Grade

Reading
Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Comprehension: Prior Knowledge . 5 Structural Analysis: Suffixes . . . . 6 Structural Analysis: Synonyms

6

Comprehension: Make Inferences . 30 Vocabulary: Frequently Misused Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Vocabulary: Content Words. . . . 32 Reading: Newspapers . . . . . . . . 33 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 34 Reading: Urban Legends . . . . . . 35 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 36 Reading: Poetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 38 Graphic Information: Diagrams . 39 Writing: Science Fiction . . . . . . . 41 More Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Our World

and Antonyms. . . . . . . . . . . 7 Fluency: Reading with Expression. . 8 Comprehension: Understand Idioms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Comprehension: Draw Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vocabulary: Frequently Misused Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Vocabulary: Content Words. . . . 12 Reading: Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 14 Reading: Biographies . . . . . . . . 15 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 16 Reading: First-Person Narratives 17 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 19 Graphic Information: Maps . . . 20 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 21 Writing: Personal Narratives . . . 22 More Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . 25

Comprehension: Prior Knowledge . 45 Structural Analysis: Prefixes . . . 46 Structural Analysis: Word Roots. 47

Computers

Fluency: Reading with Accuracy . . 48 Comprehension: Details . . . . . . . 49 Comprehension: Cause and Effect. 50 Vocabulary: Frequently Misused Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Vocabulary: Content Words. . . . 52 Reading: Instructions . . . . . . . . . 53 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 54

Comprehension: Prior Knowledge . 26 Structural Analysis: Suffixes . . . . 27 Structural Analysis: Word Roots. . . 28

Reading: Realistic Fiction . . . . . . 55 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 58 Graphic Information: Graphs. . . 60 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 61

Outer Space Fluency: Reading with Expression . 29

Table of Contents
Writing: Essays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 More Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Comprehension: Prior Knowledge . 87 Structural Analysis: Similes and Metaphors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Comprehension: Prior Knowledge . 66 Structural Analysis: Prefixes . . . 67

Wildlife Refuges

Structural Analysis: Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Fluency: Reading with Expression . 90 Comprehension: Fact and Opinion 91 Comprehension: Analogies. . . . . 92 Vocabulary: Frequently Misused Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Vocabulary: Content Words. . . . 94 Reading: First-Person Narratives . . 95 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 96 Reading: Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . 100 Graphic Information: Line Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Reading: Comprehension . . . . 103 Writing: Persuasive Messages . . 104 More Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . 107

The Olympic Structural Analysis: Roots, Prefixes, Games and Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Fluency: Reading with Expression . 69 Comprehension: Main Idea . . . . 70 Comprehension: Draw Conclusions 71 Vocabulary: Frequently Misused Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Vocabulary: Content Words. . . . 73 Reading: How-To . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 75 Reading: Biographies . . . . . . . . . 76 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 79 Graphic Information: Time Lines . . 81 Reading: Comprehension . . . . . . 82 Writing: Descriptions . . . . . . . . . 83 More Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Answer Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

CREDITS Concept Development: Kent Publishing Services, Inc. Written by: Linda Barr Editor: Carla Hamaguchi Designer/Production: Moonhee Pak/Mary Gagné Illustrators: Frank Ordaz and Corbin Hillam Art Director: Tom Cochrane Project Director: Carolea Williams

© 2004 Creative Teaching Press, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA 92649 Reproduction of activities in any manner for use in the classroom and not for commercial sale is permissible. Reproduction of these materials for an entire school or for a school system is strictly prohibited.

Name ______________________________________________________________________________

Reading:

Comprehension

After you read the instructions for formatting text on page 53, answer questions 1 through 4.

1

Which action turns on the boldface function? typing a word clicking the B icon on the formatting control bar clicking the U icon on the formatting control bar holding the Control key down and pressing the I on the keyboard

2

What is the main idea in these three sets of instructions? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

3

How are the three sets of instructions alike and different? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

4

The steps below explain how to type the title of a report in boldface and italics, but the steps are out of order. Number the steps in the order they should be completed. _______ Finally, turn off the boldface function by holding down the Control key and pressing the B key on the keyboard. _______ Turn off the italics by holding down the Control key and pressing the I key on the keyboard. _______ Type the title. _______ First, hold down the Control key while you press the I key on the keyboard. _______ Continue holding down the control key while you press the B key.

Sequence Sequence means the order in which steps should be completed or the order in which events happen in a story. Signal words such as first, next, then, and finally often help show the order of events.
54
Advantage Reading Grade 6 © 2004 Creative Teaching Press

Name ______________________________________________________________________________

Vocabulary:

Content Words

Our World

Here’s your opportunity to brush up on the meanings of geographical terms and expand your vocabulary. Fill in the bubble beside the correct answer for questions 1 through 8. If you aren’t sure of an answer, look it up in a social studies or geography textbook or an encyclopedia.

1

Which of these is not a landform? mountain equator plateau plain

5

Which of these is a continent? Australia Thailand Calcutta Brazil

2

Which of these divides the globe vertically? altitude latitude longitude Arctic Circle

6

What kind of rock allows water to pass through? impermeable permeable granite runoff

3

Which of these explains the meanings of symbols on a map? scale legend compass contours

7

Which kind of map shows which areas are higher than others? topographic geologic political cultural

4

Which of these is a long-term pattern of weather? front climate terracing vegetation

8

What are people called who move from place to place, often following the seasons? nomads colonists immigrants communities

12

Advantage Reading Grade 6 © 2004 Creative Teaching Press

Name ______________________________________________________________________________

Writing:

Persuasive Messages

Wildlife Refuges

Write a persuasive message that relates in some way to wildlife, refuges, or endangered species. Choose a topic that interests you and you know (or can learn) about. For example, you might try to convince your readers to contribute to a wildlife refuge near you. Or you might express your opinion that the nation’s resources could be better used in other ways. As you write, think about these questions: • To whom am I writing? • What is important to this person? • How could the action I’m suggesting benefit this person? What reasons for acting should I stress? • Why might this person not want to do as I request? • How can I show that the reasons to act are more important than the reasons not to act? Use this graphic organizer to get your ideas in order. It is organized in an indirect way. You will present the problem first, then possible solutions, ending with the best solution, which is the solution you want your reader to support. Next, explain all the benefits of the best solution, from the reader’s point of view. Last, make sure you clearly describe the action you want your reader to take and make it as easy as possible for him or her to act.

Problem Possible Solution Possible Solution Best Solution Benefits of Best Solution Request for Action

104

Advantage Reading Grade 6 © 2004 Creative Teaching Press

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