and enter the Settings tab-panel.

[2] Select the loopback to be activated by clicking on the relevant object in the Resource Tree Area or
by selecting the relevant row in the Resource List Area.

[3] Select Active in the Activation field.

[4] Click on Apply.

[5] The Loopback is now ACTIVE (in the row in the Resource List Area the Activation field of the loop-
back will change from Not Active to Active).

Note 1

The IF cable loopback is active only on the cross-connections with TDM2TDM and TDM2Eth profiles.

Note 2

In the Timeout Period field a timeout period can be set for the loopback activation (max. 4 days).
At the end of this period the loopback will be automatically deactivated.

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3.13.5.2 How to remove a loopback

[1] Select the loopback to be removed by clicking on the relevant object in the Resource Tree Area or
by selecting the relevant row in the Resource List Area.

[2] Select Not Active in the Activation field.

[3] Click on Apply.

[4] The Loopback is now DEACTIVATED (in the row in the Resource List Area the Activation field of the
relevant loopback will change from Active to Not Active).

[5] Remove the muting from the Transmitter.

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3.14 CORE VIEW for CORE and ETHERNET DOMAIN (this menu opens
with double click on a Core unit)

3.14.1 Core domain


This chapter describes the functions types offered to the operator in order to navigate the Core board.
Core domain multiple main view contains two tab-panels:

Ethernet Physical Interface

TMN Interface

This domain view consists of the following areas:

Resource Tree, displaying Ethernet physical interface with related port number;

Resource List, displaying tabular information about tributaries in tree area;

Resource Detail, providing access to Core detail view Alarms and Settings.

3.14.1.1 Ethernet Physical Interface

Figure 111. Core Main view

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If the optional SFP optical plug-in has been enabled in the Core unit (refer to Equipment menu) also the
Ethernet Port #5 will appear (see Figure 112.).

Figure 112. Core Main view (with optical SFP Ethernet port#5)

This tab-panel refers to the Ethernet ports, which can be used as traffic ports and includes two tab-panels
each Ethernet port:

Alarms tab-panel

Settings tab-panel

Alarms tab-panel

Alarm view shows the Ethernet ports-related alarms. Selecting the node in Tree area allows checking
Ethernet tributary alarms current state.

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Settings tab-panel (for Ethernet Port#1 to Port#4)

The Settings view performs all the available functions for Ethernet tributary ports. Information related to
a data port configuration is provided by the following parameters:

Port Status (Enabled or Disabled);

Alarm Profile (not implemented);

Auto-Negotiation Status (Enabled or Disabled);

Flow Control (Enabled or Disabled);

Configuration (Other / Configuring / Complete / Disabled / Parallel Detect Fail) all read-only;

Advertised Capability, (10 Mb/s Half Duplex, 10 Mb/s Full Duplex, 100 Mb/s Half Duplex,
100 Mb/s Full Duplex).

The Restart button allows forcing auto-negotiation to begin link re-negotiation.

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Settings tab-panel (for Ethernet Port#5)

The Settings view performs all the available functions for Ethernet tributary port#5. Information related to
the port configuration is provided by the following parameters:

Port Status (Enabled or Disabled);

Alarm Profile (not implemented);

Auto-Negotiation Status (Enabled or Disabled);

Flow Control (Enabled or Disabled);

Configuration (Other / Configuring / Complete / Disabled / Parallel Detect Fail) all read-only;

Advertised Capability, (1000 Mb/s Full Duplex).

The Optical Info field is a read-only field not implemented in the current release.

The Restart button allows forcing auto-negotiation to begin link re-negotiation.

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3.14.1.2 TMN Interface

This tab-panel refers to the TMN Interface. The interfaces are of two types:

1) TMN Ethernet on a dedicated connector

2) Port #4 of the Ethernet traffic ports, which can be dedicated to TMN purpose and not to traffic.

This tab-panel has 2 tab-panels:

Alarm tab-panel

Settings tab-panel

Alarms tab-panel

Alarm view shows the Ethernet ports-related alarms. Selecting the node in Tree area allows checking
Ethernet tributary alarms current state.

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Settings tab-panel for TMN Ethernet port

If used, the TMN Ethernet must be:

Enabled.

Assigned an IP address with its IP mask.

Selected the IP Routing Protocol: Static Routing or OSPF. If OSPF has been selected, assign also
the area number.

Click on Apply to activate the selections.

Settings tab-panel for Port #4 TMN Ethernet

If the Ethernet Port 4 has been used as TMN port, the port 4 must be:

Enabled.

Assigned an IP address with its IP mask.

Selected the IP Routing Protocol: Static Routing or OSPF. If OSPF has been selected, assign also
the area number.

Click on Apply to activate the selections.

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3.15 Performance Monitoring tool
To open the Performance Monitoring tool click on the relevant icon in the Menu bar as shown in the next
figure.

Performance Monitoring
tool icon

The Performance Monitoring tool allows to display all the performances available on the units of MPR:

Core unit (par. 3.15.1 on page 209)

MD300 unit (par. 3.15.2 on page 214)

P32E1DS1 unit (no performance available on the current release for this unit)

The welcome screen of the Performance Monitoring screen is shown in Figure 113.

The Performance Monitoring tool can be used for different NEs. In the left column will be present all the
NEs. In the example only one NE is present (151.98.96.117).

Tool bar

Figure 113. Performance Monitoring tool welcome screen

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By clicking on a specific unit will appear the performances available with the selected unit.

Tool bar:

Start Refresh Export Help

Stop Reset Print

Figure 114. Tool bar

3.15.1 CORE unit performances


Two groups of Performance Monitoring are available:

Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table (incoming side)

Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table (outgoing side)

3.15.1.1 Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table

To activate the Rx performances (Incoming side):

[1] Select the Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table row as shown in the next figure.

[2] Select the Interval (the collection time of the performances): 4, 6, 30, 60 seconds. The default value
is 4 sec.

[3] Select the Duration of the performance monitor in hour and minutes. The max. duration is 24 hours.

[4] Click on the Start button to start the monitoring.

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Figure 115. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table

To display the performance monitor select the suitable port, as shown in the next figure (port #2 in the
example).

Figure 116. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table display (at port level)

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The available performances at port level are:

TRCO: total number of octects of Ethernet frames received by the Virtual Ethernet Interface,
including Ethernet header characters.

TRCF: total number of Ethernet frames received by the Virtual Ethernet Interface.

TRSEF: total number of errored frames.

TDF: total number of Ethernet frames which were chosen to be discarded due to buffer congestion.

TRCF Unicast: total number of Ethernet Unicast frames received correctly by the Virtual Ethernet
Interface.

TRCF Multicast: total number of good packets received that were directed to a multicast address.
This number does not include packets directed to the broadcast address.

TRCF Broadcast: total number of good packets received that were directed to the broadcast
address. This number does not include multicast packets.

The performances are displayed in two different formats:

graphical format in the lower part

tabular format in the upper part

In the graphical format by putting a check mark on the check box only one (or more than one or all)
performance can be displayed.

By selecting the Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table (as shown in the next figure) all the performances regarding
all the enabled Ethernet ports are shown in tabular format.

Figure 117. Ethernet Aggregate Rx Table display (all enabled ports)

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3.15.1.2 Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table

To activate the Tx performances (Outgoing side):

[1] Select the Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table row as shown in the next figure.

[2] Select the Interval (the collection time of the performances): 4, 6, 30, 60 seconds. The default value
is 4 sec.

[3] Select the Duration of the performance monitor in hour and minutes. The max. duration is 24 hours.

[4] Click on the Start button to start the monitoring.

3 2

Figure 118. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table

To display the performance monitor select the suitable port, as shown in the next figure (port #2 in the
example).

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Figure 119. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table display (at port level)

The available performances at port level are:

TTO: total number of octets of Ethernet frames transmitted out by the Interface, including Ethernet
header characters.

TTF: total number of Ethernet frames transmitted out by the interface.

TDF: total number of Transmitted Ethernet frames which were chosen to be discarded due to buffer
congestion.

TRCF Unicast: total number of Ethernet Unicast frames transmitted out by the Virtual Ethernet
Interface.

TRCF Multicast: total number of good packets transmitted by this address that were directed to a
multicast address. This number does not include packets directed to the broadcast address.

TRCF Broadcast: total number of good packets transmitted by this address that were directed to the
broadcast address.

The performances are displayed in two different formats:

graphical format in the lower part

tabular format in the upper part

In the graphical format by putting a check mark on the check box only one (or more than one or all)
performance can be displayed.

By selecting the Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table (as shown in the next figure) all the performances regarding
all the enabled Ethernet ports are shown in tabular format.

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Figure 120. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table display (all enabled ports)

3.15.2 MD300 unit performances


By selecting the MD300 unit the screen in Figure 121. opens.

Figure 121. MD300 unit performance screen

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The performance monitoring (PM) gives indication on the quality of service of the radio system.

Quality of service Performance Monitoring is performed in accordance with G.826 and G.784.

It has assumed that the quality of the single tributary (E1, ...) can be derived from the quality of the aggre-
gate signal, therefore no dedicated quality of service Performance Monitoring is foreseen on the single
tributaries.

Considering one section (see below), one current register is for 15 min report and one for 24 h report; 96
history data can be stored for 15 min report and 8 history data for 24 h report.

Note

The 15 min Performance Monitoring data are stored in the History Data
report only if errors have been occurred.
The 24 h Performance Monitoring data are always stored in the History Data report.

Two different radio sections can be monitored:

Radio Hop Section: section between two radio stations inside the protection section.

Radio Link Section: section identifying the protected section.

Figure 122. Radio sections

The counters supported are the following:

Errored Seconds

Severely Errored Seconds

Background Block Error

Unavailable Seconds

The performance reports can be of 2 different types:

15 minutes

24 hours

The following description explains the functions to provide the Performance Monitoring process with a
granularity period of 15 min. The same functions are provided for 24h Performance Monitoring process.

The Performance Monitoring are of HOP or LINK type.

HOP refer to Performance Monitoring before the RPS switch.

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LINK refer to Performance Monitoring after the RPS switch. The current report can be seen (and config-
ured) and the history log can be seen.

3.15.2.1 Current Data Table

To see (and configure) the Current Data report:

[1] Click on the desired granularity (15 m or 24 h) on the Current Data Table below the HOP channel
(0 or 1) (in 1+0 configuration channel 1 only) to see the HOP report or below the LINK to see the LINK
report. Refer to the next figure.

[2] Click on the Start button in the Tool bar.

Figure 123. Current Data Table (15 Min)

Refer to Figure 124. to see an example of the Current Data display and to Figure 125. to see the Alarm
Data tab panel to see the alarms regarding the performances, if any.

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Figure 124. Current Data Table (15 Min) display

Figure 125. Alarm Data Table (15 Min)

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3.15.2.1.1 CD parameters

The fields displayed in the upper part of the screen allow the operator to check and manage the parameter
of the current data collection.

Suspect interval shows whether the current data are suspect or not (Note).

Elapsed Time field (read-only) displays the elapsed time in the current interval of monitoring.

Last Update: display time of the Performance Monitoring in the graphical description and in the tab-
ular description. This time changes after the Auto Refresh.

Max Interval supp.: max. number of intervals (reports) which can be suppressed in the History
because they dont have errors.

Num. Interval supp.: number of intervals (reports) suppressed in the History because they dont
have errors.

Note

An interval is defined as suspect if at least one of the following conditions occurs in the collection period:
- the elapsed time deviates more than 10 seconds of the nominal time
- loss of the Performance Monitoring data in the equipment
- performance counters have been reset during the interval.

3.15.2.1.2 CD counters

BBE (Background Block Errors)

ES (Errored Second)

SES (Severely Errored Second)

UAS (Unavailable Second).

Note

These values refer to the last refresh performed with the Auto Refresh.

3.15.2.2 History Data Table

To see an History Data report:

[1] Click on the desired granularity (15 m or 24 h) on the History Data Table below the HOP channel (0
or 1) (in 1+0 configuration channel 1 only) to see the HOP report or click on LINK to see the LINK
report

Refer to Figure 126. to open the History Data Table.

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Figure 126. History Data Table (15 Min)

The Performance Monitoring process monitors the parameters during a specified interval (i.e. 15min) and
stores their values in history data. A History Data collection is created automatically at the end of each
time interval of Current Data.

Note: Use the arrows Right and Left in the lower part to pass from one log to another log in the history.

3.15.2.2.1 HD Counters

BBE (Background Block Errors)

ES (Errored Second)

SES (Severely Errored Second)

UAS (Unavailable Second).

3.15.2.3 Threshold tables

This section describes how to display or change or create the threshold tables assigned to Performance
Monitoring counters.

To view the available threshold for Performance Monitoring process, the operator must select the Thresh-
olds Tables node tree.

There are threshold tables for the HOP and for the LINK.

There are two default threshold tables for HOP: Threshold #1 (to be associated to 15 min report) and
Threshold #4 (to be associated to 24 h report).

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There are two default threshold tables for LINK: Threshold #1 (to be associated to 15 min report) and
Threshold #3 (to be associated to 24 h report).

3.15.2.3.1 How to create a new threshold table

Note: Four threshold tables can be created for the HOP (Threshold #2, #3, #5 and #6).
Two threshold tables can be created for the LINK (Threshold #2 and #4).

To create a new threshold table:

[1] Click on Threshold Tables HOP (or LINK) node tree.


The Threshold Data Creation screen will appear, as shown in the next figure (Hop threshold).

[2] Write the values for the Low and High thresholds.

[3] Click on Create. Automatically the new threshold takes a name with a progressive number.

Figure 127. Threshold creation

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3.15.2.3.2 How to change a threshold table

Note: Only the created thresholds can be modified or deleted. The default thresholds can be only dis-
played.

[1] Click on the Threshold to be modified in Threshold node tree (Threshold #3 in the example of the
next figure).

Figure 128. Threshold change

[2] Low and high thresholds for each counter are shown.

[3] Edit the new values in the table fields to change them and click on the Apply button.

3.15.2.4 Threshold table association

To each Performance Monitoring can be associated a Threshold Table.

To associate a Threshold Table click on Current Data Table or History Data Table of HOP-Channel#0 (or
Channel#1) or of LINK. The 15min&24h tab panel will appear.

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Figure 129. Threshold association

In the Counter Thresholds field select the threshold to be associated and click on Apply.

3.15.2.5 Adaptive Modulation performance

If the Adaptive Modulation has been enabled in the Modem unit, in the Performance Monitoring tool will
appear also the performances regarding the Adaptive Modulation: these performances show the time dur-
ing which a specific modulation scheme has been active.

To activate the Adaptive Modulation performance:

[1] Click on the desired granularity (15 m or 24 h) on the Current Data Table below the HOP channel
(0 or 1) (in 1+0 configuration channel 1 only) to see the HOP report or below the LINK to see the LINK
report. Refer to the next figure.

[2] Click on the Start button in the Tool bar.

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Figure 130. Adaptive Modulation performances

Next Figure 131. shows a display of Current Data report (15 min).

The Scale of the diagram can be changed by using the arrows (up and down) on the scale field and by
pressing Update.

Figure 131. Current Data Table (15 min)

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Next Figure 132. shows a display of History Data report (15 min).

Figure 132. History Data Table (15 min)

Note: Use the arrows Right and Left in the lower part to pass from one log to another log in the history.

3.15.2.6 Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table

To activate the Tx performances (Outgoing side):

[1] Select the Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table row as shown in the next figure.

[2] Select the Interval (the collection time of the performances): 4, 6, 30, 60 seconds. The default value
is 4 sec.

[3] Select the Duration of the performance monitor in hour and minutes. The max. duration is 24 hours.

[4] Click on the Start button to start the monitoring.

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Figure 133. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table

Refer to next figure to see the performances.

Figure 134. Ethernet Aggregate Tx Table Performance display

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The available performances at output Tx radio port are:

TTO: total number of octets of Ethernet frames transmitted out by the Interface, including Ethernet
header characters.

TTF: total number of Ethernet frames transmitted out by the interface.

TDF: total number of Transmitted Ethernet frames which were chosen to be discarded due to buffer
congestion.

The performances are displayed in two different formats:

graphical format in the lower part


tabular format in the upper part

In the graphical format by putting a check mark on the check box only one (or more than one or all)
performance can be displayed.

3.15.2.7 Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue

The MD300 unit has 8 output queues.


Queue 8 is reserved to TDM2TDM traffic.
Queue 7 is reserved to TDM2Eth traffic.
Queue 6 is reserved to TMN traffic.
The remaining 5 queues are reserved to Ethernet traffic. Queue 5 is the highest priority queue.

To activate the Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue performances (Outgoing radio side):

[1] Select the Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue row as shown in the next figure.

[2] Select the Interval (the collection time of the performances): 4, 6, 30, 60 seconds. The default value
is 4 sec.

[3] Select the Duration of the performance monitor in hour and minutes. The max. duration is 24 hours.

[4] Click on the Start button to start the monitoring.

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Figure 135. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue

To display the performance monitor select the suitable queue, as shown in the next figure (Queue #1 in
the example).

Figure 136. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue (Queue #01)

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The available performances at queue level (for each queue) are:

TCF: total number of Ethernet conforming frames accepted and transmitted out by the specific queue
of the interface.

Discard TCF: total number of Discarded Ethernet conforming frames accepted by the specific queue
of the interface.

TCO: total number of Ethernet conforming octects accepted and transmitted out by the specific
queue of the interface.

The performances are displayed in two different formats:

graphical format in the lower part


tabular format in the upper part

In the graphical format by putting a check mark on the check box only one (or more or all) performance
can be displayed.

By selecting the Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue row (as shown in the next figure) all the performances
regarding all the queues are shown in tabular format.

Figure 137. Ethernet Aggregate Per Queue (all queues)

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4 Installation

4.1 Hardware Installation


4.1.1 - Power consumption on page 229

4.1.2 - Rack Installation on page 230

4.1.3 - Outdoor Unit Installation (ODU) on page 245

4.1.4 - Indoor Unit Installation (IDU) on page 275

4.1.5 - Antenna Alignment on page 316

4.1.1 Power consumption

Part Max. Power Consumption

CORE 16 W

RADIO ACCESS CARD 23 W

E1 ACCESS CARD 16 W

FAN 8W

ODU 30 W

Note

Figures are for normal (not start-up) operation.

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4.1.2 Rack Installation

4.1.2.1 General

Indoor units (IDU) of the 9500 MPR-E system can be installed in 3 different ways:

"ETSI (WTD) rack (21") (see par. 4.1.2.2 on page 230)

"North American standard rack (19") (par. 4.1.2.3 on page 235)

The equipment can also be installed on the wall (par. 4.1.2.5 on page 238)

For each of the above type of installation special mechanical supporting fixtures are available.

Special mechanical fittings are provided for this type of installation, depending to the width of rack (19"
or 21"). The examples show the fittings used to insert the equipment in ETSI racks (21"). For installation
in 19" DIN racks the adaptors must be changed.

4.1.2.2 ETSI Rack Installation

4.1.2.2.1 Mechanical Installation

Installation has been sub-divided into the following phases:

Rack Positioning and Fastening

Fixing the rack to floor using expansion bolts or Fixing to floating floor;

T.R.U. fastening to WTD rack.

4.1.2.2.2 Rack Positioning and fastening

Proceed as follows:

Refer to the plant documentation to see rack row assignment

Fasten the rack to the station structure according to one of the following procedures

Fixing the rack to floor

Fixing the rack to floating floor

4.1.2.2.3 Fixing the rack to floor using expansion bolts

(Refer to Figure 138. and Figure 139.).

Mount the rack in a vertical position in the desired place.

Mark the base-plate with six holes (1) to be drilled on the floor.

Temporarily remove the rack and drill the holes at the points drawn on the floor. Place the inserts
into the holes.

Secure the expander bolts to the floor through the base-plate holes.

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Figure 138. Fixing the Rack to Floor (1)

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Figure 139. Fixing the Rack to Floor (2)

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4.1.2.2.4 Fixing to floating floor

(Refer to Figure 140. and Figure 141.).

The drilling mask is the same used for concrete floor fastening.

In this case a hole must be created for the cables coming from the bottom according to Figure 140.

The rack fastening is to be mounted on the concrete floor below using a suitable stud as shown in Figure
140.

Using the row layout drawing, mark out the cable entry areas in the floor tiles and cut out with a jigsaw.
Remember that the beginning of the row must be approved by the customer.

N.B. Unused or incompletely used cable entry areas should be blocked off with foam rubber.

Figure 140. Floor file drilling template

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Figure 141. Example of securing rack assembly to computer floor

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4.1.2.3 Laborack (19") installation

Figure 142. Laborack

The Laborack must be fixed to the floor by means of the four (4) screws.

(For more information see the manufacturer instructions).

When you have correctly positioned the fixing brackets on the 19" unit, the front panel will hold the
equipment by four screws fitted into the laborack cage nuts.

Fasten the IDU to the rack by inserting screws into holes of 19" mechanical adaptors and by screwing them
into relevant holes provided with nut cage situated on rack brackets.

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4.1.2.4 Subrack Installation

Figure 143. MSS-8 Subrack

Figure 144. MSS-4 Subrack

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Figure 145. Fixed Subrack with screw

Figure 146. Subrack grounding point

The subrack must be grounded using the Faston connector present on the rear side of the apparatus.

The section cable (wire) to use must be a 1x3 mm (12AWG) (Yellow/Green).

The subrack-mounting item ,adds a good electrical connection to rack ground.

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4.1.2.5 Wall Mounting Installation

The IDU wall mounting kit (3CC50027AAAA) can be used for wall installation and it can support a
maximum of three units.

The kit includes:

Two brackets

Four fixing for the brackets

M6x50 socket cap screws

Onduflex washers

Expansion bolt

The mechanical support can contain a maximum of ONE unit in case of system 1+0 and TWO units in
case of system 1+1, both equipped with mini distributor.

The possible installations are the followings:

1+0 and 1+1 Installation wall with and without mini distributor

1+0 and 1+1 typical wall installation (horizontal and vertical positioning)

The wooden or masonry wall that is selected for the installation should be in a suitable portion of the room.

Preferably it should be near to a safety power outlet, and it should ensure safeguard against accidental
tampering.

It is possible to install the apparatus in a horizontal or vertical position.

Figure 147. Mechanical Support (Two brackets)

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Figure 148. Installation kit to fix the mechanical support

Figure 149. MSS 8 Fixed on wall mounting

The mechanical support must be grounded using the Grounding Kit 3CC13423AAAA.

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4.1.2.6 Top Rack Unit

The Top Rack Unit (T.R.U.) fastening to the rack guarantees the connection to the protection ground in
that the rack is wired to the station protection ground.

Figure 150. Top Rack Unit (T.R.U.)

The T.R.U. is positioned on the top of the Rack and it is use to provide the Power Supply to the equipment.

Figure 151. Top Rack Unit - Front/Rear

The T.R.U. is fixed to the rack by means two (2) screws.

Figure 152. Top Rack Unit - Fixed to rack

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4.1.2.6.1 Top Rack Unit Components

Description Component Q.ty Particular View

Terminal Block 16mm 2

Thermal Magnetic Circuit Breaker Unipolar 6

Bus Bar Supply to 12 Fuse Carrier 1

Screws M6x16 with plastic Washer 4

Natched Clamp Nuts M6 4

Rail + Front 19" 1

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4.1.2.6.2 Top Rack Unit Connections

The photo's below show the connections from IDU to T.R.U.

Figure 153. TRU Connections

4.1.2.6.3 Top Rack Unit Grounding

The rack must be grounded by means of a connection to the protection ground terminal of the site
electrical plant.

The rack must be connected to the protection ground before performing any other electrical connection.

Figure 154. TRU Grounding position on Laborack

The rack is grounded to the station through a 16 to 25 mm2 (1 to 2 AWG) section cable (1) terminated
onto the cable terminal lug (2).

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Figure 155. ETSI Rack - Ground connection

Figure 156. Laborack - Ground connection

4.1.2.6.4 Power Supply Cable

Figure 157. 2W2C Connector and Cable (#DB18271AAAA)

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Figure 158. Battery Access Card on subrack

A power cable is supplied in the IDU Installation Kit, which has a 2-pin 2W2C fitted at one end and wire
at the other. The cable is nominally 5 m (16 ft), and the wires are 4 mm2 (AWG 12). The blue (or red) wire
must be connected to -48 Vdc (live); the black wire to ground/+ve.

Note

The 2W2C DC power connector can be shorted inadvertently if applied at an angle.


Always insert with correct alignment.
For WTD rack the TRU doesn't require any cable ground connection to the rack.

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4.1.3 Outdoor Unit Installation (ODU)
This section describes the following installation procedures:

Installing the Antenna (par. 4.1.3.1 on page 245)

Installing the ODU (par. 4.1.3.2 on page 245)

Installing a Coupler (par. 4.1.3.3 on page 260)

Installing ODU Cables and Connectors (par. 4.1.3.4 on page 264)

Installing Lightning Surge Suppressors (par. 4.1.3.5 on page 267)

Weatherproofing (par. 4.1.3.6 on page 273)

4.1.3.1 Installing the Antenna

Antennas must be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

For direct-mounted ODUs the antenna includes a collar with integral polarization rotator. Dependant
on frequency band, these antennas are available in diameters up to 1.8 m (6 ft).

Where standard antennas are to be used, the ODU must be installed on a remote-mount, and a flex-
ible waveguide used to connect to its antenna.

Before going to the site, check that you have the required installation tools as recommended by the
antenna manufacturer, and that you have data for positioning the antenna on the tower, its polarization
and initial pointing.

For direct-mounted ODUs, polarization is determined by the setting of the polarization rotator.

For standard antennas, polarization is determined by the orientation of the antenna.

Note

Unused or incompletely used cable entry areas should be blocked off with foam rubber.

4.1.3.2 Installing the ODU

The type is ODU V2.

All ODUs are designed for direct-mounting to a collar supplied with direct-fit antennas.

All ODUs can also be installed with standard antennas using a flex-waveguide remote-mount kit.

For single-antenna protected operation a coupler is available to support direct mounting of the two ODUs
to its antenna, or to support direct mounting onto a remote-mounted coupler.

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4.1.3.2.1 Direct-Mounted ODUs

4.1.3.2.1.1 Overview

The ODU is attached to its mounting collar using four mounting bolts, with captive 19 mm (3/4") nuts.

The ODU mounts directly to its antenna mount as shown below.

An ODU should be installed with its connectors facing down as shown below.

Figure 159. ODU and Mounting Collar

Figure 160. Andrew Pole Mount and ODU Mounting Collar

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Figure 160. shows the ODU mounting collar, pole mounting polarization rotator for an Andrew antenna.

Figure 161. Radio Waves Pole Mount and Mounting Collar

Figure 161. shows the ODU mounting collar, pole mounting, and polarization rotator for Radio Waves
antenna.

Figure 162. Precision Pole Mounting and ODU Mounting Collar

Figure 162. shows the ODU mounting collar, pole mount, and polarization rotator for a Precision antenna.

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4.1.3.2.2 Setting the Polarization

The polarization of the transmitted signal, horizontal or vertical, is determined by the position of the
polarization rotator fitted within the ODU mounting collar. The ODU is then mounted on the collar to match
the chosen polarization. The rotator is an integral part of the antenna mount. Vertical polarization is the
default setting. If the rotator is not set for the required polarization, you must adjust its orientation. This
topic includes typical adjustment procedures for Radio Waves and Andrew antennas. Antenna installation
instructions are included with all antennas. These instructions include procedures for setting polarization.

4.1.3.2.2.1 Procedure for Andrew Rotator

To change the polarization of the Andrew antenna:

1) Release (do not completely undo) the six metric Allen-head screws approximately 10 mm (3/
8 inch). Pull the collar forward and hold the rotator back, which will allow the rotator to disengage
from a notch in the collar, and turn freely.

2) Turn the rotator hub 90 until it locates back into a notched "timing recess" in the collar.

3) Check that the timing mark on the rotator hub has aligned with either a V or an H on the collar
to confirm polarization. Refer to this photo.

4) Ensure the rotator hub is correctly seated within its collar, then push the collar back against the
antenna mount and re-tighten the six screws.

Figure 163. Andrew ODU Collar and Polarization Rotator

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4.1.3.2.2.2 Procedure for Radio Waves Rotator

The polarization rotator is fixed by three metric Allen-head bolts.

To change the polarization of the Radio Waves antenna:

1) Loosen the bolts. Refer to Figure 164.

2) Rotate to other end of the slots. Refer to Figure 164.

3) Check bolt heads are located in the slot recesses.

4) Refasten.

Figure 164. Radio Waves Polarization Rotator

Figure 164. shows a close-up of the polarization rotator being released from the vertical position (left) and
rotated clockwise towards horizontal (right).

4.1.3.2.2.3 ODU Polarization

The ODU must be mounted on the collar to match the chosen polarization.

Correct positioning for vertical or horizontal polarization is shown below.

Figure 165. ODU orientation for Vertical or Horizontal Polarization

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4.1.3.2.3 Direct-Mount ODU Attachment Procedure

This topic describes the physical attachment of an ODU to an antenna mounting collar.

Related procedures are:

Installing the ODU Lightning Surge Suppressor (par. 4.1.3.5 on page 267)

Grounding an ODU (par. 4.1.3.2.6 on page 259)

Installing the ODU cable and connectors (par. 4.1.3.4 on page 264)

4.1.3.2.3.1 Attaching the ODU

An ODU should be installed with connectors facing down.

To attach the ODU:

1) Check that the ODU mounting collar, polarization rotator, ODU waveguide feed head and O-
ring, are undamaged, clean, and dry.

2) Set the polarization rotator for the required polarization. Refer to par. 4.1.3.2.2 - Setting the
Polarization on page 248.

3) Apply a thin layer of silicon grease around the ODU feed-head O-ring.

A tube of silicon grease is included in the ODU installation kit.

4) Fully loosen the nuts on the four ODU mounting bolts.

5) Position the ODU so the waveguide slots (ODU and rotator) will be aligned when the ODU is
rotated to its end position.

6) Fit the ODU onto its mounting collar by inserting the bolts through receptor holes in the collar,
then rotate the ODU clockwise to bring the mounting bolts hard up against the slot ends.

7) Carefully bring the ODU forward to fully engage the ODU feed head with the polarization rotator.

8) Finger-tighten the four nuts, checking to ensure correct engagement of ODU with mounting col-
lar.

9) Ensure the ODU bolt-down points are correctly seated, then tighten the four nuts with a 19 mm
(3/4") torque wrench (it must be set to 35 Nm).

10) To remove an ODU, reverse this procedure.

When removing an ODU from its mount, ensure the ODU fastening nuts are fully released.

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4.1.3.2.4 Remote-Mounted ODUs

An ODU can be installed separate from its antenna, using a remote-mount to support the ODU, and a
flexible-waveguide to connect the ODU to its antenna. A remote mount allows use of standard, single or
dual polarization antennas. The mount can also be used to remotely support a protected ODU pairing
installed on a coupler. The coupler connects to the remote mount assembly in the same way as an ODU.

When co-channel XPIC single antenna link operation is required, the two ODUs must each be connected
to their respective V and H antenna ports using remote mounts.

The remote mount clamps to a standard 112 mm (4") pole-mount, and is common to all frequency bands.

Two different solutions for the remote-mount are available.

4.1.3.2.4.1 Remote mount: solution 1 (P/N 3CC58001AAAA)

The photo below shows an ODU installed on the remote mount solution 1.

Figure 166. Remote Mount

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4.1.3.2.4.2 Remote mount: solution 2 (P/N 3CC58046AAAA)

The following photos show the remote mount solution 2.

Figure 167. Remote Mount: front view

Figure 168. Remote Mount: rear view

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Figure 169. Remote Mount with an ODU installed: front view

Figure 170. Remote Mount with an ODU installed: rear view

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Figure 171. Remote Mount with an ODU installed and flexible waveguide

Figure 172. Remote Mount with the 1+1 coupler installed

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Figure 173. Remote Mount with the 1+1 coupler and one ODU installed

4.1.3.2.4.3 Flexible waveguides

Flexible waveguides are frequency band specific and are normally available in two lengths, 600 mm (2
ft) or 1000 mm (3.28 ft). Both flange ends are identical, and are grooved for a half-thickness gasket, which
is supplied with the waveguide, along with flange mounting bolts.

To prevent wind-flex, a flexible waveguide or coax must be suitably fastened or supported over its length.
Where it is not possible to fasten directly to the support structure, hanger assemblies are recommended,
comprising a stainless steel clamp, threaded rod and a form-fit rubber grommet.

Figure 174. shows a typical assembly.

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Figure 174. Flexible Waveguide Hanger Assembly

Note

The flexible waveguides have tin-plated brass flanges to minimize dissimilar-metal corrosion between the
aluminum feed-head on the ODU and the brass antenna port(s) used on most standard antennas.

Where a flexible-waveguide length greater than the 1 m (3.28 ft) maximum included in the
9500 MPR-E accessories list is needed, contact your Alcatel-Lucent service support center.

4.1.3.2.4.4 Waveguide Flange Data

Table 9. lists the antenna port flange types used with the ODU V2 , plus their mating flange options and
fastening hardware for remote mount installations. UDR/PDR flanges are rectangular; UBR/PDR flanges
are square.

On the ODU, the two flange styles are:

UDR. 6-hole or 8-hole (6/8 bolt holes depending on frequency range/waveguide type), flush-face
flange with threaded, blind holes.

UBR. 4-hole flush-face flange with threaded, blind holes.

The corresponding mating flange styles are:

PDR. 6-hole or 8-hole flange with gasket groove and clear holes.

PBR. 4-hole flange with a gasket groove and clear holes.

All fastening hardware is metric.

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Table 9. Waveguide Flange Data
Freq Radio Waveguide Waveguide Spring Bolts Bolt Thread Hole Bolt
Band Flange Mating Type Washers Reqd Type Spec Depth Length
Flange Reqd mm Required

Flange
thickness +
6 GHz UDR70 PDR70 WR137 8 x M5 8 M5x0.8 6H 10
Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
thickness +
7/8 GHz UDR84 PDR84 WR112 8 x M4 8 M4x0.7 6H 8
Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
10/11 UDR10 thickness +
PDR100 WR90 8 x M4 8 M4x0.7 6H 8
GHz 0 Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
thickness +
13 GHz UBR120 PBR120 WR75 4 x M4 4 M4x0.7 6H 8
Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
thickness +
15 GHz UBR140 PBR140 WR62 4 x M4 4 M4x0.7 6H 8
Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
18/23/26 thickness +
UBR220 PBR220 WR42 4 x M3 4 M3x0.5 6H 6
GHz Hole depth
- 2mm

Flange
28/32/38 thickness +
UBR320 PBR320 WR28 4 x M3 4 M3x0.5 6H 6
GHz Hole depth
- 2mm

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4.1.3.2.5 Remote-Mount Installation Procedure

This topic describes the installation of a remote mount, the attachment of the ODU to the mount, and the
installation of the flexible waveguide.

4.1.3.2.5.1 Installing the Remote Mount

The remote mount attaches to a standard 112 mm (4") pipe mount using two saddle clamps. Firmly fasten
the clamp nuts.

4.1.3.2.5.2 Attaching the ODU and Flexible Waveguide

Before attaching the ODU to the remote mount, fit the flexible waveguide to the ODU.

1) Remove one gasket from the packet supplied with the flexible waveguide,apply a thin smear
of silicon grease to the gasket, and fit the gasket to the recess in the flange.

2) Firmly attach the flange to the ODU feed head using the bolts supplied.

3) Fully loosen the nuts on the four ODU mounting bolts, then thread the waveguide through the
center of the mount.

4) Attach the ODU to the mount by inserting the bolts through the receptor holes,and rotating the
ODU clockwise to bring the mounting bolts hard up against the slot ends.

5) Tighten the four nuts with a 19 mm (3/4") torque wrench (it must be set to 35 Nm).

6) Prepare the antenna-end of the flexible waveguide as in step 1 above.

7) Check, and adjust if necessary, the run of the waveguide for best protection and support posi-
tion before fastening the flange to the antenna port.

8) Secure the waveguide to prevent wind-flex using hanger assemblies or similar. If cable ties are
used, do not over-tighten.

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4.1.3.2.6 Grounding the ODU

Note

The ODU must be installed with a lightning surge suppressor.


Failure to do so can invalidate the Alcatel warranty.
Refer to Installing Lightning Surge Suppressors.

The only time one ground wire can be used to ground both the ODU and the suppressor is when an ODU
is installed with a suppressor support bracket. Refer to par. 4.1.3.5.3 - Installing a Suppressor With a
Support Bracket on page 269. The following procedure applies where separate grounding of the ODU is
required; one ground wire is installed to ground the ODU, and a separate ground wire is installed for the
surge suppressor.

4.1.3.2.6.1 ODU Grounding Procedure

To ground the ODU independent of the suppressor use the following procedure:

1) Locate the green 2 m ground wire in the ODU installation Kit. One end is fitted with a crimp lug,
the other is free.

2) Fasten the lugged end of ground wire to the ODU grounding stud. Before tightening, ensure
the cable is correctly aligned towards the tower.

3) Locate a position on a tower member for the ground clamp. This must be as close as practical
below the ODU for downward-angled positioning of the ground wire.

4) Scrape any paint or oxidation from the tower at the clamping point to ensure there will be good
low-resistance contact

5) Cut the ground wire so there will be a just a little slack in the wire when it is connected to the
ground clamp. A ground clamp is supplied as part of all ODU Cable Installation and Suppressor
kits.

6) Strip the insulation back by 25 mm (1 inch), fit into ground clamp, and firmly secure the clamp
to tower.

7) Liberally apply conductive grease/paste around the ground clamp to provide corrosion resis-
tance. Also apply to the ODU ground stud.

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4.1.3.3 Installing a Coupler

4.1.3.3.1 Coupler Overview

Couplers (combiners) are available for equal loss or unequal loss.

For equal loss the attenuation per side is nominally 3.5 dB (3.5 / 3.5 dB), which applies to both the
transmit and receive directions, meaning the additional total one-way attenuation compared to a
non-protected link is 7 dB.

For unequal loss the attenuation is nominally 1.5/6.5 dB. They have application on rain-affected
bands, 13 GHz and above.

The rationale for using unequal ratios is that they can be shown to lower annual outage due to rain fades
as compared to links deployed with equal loss couplers.

4.1.3.3.2 Coupler Installation Procedure

Note

A coupler installation procedure is included with each coupler.

The following procedure summarizes installation of a direct-mounted coupler. A coupler may also be
installed remote-mounted, where a single flexible waveguide is used to connect the coupler to its antenna.

4.1.3.3.2.1 Attaching a Direct-Mounted Coupler

Before installing a coupler check there will be sufficient mechanical clearance for the coupler and its
ODUs. There should be no clearance issues using approved antennas when installed correctly on its
mount with the appropriate left or right offset. However care must be taken at locations where a non-
standard antenna installation is required.

The ODUs are attached to the coupler as if attaching to an antenna except that there is no polarization
rotator associated with each ODU. Rather the coupler polarization is set to match the V or H antenna
polarization using 0 degree or 90 degree coupler interfaces, which are supplied with the coupler. Couplers
are default fitted with the vertical polarization interface.

A coupler must always be installed onto its antenna before ODUs are attached to the coupler.

To install a coupler:
For a vertically polarized antenna proceed to step 2. For a horizontally polarized antenna begin at step
1. (Antenna polarization setting is described in par. 4.1.3.2.2 - Setting the Polarization on page 248)

1) To change the coupler interface, remove by unscrewing its four retaining screws. Replace with
the required interface, ensuring correct alignment between the interface and coupler body
alignment indicators. Relocate the O-ring to the newly fitted interface.

2) Remove all protective tape from the waveguide ports and check that the ODU/coupler mounting
collar, polarization rotator, coupler interface and O-ring, are undamaged, clean, and dry.

3) Apply a thin layer of silicon grease around the coupler interface O-ring.

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Note

A tube of silicon grease is included in ODU and coupler installation kits

4) Fully loosen the nuts on the four coupler mounting bolts.

5) Position the coupler so the waveguide slots (coupler and rotator) will be aligned when the ODU
is rotated to its end position.

6) Fit the coupler onto its mounting collar by inserting the bolts through receptor holes in the collar,
then rotate the coupler clockwise to bring the mounting bolts hard up against the slot ends.

7) Carefully bring the coupler forward to fully engage the coupler feed head with the polarization
rotator in the mounting collar.

8) Finger-tighten the four nuts, checking to ensure correct engagement of coupler with mounting
collar.

9) Ensure the coupler bolt-down points are correctly seated, then tighten the four nuts with an
open-ended 19 mm (3/4") spanner.

10) To remove a coupler, reverse this procedure.

Figure 175. shows an installed coupler. Figure 176. and Figure 177. show a completed installation with
ODUs, surge suppressors and grounding.

Related procedures are:

Installing the ODUs; refer to par. 4.1.3.2.3 - Direct-Mount ODU Attachment Procedure on page 250.
Note that when attaching an ODU to a coupler there is no requirement to first set a polarization; the
ODUs are attached such that when rotated into position there is correct alignment of the waveguide
slots. ODUs may be attached such that cables exit to the right or left of the ODU.

Installing the ODU Lightning Surge Suppressor; refer to par. 4.1.3.5 - Installing Lightning Surge
Suppressor on page 267.

Grounding an ODU; refer to par. 4.1.3.2.6 - Grounding the ODU on page 259.

Installing the ODU cable and connectors; refer to par. 4.1.3.4 - Installing ODU Cables and Connectors on
page 264.

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Figure 175. Coupler fitted to Antenna

Figure 176. Coupler Installation with ODUs

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Figure 177. Coupler Installation with ODUs: Rear View

4.1.3.3.3 Unused and Disconnected Coupler

Unused ODU ports on a coupler must the blanked off with a microwave load as at some frequencies the
reflected power can affect operation at the remaining port, partly canceling the wanted signal.

A flange-mounted termination is used to absorb the RF energy. They are needed in 1+0 and cascaded
coupler applications where some ODU ports are left open/ not attached to an ODU.

Terminations are available from Alcatel.

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4.1.3.4 Installing ODU Cables and Connectors

Note

The ODU cable installation must comply with 9500 MPR-E requirements. If the cable, suppressors,
grounds and weatherproofing are incorrectly installed, the Alcatel warranty can be voided.

This section includes information on:

Cable Options (par. 4.1.3.4.1 on page 264)

Coaxial Cable Installation Requirements (par. 4.1.3.4.1.1 on page 264)

Cable Grounding (par. 4.1.3.4.2 on page 265)

Type N Cable Connectors (par. 4.1.3.4.2.1 on page 266)

4.1.3.4.1 Cable Options

The recommended ODU cable Type for connections of less than 80 m (262 ft) is TDB cable.

For other cable options to reach higher distance (300m/984ft) ask Alcatel-Lucent.

4.1.3.4.1.1 Coaxial Cable Installation Requirements

Task Required Considerations Explanation

Installing Connectors Crimped connectors Always use the crimp tool designed for the
crimped connectors/cable being used. A rec-
ommended crimp tool for the connectors
used with the ET 390998 cable is available
from Alcatel.

When removing the jacket Take great care when removing the jacket to
- all coaxial cable keep the outer conductor intact. A scored
outer conductor will weaken the cable and,
for a solid outer cable, can cause the outer
conductor to break or crack when subse-
quently bent.

When removing the jacket Always use the cut-off and strip tool specifi-
-solid outer conductor cable cally designed for the cable being used.

Fastening Type N connectors Tighten Type N connectors (male to female)


by hand only.

Weatherproofing All outdoor connections must be made


weatherproof. Refer to Weatherproofing.

cont.

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Planning the Route Protection for the cable The route chosen must provide physical pro-
tection for the cable (protection against acci-
dental damage).

Keep access to tower and ser- The cable must be positioned so that there is
vices clear unimpeded access to the tower and to ser-
vices on the tower.

Ease of running and fastening Use a route which minimizes potential for
damage to the cable jacket and avoids
excessive cable re-bending.

Installing the Cable Cable jacket Keep cable clear of sharp edges.

Cable support Rod support kits or similar must be used


across unsupported sections of the cable run
so that the cable cannot flex in the wind.

Bend radius Ensure the minimum bend radius for the


cable is not exceeded.

Cable ties Use one UV-resistant cable tie (from the ODU
cable kit) every 1m (3 ft) or less, of cable.

Cable grounding Ensure the cable is grounded in accordance


with the instructions provided in Cable
Grounding.

Ice-fall protection Ensure adequate physical protection for the


cable where ice-fall from towers can occur.

4.1.3.4.2 Cable Grounding

Ground kits are included in the ODU Cable Kits.

For tower/mast installations the ODU cable must be grounded at:

The point where it comes on to the tower from the ODU

The point where it leaves the tower to go to the equipment building

Not more than 25 m (80 ft) intervals on the tower if the height on the tower exceeds 50 m (165 ft)

A point just prior to building entry

Figure 178. shows typical tower locations for cable grounding and lightning surge suppressors.

At non-standard installations, such as building tops or the sides of buildings, follow the same general
guidelines but where proper grounding points are not provided these must first be installed.

For ground kit installation instructions refer to the guide provided with each kit.

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Figure 178. Locations for Cable Grounds and Surge Suppressors

4.1.3.4.2.1 Type N Cable Connectors

Note

All type N connectors used outdoors must be weatherproofed.


Refer to par. 4.1.3.6 - Weatherproofing on page 273.

Ensure connectors are correctly fitted. Where crimp connectors are used, ensure the correct crimp tool
is used.

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4.1.3.5 Installing Lightning Surge Suppressor

Note

Failure to correctly install lightning surge suppressors can invalidate the Alcatel warranty.
If circumstances do not appear to warrant installation of suppressors,
this should be checked and confirmed in writing with your Alcatel technical support center or
an Alcatel approved installation company.

The supplied suppressor is an in-line matrix type. It has a dc-blocked RF path with multiple protection
stages in the parallel dc path. These suppressors are designed to withstand repeated strikes up to 15 kV
and in the event they do fail to hard-fail so as not to cause un-certain or intermittent operation.

One version is available:

Type BGXZ-60NFNM-AS

The suppressor must be installed at the ODU.

4.1.3.5.1 Lightning Surge Suppressor Kit

The kit includes connectors, ground wire, ground clamp, waterproofing tape, and support bracket for use
at an ODU installation.

Figure 179. BGZX Surge Suppressor

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Figure 180. Cable Grounding at building entry

4.1.3.5.2 Suppressor Installation at the ODU

This topic introduces procedures for installing a lightning surge suppressor at the ODU.

Note

For ease of installation the suppressor can be attached to the ODU and weatherproofed
(fully or partly) before the ODU (with or without its antenna) is hoisted into place.
This is applicable where the suppressor is installed with its support bracket.

Use the suppressor support bracket in all situations except where it would result in an unacceptable
looping of the ODU cable back towards the tower, or other antenna support structure. However, excessive
looping can almost always be avoided by fitting a right-angle connector between the suppressor and ODU.

Their installation and weatherproofing procedures are directly similar to the following procedure for the
current support bracket.

When a suppressor is installed with its support bracket, the bracket provides single-point grounding for
the assembly. Refer to par. 4.1.3.5.3 - Installing a Suppressor With a Support Bracket on page 269.

Installation is shown in Figure 181.

When the suppressor is installed without the support bracket, the suppressor and ODU must be
separately grounded.

Note

The body of the suppressor does not need to be weatherproofed.

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Figure 181. Installation of the Suppressor on the ODU

4.1.3.5.3 Installing a Suppressor With a Support Bracket

This procedure describes the installation process using the original suppressor support bracket, which
only supports a vertical orientation of the suppressor.

The new universal support bracket supports both a vertical and horizontal orientation. For the horizontal
option, omit the right-angle Type N connector in the following procedure.

Procedure:
Note

For ease of installation, complete steps 1 to 12 on the ground.

1) Attach the right-angle Type N connector (supplied in the ODU installation kit) to the suppressor.

2) Set in the alignment shown and firmly hand-tighten.

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3) Weatherproof the connection between the right-angle connector and suppressor using the self-
amalgamating tape supplied in the suppressor installation kit.

4) Partially overlay the amalgamating tape with UV-protecting vinyl tape.

5) Fit the partially weatherproofed suppressor assembly to the ODU and align as shown.

6) Firmly hand-tighten the Type N connector.

7) Complete the weatherproofing of the right angle connector onto the ODU with self-amalgam-
ating tape.

8) Complete with a double-wrap overlay of vinyl tape.

9) Fit the support bracket to the suppressor studs and ODU ground stud. Hold in place using the
ground stud nut (loosely hand tighten only).

10) Attach the lugged end of the ground wire and secure with the star washers and nuts supplied
in the suppressor kit.

11) Check the positioning of the bracket, carefully adjusting the assembly if necessary, and tighten
all nuts.

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12) Loop and secure the ground wire before hoisting the ODU into position.

13) Attach the terminated ODU cable to the suppressor and firmly hand tighten. Ensure the cable
is first formed (bent to fit) before it is attached to the suppressor. If necessary fit a right angle
connector to ease the running of the ODU cable from the suppressor.

Note

Do not attach the ODU cable to the suppressor and then use this as
a levering point to bend the ODU cable.
Always bend the ODU cable to fit onto the suppressor before attaching it to the suppressor.

14) Weatherproof the connector assembly with self-amalgamating tape ensuring that there is 25
mm of overlap onto the jacket of ODU cable, and maximum possible onto the female barrel.
Refer to Self Amalgamating Tape.

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15) Overlay the amalgamating tape with a double layer of vinyl tape.

16) Using cable ties, tie the ODU cable to the ground wire every 200 mm (8 inches) up to the point
where they meet with the tower.

17) Secure the tied cable/wire assembly to the antenna mount or suitable hard points to stop wind
flex.

18) Trim and attach the ground wire to the tower using the supplied Harger ground clamp. First
scrape any paint or oxidation from the tower at the clamping point to ensure there will be good
low-resistance contact.

19) Apply protective grease around the ground clamp assembly. Figure 182. shows a correct instal-
lation.

Figure 182. BGXZ Suppressor Installation on an ODU

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4.1.3.6 Weatherproofing

Weatherproofing kits are included with consumable kit. Two types of weatherproofing media are supplied.

4.1.3.6.1 Mastic Tape

The ODU cable ground kits include rolls of vinyl and butyl mastic tape. For these, a two-layer wrap process
is recommended:

An initial layer of mastic tape. It is this tape that provides the weatherproofing.

A top layer of vinyl tape to support good amalgamation and adhesion of the mastic tape and to
provide UV protection.

Note

If mastic tape is used to weatherproof connectors a three-layer process is recommended, where a layer
of vinyl tape is applied before the mastic to facilitate easy strip-back when connector disconnection is
required. Special attention must be given to ensuring the mastic tape seals cleanly to the primary surfaces,
such as the cable jacket.

4.1.3.6.1.1 Wrapping Guidelines, Mastic tape

To weatherproof connectors start at 1. To weatherproof a cable ground start at 3.

1) Ensure connectors are firmly hand-tightened, dry, and free from all grease and dirt. If neces-
sary, clean with rag lightly moistened with alcohol-based cleaner.

2) Pre-wrap using vinyl tape. Use a 25% overlay when wrapping. To avoid curl-back do not stretch
the tape too tightly at the end point.

Note

On an ODU connector, leave at least two-thirds of the smooth length of the barrel clear
of pre-wrap vinyl tape, to ensure the mastic tape has sufficient area of direct grip.

3) Wrap with mastic tape using a 75% overlay. Where possible, use not less than a 25 mm (1")
attachment onto the primary surface (25 mm past the cable sheath cut, or any pre-wrap).

Note

There must be a full seal of mastic tape onto the primary surface for weatherproofing integrity.

4) Lightly firm over by hand to ensure a full seal at all points, using a tear-off section of the mastic
tape backing to protect your hands. Check that there is no possibility of water entry before pro-
ceeding to the next step 5.

5) Cover the mastic tape with a final layer of vinyl tape. To avoid curl-back, do not stretch the tape
too tightly at the end.

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Note

To avoid displacement of the mastic tape, do not stretch the final layer of
vinyl tape across sharp corners and edges.

4.1.3.6.2 Self Amalgamating Tape

Self amalgamating tape binds to the host and bonds between layers to provide a continuous seal. It is
especially useful in tight locations, such as around the Type N connectors of the suppressor when installed
with its support bracket on an ODU.

4.1.3.6.2.1 Wrapping Guidelines, Amalgamating Tape

1) Ensure the connectors are firmly hand-tightened, dry, and free from all grease and dirt. If nec-
essary, clean with a rag lightly moistened with alcohol-based cleaner.

2) Apply the tape with tension (slight stretching), using at least a 75% overlay.

3) Where possible, apply the tape 25 mm (1") past the ends of the connector barrels to ensure
the weatherproof bond extends beyond the areas requiring protection. The tape must be
applied in such a way that the sealing is robust (no obvious weak points).

4) To avoid curl-back, do not stretch the tape too tightly at the end.

5) To assist UV protection, a post-wrap using vinyl tape can be applied.

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4.1.4 Indoor Unit Installation (IDU)
The IDU is the Indoor Unit for the 9500 MPR-E.

This section includes:

IDU Accessories (par. 4.1.4.1 on page 275)

IDU Cables (par. 4.1.4.2 on page 277)

Installing an IDU (par. 4.1.4.7 on page 282)

Types of IDU Configurations (par. 4.1.4.9 on page 285)

68 Pin SCSI Funtions (par. 4.1.4.10 on page 313)

4.1.4.1 Accessory

1AD137820001 TRU: Power Distribution with 1 Input 48VDC and 6 breakers 16A

1AD137830001 TRU: Power Distribution with 1 Input 48VDC and 12 breakers 16A

3CC50042AAAA ETSI Rack mounting kit (valid for TRU 1AD137820001, TRU 1AD137830001,
support 19" module 120 ohm 3CC07810AAAA)

3CC50074AAAA Support kit for 3 cord. N/QMA IDU MPR

1AB095530023 Coax cable conn. male straight 50 ohm (diam.=10.3 mm)

1AB128500002 Coax cable grounding kit (diam.=10.3 mm)

1AB095530036 Coax cable conn. male straight 50 ohm (diam.=6.85 mm)

1AD040130004 Coax cable grounding kit (diam.=6.85 mm)

3CC50030AAAA BGXZ ARRESTOR ODU kit

1AB119780020 N Transition 90

3CC50027AAAA IDU wall mounting kit (10U)

3CC16102AAAA Panel E1 protection 120 ohm

3DB16151AAAA DIN rack kit for Panel distributor 120 ohm

3DB16152AAAA ETSI rack kit for Panel distributor 75/120 ohm

3CC07810AAAA 3U Distributor subrack for 120 ohm EMC

3CC08061AAAA Connector support 1.5./5.6 75 ohm (Panel 1U)

3DB16104AAAA Panel E1 protection 75 ohm 1.0/2.3

3CC08061ABAA Connector support BNC 75 ohm (Panel 1U)

1AD114560001 Laborack (19" rack)

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3DB04656AAAA ETSI rack (H2200 21" rack)

3DB18171ABAA DIN Bracket

3DB18159ABAA ETSI bracket

3CC13424AAAA Rack grounding kit

3CC06503AAAA Consumable kit

3DB18181AAAA IDU kit subrack (brackets 21" kit)

1AF15185AAAA IP Phone

3CC50065AAAA Adaptor bracket kit 1U ETSI (valid for 3CC08062AAAA, 3CC08061AAAA,


3CC08061ABAA)

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4.1.4.2 Cables

1AC041800001 24V DC 3G power supply cable (2x16mm2) (from Station battery to TRU)

3DB18271AAAA TRU-IDU power-cable supply connection 2x4mm2 unshielded L=4m

3CC13423AAAA IDU grounding Kit

3DB18205AAAA QMA (male) - N (female) RF cable (from Radio Access card to bracket)

1AC001100022 Coax cable 50 ohm (diam.=10.3 mm) (L=<150m )

1AC041350001 Coax cable 50 ohm (diam.=6.85 mm) (L=<80m)

3CC52133AAAA SCSI 68pin - blue block L=1.1m

3CC52118AAAA SCSI 68-SCSI 68 pin to pin

3CC07658AAAB Cable 8XE1 IDU-DISTRIBUTOR 120 ohm L=2m (37 pin)

3CC07885ABAA Cable 8XE1 IDU-DISTRIBUTOR 75 ohm 1.5/5.6 (37 pin)

3CC07759AAAA Cable 8XE1 IDU-DISTRIBUTOR 75 ohm BNC (37 pin)

3CC52157AAAA 2xSCSI, 68 pin - 4 Compax blue blocks (120 ohm) L=1.1 m

3DB18204AAAA 1.0/2.3-1.0/2.3 Synchronization (2.048-5-10 MHz) protection

3CC52138AAAA Cord 1.0/2.3 M 90 M90 L=5m (for synch. distribution)

3CC52138ABAA Cord 1.0/2.3 M 90 M90 L=15m (for synch. distribution)

3CC52117AAAA SCSI 68pin - FW L=30m

3CC52117ABAA SCSI 68pin - FW L=15m

3DB10003AAXX Cable 8xE1 IDU-DISTRIBUTOR 75 ohm coax no connectors L=15m (37 pin)

3CC08951ACAA SUB D 37 pin - FW L=15m

3CC52015AAXX Cable, Trib, E1, RJ45 to wire-wrap L=5m

3CC52020AAXX RJ45 to RJ45 E1 cross-over cable

3CC52150AAAA SCSI-SCSI cross-cable L=1.6m

3CC52150ABAA SCSI-SCSI cross-cable L=6.4m

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4.1.4.3 Distributors

The Distributor subracks available are:

Figure 183. Protection Panel 32E1 SCSI 68 - 1.0/2.3 75 ohm (Front/Rear) (3DB16104AAAA)

Figure 184. Protection Panel RJ45 120 ohm (Front/Rear) (1AF15245ABAA)

Figure 185. Protection Panel 32E1 SCSI 68 - 1.6/5.6 75 ohm (Front)

Figure 186. Protection Panel 32E1 BNC 75 ohm (Front)

Figure 187. Connector support 1.6/5.6 75 ohm Panel 1U (3CC08061AAAA)

Figure 188. Connector support BNC 75 ohm Panel 1U (3CC08061ABAA)

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Figure 189. Support 19 Inch modules 120 ohm Panel 3U (3CC07810AAAA)

Figure 190. E1 Protection SCSI 68/Sub-D 37 (Front/Rear) (3DB16102AAAA)

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4.1.4.4 MSS cards

The MSS available cards are:

Figure 191. Core Card

Figure 192. Radio Access Card

Figure 193. 32xE1 Access Card

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4.1.4.5 Ethernet Electrical Cables

3CC52141ABAA RJ45-RJ45 Eth. CAT5E shielded straight cable 5 m

3CC52141ACAA RJ45-RJ45 Eth. CAT5E shielded straight cable 15 m

4.1.4.6 Ethernet Optical Cables

The following multi-mode jumpers are available:

1AB214000016 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-LC L=5m

1AB214000017 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-LC L=10m

1AB240330033 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-FC L=5m

1AB240330032 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-FC L=10m

1AB200240003 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-SC L=5m

1AB200240004 Fiber Simplex MM jumper LC-SC L=10m

The following single-mode jumpers are available:

3CC52077AAAA Fiber 3M SM LC to LC

3CC52078AAAA Fiber 5M SM LC to LC

3CC52079AAAA Fiber 10M SM LC to LC

3CC52080AAAA Fiber 3M SM LC to FC

3CC52081AAAA Fiber 5M SM LC to FC

3CC52084AAAA Fiber 10M SM LC to FC

3CC52083AAAA Fiber 3M SM LC to SC

3CC52085AAAA Fiber 5M SM LC to SC

3CC52086AAAA Fiber 10M SM LC to SC

3CC52087AAAA Fiber 3M SM LC to SC

3CC52088AAAA Fiber 5M, SM FC-SC

3CC52017AAAA Fiber 10M, SM FC-SC

3CC52023AAAA Fiber 3M, SM SC-SC

3CC52025AAAA Fiber 5M, SM SC-SC

3CC52029AAAA Fiber 10M, SM SC-SC

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4.1.4.7 Installation Procedure

Figure 194. Installation subrack and 3 cord N/QMA Kit

Figure 195. Installation Card

Figure 196. Installation Accessory

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Figure 197. Connection Cables

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4.1.4.8 Installation Components

Alcatel-Lucent code Description

1AD114560001 Laborack
or

3DB04656AAAA ETSI RACK H 2200

1AD137820001 Power Distribution with 1 Input 48VDC and 6 breakers 16A


or

1AD137830001 Power Distribution with 1 Input 48VDC and 12 breakers 16A

3DB18125ABAA Subrack

3DB18171AAAA Din Brackets


or
3DB18159ABAA

3CC50074AAAA Kit support for 3 Cord N/QMA

1AF15245AAAA Protection panel RJ45

3DB18172ABAA Fan unit card

3DB18007AAAA Core card

3DB18136ABAA Radio Access card

3DB18126ABAA 32E1 PDH Peripheral

3CC13423AAAA IDU Grounding kit

1AB187280040 1000BASE-LX optical plug-in (option)

1AB187280045 1000BASE-SX optical plug-in (option)

3AL81728AAAA Tool for SFP plug-in extraction (option)

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4.1.4.9 Typical types of Configurations

4.1.4.9.1 MSS-4 configurations

4.1.4.9.1.1 Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 198. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 199. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.1.2 Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3

Figure 200. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3

Figure 201. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3

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4.1.4.9.1.3 Repeater 2x1+0 with QMA for Acome cable 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75
Ohms 1.0/2.3

Figure 202. Repeater 2x1+0 with QMA for Acome cable 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3

Figure 203. Repeater 2x1+0 with QMA for Acome cable 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF
75 Ohms 1.0/2.3

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4.1.4.9.2 MSS-8 configurations

4.1.4.9.2.1 Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 204. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 205. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.2 Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 206. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 207. Repeater 2x1+0 32E1 (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.3 Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 2x1U with
cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37)

Figure 208. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 2x1U with
cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37)

Figure 209. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 2x1U with
cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37)

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Figure 210. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 2x1U with
cords 3CC52134AAAA (1 SCSI68 to 2 DB37)

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4.1.4.9.2.4 Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 211. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 212. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

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Figure 213. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

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4.1.4.9.2.5 Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.6/5.6 2U

Figure 214. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.6/5.6 2U

Figure 215. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.6/5.6 2U

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4.1.4.9.2.6 Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

Figure 216. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

Figure 217. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

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Figure 218. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

Figure 219. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

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4.1.4.9.2.7 Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 220. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 221. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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Figure 222. Repeater 2x1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.8 Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 223. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 224. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

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4.1.4.9.2.9 Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 3U

Figure 225. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 3U

Figure 226. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms BNC 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.10 Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 227. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 228. Terminal 1+0 64E1 (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.11 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3
1U

Figure 229. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U

Figure 230. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/2.3 1U

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4.1.4.9.2.12 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

Figure 231. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

Figure 232. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected (2 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms RJ45 2U

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4.1.4.9.2.13 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected with 2 cords 3CC52157AAAA (2 PBA PDH) towards
internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 233. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected with 2 cords 3CC52157AAAA (2 PBA PDH) towards
internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 234. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Full protected with 2 cords 3CC52157AAAA (2 PBA PDH) towards
internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.14 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 235. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 236. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

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4.1.4.9.2.15 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

Figure 237. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

Figure 238. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

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4.1.4.9.2.16 Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 239. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 240. Terminal 1+1 32E1 Radio protected (1 PBA PDH) towards internal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.17 Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

Figure 241. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

Figure 242. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

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Figure 243. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 75 Ohms 1.0/
2.3 1U

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4.1.4.9.2.18 Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 244. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

Figure 245. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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Figure 246. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards 2xinternal DDF 120 Ohms 3U

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4.1.4.9.2.19 Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 247. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

Figure 248. Terminal 1+1 64E1 Radio protected (2 PBA PDH) towards customer DDF 120 Ohms

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4.1.4.10 68 Pin SCSI Functions

Table 10. Pin Function: Tributaries 1-16

Description Pin # Pin # Description

GND 1 35 GND

TTIP Trib. 1 2 36 1 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 1 3 37 1 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 2 4 38 2 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 2 5 39 2 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 3 6 40 3 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 3 7 41 3 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 4 8 42 4 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 4 9 43 4 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 5 10 44 5 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 5 11 45 5 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 6 12 46 6 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 6 13 47 6 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 7 14 48 7 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 7 15 49 7 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 8 16 50 8 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 8 17 51 8 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 9 18 52 9 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 9 19 53 9 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 10 20 54 10 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 10 21 55 10 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 11 22 56 11 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 11 23 57 11 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 12 24 58 12 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 12 25 59 12 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 13 26 60 13 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 13 27 61 13 Trib. RTIP

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TTIP Trib. 14 28 62 14 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 14 29 63 14 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 15 30 64 15 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 15 31 65 15 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 16 32 66 16 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 16 33 67 16 Trib. RTIP

GND 34 68 GND

Table 11. Pin Function: Tributaries 17-32

Description Pin # Pin # Description

GND 1 35 GND

TTIP Trib. 17 2 36 17 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 17 3 37 17 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 18 4 38 18 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 18 5 39 18 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 19 6 40 19 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 19 7 41 19 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 20 8 42 20 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 20 9 43 20 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 21 10 44 21 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 21 11 45 21 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 22 12 46 22 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 22 13 47 22 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 23 14 48 23 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 23 15 49 23 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 24 16 50 24 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 24 17 51 24 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 25 18 52 25 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 25 19 53 25 Trib. RTIP

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TTIP Trib. 26 20 54 26 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 26 21 55 26 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 27 22 56 27 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 27 23 57 27 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 28 24 58 28 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 28 25 59 28 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 29 26 60 29 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 29 27 61 29 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 30 28 62 30 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 30 29 63 30 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 31 30 64 31 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 31 31 65 31 Trib. RTIP

TTIP Trib. 32 32 66 32 Trib. TTIP

RTIP Trib. 32 33 67 32 Trib. RTIP

GND 34 68 GND

4.1.4.11 Interconnection to AWY

To interconnect the MPR to AWY refer to the AWY Hardware Installation manual.

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4.1.5 Antenna Alignment
This section includes:

Preparation (see par. 4.1.5.1 on page 316)


Signal Measurement (see par. 4.1.5.2 on page 316)
Aligning the Antenna (see par. 4.1.5.3 on page 318)
Main Beams and Side Lobes (see par. 4.1.5.4 on page 322)

4.1.5.1 Preparation

Before aligning antennas ensure:

The ODUs are powered up at both ends of the link.


Transmit and receive frequencies are correctly set.
Transmit powers are correctly set and transmit mute is turned off.

Note

If frequency and/or power settings are not correct for the application,
interference may be caused to other links in the same geographical area.

4.1.5.2 Signal Measurement

Two receive signal-strength indicators are provided to assist antenna alignment, RSL in the CT
Performance screen, and the RSSI voltage at the BNC connector on the ODU. Refer to:

Using RSL Data (see par. 4.1.5.2.1 on page 316)

Using the RSSI Voltage at the ODU (see par. 4.1.5.2.2 on page 317)

RSL Measurement Guidelines (see par. 4.1.5.2.2.1 on page 317)

4.1.5.2.1 Using RSL Data

As CT is accessed via connection to the INU or IDU, a separate means of communication such as two-
way radio or cell phone is required between the CT operator and the person at the antenna.

To align using RSL:

1) Monitor RSL in the CT Performance screen.

2) Set antenna alignment for maximum RSL.

3) Repeat for the far end of the link.

4) Compare actual RSLs with the expected RSLs from the link installation datapack. RSL mea-
surement accuracies for ODU V2 are:

a) 2 dB for levels -40 to -70 dBm, over a temperature range of 0 to +35C.

b) 4 dB for levels -25 to -85 dBm, over an extended -33 to +55C range.

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4.1.5.2.2 Using the RSSI Voltage at the ODU

A voltmeter, such as a multimeter, is used to measure RSSI voltage at the BNC connector on the ODU.
A suitable BNC to banana-plug connecting cable is available as an optional ODU accessory.

1) To align using the RSSI voltage at the ODU:

2) Connect the voltmeter to the BNC connector. Center pin is positive. Use a low voltage range
for best resolution, nominally 2.5 Vdc FSD.

3) Adjust antenna alignment until the voltmeter reading is at minimum value.

4) Repeat for the far end of the link.

Check and record the peak voltage at each end. The RSSI voltage provides a direct relationship with RSL.
An RSSI of 0.25 Vdc _-10 dBm RSL, and each additional 0.25 Vdc RSSI increase thereafter corresponds
to a 10 dBm decrease in RSL, as follows:

Units Measurement

BNC (Vdc) 0.25 0.5 0.75 1.0 1.25 1.5 1.75 2.0 2.25 2.5

RSL (dBm) -10 -20 -30 -40 -50 -60 -70 -80 -90 -100

5) Compare actual RSLs to the expected RSLs from the link installation datapack. Refer to par.
4.1.5.2.2.1 - RSL Measurement Guidelines.

6) Replace the BNC weatherproofing.

Note

Failure to replace the RSSI BNC weatherproof cap may result in damage to the ODU.

4.1.5.2.2.1 RSL Measurement Guidelines

Interference

The RSSI filter has a nominal 56 MHz bandwidth, which means that depending on the channel bandwidth
used, multiple adjacent channels will be included within the filter passband. Normally this will not cause
a problem as antenna discrimination (beamwidth) and good frequency planning should exclude adjacent
channel interferers. However at sites where this is not the case, ATPC 1should not be enabled.

ATPC operates on the RSL. Any interferer that affects the RSL will adversely affect ATPC operation

Check for interference by muting the Tx at the far end and checking RSSI/RSL at the local end

Note

For CCDP operation and where there is a measurable


adjacent channel RSL, do not use ATPC.

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RSSI/RSL Accuracy

When checking RSSI/RSL against the predicted link values ensure appropriate allowances are made for
Tx power-setting accuracy, path-loss calculation accuracy, and RSSI/RSL measurement accuracy.

For a worst-case the overall accuracy is the sum of the individual accuracy limits, which for an ODU
V2 link would be 4 dB of the predicted value (2 dB for transmit, 2 dB for receive, 0 to 35C), aside
from the path-loss calculation accuracy, which should be within limits of 3 dB.

Typically, where the measured RSSI/RSL is more than 4 dB lower than the expected receive level
you should check the path survey results, path calculations and antenna alignment.

Note

When checking RSSI/RSL ensure the measurement is made under normal,


unfaded and interference-free path conditions.

A discrepancy of 20 dB or greater between the measured and calculated RSSI/ RSLs suggests an
antenna is aligned on a side lobe, or there is a polarization mismatch.

4.1.5.3 Aligning the Antenna

Antenna alignment involves adjusting the direction of each antenna until the received signal strength
reaches its maximum level at each end of the link.Fine adjustment for azimuth (horizontal angle) and
elevation (vertical angle) is built into each antenna mount.

Adjustment procedures will be provided with each antenna.If the horizontal adjuster does not provide
sufficient range to locate the main beam, the antenna mounting brackets will need to be loosened and
the antenna swiveled on its pole mount to locate the beam.

Before doing this ensure the horizontal adjuster is set for mid-travel.

Some mounts for larger antennas have a separately clamped swivel base to allow the loosened antenna
to swivel on it without fear of slippage down the pole. Where such a mount is not provided a temporary
swivel clamp can often be provided using a pair of pipe brackets bolted together immediately below the
antenna mount.

Note

Ensure antennas are aligned on the main beam, and not a side lobe.
For guidance, refer to the sections Locating the Main Beam (see par. 4.1.5.4.1 on page 322)
and Tracking Path Error (see par. 4.1.5.4.2 on page 323).
Ensure ATPC is turned off during the alignment procedure.

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4.1.5.3.1 Standard Alignment Procedure

To align an antenna:

1) Loosen the azimuth adjuster on the antenna mount (horizontal angle) and adjust azimuth posi-
tion for maximum signal strength.

2) Tighten the azimuth securing mechanism. Ensure signal strength does not drop as it is tight-
ened.

3) Loosen the elevation adjuster (vertical angle) and adjust for maximum signal strength.

4) Tighten the elevation securing mechanism. Ensure signal strength does not drop as it is tight-
ened. The terminal is now aligned and ready to carry operational traffic.

5) Record RSL and/or RSSI voltage in the commissioning log.

4.1.5.3.2 Alignment Procedure for Dual polarized Antenna

The following procedure details steps required to:

Check and if necessary set feedhead alignment using a spirit level.

Align the antennas at each end using just one of the feeds, H or V. (Standard co-plane antenna
alignment).

Check cross pole discrimination (XPD).

Note

Optimize alignment of the feed-heads to achieve maximum cross polarization discrimination.


This procedure assumes that the antennas used at each end of the link do comply with their
cross-polarization discrimination specification. If in doubt, refer to the antenna supplier.

Procedure:

[1] Static Feedhead Alignment

During antenna installation and before weatherproofing is installed, use a spirit level to check and
set exact vertical / horizontal alignment of the feeds:

Do not rely on antenna markings as these will not be accurate where a mount is not perfectly
level.

Set the spirit level against the flange of the feedhead. Take care that only the flange of the feed-
head is measured, so that no error is introduced by any minor misalignment of the mating flex-
ible waveguide flange. See Figure 249.

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Figure 249. Checking Feedhead Flange with a Spirit level

If not exactly vertical or horizontal, adjust the feedhead skew angle (rotate the feedhead) until
correct (spirit level bubble is precisely centered). For a typical feedhead check both flanges for
level, using an end point half way between the level points of the two flanges should there be
any discrepancy between the two.

[2] Align Antennas

Align the antennas at both ends using the standard (co-plane) alignment procedure, but using just one
of the feeds, V or H. Refer to Standard Alignment Procedure (see par. 4.1.5.3.1 on page 319). When
correct, proceed to step 3.

[3] - TBD -

Power-up both V and H links and check they are operating normally and are alarm-free. Use the Per-
formance screens to check that:

Tx power measurements are within 1 dB (typically). If not check Tx power settings.

RSL measurements are within 2 dB. See Using RSL Data (see par. 4.1.5.2.1 on page 316) for
guidance on measurement accuracy.

Links are operating error-free.

Note

Where there is potential for interference from other links in the same geographical area,
check by turning the far end transmitter(s) off and measuring the local end RSL
on both V and H feeds.

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[4] Measure the actual V and H signal discrimination from each antenna.

Where measured XPDs are better than 25 dB no further adjustment is needed

Where less than 25 dB proceed to the next step.

Note

The alignment procedures listed under steps 1 and 2 should result in a discrimination of better than 25dB.
However, for best results and greater operating margins during fading, feedhead alignment should be
optimized using the following procedure.

[5] Optimize End-End Feedhead Alignment

This procedure corrects for any minor rotational alignment between antennas at each end.

One antenna is the reference antenna and its feed-head assembly is not adjusted during this pro-
cedure.

Note

Only check/adjust skew angles on one antenna. If both antennas are adjusted and re-adjusted there is
potential for progressive misalignment to occur. Select one antenna as the reference antenna. On long
hops and where fading is prevalent there is potential for the V and H plane paths to be affected differently
and to therefore exhibit variable cross-polarization discrimination. This alignment procedure must be con-
ducted during periods of known, stable path conditions.

[6] Adjust the feedhead skew angle of the antenna for maximum XPD on both V and H link. If the max-
imums for each are at (slightly) different angles, adjust for a mid-point.

Note

Ensure that as you adjust the skew angle, the physical antenna alignment does not shift, which would
make it necessary to repeat step 2. Check that antenna mounting bolts and azimuth and elevation adjuster
locks have been correctly tightened. The maximum points may be quite sharp, rotate the feedhead slowly
to ensure they are not missed.

[7] Check the XPD on the link at the reference end of the link, which should be within 1 to 2 dB of the
measurements at the adjusted end.

[8] On completion ensure feedhead bolts are correctly tightened - check that XPDs do not change during
tightening.

[9] Retain feed-head adjustment data for the commissioning records.

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4.1.5.4 Main Beams and Side Lobes

This section describes how to locate the main beam, and typical tracking path errors.

4.1.5.4.1 Locating the Main Beam

Ensure the antennas are aligned on the main beam, and not a side lobe.

Once a measurable signal is observed, very small alignment adjustments are required to locate the main
beam. For instance, a 1.2m antenna at 23 GHz typically has 0.9 of adjustment from center of main beam
to the first null (0.4 to the -3 dB point). Antenna movement across the main beam will result in a rapid
rise and fall of signal level. As a guide, 1 degree of beam width is equivalent to moving approximately 1.0
mm around a standard 114 mm (4.5 in.) diameter O/D pipe.

Antennas can be verified as being on main beam (as opposed to a side lobe) by comparing measured
receive signal level with the calculated level.

Signal strength readings are usually measurable when at least a main beam at one end and first side lobes
at the other are aligned.

The strongest signal occurs at the center of the main beam. The highest first lobe signal is typically 20 -
25 dB less than the main beam signal. When both antennas are aligned for maximum main beam signal
strength, the receive signal level should be within 2 dB of the calculated level for the path. This calculated
level should be included in the installation datapack for the link.

Figure 250. is an example of a head-on, conceptual view of the beam signal strength, with concentric rings
of side lobe peaks and troughs radiating outward from the main beam.

Figure 250. Indicative head-on signal pattern for a parabolic antenna

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4.1.5.4.2 Tracking Path Error

Side lobe signal readings can be confused with main beam readings. This is particularly true for the first
side lobe as the signal level at its center is greater than the signal level at the edges of the main beam,
and if tracking on an incorrect elevation (or azimuth) a false impression of main beam reception can be
obtained. This illustration shows an example of this with a simplified head-on view of an antenna radiation
pattern, and tracking paths for three elevation settings.

Figure 251. Example Tracking Path Signals

Line AA represents the azimuth tracking path of a properly aligned antenna.The main beam is at point
2, and the first side lobes at points 1 and 3. Line BB represents the azimuth tracking path with the antenna
tilted down slightly. Signal strength readings show only the first side lobe peaks, 4 and 5. In some
instances the side lobe peaks are unequal due to antenna characteristics, which can lead to the larger
peak being mistaken for the main beam. The correct method for locating the main beam in this case is
to set the azimuth position midway between the first side lobe peaks, and then adjust the elevation for
maximum signal.

Line CC represents an azimuth tracking path with the antenna tilted down further still. The first side lobe
signal peaks (6 and 7) appear as one peak, leading to a mistaken interpretation of a main beam. The
correct method for locating the main beam is to set the azimuth at mid peak, between 6 and 7, and then
adjust elevation for maximum signal.

This first side lobe peaking is probably the most frequent cause of misalignment in both azimuth and
elevation, especially so if one side lobe peaks higher than the other, as shown in Figure 252. A common
error is to move the antenna left to right along line DD, or top to bottom along line EE, always ending up
with the maximum signal at position 1.

Figure 252. Example Tracking Path Signals on the First Side Lobe

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4.2 Software local copy
This section explains how to prepare the TCO Suite and Craft Terminal environment in your PC.

Getting Started (par. 4.2.1 on page 325)

PC Characteristics (par. 4.2.2 on page 325)

Download Software Package (SWP) to PC (par. 4.2.3 on page 325)

Download Craft Terminal (CT) and TCO Suite Software to PC (par. 4.2.4 on page 329)

Java JRE Package Installation (par. 4.2.4.1 on page 331)

Local Copy of WebEML (JUSM/CT) (par. 4.2.4.2 on page 331)

Local Copy of TCO Suite (par. 4.2.4.3 on page 333)

Configure PC Network Card to Connect to NE (par. 4.2.5 on page 335)

Download Software Package to NE (par. 4.2.6 on page 339)

Server Access Configuration (par. 4.2.6.1 on page 339)

Init SW Download (par. 4.2.6.2 on page 340)

SW Status (par. 4.2.6.3 on page 343)

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4.2.1 Getting Started

Note

Read the following before starting.

The operator must be familiar with the use of personal computers in WINDOWS environment,
internally from which the NE application software operates.

TCO Suite and Craft Terminal applications are on one CD. Software Package (SWP) is on another
CD. Verify versions of the CD-ROM.

To properly install TCO Suite and Craft Terminal applications, a PC is required, having the
characteristics specified here below.

4.2.2 PC Characteristics
The PC to use for TCO Suite and Craft Terminal applications must meet following characteristics:

PC Hardware Configuration:

CPU: Pentium III 850 MHz


RAM: 512 Mbytes (minimum), 1 Gbyte (suggested)
Min. disk space: 1.5 Gbytes (available space needed, JRE excluded)
Min. resolution: equal or higher than 1024x768 pixel
CD-ROM Drive: 24x
Primary Interface: Ethernet Card 10/100 Mbits/sec.

Operating Systems Supported:

Microsoft Windows 32-bit versions: Microsoft Windows XP Professional service pack 2

Additional requirements:

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 6.02900.2180 SP1+ or higher, Microsoft Internet Explorer 7
7.0.5730.11CO + or higher, Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.12 or higher
Administrator or Power User rights
Java Runtime Environment (JRE) 6 Update 3 (it is available on the CT/TCO Suite CD-ROM)
Disable all Firewall software on PC used

4.2.3 Download Software Package (SWP) to PC


Follow these steps to download the Software Package (SWP) to the PC.

[1] Insert the SWP CD into the CD-ROM drive.

Note

The Software Package will auto-run and open up the computer's default browser program (if auto-run fea-
ture is enabled on user's PC) as soon as the CD-ROM is read by the PC. If auto-run does not start, user
must run (double-click with left mouse button on it) the Start.exe file, available on CD-ROM root, in order
to launch the Software Package.

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Note

This certificate is not signed by a public/trusted certification authority. The Warning Security dialog (see
screen below) will inform the user about this problem and browser/JRE will probably recognize the sig-
nature as "not valid". This is neither an error nor a problem. If the dialog message specifies that the sig-
nature cannot be verified, it means the signed applet is correct but that the signature cannot be publicly
checked on the Internet. As usual, both language and graphical layout could vary with respect to browser,
operating system version, operating system and browser languages and so on. To avoid further requests
it is suggested to confirm and "always trust " the stated certificate source.

This screen shows an example of these warnings: as wrote before, things can differ with respect to
language or graphics and so on.

[2] Click the Run button to proceed with the Software Package local copy.

[3] Click on the Local Copy of Software Package button to copy the software to your local PC.

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[4] Choose a directory location to install the Local Copy of Software Package. Click Open and OK to
begin the copy process.

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The files will be copied from the CD to the PC and will create a directory named ECT.

[5] A successful copy message will display when all files have been copied. Click OK.

[6] Remove the SWP CD from the CD-ROM drive.

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4.2.4 Download Craft Terminal (CT) and TCO Suite Software to PC
Follow these steps to download the CT/TCO Suite software to the PC.

[1] Insert the CT/TCO Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.

Note

The CT/TCO Suite software will auto-run and open up the computer's default browser program (if auto-
run feature is enabled on user's PC) as soon as the CD-ROM is read by the PC. If auto-run does not start,
user must run (double-click with left mouse button on it) the Start.exe file, available on CD-ROM root, in
order to launch the Software Package.

Note

This certificate is not signed by a public/trusted certification authority. The Warning Security dialog (see
screen below) will inform the user about this problem and browser/JRE will probably recognize the
signature as "not valid". This is neither an error nor a problem. If the dialog message specifies that the
signature cannot be verified, it means the signed applet is correct but that the signature cannot be publicly
checked on the Internet. As usual, both language and graphical layout could vary with respect to browser,
operating system version, operating system and browser languages and so on. To avoid further requests
it is suggested to confirm and "always trust " the stated certificate source.

This screen shows an example of these warnings: as wrote before, things can differ with respect to
language or graphics and so on.

[2] Click the Run button to proceed with the CT/TCO Suite software local copy.

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[3] Click on the Advanced Settings button below.

[4] Select one of the three Advanced Settings options to copy software to the PC.

Java JRE Package Installation (par. 4.2.4.1 on page 331)

Local Copy of WebEML (JUSM/CT) (par. 4.2.4.2 on page 331)

Local Copy of TCO Suite (par. 4.2.4.3 on page 333)

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4.2.4.1 Java JRE Package Installation

[1] Click on the Java JRE Package Installation button to install the Sun Java Runtime Environment
(JRE) 6 Update 3 version to your PC.

4.2.4.2 Local Copy of WebEML (JUSM/CT)

[1] Click on the Local Copy of WebEML (JUSM/CT) button to copy the WebEML software to your PC.
Choose the directory location and click Open and then OK.

Note

This software has to reside in a directory name with no spaces in the name. Microsoft Windows defaults
to the My Documents directory. Change directories and/or create a new directory without spaces in the
directory name.

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[2] When the files have finished copying, this window will display. Click the OK button. The files will be
copied to a created directory named MPRE_CT_VXX.XX.XX (where the X's are the version num-
ber).

[3] The user has the option to create a shortcut link on the PC desktop. Click Yes or No.

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An icon similar to this one will be created on the desktop if the user clicked yes.

4.2.4.3 Local Copy of TCO Suite Installation

[1] Click on the Local Copy of TCO Suite button to install the TCO Suite software to your PC. Choose
the directory location and click Open and then OK.

Note

This software does not have to reside in a directory name with no spaces in the name. Microsoft Windows
defaults to the My Documents directory. It is recommended to install this software in the same location
as the WebEML software.

The files will be copied from the CD to the PC in a created directory named mpreSuite.(Version).

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[2] When the files have finished copying, this window will display. Click the OK button.

[3] The user has the option to create a shortcut link on the PC desktop. Click Yes or No.

An icon similar to this one will be created on the desktop if the user clicked yes.

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4.2.5 Configure PC Network Card to Connect to NE
This example uses a Microsoft Windows XP Professional system.

[1] Connect a CAT 5/5E cable from the PC network card to NMS connector on Slot 1 Core card.

[2] Click on the START menu on the Windows desktop and open up the CONTROL PANEL.

[3] Open up the NETWORK CONNECTIONS. Highlight the network card as shown below.

[4] Right click and select Properties to display the screen below.

[5] Scroll down the list to highlight the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) line. Click the OK button.

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[6] As default the DHCP server on the MPR is enabled. Set the PC to get automatically an IP address.

[7] If for any reason the DHCP server on the MPR has been disabled, enter the IP address of 10.0.1.3
for the PC network card as shown below. Click OK.

Note

The 10.0.1.3 IP address example shown below is derived from the default NE IP address (10.0.1.2) plus
1. If there is an IP address conflict within your network, increment the last number by two.

Note

It is suggested to keep enabled only one network connection on a PC.

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[8] To check the connectivity between the PC and the NE, open up a DOS window or Command Prompt.
Click on the START menu on the Windows desktop and open up the RUN window as shown below.

[9] Type cmd and click OK to open up a DOS window.

The DOS window will display.

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[10] In the DOS window, click the cursor after the > and type ping 10.0.1.2 to verify a connection between
the PC and the NE. The Ping statistics for the IP address 10.0.1.2 should display 4 packets sent and
and 4 packets received.

Note

The 10.0.1.2 IP address is the default NE IP address.

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4.2.6 Download Software Package to NE
After the switching on of the equipment click on the MPRE-CT icon on your desktop.

The Server Access Configuration menu option in the menu bar allows the user to configure the FTP server
to be used to download the Software Package (SWP) to the NE.

[1] On the WebEML main screen, click on the SW Download dropdown menu and select Server
Access Configuration.

4.2.6.1 Server Access Configuration

The user has the choice of implementing Step 2 OR Step 3 below. Afterwards, continue to Step 4.

[2] Enter the User Id and Password login information to access the FTP server. In the Address field,
write the IP address of the FTP server. In the Port field, write the port to be used and in the Root
Directory field, write the directory into which the software has been downloaded.

[3] Click the Set Default button and the screen below will appear showing the default configuration. The
CT is the default FTP server with the following parameters:

User Id: anonymous


Password
Address: Local host IP address
Port: 21
Root Dir: /

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Note

The set default parameters can be changed by writing different values in the fields and then by clicking
on the OK button.

[4] Click the OK button.

4.2.6.2 Init SW Download

[1] On the WebEML main screen, click on the SW Download dropdown menu and select Init SW
Download. This menu option allows the user to download software to the NE for initial downloads
and upgrades.

[2] Click the Add button to add the available software packages on the PC.

Note

Before the starting the software download it is recommended to set the RTPC mode to the maximum Tx
power.

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[3] Browse to the directory where the NE software was installed and click the Open button.

[4] Highlight the description file (i.e. R95M.DSC) and click the Open button.

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[5] Highlight the line as shown below and click on the Init Download button.

[6] Click the Yes button to begin the download process.

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When the SW download starts, a screen showing the in progress operation of the download appears. The
download is aborted when the Abort button is pressed.

[7] Click Ok.

4.2.6.3 Software Status Detail

[1] On the WebEML main screen, click on the SW Download dropdown menu and select SW Status.
This screen shows the last two software versions details (par. 4.2.6.3.1 and par. 4.2.6.3.2) stored on
the NE. In this example, par. 4.2.6.3.1 shows the current committed software running on the NE. par.
4.2.6.3.2 shows the standby software or previous software.

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4.2.6.3.1 Tab 1 Committed Software

This is the current software running on the NE.

4.2.6.3.2 Tab 2 Standby Software

This is the software that was downloaded above or was the previous SW version.

[2] Select Tab 2 and click on the Software Management Action drop down list.

[3] Select Activation from the Software Management Action drop down list.

[4] Click the Apply Action button to confirm the action.

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[5] Click Confirm.

[6] Click OK.

[7] The card will reboot automatically with the new software in Tab 2 and will display this message. Click
OK.

Note

After the Core card reboots, the Tab 2 software version that was activated above (i.e. V01.00.15) will be
listed under the Tab 1 SW status detail and is the committed software running the NE. The previous soft-
ware (i.e. V01.00.00) will be listed under Tab 2 now.

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5 Provisioning
The Provisioning can be performed by using:

WebEML (refer to paragraph 5.1 on page 347)

Provisioning tool (refer to paragraph 5.2 on page 386)

5.1 Provisioning by WebEML

5.1.1 Start WebEML


1) Click on the Operational & Maintenance button to start WebEML.

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There are three methods available to access the NE CT screens, based on the status of the NE
configuration tables that identify the NE in the system.

[1] If the NE is already listed in the NE Table as part of the system, a simple procedure (Startup WebEML
From An Existing Configuration) allows this information to be downloaded to the NE Configuration
screen.

[2] If the system is new or the NE is being added to an existing system, the Startup WebEML With A
New Configuration method can be used to create a new table or add a new NE to the table.

[3] The Manual WebEML Startup method can be used anytime to access the NE. This entails writing
in the NE information in the fields on the NE Configuration screen. Manual WebEML Startup is shown
here.

Manually Enter the Information

Follow one of the two procedures below to manually start up the application.

1) Enter the IP Address or DNS name.

2) Click OK.

3) Click Show.

The application has been started pop-up will automatically close in a few seconds. The user can click
the OK but it is not necessary. The Login screen will appear.

4) Type your username must not be more than 20 characters.

5) Type your password must not be less than six (6) or more than 20 characters and must be
composed of full ASCII characters set (UPPER/lower case, numeric and special characters).

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Note

Profile Types there are four user profiles defined.

Administrator (full access also for NMS local system security parameters).

CraftPerson: person in charge for installation and the mantenance at radio site; full access to NE but
not for security parameters, only for own password.

Operator (person in charge to operate at the network level, not at the radio side).

Viewer (view screens only).

Note

Default User Accounts at the NE installation time, two default user accounts
are created on NE independently from the SNMP operating mode.

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Profile: administrator
Username: initial
Password: adminadmin

Profile: craftPerson
Username: Craftperson
Password: craftcraft

5.1.2 Provisioning Radio

Note

Changes to provisioning do not have to be made in any particular order.

Click on Provisioning. Check current provisioning and change as required. See Figure 253. for
recommended sequence.

Figure 253. Provisioning Sequence

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5.1.2.1 Enable Plug-In Cards

MSS E1 Access Card and Radio Modem Card have to be enabled in order to communicate what type of
card is in what MSS slot to the microprocessor in the Core Card. This is accomplished on the Settings
screen for that card. The Core Card in MSS slot 1 is enabled by default. The ODU is enabled concurrently
with the associated Radio Modem Card. The Fan Unit must be enabled.

Enable MSS modules using the following procedures. See Figure 254. through Figure 262.

5.1.2.1.1 Enable SFP optical plug-in

See Figure 254. Follow the steps to enable the optional SFP plug-in for the optical 1000 Mb/s Ethernet
interface.

Figure 254. Enable SFP optical plug-in

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5.1.2.1.2 Enable Spare Core Card

See Figure 255. Follow the steps to enable the Spare Core Card in slot 2.

Figure 255. Enable Spare Core Card

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5.1.2.1.3 Enable E1 Access Card

See Figure 256. Follow the steps to enable the E1 Access Card(s).

Figure 256. Enabling E1 Access Card

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Figure 257. Enabling E1 Access Card on the same row (to implement protected configuration)

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Figure 258. Enabling E1 Access Card protection

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5.1.2.1.4 Enable Radio Modem Card

See Figure 259. Follow the steps to enable the Radio Modem Card(s).

Note

ODU is automatically enabled when Radio Modem Card is enabled.

Figure 259. Enabling Radio Modem Card

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Figure 260. Enabling Radio Modem Card on the same row (to implement protected configuration)

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Figure 261. Enabling Radio Modem Card protection

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5.1.2.1.5 Enable Fan Unit

See Figure 262. Follow the steps to enable the Fan Unit.

Figure 262. Enabling Fan Unit

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5.1.2.2 Provision Plug-In Cards

See Figure 263. through Figure 272. to provision MSS plug-in card parameters after the cards have been
enabled.

5.1.2.2.1 Provision Core Card

See Figure 263. Follow the steps to provision Ethernet ports 1-4.

Figure 263. Core Card Provisioning (Ethernet ports 1-4)

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See Figure 264. Follow the steps to provision Ethernet port 5 (available if the optional SFP plug-in has
been installed and enabled in the Core unit.

Figure 264. Core Card Provisioning (Ethernet port 5)

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5.1.2.2.2 Provision E1 Access Card TDM2TDM

See Figure 265. Follow the steps to provision E1 lines (ports) 1-32.

Figure 265. E1 Access Card Provisioning TDM2TDM

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5.1.2.2.3 Provision E1 Access Card TDM2ETH

See Figure 266. Follow the steps to provision E1 lines (ports) 1-32.

Figure 266. E1 Access Card Provisioning TDM2ETH

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Figure 267. Access Card Details

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5.1.2.2.4 Provision Radio Modem Card

See Figure 268. and follow the steps to provision the Radio Modem Card for Presetting Mode.

See Figure 270. and follow the steps to provision the Radio Modem Card for Adaptive Modulation mode.

Figure 268. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Presetting Mode (Sheet 1 of 2)

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Figure 269. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Presetting Mode (Sheet 2 of 2)

Note

When the Mode is changed from Presetting to Adaptive Modulation, the radio defaults to 14 MHz band-
width at 4 QAM. If the capacity of the radio (number of E1 lines cross connected) exceeds the available
capacity of a 14 MHz Channel at 4 QAM, Adaptive Modulation will not enable. It may be necessary to per-
form one of the following provisioning changes:
1. Reduce the quantity of E1 lines being transported to meet the required capacity.
2. Increase Reference Channel Spacing.

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Refer to Table 12. for the equivalent number of E1 lines available for 14 MHz bandwidth at 4 QAM.

Table 12. Modem Profiles In Adaptive Modulation

REFERENCE CHANNEL MODULATION E1 EQUIVALENT CAPACITY


SPACING

4 QAM 18 E1

28 MHz 16 QAM 37 E1

64 QAM 56 E1

4 QAM 8 E1

14 MHz 16 QAM 18 E1

64 QAM 27 E1

4 QAM 4 E1

7 MHz 16 QAM 8 E1

64 QAM 13 E1

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Figure 270. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 1 of 3)

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Figure 271. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 2 of 3)

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Figure 272. Radio Modem Card Provisioning, Adaptive Modulation Mode (Sheet 3 of 3)

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5.1.2.3 Provision Synchronization

All 9500 MPR-E radios in the network must be synchronized to the same clock. One radio in the network
is provisioned Master. All other radios in the network must be provisioned Slave. The slave radios all sync
to the clock provided by the master.

5.1.2.3.1 Normal Operation

During normal operation, the master can be provisioned to get sync clock from two separate sources: an
internal local oscillator (most common source) or external clock from customer provided equipment. The
slave radios can be provisioned to receive the sync clock from one of two sources: clock recovered by
the radio receiver or the sync clock from another radio in the network. Normally at a repeater, the sync
clock is received over the RF path and recovered by the radio receiver. A typical slave terminal uses the
clock from an adjacent radio. See Figure 273. for typical master terminal provisioning. See Figure 274.
for typical slave terminal provisioning.

5.1.2.3.2 Failed Primary Operation

With the exception of the master when the radio is provisioned to sync off the local oscillator, the
provisioned secondary sync source is enabled if the primary source fails. When the master, provisioned
to accept sync clock at the core from an external source, fails, the internal free-running local oscillator is
enabled. Provisioning choices for the secondary source for slave radios are dependent upon the choices
made from the primary source.

5.1.2.3.3 Sync Switching

With the exception of the master when the radio is provisioned to sync off the local oscillator, the sync
clock source is switched from primary to secondary if the primary source fails. Sync clock switching
provisioning is dependent on the role of the radio in the network (master or slave) and on user preference.
A revertive switching feature is a provisioning option that restores the sync clock to the original source
when the alarm on the primary source is cleared. If revertive switching is not selected, the secondary sync
source will continue to provide sync clock, and if the secondary source fails, must be manually switched
to the primary source.

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Figure 273. Provisioning Master with Free Run Local Oscillator as Primary Source

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Figure 274. Provisioning Slave with Radio Port as Primary Source

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5.1.2.4 Provision NTP protocol

This menu allows to enable the NTP (Network Time Protocol).

Figure 275. Provisioning NTP protocol

Put a check mark in the NTP protocol field to enable the protocol and write in the Main Server address
field the IP address of the server, which is in charge to distribute the time to all the NEs in the network.
In the Spare Server address field write the IP address of the Spare Server, if any.

The Server reachability field is a read-only field, which shows the reachability of the NTP servers. The
following information can appear:

"Main server reachable"

"Spare server reachable"

"None servers reachable"

"Both servers reachable"

Click on Refresh to update the screen.

Click on Apply to send to the NE the NTP Configuration.

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5.1.2.5 Provision NE Time

The user can provision either the operating system (PC/laptop) or Network Time Protocol (NTP) servers
to manage time and date stamping functions. Time and date provisioning is accomplished using the NE
Time Configuration screens. See Figure 276. and follow the steps to provision Network Equipment Time.

Figure 276. NE Time Provisioning

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5.1.2.6 Cross Connections

The cross connections screen is used to configure switching of packetized data through the Core Card.
Using this screen, the operator can switch:

E1 ports (lines) from/to an E1 Access Card (PDH) to/from a Modem Card (RADIO) and/or any of four
Ethernet (ETH) ports on the Core Card.

Ethernet (ETH) data from/to an external source to/from a Modem Card (RADIO) and/or to/from an
E1 Access Card (PDH).

The screen allows the operator to select PDH (E1), ETH (Ethernet), and/or RADIO (Modem) ports as
source and destination ports and provides a graphical presentation of the switch functions.

Valid Cross Connections:

PDH -to- RADIO

PDH -to ETH

ETH -to- RADIO

RADIO -to- RADIO

5.1.2.6.1 Cross Connecting PDH (E1 Access Card)-To-Radio (Modem Card)

The following rules and guidelines apply to switching E1 ports 1 through 32 on the E1 Access Card through
the Core Card to the Radio Modem Card. See Figure 277. Follow the steps to crossconnect E1 lines to
Radio.

1) The license key installed on the Core Card determines the number of E1 ports that can be cross
connected.

2) The E1 Access Card (E1 source) and Radio Modem Card (destination) must be Enabled on
the respective card provisioning screens.

3) Each E1 port to be cross connected must be Enabled on the E1 provisioning screen.

4) Each E1 port to be cross connected must have a Flow ID number assigned to it on the E1 pro-
visioning screen. Refer to Flow ID number rules.

5) The Flow ID number check box on the cross connections screen must be checked for each E1
port to be cross connected.

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Figure 277. PDH-to-Radio Cross-connect

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5.1.2.6.2 Cross Connecting PDH (E1 Access Card) to ETH (Ethernet)

The following rules and guidelines apply to switching E1 ports 1 through 32 on the E1 Access Card through
the Core Card to the Ethernet ports 1 through 4. See Figure 278. Follow the steps to crossconnect PDH
to ETH.

1) The license key installed on the Core Card determines the capacity of the Ethernet data that
can be cross connected.

2) The Ethernet port (source) and E1 Access Card (destination) must be Enabled on the respec-
tive Core Card and E1 Access Card provisioning screens.

3) The Service Profile on the E1 Access Card Settings screen must be set to TDM2ETH for each
E1 cross connected.

4) A Flow ID number must be assigned to each E1 cross connected on the E1 Access Card Set-
tings screen. Refer to the Flow ID number rules.

5) The Ethernet port to be cross connected must have a Flow ID number assigned to it on the
Ethernet provisioning screen. Refer to the Flow ID Number rules.

6) The Flow ID number check box on the cross connections screen must be checked for each
Ethernet port to be cross connected.

7) The MAC Address of the ethernet equipment connected to the ethernet connectors on the Core
card must be entered on the pop up.

Figure 278. PDH-To-ETH Cross-connect

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5.1.2.6.3 Cross Connecting ETH (Ethernet) to RADIO (Modem Card)

The following rules and guidelines apply to switching Ethernet ports 1 through 4 on the Core Card to the
Modem Card. See Figure 279. Follow the steps to crossconnect Ethernet to Radio.

1) The license key installed on the Core Card determines the Ethernet data capacity that can be
cross connected.

2) The Ethernet port (source) and Modem Card (destination) must be Enabled on the respective
Core Card and Modem Card provisioning screens.

3) The Service Profile on the E1 Access Card Settings screen must be set to TDM2ETH for each
E1 cross connected.

4) A Flow ID number must be assigned to each E1 cross connected on the E1 Access Card Set-
tings screen. Refer to the Flow ID number rules.

5) The Ethernet port to be cross connected must have a Flow ID number assigned to it on the
Ethernet provisioning screen. Refer to the Flow ID Number rules.

6) The Flow ID number check box on the cross connections screen must be checked for each
Ethernet port to be cross connected.

7) The MAC Address of the ethernet equipment connected to the ethernet connectors on the Core
Card must be entered on the pop up.

Figure 279. ETH-To-Radio Cross Connect

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5.1.2.6.4 Cross Connecting RADIO (Modem Card) to RADIO (Modem Card)

The following rules and guidelines apply to switching Modem Card to Modem Card (such as a through
repeater). See Figure 280. Follow the steps to crossconnect Radio-to-Radio.

1) The license key installed on the Core Card determines the Ethernet data capacity that can be
cross connected.

2) Each Modem Card must be enabled.

3) Capacity of Modem Cards on Settings screens must match.

Figure 280. Radio-To-Radio Cross Connect

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5.1.2.7 Provision System

See Figure 281. Follow the steps to provision tributary port impedance, quality of service classification,
and enter NE MAC address.

Figure 281. System Setting

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5.1.2.8 Provision Local NE IP Address

See Figure 282. Follow the steps to enter the NE IP address, allowing the network to communicate with
the NE.

Figure 282. Local Configuration Provisioning

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5.1.2.9 Provision Ethernet Port 4

See Figure 283. Follow the steps to provision Ethernet Port 4 on the Core Card to carry SNMP data.

Figure 283. Ethernet Configuration Provisioning

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5.1.2.10 Provision IP Static Routing

See Figure 284.. Follow the steps to provision.

Figure 284. IP Static Routing Provisioning

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5.1.2.11 Provision OSPF Static Routing

See Figure 285.. Follow the steps to provision Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol static (automatic)
routing.

Figure 285. OSPF Static Routing Provisioning

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5.2 Provisioning by Provisioning tool

5.2.1 Start Provisioning tool


Create and modify provisioning files using the Provisioning Tool.

Figure 286. TCO Main Menu

Warning: When quit the Provisioning Tool application or Alarms & Settings application always click on
Close Current session to restore the correct network setting in the PC.

Select:

to run the provisioning tool for MPR 1.2.0 or 1.0, 1.1.0, 1.1.1 (in the lower part of the screen)

the direct connection to the NE by putting a check mark on Connect to NE, by entering the IP
address and by clicking on Apply.
Note 1: in the default configuration the DHCP Server is enabled. For this reason in the Properties
panel of the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) the PC settings must be Obtain an IP address automatically.
In this case in the Connect to NE field is written the IP address of the NE and this address cannot
be changed.
Note 2: If the DHCP server is disabled, the IP address to be entered is the IP address of the NMS
Ethernet port.

or

the off-line configuration by putting a check mark on Do not connect to NE and by clicking on
Apply.

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Figure 287. Provisioning Tool Connectivity

Figure 288. Provisioning Tool Connectivity

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After loading the JRE package, the screen in Figure 289 will display, if you are working off-line or the
screen in Figure 290, if you are directly connected to the NE.

Figure 289. Provisioning Tool Screen (off-line working)

Figure 290. Provisioning Tool Screen (direct connection to the NE)

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5.2.1.1 Configuration Screen Options

The screen below is a generic one that depicts all of the pull-down options possible depending on which
card is selected in the card slot. Protections options shown below are for all cards. See the screens shown
below for more information.

Figure 291. Configuration Options Screen

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Note:
A white icon indicates that there are no cross-connec-
tions, but cross-connections can be created.
A blue icon indicates the destination is full. The limits
granted by the license key have been exceeded. A mes-
sage is also displayed stating that no more E1 ports will
be accepted.
A green icon indicates that the source and destination
are available and the destination can accept more E1
ports.

Figure 292. Core Configuration (Sheet 1 of 2)

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Figure 293. Core Configuration (Sheet 2 of 2)

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Note

With the TDM2TDM service profile the TDM Clock source is fixed to Differential (RTP - Real Time
Protocol is used); with the TDM2Eth service profile the TDM Clock source can be Differential
(RTP - Real Time Protocol is used) or Adaptive (RTP is not used). In the unit it is not possible to have
mixed configurations with service profiles using RTP and other service profiles not using RTP.
Example: if in the unit only one E1 has service profile TDM2TDM it is possible to configure other E1
with service profile TDM2Eth only with the Differential clock source (not with the Adaptive clock
source). If the Adaptive clock source is requested the E1 must be connected to another PDH unit.

Figure 294. E1 Configuration

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Figure 295. Radio Provisioning (without Adaptive Modulation)

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Figure 296. Radio Provisioning (with Adaptive Modulation)

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Figure 297. Synchronization Configuration

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Figure 298. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 1 of 6)

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Figure 299. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 2 of 6)

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Figure 300. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 3 of 6)

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Figure 301. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 4 of 6)

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Figure 302. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 5 of 6)

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Figure 303. Cross Connections Configuration (Sheet 6 of 6)

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Figure 304. Network Configuration

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A Trusted manager is an SNMP manager to which the NE automatically sends the TRAPS generated
inside the NE.

Figure 305. Trusted Managers screen

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Figure 306. Typical Report Panel

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6 Maintenance and Trouble-clearing

6.1 Introduction
This section contains information and procedures to aid in restoring the equipment to its proper operating
condition after it has been determined that a problem exists.

The following warnings and cautions apply while operating, performance testing, troubleshooting, or
repairing the 9500 MPR-E series radios.

Short circuits in low-voltage, low-impedance dc circuits can cause


severe arcing that may result in burns or eye injury. Remove rings,
watches, and other metal jewelry while working with primary circuits.
Exercise caution to avoid shorting power input terminals.

Units with the electrostatic-sensitive (ESS) symbol contain ESS


devices. Store these units in an antistatic container when not in use,
and anyone handling a unit should observe antistatic precautions.
Refer to the Special Precautions pages in the front of the instruction
book for detailed handling information.

Note

Ensure that all antennas are properly aligned and waveguide is in


good physical condition.

Note

Before performing procedures that might in any way affect transmission,


it is recommended that the person performing the procedure
understand the Rules and Regulations pertaining to the equipment
and be properly authorized to operate the equipment.

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6.2 Maintenance Philosophy
This section provides information and procedures for equipment maintenance down to the Card level.
Card repair is not covered in this manual.

The use of maintenance procedures in this section may result from failure of a periodic check, an alarm
indication, or unacceptable performance.

6.3 Personal Computer (PC)/Laptop


Connect the RJ 45 Interface cable between Craft Terminal connector on the Core Card and the PC.

6.4 Troubleshooting
This section provides guidance on:

Before Going to Site Checklist

Troubleshooting Basics

Troubleshooting Path Problems

Troubleshooting Configuration Problems

Troubleshooting Ethernet Problems

Troubleshooting TMN Problems

6.4.1 Before Going to Site Checklist


Where possible, before going to site obtain the following information:

Does the fault require immediate attention?

Determine who is the best-placed person to attend the fault.

Confirm the nature and severity of the reported fault, its location, 9500 MPR-E type, frequency band,
high/low end ODU, capacity modulation and configuration (nonprotected, protected, diversity). Ask:

Is just one 9500 MPR-E link affected, or a number of links in the same geographical area?

Is the path down completely or is traffic passing but with a BER alarm?

Is only one or a number of tributaries affected?

Could the fault be in the equipment connected to 9500 MPR-E, rather than in 9500 MPR-E?
Are there alarms on other, connected equipment?

Is it a hard or intermittent fault?

Do alarms confirm which end of an alarmed link is faulty?

Could the weather (rain, ice, high wind, temperature) be a factor in the reported fault?

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Note

If the fault suggests a rain fade or other weather related fade


condition and it matches the prevailing weather conditions, do
not take any action until the weather abates.

Does link history suggest any fault trends?

Does the fault history for the link indicate a likely cause?

Is the 9500 MPR-E link newly installed?

Has there been any recent work done on the link?

Ensure that you have with you:

Appropriate spares. Where an equipment failure is suspected, these should include replace-
ment Cards/plug-ins and ODU. If an ODU is suspected then local/national climbing safety
requirements must be adhered to.

A laptop PC loaded with Craft Terminal, and an Ethernet cable. If an Ethernet connection is to
be used, you need the 9500 MPR-E Node/Terminal IP address and also the addresses for any
remote sites to be accessed.

If login security has been enabled, you need the engineer password for the local and also any
remote sites to be accessed.

Any special test equipment that may be needed, such as a BER tester.

Toolkit.

Key(s) for access to the site.

6.4.2 Troubleshooting Basics


This section provides general guidance on 9500 MPR-E troubleshooting:

Check front-panel LED indications. These provide summary alarm indications, which can help
narrow down the location and type of failure. Refer to Operation section for details.

Where a Status LED on a plug-in is off (unlit), but power to the MS is confirmed by LEDs on
other plug-ins, check the seating of the affected plug-in.

Check Main Screen. When logging into 9500 MPR-E with Craft Terminal, the opening screen is the
Main Screen. Use the information provided in menu Diagnosis Alarms NE alarms and in
menu Diagnosis Log Browsing Event Log to check for severity and problem type. Refer to
Table 13. - Alarm Matrix, for probable cause and recommended action.

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Table 13. Alarm Matrix
Configuration/Alarm
Equipment Alarm Description Most Probable Cause Action
1+0 1+1 1+1
HS FD

Core Card Card Fail Major Minor Minor Core card failed Replace Core Card

Equipment Mismatch N/A Minor Minor Card in slot does not Install correct configured
match card configured card
in core memory

Card Missing N/A Minor Minor Core card is missing Install Core Card in slot
from slot

SFP missing alarm Major Minor Minor The SFP optional plug- Install the plug-in in the
in is provisioned, but SFP slot
not present

Unconfigured Equip- N/A Minor Minor Card in slot is not provi- Provision card
ment sioned (enabled)

LOS on ETH TMN Minor Minor Minor No Ethernet input sig- Check link partner and
Interface nal detected on ETH 4 cable between link part-
on Core Card ner and ETH 4 connector

PPP IP Fail Minor Minor Minor

LOS on Gigabit ETH Major Minor Minor Loss of Ethernet is Check link partner and
Interface detected on ETH 1-4 on cable between link part-
Core Card ner and ETH 1-4 con-
nector

Firmware Download Minor Minor Minor Status of download Wait for downloading to
In Progress complete

LOS on Sync Interface Minor Minor Minor No sync clk detected at Check sync source and
Sync in port on Core cable between sync
Card source and Sync in port

Degraded Signal on Minor Minor Minor Sync clk errors Check sync source for
Sync Interface detected at Sync in port errors
on Core Card

License Mismatch for Major Major Major Wrong flash card Install correct flash card
Equipment Provi- installed on Core Card for license
sioned

E1 Access Card Fail Major Minor Minor Failure of E1 Access Replace E1 Access
Card Card Card

Equipment Mismatch Major Minor Minor Card in slot does not Install correct configured
match Card configured card
in Core memory

Card Missing Major Minor Minor E1 Access Card is Install E1 Access Card in
missing from slot slot

Unconfigured Equip- Major Major Major Card is not Enabled on Enable card
ment the Settings screen

LOS on PDH Tributary Major Minor Minor No E1 input signal Check E1 source and/or
detected on any one or cable
more of 32 lines

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Degraded Signal Minor Minor Minor Low quality sync signal Replace E1 Access
for E1 Access Card Card

AIS on PDH Tributary Major Major Major AIS detected by the Check for upstream E1
(RX) receive circuits on one source for errors
or more E1 lines, indi-
cating upstream failure

AIS on PDH Tributary Major Major Major AIS detected on one or Check E1 source
(TX) more E1 lines at input
to PDH 32xE1 Access
Card

Loss of CESoETH Major Major Major Packets are not being 1. Check/troubleshoot
Frame received by the emula- farend alarms
tion circuits 2. Replace alarmed E1
Access Card

Firmware Download Minor Minor Minor Status of download Wait for downloading to
In Progress complete

Fans Unit Card Fail Major Fan failed Replace fan unit

Card Missing Major Fan unit is missing from Install fan unit
slot

Unconfigured Equip- Minor Minor Minor Unit is not Enabled on Enable fan unit
ment the Settings screen

Radio Modem Card Fail Major Minor Minor Radio Modem Card Replace Radio Modem
Card failed Card

Equipment Mismatch Minor Minor Minor Card in slot does not Install correct configured
match card configured card
in Core memory

Card Missing Major Minor Minor Radio Modem Card is Install Radio Modem
missing from slot Card in slot

Unconfigured Equip- Minor Minor Minor Card is not Enabled on Enable card
ment the Settings screen

PNU Cable Loss Major Minor Minor Bad cable connection Check/repair IF cable
at IF in/out connector connection on alarmed
on Radio Modem Card Radio Modem Card

Loss of Radio Frame Minor Minor Minor Farend XMTR prob- 1. Switch farend XMTRs
lems, RF path prob- (in a protected system).
lems, or local circuit If alarm clears, replace
failures have caused farend off-line Radio
BER to increase to the Modem Card.
point that frames are 2. Check/troubleshoot
being lost farend alarms
3. Replace alarmed
Radio Modem Card

Loss of Alignment N/A Minor Minor Delay between main 1. Replace main Radio
and protect RF paths Modem Card
detected 2. Replace protect
Radio Modem Card
3. Replace main ODU
4. Replace protect ODU

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Demod Function Fail Major Minor Minor Internal receive circuit Replace Radio Modem
failure Card

High BER Major Minor Minor Bit Error Rate threshold 1. Verify RF path is clear,
(10E-4) exceeded on antenna is aligned, and
RCVR input circuits on no existing weather-
modem related problems
2. Verify RSL is above
RCV threshold. a). If not
check upstream XMTR
output/troubleshoot
XMTR. b). If ok,

Early Warning N/A Minor Minor 10E-9 BER detected No action is required at
this time. Monitor
receive signal for
increased degrading

Link Identifier Mis- Major Major Major Link identifier number Set numbers at both
match provisioned on Radio ends of hop to match
Modem Card settings
screen is different from
link identifier number
provisioned at other
end of hop

TCA on Radio Link N/A N/A Major Alarm threshold Switch farend XMTRs (in
exceeded on standby a protected system). If
Radio Modem Card alarm clears, replace
farend off-line Radio
Modem Card

TCA on Radio Hop Major N/A Minor Alarm threshold


exceeded on standby
Radio Modem Card
after switching from
main to standby

UAT on Radio Link N/A N/A Major 10 consecutive SES Switch farend XMTRs (in
(unavailable time a protected system). If
period) detected on alarm clears, replace
main Radio Modem farend off-line Radio
Card Modem Card

UAT on Radio Hop Major N/A Minor 10 consecutive SES


(unavailable time
period) detected on
standby Radio Modem
Card after switching
from admin to standby

Firmware Download Minor Minor Minor Download status Wait for downloading to
In Progress complete

Degraded Signal Minor Minor Minor Low quality sync signal Replace Radio Modem
from Radio Modem Card
Card

License Mismatch for Major Major Major Modem card type does Replace Radio Modem
Equipment Provi- not match card type Card with correct card
sioned stored in memory on type
the Core Card flash
card

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ODU Card Fail Major Minor Minor ODU failed Replace ODU

Equipment Mismatch Major Minor Minor ODU does not match Replace ODU
ODU configured in
Core memory

RCV Function Fail Major Minor Minor ODU RCVR circuit Replace ODU
failed

RF Frequency Mis- Major Minor Minor Frequency out-of- Re-configure frequency


match range of configured TX
frequency

Shifter Frequency Major Minor Minor Configured shifter Re-configure shifter


Mismatch value not supported by value
ODU

TX Power Mismatch Minor Minor Minor Configured TX power Re-configure TX power


value not supported by value
ODU

Software Mismatch Minor Minor Minor Software version on Download correct soft-
ODU does not match ware version
software version on
Core

ODU Not Responding Minor Minor Minor Loss of communication 1. Replace ODU
with ODU 2. Replace alarmed
Radio Modem Card

Firmware Download Minor Minor Minor Download status Wait for downloading to
In Progress complete

EPS Equipment Protection Switching

LOS Loss of Signal

RPS Radio Protection Switching

TCA Threshold Crossing Alarm

UAT Un-Available Time

Check the basics first.

For example, if multiple alarms are present, and these include power supply voltage or hard-
ware alarms, always check their cause before looking at resultant down-stream path failure or
path warning (signal) alarms.

Similarly, if a path-related failure is indicated (no hardware or software alarms), investigate the
path. Go to the Craft Terminal History screen (15 minute view) to check supporting data, such
as low RSL and incidence of intermittent pre-failure BER alarms, which if present are evidence
of a path-related failure.

Check if symptoms match the alarm. Alarms reflect the alarm state, but in exceptional
circumstances an alarm may be raised because of a failure to communicate correctly with the alarm
source, or a failure in alarm management processing. Always check to see if symptoms match the
alarm, using LED indications and the Craft Terminal.

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Check if recent work may be a cause. Recent work at the site may be a cause or contributing factor.
Check for a configuration change, software upgrade, power recycling (reboot), or other site work:

Many hardware alarms are only initiated as a loss-of-communications alarm during a reboot,
software upgrade, or reconfiguration. By not being able to communicate with the Core, their set-
tings cannot be loaded. The fault may be at the hardware device (most likely), communications
to it, or the Core.

Hardware/software compatibility alarms will be raised when a new plug-in is installed that
needs a later version of 9500 MPR-E software.

Hardware incompatible alarms will be raised when a plug-in is installed in a slot that has been
configured for a different plug-in.

MSS before an ODU. If there is doubt about whether a fault is in the MSS or ODU, always replace
the MSS first; it is quicker and easier.

Hot-pluggable. MSS cards are hot-pluggable. There is no need to power-down before replacing,
but traffic will be lost unless the plug-in is protected.

Plug-in restoration time. Ensure adequate time is allowed for services to resume when a plug-in
is replaced.

6.4.3 Troubleshooting Path Problems


A path-related problem, with the exception of interference, is characterized by traffic being similarly
affected in both directions. Generally, if you are experiencing only a one-way problem, it is not a path
problem.

Note

A path extends from ODU antenna port to ODU antenna port.

Normally a path problem is signalled by a reduced RSL, and depending on its severity, a high BER.

Only in worst case situations, such as an antenna knocked out of alignment, will a path fail
completely, and stay that way.

For weather-related problems, such as rain or ducting, the path problem will disappear as the
weather returns to normal.

6.4.3.1 Path Problems on a Commissioned Link

A path problem on an existing link, one that has ben operating satisfactorily may be caused by:

Weather-related path degradation

If BER alarms are fleeting/not permanent and RSL returns to its normal, commissioned level after
the alarm is cleared, rain, diffraction, or multipath fading is indicated. Rain fade is the likely cause
of fade for links 13 GHz and higher. Diffraction and multipath/ducting for links 11 GHz and lower. If
these alarms are persistent, there could be a problem with the link design or original installation.

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Changed antenna alignment or antenna feed problem

If RSLs do not return to commissioned levels after a period of exceptionally strong winds, suspect
antenna alignment. Also, check the antenna for physical damage, such as may occur with ice-fall.
For a remote-mounted ODU, check its antenna feeder.

New path obstruction

Where all other parameters check as normal, and the path has potential for it to be obstructed by
construction works, view/survey the path for possible new obstructions.

Interference from other signal sources

Interference usually affects traffic in just one direction. Unlike other path problems, RSL is not
affected. If suspected, check for new link installations at, or in the same geographical area, as the
affected site. Ultimately, a spectrum analyzer may have to be used to confirm interference, which
is not an easy task given the need to connect directly to the antenna port, after removing the ODU.

6.4.3.2 Path Problems on a New Link

For a new link, potential problems can extend to also include:

Incorrect antenna alignment

One or both antennas incorrectly aligned. Refer to Installation alignment procedure on CD.

Mismatching antenna polarizations

Given a typical polarization discrimination of 30 dB, for most links it is not possible to capture a signal
to begin the antenna alignment process.

Incorrect path calculations

If the RSLs are too low or too high, antenna alignment is correct, and Tx power settings are correct,
check the path calculations used to determine the link performance. A good calculation match is +/
- 2 dB. Disagreements in excess of 3 dB should be investigated.

Reflections

Reflection (path cancellation) problems may not have been picked up at the path planning stage, par-
ticularly if the survey was a simple line-of-sight. If suspected, resurvey the path.

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6.4.4 Troubleshooting Configuration Problems
Configuration problems should only occur during the setup of a new link, or reconfiguration of an existing
link. The more common problems may be broadly categorized as:

Compatibility Problems

The two alarms that may activate are Configuration Not Supported and SW/HW Incompatible:

Configuration Not Supported: The plug-in installed is not enabled or is incorrect for the con-
figuration.

SW/HW Incompatible: Typically raised when new hardware is plugged into an existing MSS
that has software from an earlier release. To remove the alarm, compatible 9500 MPR-E soft-
ware is required; install the latest software.

Incorrect circuit connections

No alarms are activated for incorrect circuit connections. An incorrect assignment means the
expected end-to-end circuit connectivity will not happen. Re-check circuit assignments for all nodes
carrying the lost circuit(s).
Take extra care when configuring ring circuits.

Incorrect ID naming and commissioning

All traffic-carrying circuits must have a unique flow ID for the cross-connect capability to operate.

Incorrect/incompatible trib settings

Trib line interface settings incorrect, or line levels incompatible. While no alarm activates for an incor-
rect setting, its effect may result in line levels being too low (LOS alarm), or too high, resulting in a
high BER.

6.4.5 Troubleshooting Ethernet Problems


This section gives general guidance on troubleshooting problems related to the four Ethernet ports on the
Core Card.

The most common Ethernet problems are network and connectivity related and therefore always check
the following first:

Verify link partner capability, provisioning, and connection

Verify radio provisioning matches link partner

Verify cabling between radio and link partner

The LEDs on the Core Card front panel for each Ethernet connector are a good indicator of correct
connectivity and activity on the Ethernet port. Refer to Table 14. for detail troubleshooting using the LEDs
locally at the alarmed site.

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Table 14. Troubleshooting Ethernet Problems
LED Indication Probable Cause Corrective Action

ETH IN LOS Green LED Loss of Ethernet RCV/radio XMT signal


Not Lit in. Most probable causes:
1 Cable between link partner and radio Connect/repair cable.
is disconnected/broken. 1. Check local Ethernet provisioning
2. Speed/Mode provisioning mismatch screen.
between link partner and radio. 2. Check link partner provisioning.

ETH OUT Green LED Loss of Ethernet XMT/radio RCV signal Check local RSL screen on CT. Is RSL
LOS Not Lit out. Most probable causes: ok?
1. Loss of RF input to Radio Modem Yes - Check farend for Ethernet alarm.
Card No - Check farend Tx output. Is farend
Tx Out ok?
Yes - Check path, antenna, waveguide/
cabling
No - Check/replace farend Radio
Modem Card.

2. Loss of Ethernet input to Radio Check farend for Ethernet alarms.


Modem Card Are any alarms indicated?
Yes - Troubleshoot farend alarms
No - Check farend Ethernet status. Is
only abnormal status indicated?
Yes - Troubleshoot farend Ethernet sta-
tus.
No -
1. Replace local alarmed Core Card.
2. Replace local Radio Modem Card.

In order for the green Link LED to light:

1) Cable must be connected to Ethernet port

2) Ethernet port must be enabled (provisioned Enabled on Core Settings Screen)

3) Speed and mode (on Core Settings Screen) must be provisioned the same as the link partner.

The yellow LED opposite the green on the connector indicates activity only. The flashing yellow LED is
not an indicator of signal type or quality.

6.4.6 Troubleshooting TMN Problems


This section gives general guidance on troubleshooting TMN problems related to Ethernet port 4 on the
Core Card. Ethernet port 4 on the Core Card can be used to transport SNMP IP data. Troubleshoot port
4 connectivity alarms the same as Ethernet ports 1-3.

The most common TMN problems are network related and first alert is normally observed by improper
operation at the SNMP master. Always check the following first:

Verify master is properly registered in NE to receive traps.

Verify SNMP version matches system requirements

Verify correct community string and privileges

Verify proper network routing.

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Refer to Table 15. for detail TMN network troubleshooting.

Table 15. TMN Network Troubleshooting


Problem Possible Cause Possible Solution

Unusually slow communication in 1. Normal network management traf- 1. There may be too many radios
radio network fic is saturating the communications being managed within a single
channel. region. Split the radio network man-
agement into different regions and
backhaul the traffic for each region
through separate channels.

2. Polling radios for PM data or 2. Poll the radios more slowly.


missed alarms too rapidly

3. Multiple remote software down- 3. Download to fewer radios at a


loads in process time.

4. IP traffic other than network man- 4. Configure external routers to allow


agement traffic being routed through only network management related
radio network traffic through the Management net-
work of the radios. Dynamic route
updates (OSPF, RIP) may attempt to
reroute high speed traffic through the
TMN network if a high speed ink fails.

Unable to operate controls using To perform control operations, the Register the Manager as a craft
SNMP Manager must be registered as a device. Manager registration type
craft device. can be changed as needed to type ct
to allow control operation and then be
changed back to nml for normal
operation.

Can Read SNMP objects but cannot 1. Incorrect community string 1. Use the correct community string.
Write to SNMP objects
2. If the TMN Interface is configured 2. Use the correct write community
for SNMPv2, the write community string.
string is probably wrong.

No traps being received from NE 1. Manager not registered in NE to 1. Register Manager with NE.
receive traps

2. Communication failure in network 2. Check network connectivity.


Check redundant network paths and
routing. Traceroute (tracert) is useful
for locating path or routing faults.

Unable to communicate with the NE Possible communication path failure Use traceroute (tracert) to help locate
through the radio network (unable to or routing failure within the radio net- for communication path or routing
ping the NE). work. problems.

Can ping the TMN Interface but can- If using SNMPv2, using the wrong Verify community string or username/
not communicate with the NE using community string. passphrase.
SNMP, or can only see a few SNMP
objects in the NE.

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6.5 Card Removal and REPLACEMENT
The basic rules for installing plug-in cards are as follows:

Never install, change or remove a card without first connecting


to the shelf with an ESD grounding cable. Failure to do so may
cause ESD damage to the cards.

Plug-ins must be withdrawn and inserted using their finger-grip


fastener/pulls. Never withdraw or insert using attached cable(s).
Pulling on the cables may damage the cable, plug-in connector,
and/or plug-in card connector attachment.

When installing a plug-in, ensure its backplane connector is


correctly engaged before applying sufficient pressure to bring
the plug-in panel flush with the front panel. Improper alignment
can result in damaged pins on the backplane connector and/or
damage to the plug-in connector.

All slots must be filled with either a peripheral plug-in card or a


blank panel. Failure to do so will compromise EMC integrity and
cooling air from the fan.

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Use extreme caution when connecting or disconnecting the
ODU cable on the Radio Modem Card. The shelf battery voltage
is present on the center conductor of the connector. When
removing or replacing a Radio Modem Card, withdraw the
card from the shelf before disconnecting the cable to the ODU.
Failure to follow these cautions may cause arcing and/or
possible power spikes that could affect traffic on other links
installed at the node.

Removing an in-service card in an unprotected link will cause


loss of traffic. Removing an in-service card in a protected link
requires switching the traffic onto the standby (protection)
channel.

The main Core Card, standby Core Card, and fan card have dedicated slots.

The E1 Access Card and Radio Modem Cards (peripherals) can be installed in any of the universal
slots (3 through 8).

The MSS-8 can be configured with a maximum of six peripherals; three protected links, six non-
protected links, or a combination of protected and non-protected links.

For protected links, main and standby (spare) peripherals must be plugged in side-by-side.

All plug-ins can be removed and installed with power applied.

If the main Core Card fails, traffic and platform data will
switch to the spare Core Card automatically. Do not remove
power from the NE during the removal and replacement of
the failed main Core Card without first reviewing/performing
the following procedure:

a) Turn off NE power.

b) Remove failed main Core Card.

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c) Turn on NE power.

d) Wait two (2) minutes.

e) Install replacement Core Card.

6.5.1 Core Card Removal and Replacement Core Protected Radio

If the Main Core Card in slot 1 fails, traffic/services protection


and control platform protection switches to the spare Core Card
in slot 2. Loopbacks and all other manual operations, such as
manual switch, tx mute, will be lost (deactivated). Alarms previously
active will be newly detected and reported via notification, with a
new time stamp.

Verify the replacement Core Card meets the following compatibility rules:

Main Core Card (in slot 1) and Spare Core Card (in slot 2) must be the same type.

Local and far end Core Cards must use the same software version, but do not have to be the same
type.

6.5.2 Core Flash Card Removal and Replacement


Verify the replacement Flash Card being installed on the Core Card meets the following compatibility
rules:

Main Flash Card (in slot 1) and Spare Flash Card (in slot 2) must be the same.

Local and far end Flash Cards must be the same.

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6.6 Replacement procedure of Core B card with Core E card

6.6.1 Core replacement from Rel. 1.1.0


Note: flash memory not to be replaced.

For 1+0 configuration:

Remove all the TDM2Eth Cross-connections.

Load (from remote, if necessary) the SW 1.2 into Core B (without activating it): at this stage the
standby side of the flash is loaded with the SW 1.2.

Making use of the Core B, start the standby side of the flash through 1.2 CT: this is like having the
SW 1.2 into Core B (as for the activation).

Database is converted automatically (with Core E written on it and subsequent mismatching


activation, as expected).

Using the 1.2 CT, load SW 1.2 again into Core B (from remote as well) and execute a second
activation (this is required to load Duff).

Switch the system off.

Replace Core B with Core E keeping the same flash.

Switch the system on: traffic interruption is in the order of 5-10 minutes.

For 1+1 configuration:

Remove all the TDM2Eth Cross-connections.

Load the SW 1.2 from remote into Core B (without activation).

Remove the spare Core B.

Follow the 1+0 configuration procedure

Making use of the, start the standby side of the flash through 1.2 CT: this is like having the SW
1.2 into Core B (as for the activation).

Database is converted automatically (with Core E written on it and subsequent mismatching


activation, as expected),

Switch the system off.

Replace Core B with Core E keeping the same flash.

Switch on and wait for traffic restoration (same impact on the traffic as for the 1+0 case).

Insert the spare Core E with the flash from spare Core B.

Tools:

ETH patch-cord for the connection to the PC,


CD of SWP MPR 1.2,
1.2 Craft Terminal.

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420/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Maintenance and Trouble-clearing
6.6.2 Core replacement from Rel. 1.1.1
Note: flash memory not to be replaced.

For 1+0 configuration:

Load (from remote, if necessary) the SW 1.2 into Core B (without activating it): at this stage the
standby side of the flash is loaded with the SW 1.2.

Making use of the Core B, start the standby side of the flash through 1.2 CT: this is like having the
SW 1.2 into Core B (as for the activation).

Database is converted automatically (with Core E written on it and subsequent mismatching


activation, as expected).

Using the 1.2 CT, load SW 1.2 again into Core B (from remote as well) and execute a second
activation (this is required to load Duff).

Switch the system off.

Replace Core B with Core E keeping the same flash.

Switch the system on: traffic interruption is in the order of 5-10 minutes.

For 1+1 configuration:

Load the SW 1.2 from remote into Core B (without activation).

Remove the spare Core B.

Follow the 1+0 configuration procedure

Making use of the, start the standby side of the flash through 1.2 CT: this is like having the SW
1.2 into Core B (as for the activation).

Database is converted automatically (with Core E written on it and subsequent mismatching


activation, as expected),

Switch the system off.

Replace Core B with Core E keeping the same flash.

Switch on and wait for traffic restoration (same impact on the traffic as for the 1+0 case).

Insert the spare Core E with the flash from spare Core B.

Tools:

ETH patch-cord for the connection to the PC,

CD of SWP MPR 1.2,

1.2 Craft Terminal.

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Maintenance and Trouble-clearing 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 421/464
6.7 Upgrade From Not Protected To A Protected Radio

6.7.1 1+0 Adaptive Modulation to 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation


Starting from a NSB 1+0 configuration (see graphics below) perform the following procedure to upgrade
to a 1+1 HSB radio with Adaptive Modulation.

This is an in-service but not a hitless procedure.

1) Plug-in E1 Access card in slot 4 (spare). An Unconfigured Equipment alarm displays.

2) Plug-in Modem card in slot 8 (spare). An Unconfigured Equipment alarm displays.

3) On CT Settings screen enable the E1 Access card in slot 4.

4) On CT Settings screen enable the Modem card in slot 8.

5) On CT Settings screen provision the E1 Access cards (slots 3 and 4) for 1+1 EPS Protection
Type.

6) On CT Settings screen provision the Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) for HSB Protection Type.
Local station and remote station will observe 2 seconds sync loss.

7) Connect the E1 signal cables to the spare E1 Access card in slot 4.

8) Connect the IDU/ODU cable to the spare Modem card in slot 8.

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6.7.2 1+0 Static Modulation to 1+1 HSB Static Modulation
Refer to the 1+0 Adaptive Modulation to 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation procedure above.

6.7.3 1+0 to 1+1 Frequency Diversity

This is an in-service but not a hitless procedure.

Starting from a NSB 1+0 configuration (see graphic below) perform the following procedure to upgrade
to a 1+1 Frequency Diversity.

1) Plug-in E1 Access card in slot 4 (spare). An Unconfigured Equipment alarm displays.

2) Plug-in Modem card in slot 8 (spare). An Unconfigured Equipment alarm displays.

3) On CT Settings screen enable the E1 Access card in slot 4.

4) On CT Settings screen enable the Modem card in slot 8.

5) On CT Settings screen provision the E1 Access cards (slots 3 and 4) for 1+1 EPS Protection
Type.

6) On CT Settings screen provision the Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) for 1+1 FD Protection Type.
Local station and remote station will observe 2 seconds sync loss.

7) Connect the E1 signal cables to the spare E1 Access card in slot 4.

8) Connect the IDU/ODU cable to the spare Modem card in slot 8.

9) Properly configure the protection ODU.

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6.8 Downgrade from Protected to a Not Protected Radio

6.8.1 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation to 1+0 in Adaptive Modulation

Downgrading from 1+1 HSB to 1+0 configuration is an out-of-service procedure.


The main channel must be in service including sync source before starting procedure.

1) Disconnect E1 signal cables from the spare E1 Access card in slot 4.

2) Disconnect IDU/ODU cable on the spare Modem card in slot 8.

3) On CT Settings screen for Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) Enable Local Tx Mute for Channel #1
and Channel #0.

4) On CT Settings screen for Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) set Protection Type to no Protection.
Local station will observe 2 seconds AIS.

5) On CT Settings screen for Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) disable Local Tx Mute for Channel #1
and Channel #0.

6) On CT Settings screen for E1 Access cards (slots 3 and 4) set Protection Type to no Protection.

7) On CT Settings screen for spare E1 Access card (slot 4) set Equipment Type to EMPTY.

8) On CT Settings screen for spare Modem card (slot 8) set Equipment Type to EMPTY.

9) Remove spare Modem card (slot 8).

10) Remove spare E1 Access card (slot 4).

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6.8.2 1+1 HSB in Static Modulation to 1+0 Static Modulation
Refer to the 1+1 HSB in Adaptive Modulation to 1+0 in Adaptive Modulation procedure above.

6.8.3 1+1 FD to 1+0

Downgrading from 1+1 FD to 1+0 configuration is an out-of-service procedure.


The main channel must be in service including sync source before starting procedure.

1) Disconnect E1 signal cables from the spare E1 Access card in slot 4.

2) Disconnect IDU/ODU cable on the spare Modem card in slot 8.

Note

Local AIS will remain active throughout remainder of procedure.

3) On CT Settings screen for Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) set Protection Type to no Protection.
Local station will observe 2 seconds AIS.

4) On CT Settings screen for E1 Access cards (slots 3 and 4) set Protection Type to no Protection.

5) On CT Settings screen for Modem cards (slots 7 and 8) set Protection Type to no Protection.

6) On CT Settings screen for spare E1 Access card (slot 4) set Equipment Type to EMPTY.

7) On CT Settings screen for spare Modem card (slot 8) set Equipment Type to EMPTY.

8) Remove spare Modem card (slot 8).

9) Remove spare E1 Access card (slot 4).

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6.9 Cleaning

Do not use acid, alcohol, or brushes to clean cards because


damage to the silkscreen labeling and antistatic coating can
result. Cleaning should be confined to the removal of dust and
dirt using a damp cloth.

Cleaning should normally be confined to the removal of dust and dirt using a soft bristled (natural fiber)
brush and a low velocity blower (such as a vacuum cleaner with a plastic blower nozzle). Do not use acid
or synthetic bristled brushes to clean cards that contain electrostatic-sensitive components.

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7 LINEUP AND COMMISSIONING
This chapter details all phases necessary for the equipment lineup and commissioning.

Subject On page

Introduction 428

General 428

SafetyEMCEMFESD norms and Cautions to avoid equipment damage 429

Conventions 429

Summary of the commissioning phases 430

General information about test bench drawings 431

Commissioning of STATION A phase 1 (Turn up) 432

Commissioning of STATION B phase 1 (Turn up) 433

Fine antenna alignment and preliminary checks Stations A & B 433

End of commissioning phase 1 (Turn up) in STATION A 438

Commissioning station A phase 2 (acceptance test) 439

Commissioning station B Phase 2 (acceptance Test) 457

Final operations 457

Annex A: fine antenna alignment 457

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7.1 Introduction

7.1.1 General
This chapter details all phases necessary for the equipment lineup, commissioning, and acceptance,
providing the user with the information needed to connect, power on, and perform a minimum turnup of
a radio link comprising two 9500 MPR-E Rel.1.2.0 Network Elements.

It is assumed that, at both premises (Station A and Station B), the mechanical installation and cabling of
the INDOOR and OUTDOOR units is completed, the antennas are installed and prepositioned, and the
MSSODU cable(s) has/have been connected to the MSS.

Any information needed to complete the above mentioned operations are out of the scope of this chapter.

For this purpose refer to the Installation section.

All the cables and measurement kits as described in Table 16. below are supposed to be available.

Table 16. Test and commissioning instruments


INSTRUMENT QTY CHARACTERISTICS

Laptop computer running the 1 The PC must have been already configured as SWP
supervisory software 9500 MPR-E V2.1.2 1320CT.

PDH Analyzer Pattern Generator 1 E1 traffic

In alternative, for Ethernet Data Optional


channel functionality tests:

1 PC + 1 Ethernet cable (for


ping function)

or

2 PCs (for ping function)

or

2 Ethernet Data Analyzers

Multimeter 1 Voltmeter AC and DC Loop tester

TRS 1 Test Result Sheet, available as separate document

The AlcatelLucent Software package SWP 9500 MPR-E V1.2.0 must have already been installed in the
PC used as the Craft Terminal (CT) and the same software V1.2.0 must be already present as commit
version in the Flash Card of both two Network Elements.

Before proceeding with lineup and commissioning, ensure that you have the equipment and accesso-
riesrequired for that purpose.

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7.1.2 SafetyEMCEMFESD norms and cautions to avoid equipment damage
If not yet done, read whole Chapter 1 on page 21: it describes the operations and/or precautions to be
observed to safeguard operating personnel during the working phases, and to guarantee equipment
safety. Read them with accuracy before to start every action on the equipment.

7.1.3 Conventions
To simplify the description of actions, the following symbols are in use:

Symbol used Meaning

& Manual action

3 Check/Verify

CT On Craft Terminal Select

Select a Menu item

Sub Menu item

The commissioning operations described in this document are for a radio link between a Station A and
a Station B.

If the network includes supervision, station A is the one located between the supervisory station and sta-
tion B (see figure below). Installation and commissioning begin at station A.

MSS MSS

Figure 307. Relative positions of stations A and B

WARNING: at the beginning of this procedure, the local IP address and Ethernet IP address of both
the NE 9500 MPR-E stations, are still set to default value 10.0.1.2 (as delivered from AlcatelLucent
factory). For this reason, their physical connection to the TMN network must be done after having changed
such addresses to correct values.

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7.1.4 Summary of the lineup, commissioning, and acceptance phases
Note: The following procedure must be used for every Modem unit installed in MSS.

The commissioning procedure is summarized as follows:

[1] Turn up (phase 1)

1) Visual inspection and NE configuration.

a) Station A, roughly point the antenna towards station B (if not done in the Hardware Instal-
lation procedure)

b) Commission station A (phase 1)

c) Commission station B (phase 1)

MSS MSS

2) Fine antenna alignment and preliminary checks Stations A & B

a) Station B, fine align the antenna towards station A, and preliminary checks

b) Station A, fine align the antenna towards station B, and preliminary checks

MSS MSS

[2] Site acceptance tests (phase 2)

3) Station A, perform all the commissioning checks and tests Report the results in the TRS.

MSS MSS

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4) Station B, perform all the commissioning checks and tests Report the results in the TRS.

MSS MSS

7.1.5 General information about test bench drawings


In the test bench drawings depicted in the following paragraphs of this chapter, take always into account
the following considerations:

[1] Actual station configuration

For detailed information on the layout and equipment interconnections refer to the Plant documen-
tation.

[2] 1+0 and 1+1 configurations

Test bench drawings refer usually to the 1+0 configuration. When necessary, the additional mate-
rial for 1+1 configurations is drawn in dotted line.

[3] Equipment interfaces for test access points, signal meaning and use

The standard equipment interfaces for access points are always considered at Station DDF. Station
DDF is not detailed in the drawings: refer to your own plant documentation for details.

[4] Craft terminal need


The Craft Terminal (CT) is always required.

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7.2 Commissioning of STATION A phase 1 (Turn up)

Where necessary, switch OFF the power supply before disconnecting the earth connection,

Do not connect instruments directly to the MSS/ODU cable connector since the connector
carries DC voltage used to supply the ODU.

Do not connect the IF cable between MSS and ODU while the MSS is powered up.

7.2.1 Turnon preliminary operations

ALL THESE OPERATIONS ARE PERFORMED WITH THE POWER OFF

3 The antenna of station A (or B) is pointed towards station B (or A) the best as possible (use compass
if necessary).

3 The hardware configuration of the equipment corresponds to the expected one.

3 Make visual inspection for units installation and cabling:

The MSS subrack allocation according to the station layout

The MSS subrack and units ground connections

The power supply voltage is present with the correct polarity at the MSS power supply input

Tributaries are cabled on the station DDF

The MSSODU cables ground kit connections

The ODU(s) ground connections (In the case of a nonintegrated antenna, the antenna and the
ODU(s) must be ground connected)

The MSS(s) / ODU(s) cables are connected to MSS(s) and ODU(s)

The ODU(s) cables connectors waterproofing.

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7.2.2 Powering up the MSS(s) with ODU(s) connected
This operation has the following scopes:

verify the SWP present both in CT and NE

make the Central Frequency and Shifter values of ODUs be acquired by MSS (so that they are
retained in the NEs data base).

Proceed as follows:

a) Switch on the MSS by using the circuit breakers

b) Connect locally the CT to the MSS of the local station and perform the NE login with NETO.

1) Make a local connection through the Ethernet cable, between the Ethernet port of the PC and
the NMS interface on the MSS

2) Power on the PC and wait for its startup

3) Startup the LCT and wait for the NETO screen

4) Insert the local IP address of the NE 9500 MPR-E station

5) Start supervision on the local Network Element

c) Configure the NE as explained in the Provisioning chapter.

7.3 Commissioning of STATION B phase 1 (Turn up)


To commission Station B, perform (at Station B premises) the same operations carried on at Station
APhase 1.

& For near future tests, establish, on the DDF of Station B, hardware loops on every tributary.

7.4 Fine antenna alignment and preliminary checks Stations A & B

7.4.1 Fine antenna alignment


When Station A and Station B are fully configured and operational, and assuming that the antenna insta-
tion A (or B) has been previously correctly pointed toward the antenna in station B (or A), you shoul dre-
ceive some field from station B (or A).

Now, proceed to a fine tuning of the antenna to improve as much as possible the received level, in both-
Station A (at Station A premises) and Station B (at Station B premises). To perform the fine antenna align-
ment refer to Annex A: fine antenna alignment on page 457.

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7.4.2 Preliminary checks
At first on Station A (at Station A premises), then on Station B (at Station B premises), log in the NE and-
perform following checks by CT:

Subject On page

Verify ODU(s) alarm status 434

Transmitter power output check 435

Received power measurement 436

7.4.2.1 Verify ODU(s) alarm status

Purpose: Verify no abnormal communication alarm between MSS(s) and ODU(s)

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS.

& CT Views Equipment

In the left window, select ODU ch#1n

3 In the lower right window, verify in the alarms list for that there is no internal communication failuren

3 In the lower right window, verify in the alarms list that there is no TX failure

Repeat for Ch#0 if any (1+1)

Figure 308. ODU(s) alarm status

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7.4.2.2 Transmitter power output check

Purpose: Verify via CT the ODU(s) transmitted power output.

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS.

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit (Channel #1)

3 Verify that ATPC is Disabled (If required, change the ATPC status to disable in the ATPC field then
Apply)

3 Verify that Tx Power value complies with the suitable value already set (If required, change the Tx
Power in the RTPC field then Apply)

Repeat for Ch#0 if any (1+1)

Figure 309. Transmit power check

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7.4.2.3 Received power measurement

Purpose: Verify via CT the received power to detect any interference

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS.

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit (Channel #1)

Select Measurements tab panel

In the Sample time (sec), write the suitable measurement poling time then press Start

Figure 310. Received power check

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Pressing Start will prompt a graphic monitoring view of the transmitted and received levels:

Figure 311. Power measurements

Ticking the box Show Details in the lower left corner will call a summary view of the TX an Rx levels:

Figure 312. Received power details

3 Verify in the hop calculation (plant documentation) that the calculated received level has been
reached.

3 Verify that the current Rx local End received level is < 95 dBm (no interferences)

Repeat for Ch#0 if any (1+1)

WARNING:

If in the Tx end field the indication in dBm is +99, the Transmitter is off (or in HSB Configuration the-
transmitter is in standby).
If in the Tx end field the indication in dBm is +99 and, at the same time, in the relevant Rx end field
the information in dBm is 99, probably the supervision has been lost.

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7.5 End of commissioning phase 1 (Turn up) in STATION A
In Station A, proceed to a final fine alignment of the antenna toward the antenna of Station B. To per-
form the fine antenna alignment, refer to Annex A: fine antenna alignment on page 457.

In Station A, proceed to the remote NE (station B) acquisition (by opening a second NETO session)
in order to verify in both the stations:

3 Received level complies with hop calculation

3 No alarm showing (except unloaded tributaries)

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7.6 Commissioning station A phase 2 (acceptance test)
Commissioning phase 2 is a site acceptance test procedure made up of the required tests to ensure that
the equipment is fully operational.

This phase describes first of all the way to check and to change (if necessary) via the Craft Terminal
menuthe different configuration parameters already set, for most of them, during the Provisioning followed
by various tests.

Most of the tests and checks results have to be recorded in the TRS (Test Results Sheet). Operator will
be invited to do so each time it is required by the following sentence: Report in the TRS.

N.B. The lettered titles in following table [ a ) , b ) , etc.] correspond to the pages heading titles of
the TRS document.

Test On page Report


in TRS

a) Installation and cabling visual inspection 441

Indoor System installation and cabling visual inspection 3

Outdoor System installation and cabling visual inspection 3

b) System configuration 441

Check/set Mode (Presettings or Adaptive modulation), Channel spacing, 3


Modulation

Check/set Link Identifier configuration (optional) 3

Check/set the QoS criteria to be used 3

Check/set the Automatic Restoration Criteria (only 1+1) 3

HSB Transmission Protection (1+1 HSB configurations only) 3

Radio Protection (RPS) 3

EPS Protection 3

Check/set Tx/Rx Spacing, Transmission and Reception frequencies 3

Check/set Tx power (ATPC Off ) or Tx range and Rx threshold (ATPC On) 3

Tx and Rx power measurement (with CT) 3

IF Loopback functionality 3

c) P32E1 unit 447

Balanced or Unbalanced impedance 3

Check/set E1 tributaries configuration 3

Protection functionality (1+1 only) 3

E1 point to point loop test 3

d) CORE unit 449

Check the Software Licence Code 3

Check/set Traffic Ethernet port parameters 3

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e) NE configuration 450

Check/set the local NE IP address 3

Check/set OSPF Area Configuration 3

Check/set the Ethernet access (OS) configuration 3

Check/set IP static routing configuration 3

f) Hop E1 stability test 451 3

g) Ethernet Traffic stability test 452 3

h) Data/Time settings 456 3

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7.6.1 Installation and cabling visual inspection

7.6.1.1 Indoor System installation and cabling visual inspection

See and fill the indoor inspection check list in the TRS.

7.6.1.2 Outdoor System installation and cabling visual inspection

See and fill the indoor inspection check list in the TRS.

7.6.2 System configuration


Purpose: Verify via CT the Radio configuration of the Local Station.

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS

7.6.2.1 Check/set Mode (Presettings or Adaptive modulation), Channel spacing,


Modulation

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit Settings tab panel

In the left window Mode (Presettings or Adaptive modulation), Channel spacing, Modulation (Sup-
ported Modulation Schemes and Switching Threshold, if the Adaptive Modulation has been enabled)

If required, change any paramater.

Report the parameters in the TRS.

7.6.2.2 Check/set Link Identifier configuration (optional)

Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit System Settings Link Identifier

If it is necessary, change any parameter.

Report the Link Identifier status (Enabled or Disabled), and, if Enabled, the Expected andSent values.

7.6.2.3 Check/set the QoS criteria to be used

& CT Menu bar Configuration System Settings


Select the suitable QoS criteria to be used: Disabled/802.1p/DiffServ.

Report in the TRS.

7.6.2.4 Check/set the Automatic Restoration Criteria (only 1+1)

7.6.2.4.1 HSB Transmission Protection (1+1 HSB configurations only)

& CT Views Protection Schemes

In the left window HSB Protection

In the lower right window Protection Scheme Parameters Tab panel Protection Type 1+1

If required, change Operation type (Revertive or Not Revertive) then Apply

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Report the Operation Type in the TRS.

7.6.2.4.2 Radio Protection (RPS)

& CT Views Protection Schemes

In the left window Rx Radio Protection (RPS)

In the lower right window Protection Scheme Parameters Tab panel Protection Type 1+1

If required, change Operation type (Revertive or Not Revertive) then Apply

Report the Operation Type in the TRS.

7.6.2.4.3 EPS Protection

& CT Views Protection Schemes

In the left window Equipment Protection

In the lower right window Protection Scheme Parameters Tab panel Protection Type 1+1

If required, change Operation type (Revertive or Not Revertive) then Apply

Report the Operation Type in the TRS.

7.6.2.5 Check/set Tx/Rx Spacing, Transmission and Reception frequencies

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit

In the central window Channel #1 Shifter, Tx frequency

Repeat for Channel 0 (only in 1+1)

Report the Shifter, Tx and the Rx frequencies in the TRS.

If required, change the Tx frequency then Apply. Rx Freq. will be automatically adjusted.

7.6.2.6 Check/set Tx power (ATPC Off ) or Tx range and Rx threshold (ATPC On)

ATPC Disabled:

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit Setting tab panel
RTPC&ATPC field

3 ATPC Disabled

Repeat for Channel 0 (only in 1+1)

Report the ATPC Disabled status, Tx nominal Power and Tx Power setting into theTRS.

ATPC Enabled:

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit Setting tab panel
RTPC&ATPC field

3 ATPC Enabled

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Repeat for Channel 0 (only in 1+1)

Report the ATPC Enabled status, ATPC Range and ATPC RX Threshold setting in the TRS.

If required, change ATPC Mode or ATPC Range or ATPC Rx Threshold then Apply

7.6.2.7 Tx and Rx power measurement (with CT)

Purpose: Verify via CT the Transmitted (PTx) and Received (PRx) power.

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit

From the left window select Channel #1 select Measurements tab panel

In the Sample time (sec), write the suitable measurement poling time then press Start
Pressing Start will prompt a graphic monitoring view of the transmitted and received levels.

Ticking the box Show details in the lower left corner will call a summary view of the TX an Rx levels.

Report the Current Tx Local End (PTx) and the current Rx Local End (PRx) in the TRS.

7.6.2.8 IF Loopback functionality

Purpose: Verify via CT the IF cable loopback functionality (only in the local NE)

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software and E1 Data Analyzer

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS


Connect Pattern Generator/Error Detector analyzer on one Tributary Access
(At the Station DDF)

A delay up to 10 seconds may be observed for each activation/deactivation.

Ensure that the local tributary access is active (unframed and configured).

Ensure that the local transmitter is muted (double click on the front panel of the Modem unit Set-
tings tab panel).

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IF cable loopback

Figure 313. IF Cable loopback

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Modem unit Loopback tab panel

In the left window IF cable

In the lower right window Active Apply

3 Error Detector showing no errors.

3 Loopback showing in the Summary Block Diagram view.

To remove the loopback: in the lower right window Not Active Apply

Report about the Loopback functionality in the TRS.

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Figure 314. Loopback control in the CT

7.6.2.9 Protection functionality (1+1 only)

Purpose: Force command (if the active channel is the Main) and Lockout command (if the
active channel is the Spare)

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS

& CT View Protection Schemes

In the left window Rx Radio Protection Main #1 or Spare #0

In the Commands tab panel window Commands scroll list Forced or Lockout Apply

Repeat for HSB Tx Protection (for 1+1 HSB configurations only)

Repeat for Equipment Protection

3 Check in the Summary block diagram that the full channel (Tx and Rx) path is in service.

Report about the Channel protection switching functionality in the TRS.

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Figure 315. Protection command (Main)

Figure 316. Protection command (Spare)

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7.6.3 P32E1 unit

7.6.3.1 Balanced or Unbalanced impedance

& CT Menu bar Configuration System Settings


Set the impedance for the E1 streams.

Report the Impedance in the TRS.

7.6.3.2 Check/set E1 tributaries configuration

& CT Double click on the front panel of the P32E1DS1 unit

In the left window E1 port# 1

In the lower right window Settings Tab panel

If it is necessary, change the E1 parameters.

Report in the TRS.

Repeat for each E1 port#

7.6.3.3 Protection functionality (1+1 only)

Purpose: Force command (if the active channel is the Main) and Lockout command (if the
active channel is the Spare)

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS

& CT View Protection Schemes

In the left window Equipment Protection Main #1 or Spare #0

In the Commands tab panel Forced or Lockout Apply

3 Check in the Summary block diagram that the full channel (TX and RX) path is in service.

Report about the Channel protection switching functionality in the TRS.

7.6.3.4 E1 point to point loop test

Purpose: Verify the point to point Tributaries quality


Verify the tributaries alarm status monitoring functionality

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software and E1 Data Analyzer

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS


Connect Pattern Generator/Error Detector on Tributary Access (At the Station
DDF)

& CT Diagnosis Summary Block Diagram View


Report the result in the TRS.

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ODU ODU
REMOTE STATION

ODU ODU

Main Core Main Core

Main Modem Spare Modem Main Modem Spare Modem


FANS FANS
Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1 Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1

DDF DDF

E1
"Tributary loopback"
Error Analyzer
Pattern Generator

Figure 317. Test bench for tributary functionality check

[1] Point to point Tributaries quality test

Assuming that all the tributaries have been enabled and configured (Unframed status and configu-
ration) via CT in both stations and that every tributary is looped at the DDF in the remote station:

Perform one minute of BER test on each E1 tributary

3 Verify that the analyzer detects no error.

3 Verify the tributary alarm status:

& CT Double click on the front panel of the P32E1DS1 unit


In the lower right Alarms tab panel, verify that while the data analyzer is connected,
theAlarmLossSignal on the relevant tributary is off.

Leave the Alarms screen open, to perform following check

[2] Check of the tributaries alarm status monitoring functionality

To create an alarmed condition, remove the Tributary loopback at the Remote station.

In the lower right Alarms, verify that while the data analyzer is connected, the AlarmLossSignalon the
relevant tributary goes on.

Restore the Tributary loopback at the Remote station, and verify that the AlarmLossSignal on there-
levant tributary goes off.

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Figure 318. Tributary alarm status monitoring

Report about the Tributary BER test and alarm CT monitoring in the TRS.

7.6.4 CORE unit

7.6.4.1 Check the Software Licence Code

& CT Menu bar Supervision SW licence


Report the Licence string and code in the TRS.

7.6.4.2 Check/set Traffic Ethernet port parameters

& CT Double click on the front panel of the Core unit

In the left window Ethernet Port#1 or Ethernet Port#2 or Ethernet Port#3 or Ethernet Port#4 or Optical
SFP Ethernet Port #5.

In the lower right window Settings Tab panel

If it is necessary, change the parameters.

Report in the TRS.

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7.6.5 NE configuration

7.6.5.1 Check/set the local NE IP address

& CT Configuration Network Configuration Local Configuration


Report the local IP Address in the TRS.

7.6.5.2 Check/set OSPF Area Configuration

& CT Configuration Network Configuration IP Configuration OSPF Area Configuration


Report the Id, IP Address, IP Mask and Stub flag in the TRS.

7.6.5.3 Check/set the Ethernet access (OS) configuration

& CT Double click on the front panel fo the Core unit TMN Interface tab panel
Report the IP Address, IP Mask, IP Routing protocol and OSPF Area in the TRS.

7.6.5.4 Check/set IP static routing configuration

& CT Configuration Network Configuration IP Configuration IP Static Routing Configuration


Report the IP Address, IP Mask and Default gateway IP Address or interface type into theTRS.

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7.6.6 Hop E1 stability test
N.B.: this test is in alternative to that described in point d) (performed on one Ethernet port)

Purpose: Verify the Hop stability

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software and E1 Data Analyzer

Procedure: Connect CT to MSS


Connect Data analyzer on one Tributary Access (At the Station DDF)

The Hop stability test is performed during two consecutive hours, one time, on one Tributary, in real-
working condition whatever the protection configuration (1+ 0 or 1+1).

The two-hour stability test must be free of error in normal propagation conditions (out of fading
period)

Via the CT, let only one active tributary in both station

In the remote Station, place a hardware loop on the relevant tributary access (at the station DDF).

In the local station, connect the E1 Data Analyzer on the relevant tributary. Check that the
Tributary Alarm Loss disappears.

3 Verify in both stations that there are no active software loopbacks or switching requests.

3 Verify in both stations that none alarm is showing.

Report the two-hour error-free of error Hop Stability Test result in the TRS.

ODU ODU
REMOTE STATION

ODU ODU

Main Core Main Core

Main Modem Spare Modem Main Modem Spare Modem


FANS FANS
Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1 Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1

DDF DDF

E1
"Tributary loopback"
Error Analyzer
Pattern Generator

Figure 319. Test bench for hop stability test

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7.6.7 Ethernet Traffic stability test
Purpose: Verify the quality of point to point Ethernet Data Channels

Required Instruments: PC with Craft Terminal software and, in alternative:


1 additional PC and 1 Ethernet cable
2 additional PCs
2 Ethernet Data Analyzers

Procedure:

a) Connect CT to MSS of local station

b) Perform the connectivity test on port #1, according to the chosen test bench:

Test bench with 1 additional PC and 1 Ethernet cable: see point [1]

Test bench with 2 additional PCs: see point [2]

Test bench with 2 Ethernet Data Analyzers: see point [3]

c) Perform the connectivity test on ports #2 , #3, #4 and #5 (if enabled)


If required in plant documentation, repeat the connectivity test [step b) above] for the other three-
ports, with obvious test bench changes on remote station.

Report about the connectivity test of Ethernet Data Channels in the TRS.

d) Perform the hop stability test

1) Set up the test bench with 2 Ethernet Data Analyzers (point [3]). On both stations, connect the
Data analyzer on Ethernet port #1 on the Core unit.

2) Start this test after the learning of the MAC address.

3) Configure the pattern A generator, in order to generate continuos traffic, and set the data rate-
half to the radio capacity and with packet size of 1518 bytes.

4) Perform the stability test for 2 hours.

5) Compare the number of TX and Rx Frames on the Pattern A: the number of frames must be
equal in normal propagation conditions (out of fading period).

Report the two-hour error-free Ethernet Stability Test result in the TRS.

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[1] Test bench with 1 additional PC and 1 Ethernet cable

a) Connections
On local station, connect the additional PC on Ethernet port #1 (testing port).
On remote station, through the Ethernet cable, connect the NMS Ethernet port to the
Ethernet port #1 (port to be tested)

b) Set Enable, Flow Control disable, and Capability Advertised for ports to test
& CT perform the following operations on each data port (Ethernet ports #1 to #4) of both
stations:
Enabled Apply
Auto Negotiation Status Disabled Apply
Flow Control Disabled Apply
Capability Advertised 1000 Mb/s Full Apply

c) Perform the connectivity test on port #1

1) at local station, on PC connected to Ethernet port #1 (N.B.), ping the remote station
(using) the NEs Ethernet Configuration IP address) with 50 packets with 1000 byte
length.
N.B.: the PCs IP address and the NEs Ethernet Configuration IP address must
belong to the same subnetwork.
Windows OS details, if necessary:
Start Programs Accessories Command Prompt
ping <space> l <space> 1000 <space> n <space> 50 <space> IP Address
<enter>

2) the RIGHT LED on the corresponding front panel blinks with cable inserted and traffic
running
At least 45 packets must pass without any packet loss from the 5th packet

ODU ODU
REMOTE STATION

ODU ODU

Main Core Main Core

Main Modem Spare Modem Main Modem Spare Modem


FANS FANS
Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1 Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1

Port #1
Port #1
(testing) Mngt Port
(tested)

Ethernet cable

CT
PC for ping

Figure 320. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with 1 additional PC and
1 Ethernet cable

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[2] Test bench with 2 additional PCs

a) Connections
On local station, connect the additional PC on Ethernet port #1 (testing port)
On remote station, connect the additional PC on Ethernet port #1 (port to be tested)

b) Set Enable, Flow Control disable, and Capability Advertised for ports to test
& CT perform the following operations on each data port (Ethernet ports #1 to #4) of both
stations:
Enabled Apply
Auto Negotiation Status Disabled Apply
Flow Control Disabled Apply
Capability Advertised 1000 Mb/s Full Apply

c) Perform the connectivity test on port #1

1) at local station, on PC connected to Ethernet port #1, ping the farend PC with 50
packets with 1000 byte length.
Windows OS details, if necessary:
Start Programs Accessories Command Prompt
ping <space> l <space> 1000 <space> n <space> 50 <space> IP Address
<enter>

2) the RIGHT LED on the corresponding front panel blinks with cable inserted and traffic
running.
At least 45 packets must pass without any packet loss from the 5th packet.

ODU ODU
REMOTE STATION

ODU ODU

Main Core Main Core

Main Modem Spare Modem Main Modem Spare Modem


FANS FANS
Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1 Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1

Port #1
Port #1
(testing)
(tested)

CT
PC for ping PC for ping

Figure 321. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with 2 additional PCs

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[3] Test bench with 2 Ethernet Data Analyzers

a) Connections
On local station, connect the Data analyzer on Ethernet port #1 (testing port)
On remote station, connect the Data analyzer on Ethernet port #1 (port to be tested)

b) Set Enable, Flow Control disable, and Capability Advertised for ports to test
& CT perform the following operations on each data port (Ethernet ports #1 to #4) of both
stations:
Enabled Apply
Auto Negotiation Status Disabled Apply
Flow Control Disabled Apply
Capability Advertised 1000 Mb/s Full Apply

c) Perform the connectivity test on port #1

1) Start this test after the learning of the MAC address.


2) Configure Pattern Generator A in order to generate 50 packets with 1000 byte length,
and set the data rate half of the radio capacity.
3) the RIGHT LED on the corresponding front panel blinks with cable inserted and traffic
running.
At least 45 packets must pass without any packet loss from the 5th packet.

ODU ODU
REMOTE STATION

ODU ODU

Main Core Main Core

Main Modem Spare Modem Main Modem Spare Modem


FANS FANS
Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1 Main P32E1DS1 Spare P32E1DS1

Port #1 Port #1
(testing) (tested)

Ethernet Data Ethernet Data


Analyzer Analyzer

Pattern A CT Pattern B: Ethernet loop: Destination


MAC address and Source
MAC addresses are swapped

Figure 322. Test bench for optional Ethernet Data Channel functionality with
2 Ethernet Data Analyzers

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7.6.8 Data/Time settings

& CT Menu bar Configuration NE Time


Enter the time settings.

Report in the TRS.

& CT Menu bar Configuration Network Configuration NTP Server Configuration


Enter the IP address of the NTP Server, if any.

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7.7 Commissioning station B Phase 2 (acceptance Test)
Repeat in Station B all the tests performed in Station A except the Hop Stability Test that has to be run
only one time for the full hop.

Fill a second Test Result Sheet for Station B

END OF COMMISSIONING ACCEPTANCE TEST

7.8 Final operations


Complete the commissioning of each NE, creating the NE operator profiles and saving its data.

7.9 Annex A: fine antenna alignment


Safety requirements for workers on antenna pole, and microwave radiations (EMF norms)

SAFETY RULES
When operating on the antenna pole, strictly follow cautions.
In particular, if ODU is powered on from MSS, do not stand on the antenna axis
and beaware of the compliance boundaries.

Antenna prepointing should have been done during equipment hardware installation.

This annex explains how to carry out the antenna fine alignment.

To monitor the received level during alignment in the local station:

use the ODU Rx power monitoring in addition to a voltmeter,

or, after having logged in the NE, use the Craft Terminal received power measurement facility

Alignment procedure using the ODU Rx power monitoring

a) the radio link must be up

b) in general, fine alignment should be done only on one station of the radio link

c) connect a voltmeter to the ODU

d) proceed with Vertical alignment, then with Horizontal alignment

e) in configurations with two antennas, repeat the procedure for the second antenna.

Note

Procedures for Vertical and Horizontal alignment depend on the type of integrated polemounting
employed.

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ABBREVIATIONS

ABBREVIATION MEANING

ADM Add Drop Multiplexer

AIS Alarm Indication Signal

ALS Automatic Laser Shutdown

AP Access Point

APS Automatic Protection Switching

AS Alarm Surveillance

ASAP Alarm Severity Assignment Profile

BER Bit Error Rate

BR & SW Bridge & Switch

Browser Application which allows to browse all RM-MIB objects

CCLNP ConnectionLess Network Protocol

CDCC Data Communication Channel

CD-ROM Compact Disc Read Only Memory

CES Circuit Emulation Service

CI Communication Infrastructure

CRU Clock Reference Unit

CTP Connection Termination Point

CT Craft Terminal

DCI Drop & Continue Interconnection

DCN Data Communications Network

DS Degraded Signal

ECC Embedded Communication Channels

EML Element Management Layer

EML domain A set of NEs that are maintained by the same EML-OS.

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ABBREVIATION MEANING

EPS Equipment Protection Switching

EM-OS Element Manager-Operation System

EMS Event Management Services

ET Elementary Topology. It is a grouping of some nodes connected


according to specific rules. A typical ET is a ring.

FLS Frame Loss Second

Gbit/s Gigabits per second

FM FM Fault Management

GNE Gateway Network Element

HSB Hot Stand-By

IWF Inter-Working Function

Link Connection (lc ) A transport entity provided by the client/server association.It is


formed by a near-end adaptation function,a server trail and a far-
end adaptation function between connection points. It can be con-
figured as part of the trail management process in the associated
server layer.

IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

IM Information Manager

Kbit/s Kilobits per second

LAN Local Area Network

LOS Loss Of Signal

Mbit/s Megabits per seconds

MEF Metro Ethernet Forum

MIB Management Information Base

MPR Microwave Packet Radio

MSS Microwave Service Switch

NE Network Element

NEC Network Element Clock

Node It is the view of the NE at NML level

NTP NetworkTime Protocol

ODU OutDoor Unit

OFS Out of Frame Seconds

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460/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Abbreviations
ABBREVIATION MEANING

OS Operation System

PDH Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy

PM Performance Monitoring

PNU Packet Node Unit

Port Physical Interface of a Node. A port can be SDH or PDH.

PI Physical Interface

PPI PDH Physical Interface

SA Site Aggregator

SDH Synchronous Digital Hierarchy

SD Signal Degrade

SF Signal Failure

SONET Synchronous Optical Network

SPDH Super PDH

STM Synchronous Transport Module

TMN Telecommunications Management Network

TCA Threshold Crossing Alarm

USM User Service Manager

UPA Unavailable path alarm

URU Underlying Resource Unavailable

WTR Wait Time to Restore

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462/464 3DB 18528 DFAA Issue 1 Abbreviations
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3DB 18528 DFAA
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