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Southwest Maui Watershed Plan


Watershed Advisory Group Steering Committee Meeting
May 13, 2010, 3:00 p.m - 5:00 p.m.
HIHWNMS (Humpback Whale Sanctuary) Education Center
726 S. Kihei Rd., Kihei, Maui

Summary
This was the second meeting of the WAG Steering Committee in the two-year Southwest
Maui Watershed Planning project. There were four topics on the agenda: 1) SC and
WAG membership, representation and participation; 2) Guiding principles, a project
deliverable; 3) A first cut at defining sensitive ecosystem issues to be addressed by the
SMWP plan; and 4) A first cut at linking watershed problems, causes, goals, and
indicators. There were 13 people present.

Upcoming meetings
The next Steering Committee meeting will be June 10 at the Whale Sanctuary, 1:30-3 pm.
The next WAG meeting will be June 10 at the Whale Sanctuary, 3-5 pm.

Attendees
Michael Brady, Emily Fielding, Charlene Griffin, Skippy Hau, Daniel Kanahele, Pamela
Kantarova, Robin Knox, Ellen Kraftsow, Teri Leonard, Julia Staley, Richard Sylva, Dave Taylor
and Darla White.

SC and WAG membership


Who are we missing, and how can we get them to the table?
Steering committee members would like to have participation in this project from several
additional groups, identified below. Robin and others volunteered to do more outreach to them.
Native Hawaiians and those with roots in this area: Daniel offered advice on cultural norms
and how best to gain participation. Emily said it’s important to highlight this project’s
participation model – all are welcome – in contrast to some past watershed efforts. Robin will
contact:
• The people from Nahiku and the West Side who attended the public meeting
• Emily Fielding to get the name of a speaker she heard recently
• Darla White to get names of some people at the DAR office who might have suggestions
Teri Leonard will ask Lucienne DeNaie for her suggestions.
Commercial interests: Such as tourism, hotel, real estate, construction, developers, retail.
Someone from the Visitors Bureau or Chamber of Commerce could represent many of these.
Pam Kantarova will contact the Maui Visitor’s Bureau and Chamber of Commerce (get names
and numbers from Julia Staley if needed).
Ranchers: Richard represents one ranch, and others are on our email list but have not come to
the meetings. Andrea Buckman from leeward Haleakala will try to come to the June 10 meeting,
representing Art Medeiros’ group. Richard will contact Paul in the Ulupalakua farmers group.
Other ethnic groups; fishermen: May need to approach churches, community gatherings.

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County Council: Key to much local decision-making.


County Department of Public Works: Mike Miyamoto, the Deputy Director of DPW, is aware
of these meetings and has said that he may come.
Legislators: Robin has talked to Roz Baker and Joe Bertram, who have said they are unable to
make it to the WAG meetings but may be able to attend the next public meeting.

Guiding Principles
The Guiding Principles are a project deliverable, to be decided by the WAG. Robin sent out a
draft set of guiding principles consolidated from a “laundry list” of ideas generated at the last
meeting. We discussed that draft, as regrouped by Karen Bennett. See the draft and comments in
Table 1, Guiding principles and below.
The Hawaii state motto, “Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono”, was originally the motto of the
kingdom of Hawaii. It is usually translated as “The life of the land is perpetuated in
righteousness.” Another take on it is “The life of the land is preserved by the correct behavior,
proper conduct, of people who call Hawaii home.” Daniel thinks of it as a mission statement for
Hawaii nei. Emily brought up the point that traditionally, ahupua`a tenants have responsibilities –
kuleana – and also specific rights under the law. That has implications for how we’ll develop the
plan. We want this to become institutionalized. It promotes transparency. Someone mentioned
that another principle of the ahupua`a is: if it’s not good for one part of the ahupua`a, it’s not
good for the entire system. Robin mentioned an idea of inviting a cultural practitioner to talk to us
about the concept of ahupua`a. Some of the guidelines echo recommendations from the EPA.
Add “trust” to gaining stakeholder commitment.
Robin also mentioned that she is looking to add funds for monitoring, through additional grants
(recall the role of monitoring in the planning cycle). That is how we can implement adaptive
management.
Robin will revise the list based on today’s input, and send it to SC members for review, before
offering it for WAG approval and adoption.

Sensitive Ecosystem Issues – Worksheet 4-2


We discussed the current problems in the watersheds – sensitive ecosystem issues – and started
adding them to our version of Worksheet 4-2 from the EPA’s Handbook for Developing
Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect Our Waters (See Table 2, Worksheet 4-2). The
worksheet categories are: Sensitive Habitat, Location in Watershed, Buffers?, Fragmentation,
Invasive Species, Climate change, Flow Alteration, Scale, Does hydrology support biology?, and
Change in protection status?
Dave asked how these worksheets fit in the big picture, what’s the roadmap? Robin replied that
this is our first cut at identifying the current conditions and problems. We will be updating it as
we go along.
Richard would like to know the local names for drainages, to have John Astilla add them to the
watershed characterization (land use) maps.
Ellen mentioned that there used to be wetlands all around here. Richard has a wetland study from
the 1960s through the present on loss of wetlands in Kihei.
Julia mentioned that the Army Corps of Engineers is planning to do a sedimentation drift study.
They are in the process of deciding where to focus their interest: West or South Maui, or both.

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Robin will gather more specific info and continue filling in Worksheet 4-2.

Problems, causes, goals and indicators – Worksheet 4-4


We started looking at creating our version of Worksheet 4-4 from the EPA’s Handbook for
Developing Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect Our Waters: problems, causes, goals and
indicators (see Table 3, Worksheet 4-4).
Dave pointed out that with 15 minutes left, we wouldn’t be able to get very far at filling it out,
and said he trusted Robin to fill out a draft to send to us to review. The group seemed fine with
that idea.
Teri suggested that coral reef decline might be a key indicator for watershed health. Dave
disagreed, citing a UN report about global declines in reef health. Ellen added that air quality
issues are also reef health stressors. We need to be able to correlate the local causes and effects.
Dave said that with a budget of $200,000 over two years, we won’t be able to quantify the
problems in detail; we’ll have to do broad-brush estimates. Robin agreed, saying that we’re
building a framework for the future, identifying data gaps, and what it would take to do a more
detailed analysis. We’re trying to identify local actions we can take to buffer ourselves from
climate change.
Robin will gather more specific info and continue filling in Worksheet 4-4.
This is the list that Robin provided as a starting point, based on the WAG’s input on broad
problems and goals.
Create a rational, logical plan; provide rationale for Resuspension
decisions Airborne particles (dust and/or pathogens?)
First identify the problems; your goals will be to Ocean water quality / public health / ocean
get rid of the problems illness
Be consistent with Community Plans (s/b guiding Coral disease montifera
principle?) Lack of fish
Get the players at the table (e.g., Kihei Community Wildland fires: stabilization, invasives,
Association) erosion, groundwater recharge, debris,
Reefs are dying human health & safety
Consider needs and usage: development (demand); Understand natural processes and function,
water supply; storm water, drainage, flooding; and man-made components and processes
pollution control Understand critical conditions
Pollutants associated Natural systems are complex; use a light
Silt runoff / sedimentation / pollutant touch / limit footprint
Erosion: others’ BMPs; siltation basins, swales etc. Flooding
Turbid water, has tourism ramifications Algae blooms

Additional discussion
Dave asked, “Who is the WAG, if they’re going to vote on things?” (e.g., the guiding principles).
It’s basically the people who come to the WAG meetings, the stakeholders who are participating.
Ellen said that it would be really useful to have something like two paragraphs that describe this
effort (an elevator pitch). Several other people would also find this useful. Robin said she’ll send
something out.

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Action items from May 13 steering committee meeting


# Due
Description Person
date
Contact about participating, representing Native Hawaiians & others with
roots in the area
• The people from Nahiku and the West Side who attended the
1
public meeting Robin
• Emily Fielding to get the name of a speaker she heard recently
• Darla White to get names of some people at the DAR office who
might have suggestions
2 Contact Lucienne DeNaie for her recommendations of others who might
Teri
represent Native Hawaiians & others with roots in the area
3 Contact Chamber of Commerce and/or Maui Visitors Bureau about
Pam
participating, representing commercial interests
4 Contact Paul in Ulupalakua farmers group about participating Richard
5 Update Guiding Principles draft and send to SC for review Robin
Review Guiding Principles draft; send revisions to Robin; recommend to Steering
6
WAG committee
7 Update Worksheet 4-2 draft and send to SC for review Robin
8 Update Worksheet 4-4 draft and send to SC for review Robin
9 Draft “elevator pitch” description of this project and send to SC members Robin

Notes prepared by Karen Bennett.

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Table 1, Guiding principles

Guiding principles – draft


How we will behave
Be inclusive – The Watershed Advisory Group and Steering Committee seek to include
all stakeholders, those
• with information or knowledge
• who make decisions
• who are affected by decisions
• who have the ability to assist or impede implementation of decisions
Be the solution – the solutions to water quality problems come from within the group of
stakeholders.
Be Equitable - Seek balance and transparency in the decision-making process, avoiding
undue burdens on one party.
Respect and honor the host culture and each other

How we will develop our plan


Use the best available science and traditional ecological knowledge to develop logical
plan and rationale
Recognize the interconnectedness of water resources mauka to makai (ahupua`a
concept)
Optimize solutions to realize the greatest water quality benefits for the resources
invested.
Create an adaptive management process with flexibility to adjust plans and strategies
based on success of implementation
Gain commitment of stakeholders to the process

Suggested additions
Laulima = cooperation, to work together towards achievement of a task
Lokahi = unity of effort
Aloha = compassion, caring, love for others and nature
Ho`omanawanui = patience
Hoike = respect
Kokua = principle of helpfulness
Gain stakeholder trust as well as commitment
Incorporate principles from the state motto: “Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono.” It is
usually translated as “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.” Another take
on it is “The life of the land is preserved by the correct behavior, proper conduct, of
people who call Hawaii home.”

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Table 2, Worksheet 4-2


Sensitive Location in Buffers? Fragmentation Invasive Climate Flow Scale Does Change in
Habitat Watershed Species change Alteration hydrology protection
support status?
biology?
Coral Reef Coastline Some Yes Yes: limu, Yes: Yes: Regional There’s 1973 Ahihi
shallow, non-native temperature Wastewater always an Kinau;
sandy fish. and pH injected impact; whale
intertidal changes which came how much sanctuary
areas. from other is too are the
Some regions. much? only 2
have sea Lack of flow protected
grass of natural areas now.
beds streams.
Impervious
surfaces.
Alpine
Dryland Honua Ula No Yes, 3-5% Yes yes yes Site yes Yes
Forest Puu Okali and remains specific
scattered
throughout;
data on
wiliwili limited.
Contact Lee
Altenberg for
more info.
TNC’s
regional plan;
Emily Fielding
can give
Robin the
name of the
person who
did mapping
of High
Islands
regional plan.
Mesic

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Sensitive Location in Buffers? Fragmentation Invasive Climate Flow Scale Does Change in
Habitat Watershed Species change Alteration hydrology protection
support status?
biology?
Upland Upper Yes, but ? Yes ? ? Watershed
Forest (rain elevations (ranches)
forest)
Gulches (dry
stream beds)
Tidepools Coastline No No ? ? ? Watershed
(rocky
intertidal
areas)
Sand dunes
& beaches
Wetlands Coastal No Yes Yes ? Yes Site No ?
some are (upper?) specific
planned for now; was
development regional
Other values
we want to
protect: open
space, views,
public health
Fish ponds
(benthic,
estuaries)

Robin will gather more specific info and continue filling this out.

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Table 3, Worksheet 4-4, Identifying concerns, causes, goals, and indicators


What are the What do you think How can we assess What would you like to How will we measure
problems/concerns in caused the problems? current conditions see? (goal) progress toward these
the watershed? (indicators) goals?
Coral Reef Decline See list. CRAMP data Stop coral decline. Monitoring benthic cover.
Mirror of health of UN report on global study: Meghan Dailer’s data Increase coral coverage. Fishery surveys.
watershed; it’s the end of 3 threats: overfishing, Fish surveys
the line. acidification of water Coral studies.
causing bleaching; Light reflectivity study with
warming of water dive follow-up creating
Alien species detailed map of live vs.
Land-based pollution dead reef.
Monitoring benthic cover.
Sedimentation (soil) (a Erosion, runoff, Turbidity task force is Natural buffers Turbidity
cause of reef decline. Loss channelization, land monitoring. Measure Clear water Number and types of
of topsoil, loss of clearing, animal grazing, accumulation rates and Healthy coral buffers
productivity) wind, construction, rising totals. Estimate loss of soil Healthy fish population Quantitative repeatable
What resource is being sea level; resuspension per acre. Measure graded
threatened? due to swells and currents and bare acreage. Tilled
Silt built up in concrete land.
channels
Flooding
Lack of Fishery
Algae Blooms
Nutrients
Pathogens
Wildfire
Invasive species

Water quality
Water quantity
Urban runoff
Agricultural runoff
Suspended chemicals
Toxicity
Turbidity
=NPS pollution

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