THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

Journal
VOL LI, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2006

S TATEMENT

OF

OWNERSHIP

The ownership, management and circulation of The Garden Club of Virginia's Journal, published four times a year in Richmond, Virginia, is hereby stated in the first issue published after the first of October 2006. The name and address of the publisher is: The Garden Club of Virginia, KentValentine House, 12 East Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219. The name and address of the editor is: Peggy Federhart, PO Box 247, Ophelia, Virginia 22530. The owner is The Garden Club of Virginia, Kent-Valentine House, 12 East Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219. There are no bondholders, mortgages or security holders. The purpose, function and non-profit status of this organization and the exempt status for Federal Income Tax purposes have not changed during the preceding 12 months. The total number of copies published nearest the filing date is 3450. The average number of copies published in the preceding 12 months is 3438. There are no sales through dealers, etc Paid subscriptions average 3282; the number nearest the filing date is 3286. Other mailed copies average 10 copies. Free distribution averages 40 copies. The average number of copies not distributed for the preceding year is 106; the number of copies not distributed of the publication nearest the filing dates is 116. The Journal editor requests permission to mail The Garden Club of Virginia's Journal at the phased postage rates presently authorized on form 3526 for USPS #5764520.(ISSN 0431-0233). I certify that the statements made here are correct and complete as listed in the Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation. Peggy Federhart, Journal Editor Post Office Box 247 Ophelia, Virginia 22530-0247 October 23, 2006

Journal Editorial Board
2006-2007
Editor and Chairman, Peggy Federhart, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck ExOfficio Members The GCV President, Sally Guy Brown, The Garden Club of Alexandria The GCV Vice President & Chair of The GCV Communications Committee, Cabell West, The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton The GCV Director of Public Relations, Linda Consolvo, The Nansemond River Garden Club Journal Chair, Gail Braxton, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club Journal Advertising Chair, Betsy Agelasto, The Virginia Beach Garden Club Members Mason Beazley, The James River Garden Club, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Fleet Davis, The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore Betty Delk, The Nansemond River Garden Club Ann Gordon Evans, The Huntington Garden Club Marietta Gwathmey, Harborfront Garden Club Sarah Pierson, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club Lynne Rabil, The Franklin Garden Club

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ON THE COVER...

The Garden Club of Virginia Journal
The Garden Club of Virginia Journal (USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is published four times a year for members by The GCV, 12 East Franklin St., Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage paid in Richmond, VA. Single issue price, $3.00. Copy and ad deadlines are: January 15 for the March issue April 15 for the June issue July 15 for the September issue October 15 for the December issue Email copy to the Editor and advertising to the Ad Manager Journal Editor and Chairman of the Editorial Board: Peggy Federhart (Mrs. John A.) Post Office Box 247 Ophelia, VA 22530 Phone: (804) 453-3064 Email: peggyfed@earthlink.net Journal Advertising Manager: Betsy Agelasto (Mrs. Peter A. III) Phone: (757) 428-1870 Email: Betsyagelasto@mindspring.com President of The Garden Club of Virginia: Sally Guy Brown (Mrs. Thomas C., Jr.) Journal Committee Chairman: Gail Braxton (Mrs. H. Harrison, Jr.)

This issue is dedicated to The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club, host of the The GCV Daffodil Show in 2007.

IN THIS ISSUE...
Statement of Ownership . . . . . inside front cover Speaker Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Let Your Fingers Do The Walking . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 When We Speak, Politicians Listen . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Books on Our Favorite Trees and Shrubs . . . . . 5 The Lucy Preston Beale Garden Presentation . . 6 Garden of Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Dugdale Award for Conservation . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Common Wealth Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Who Is She . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Rare Botanical Prints at UVA Part 2 . . . . . . . . . 13 The Rose Show Winners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Daffodil Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Historic Garden Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Other Rose Show Winners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Rose Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Daffodil Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Lily Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Contemporary Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 To Seed or To Mulch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 GCV Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside back cover

OTHER REFERENCES...
Vol. LI, No. 4 Printed on recycled paper by Carter Printing Company Richmond, VA Kent-Valentine House Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: administrator@gcvirginia.org Historic Garden Week Office Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: gdnweek@verizon.net www.VAGardenWeek.org POSTMASTER send address changes to: GCV Administrator 12 East Franklin Street Richmond, VA 23219

DECEMBER 2006

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2007 GCV Speakers Series
Monday, January 15, 2007
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Richmond

Ken Druse, Speaker
www.kendruse.com Nationally Known Garden Expert and Author America's Best-Loved Gardner The Natural Garden The Natural Shade Garden The Natural Habitat Garden The Collector's Garden Making More Plants: The Science, Art and Joy of Propagation Ken Druse: The Passion for Gardening
(Ken Druse's books will be available for purchase and signing. The LGBG Gift Shop will open at 9:00 a.m.)

9:30 am: Registration 10:30 am: Speaker 1:00 pm: Lunch
Cost: $45 per person Registrar: Aileen Laing 540.937.4133 bunreefarm@aol.com Registration deadline: January 5, 2007 Registration information at www.gcvirginia.org Open to all GCV members and their guests

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Let Your Fingers Do the Walking Through Your Register's “Yellow Pages”
By Meg Clement, GCV Parliamentarian and Editor of the Register Three Chopt Garden Club

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ave you ever wished that you had the phone number, address or the spouse's name of a particular Garden Club of Virginia member right by your telephone or in your car? Or did you drive to Richmond for your first

visit to the Kent-Valentine House and didn't know where it was located or where to park? If so, you can find this information and much more right at your fingertips. The bright yellow 2006-2007 Register, which your club president made available to you this fall, can provide you with these answers and other important information about The Garden Club of Virginia and its activities. This summer the Board of Directors of The Garden Club of Virginia voted to include in the Register for the first time the complete name, phone number and address of every Garden Club of Virginia member. It also voted to provide every member with a copy of the Register. The GCV Bylaws, Standing Rules, a listing of all flower show awards, restoration projects and web pages which identify your local, state and federal government representatives are also included in the Register. It can also be found under the Publication side bar in the members' section of The Garden Club of Virginia web page, www.gcvirginia.org. The complete Register is printed biennially. The Board of Directors hopes that you will enjoy using The Garden Club of Virginia 2006-2007 Register and that it will serve as a valuable source of information for all of our members.

DECEMBER 2006

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When We Speak, Politicians Listen
By Marsha Merrell, GCV Conservation and Beautification Chairman The James River Garden Club n January 22, 2007, during annual GCV Legislative Day, members will gather in Richmond for an update about conservation and beautification issues coming before the General Assembly. That is the day we can all become lobbyists. Why is lobbying such an important role for The GCV? First and foremost, it is a right and privilege to communicate with our elected officials. Second, The GCV has achieved significant impact when it takes a position on legislation that affects our goals. The GCV has a history of making informed decisions that bring about positive results on environmental issues. Before we can place our imprimatur on a bill, the Conservation and Beautification Committee works diligently to educate itself and then makes a recommendation to the Board of Directors. When The GCV decides to speak, politicians listen. Environmental groups and legislators often court us for support. Taking on such a leadership role has resulted in the preservation of some of the most historic and scenic places in Virginia. Laws significantly affecting recycling and billboards are also important legislative victories for The GCV. Please consider registering for this valuable Legislative Day activity on The GCV Website or by obtaining a registration form from the conservation chairman of your club. Members interested in becoming involved should read either in the Register or on our Website the white paper called "Lobbying Versus Political Activity." This is a guide for our members who choose to lobby. As a 501(c)(3) we may not engage in political (electoral) activity. We may lobby or try to persuade the members of a legislature to enact legislation favorable to our cause or to defeat or repeal legislation unfavorable to our cause. It is about policy, not party. Our lobbying effort does not end on The GCV Legislative Day. The GCV Conservation Committee and club conservation chairmen work very hard to keep us informed as bills move through the House of Delegates and Senate. A club's legislative alert team receives updates and must respond to changes in status quickly via email or phone. Because an amendment to legislation may cause a change in the position taken by The GCV, bills are monitored and shepherded through the entire process. The work can be fast and furious during January and February, but our system has worked beautifully for years and is a model for other organizations. You will find it is far more rewarding than just pulling a lever and waiting for the next election.

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Ex Libris:
Books on Our Favorite Trees and Shrubs
By Mary Lloyd Lay, Kent-Valentine Librarian The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

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ogwood, magnolia, holly and boxwood are four traditional plants with which we Southerners can most identify. Dogwood, our state flower, heralds spring and Historic Garden Week in Virginia. Magnolia, holly and boxwood decorate our houses during the holidays, and boxwood is considered an indispensable treasure at historic homes. Each of these plants has many varied cultivars that are easily grown in our climate, and our library has an excellent book on each of them. My favorite is Dogwoods, the first comprehensive study of the genus, by Paul Cappiello and Don Shadow. The authors consider dogwoods among the superstars of the garden and accompany their text with stunning photographs. They devote this very readable book entirely to the gardening use of the genus with an all out effort not to get mired down in taxonomy. Their descriptions at times remind one of Michael Dirr's no-holes-barred assessment of plants. They describe Cornus florida 'First Lady' as one to grow "if one is in the market for a screamer in the landscape." Magnolias by Jim Gardiner is full of mouthwatering selections of deciduous magnolias. There is the yellow variety and the very dark pink as well as the most common pink variety, M. soulaniana. If space permits, he suggests planting M. macrophylla, a big leaf magnolia whose leaves can be four feet long with undersides of a metallic silvery glow; it makes quite a statement. The Magnolia is one of the most ancient and diverse plants. Two things to remember: some magnolias do not bloom young and early bloomers in Virginia are likely to get zapped by frost. Hollies by the well-known plantsman Fred C. Galle is the most definitive book on the genus Ilex. We tend to overlook the variation in the genus and our gardens suffer. With plenty of sun there is no end to the possibilities. The many varieties of the decidious Ilex verticillata yell for attention while the yellow-berried Ilex verticillata 'Winter Gold' is a real aristocrat. Last but not least is Boxwood by Lynn Batdorf. This book only whets the appetite for a visit to the state arboretum at Boyce, home of the Boxwood Society. Even a brief reading of the introductions in these books will give one a better appreciation of plants often taken for granted. Stop by and check one out soon.
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The Lucy Preston Beale Garden Presentation
By Lucy R. Ellett Mill Mountain Garden club inker Mountain is a very distinctive shape in the bowl of mountains surrounding the Roanoke Valley. Hollins University is located at the foot of this lovely mountain. On Wednesday, October 17, delegates to the Board of Governors’ meeting, together with Hollins University friends, gathered there for the presentation of the Lucy Preston Beale Memorial Garden. Sally Guy Brown, The GCV President, welcomed the assemblage and told about the long involvement of The Garden Club of Virginia in the restoration of historic gardens. William D. Rieley, Landscape Architect for The Garden Club of Virginia, gave a brief history of the Mary Lou Seilheimer, The GCV Restoration Committee garden and explained its imporChair, Presenting the Restoration of the Beale Garden to Hollins University tance in the life of the college. He noted that Lucy Preston Beale attended Hollins during the Civil War and following her college days continued to take an active interest in Hollins for the next fifty years. After her death, her daughter, Lucy Beale Huffman, decided to honor her memory with the gift of a garden to the college. The landscape architect for the project was Roanoke architect A. A. Farnham, who planned a lovely serene setting with a creek flowing through the center. Correspondence between Mr. Farnham and others involved in the project as well as the original plant list, a sketch of his plan and a few pictures of the original garden were helpful in this restoration. Construction of the college chapel in the late 1950s covered a portion of the original garden and this necessitated changes in the design. To re-establish the circular path, two bridges now cross the creek instead of one. In order to connect the chapel terrace visually to the garden, large boxwoods New Bridge for the Beale Garden along the edge of the terrace were

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replaced with small flowering trees. A pleasing set of stone steps leads visitors into the garden. Native trees and shrubs are used in the revised plan rather than many of the exotic species specified by Mr. Farnham. The treatment of the streambed includes lining the banks with larger stones and planting with ferns, iris and daylilies to enhance the stream and to make it an impor- The Restored Beale Garden-Plantings along the meandering creek tant element in the garden. Mary Lou Seilheimer, Chairman of the Restoration Committee, discussed the restoration process and the involvement of the Restoration Committee. She then made the formal presentation of the gift of the garden to Hollins University. Nancy Oliver Gray, President of Hollins University, accepted the gift of the garden and expressed her appreciation to The Garden Club of Virginia. She noted that the Beale Garden will be used for many special events such as receptions, weddings and outdoor meetings and will add to the aesthetic appeal of the campus for generations to come. After the ceremony guests enjoyed a reception and tour of the garden.

The Beale Garden 1930-Used with permission of Hollins University

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Garden of Member (YOUR NAME HERE)
By Esther Carpi, GCV Online Committee The Hunting Creek Garden Club here is a new monthly feature online called Garden of the Month. Each month we will post two pages of photos of gardens of The GCV members. Go to the GCV Website at www.gcvirginia.org and click on "Members Only." Enter the password and you will see a photo of the featured member and a link to photos of her garden. This is our way of sharing with as many as possible the amazing talent and dedication of members statewide. We want to share gardens of all kinds: large, small, country, city, patio, mountainside and seaside. We would love to feature your garden. It is easy to submit photos for us to review and post. If you have digital photos of your garden, send them via e-mail as individual attachments. If you have prints, send them by regular mail. We will scan the prints and return them to you. If you have no photos but would like to share your garden, call us and we will come take photos. If you know of a member who has a wonderful garden to share, send us her name and we will contact her. As a club you might consider designating someone who is talented with a digital camera to take pictures of your own members' gardens and submit them to us. Include a photo of the member gardener and a little bio regarding club activities. We will edit the photos, design the layout, draft a bit of text and e-mail the layout back to you for review and possibly some plant identification. Additionally we will be making hardcopies of the web pages and compiling them into a portfolio to be kept in the Kent-Valentine House Library. Look for the portfolio this spring. So what are you waiting for? Go get your camera and take some pictures. Remember winter gardens are beautiful too. Don't have a garden? Send us a photo of your window box. Also send us a photo this year of your door or gate decorated for Christmas with fresh greens. We will use the photo next year in our December article.

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Send all photos and inquiries to Esther Carpi 202 Duke Street Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 548-3850 esthercarpi@comcast.net

Flowersense with Lee Snyder
Call 757-627-3185 or e-mail lee@flwrguru.com www.flwrguru.com

A floral design series for all enthusiasts.

1 2 3 4

THE BASICS STUFF & GO FUN, FRUIT & FLOWERS HOLIDAY DESIGN

Available as a BOXED SET or individual DVD’s.

A portion of the proceeds go to The Garden Club of Virginia

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The Garden Club of Gloucester
presents

the 57th Annual Daffodil Show
(an ADS accredited show)

Let’s Dance
Page Middle School Rt. 17, 2.5 miles south of Gloucester Courthouse Gloucester, VA 2:00 pm to 5:30 pm Saturday, April 7, 2007 (1 day only)
Contact: Kathy Klein 804-693-5629, KLEINRKR@aol.com Sarah Hylton 804-642-3786, sphylton@wmconnect.com Sue Zima 804-642-5270, sueannz@aol.com

DECEMBER 2006

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The Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale Award for Conservation
By Marsha Merrell, GCV Conservation and Beautification Chairman The James River Garden Club iranda Bryant Strutton (Randi) received the Dugdale Award for Conservation on November 9th at the 48th Annual Conservation Forum at Stratford Hall. The Elizabeth River Garden Club in the City of Portsmouth nominated her for her work in creating and preserving the Hoffler Creek Wildlife Preserve. In a recent interview, Randi cited the nomadic life of her Navy family Dugdale Award Winner Randi Sutton as having helped her experience the grandeur of America's vast and diverse landscapes and peoples. This created a deep appreciation for the beauty and mysteries of the natural world. In the interview she said, "That appreciation helped to shape my philosophy of life and my resolve to protect the environment, conserve natural resources and preserve our natural heritage for future generations." By taking a leadership role and using her superb organizational and communications skills, she was able to establish the Hoffler Creek Wildlife Preserve in 1977. This beautiful suburban wilderness was saved from being an area of refuge. The Preserve is owned by the City of Portsmouth and managed by the Hoffler Creek Wildlife Foundation. Randi is the Executive Director of the Foundation. Interactive educational programs and field trips (K-12) are offered for students across the Hampton Roads area to explore the Chesapeake Bay. The four distinct habitats in the 142 acre wilderness make this an outstanding living laboratory. Helping children make connections to their environment is an important mission of the Foundation. She organizes bird walks, volunteer workdays, Earth Day programs and many other educational and recreational programs. This Preserve is affiliated with the National Park Service's Chesapeake Bay Gateway Network and is an attraction on the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Birding and Wildlife Trail. Randi persuaded The Elizabeth River Garden Club to help build the Education Pavilion. The club is also in the process of erecting a demonstration bird garden as a part of landscaping for the new Science Center that will be constructed in the near future. Randi was instrumental in including the Hoffler Creek Wildlife Preserve on the 2006 GCV Historic Garden Week Tour. Randi Strutton has indeed rendered outstanding service in the conservation and wise development of our natural resources and certainly exemplifies the spirit of the Dugdale Award.

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The Garden Club of Virginia Common Wealth Award
By Nancy F. Lowry, Common Wealth Award Chairman Rivanna Garden Club

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his year's Common Wealth Award winner is The Nansemond River Garden Club for The Cedar Hill Project - The Heritage Garden Phase. The club received a check for $4,150.00 at the Board of Governors' meeting banquet

on Wednesday, October 18, 2006. To date, the Nansemond River Garden Club has made an investment of $10,000 to hire an architectural historian, landscape the main entrance of the cemetery, replace cedar trees felled by Hurricane Isabel and create a scatter garden for ashes. The award funds will be used to add historic signage (including Braille) and plants to complete the garden. Albemarle Garden Club received $3,000.00 as runner-up for Morea: A Living

Botanical Classroom. The award will be used to restore the northeast border of the garden to create a screen. The planting will be a combination of evergreen and deciduous, with an emphasis on red berries for display. The club will place two or three benches for visitors and The University of Virginia faculty to use in the garden. Editor's Note: For more information on the projects, read the award nominations that appeared in the June 2006 issue of Journal.
Pictured below are both winners with Nancy Lowery, Common Wealth Award Chairman

Common Wealth Award winner Pat House

Common Wealth Award winner Julie Stamm

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Who Is She?
By Betty M. Michelson The Princess Anne Garden Club

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he does not wear a black robe and she does not have a gavel, but she is sensitive, knowledgeable and has integrity. She is a judge. What kind of judge is she? You guessed it; she is a Garden Club of Virginia Artistic Arranging Judge. The Garden Club of Virginia Artistic Judges are highly respected throughout the Commonwealth and beyond. They are often asked to judge for Federated Garden Clubs as well as for independent garden clubs. Some GCV judges are also qualified Garden Club of America judges. After successfully completing an extensive training course, exams and student judging, the GCV judges are invited to judge shows. The invitation is a privilege as well as a great responsibility, and The GCV judges take it very seriously. A judge gains more knowledge and insight into flower arranging with each show she judges. When invited to judge, she must become thoroughly familiar with the show's schedule and all other rules governing the show in order to make informed and intelligent choices in each class. In The GCV shows, a point scoring system is used to determine winners. Design (principles and elements) is worth 42 points; Conformance to the Schedule, 20 points; Distinction, 16 points; Artistic Concept (over-all organization of the design) 12 points and Expression (interpretation of the class by the exhibitor) 10 points. An arrangement must score 90 points or above in order to win a blue ribbon; 85-89 points, a red; 75-84 points, a yellow and 65-74 points for a white Honorable Mention. Only one blue, one red and one yellow are awarded in each class. The number of white ribbons is unlimited and at the discretion of the judges. Awards include the Quad Blue for the best Inter Club arrangement and the Tri-color for the best arrangement by an individual. Also receiving special merit are the best arrangement by a novice, someone who has not won a blue ribbon in a GCV show, and the most creative arrangement. It is not necessary for the most creative arrangement to have received a ribbon in order to be recognized. The GCV judges travel throughout Virginia. They have wonderful opportunities to visit different areas of The Commonwealth, see old friends, make new friends, take part in fabulous shows and just have fun being with fellow garden club members. There may even be time to shop a little or a lot. If judging sounds interesting, contact me at (757) 428-1063 or a member of the Flower Shows Committee. We will be glad to help you get started on a new adventure. Keep bringing those beautiful arrangements to The GCV flower shows. Remember the next one is the Daffodil Show, April 4-5, 2007, in Fredericksburg.
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Rare Botanical Prints at The University of Virginia: Part 2
By Holly Maillet The Charlottesville Garden Club

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invite you to explore more treasures in the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library at the University of Virginia. Among the collection's rare books and manuscripts are important botanical prints to delight anyone curious about early exploration and discovery of plants in America. Mark Catesby's work is a case in point. Catesby was an English botanist and naturalist who came to America in 1712 and again in 1722 to study the flora and fauna of the new world. Funded by wealthy patrons in England and in the colonies, he compiled notes and drawings of hundreds of plant and animal species that he encountered in his 12 years here. His travels took him throughout Virginia and the Carolinas, and south to the Bahamas. When Catesby returned to England, he spent the next 20 years producing an illustrated text of his findings. Because of the prohibitive cost of engraving, he decided to study with printmaker Joseph Goupy, who taught him how to etch his own plates. In 1732 Catesby finally published The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands, a two volume set with 200 hand-colored plates with an appendix of twenty more plates published in 1747. It was one of the most expensive publications of its day. Each illustration boldly depicts a plant species paired with a bird or animal one would expect to find in the same habitat. The carefully researched text and the dramatic illustrations stimulated the mania for American plants in British gardens in the 18th century. The volumes increasingly became an important reference for naturalists and gardeners on both sides of the Atlantic. Catesby greatly influenced the character of Colonial American gardens, and his study of environmental relationships was original and remained relevant up until the American Revolution. His contribution to the study of natural history is great. The design of the book, with its plant and animal pairings, served as a model for the work of successive generations of American naturalists, such as Audubon. Two more editions of this work were later printed, and The University of Virginia owns a copy of all three. Thomas Jefferson, who also owned all three editions, preferred the second edition because of the more vivid coloring of the plates. Come see for yourself which edition you prefer! The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library is open for use by the general public and is located adjacent to Alderman Library on Central Grounds of UVa. It is normally open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information or to check hours, call (434) 243-1776 or visit the library's Website at: http://www.lib.virginia.edu/small.

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The 68th Annual

ROSE SHOW
Photos by Linda Consolvo

2006 W

“River Reflections”
Sponsored by The Garden Club of the Middle Pennisula

Class 40 Interclub Artistic Classes
A. The Rappahannock River Creative line The Warrenton Garden Club B. The York River Creative line mass Winchester-Clarke Garden Club

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Queen of Show ‘Let Freedom Ring’ Mr. & Mrs. Howard Jones

Other W
For a complete list of Rose Show Winners, go
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THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

Winners
Number of Exhibitors: 138 Number of Stems In Horticulture: 351 Number of Arrangements: 71

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Placement and Text by Fleet Davis

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C. The Pamunkey River Free form The Garden Club of Gloucester Quad Blue

D. The Mattaponi River Underwater Roanoke Valley Garden Club

Best Arrangement in Show Class 43, small arrangement Ceci Brown, The Garden Club of Gloucester Blue and Tricolor

Winners

Pages 18 and 19

to www.gcvirginia.org and access Flower Shows
DECEMBER 2006
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The Garden Club of Virginia

The 73rd Annual Daffodil Show
Sponsored by The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club Wednesday, April 4, 2007 2:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. Thursday, April 5, 2007 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Entry acceptance: Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 3:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 7:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Jepson Alumni Executive Center University of Mary Washington 1119 Hanover Street Fredericksburg For complete schedule and registration, see www.gcvirginia.org Sanctioned by the American Daffodil Society

Presents

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Flowers for Historic Garden Week
By Mary Nelson Thompson The Franklin Garden Club

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all and early winter are the ideal times for the landscaper to add plants that can be incorporated in our Historic Garden Week arrangements. Bulbs should be planted according to the bloom schedule that will occur at the time of your tour. Naturally, the Tidewater area members would want to plant late blooming bulbs. Consult the horticulturist at your local nursery or garden center for advice on choosing plants for your landscape. Recently introduced dwarf varieties of old favorite plants may make adding new plants more feasible for those members with limited space. Keep in mind that greens can add great textural interest, as well as contrast in color, form, and lines. An "all green" arrangement can be the most elegant of all! Last year I had great success with left over bulbs purchased from the clearance table. In late winter, I planted them in pots left in a sunny spot. I had pots of blooms to transport or pick in April. Camellias and herbs came in handy to use in arrangements. As you do your holiday shopping, think of bulbs and plants for the gift that keeps on giving. Be on the lookout for containers that require few flowers and can be used in multiple settings. Check your bookstores or The GCV Library (catalog on The GCV Website) for the many great books on floral design. Lastly, encourage community and city beautification projects. Often cities have monies available, but need an impetus to get the job started. Selective pruning (with permission) can yield benefits for your HGW arrangements. We reap double rewards by planning, planting and beautifying our surroundings. This will help to make our state more lovely and enticing to guests while reducing our floral budgets.

Historic Garden Week 2006 - Update
By Suzanne Munson Executive Director, Historic Garden Week ollowing the deadline for the September Journal, The GCV Clubs reported additional income for the 2006 Historic Garden Week tours. The new total for 2006 ticket sales is $722,370. The revised figure for club expense deductions from tour income is $119,176, more than $6,000 lower than deductions from the previous year. This improvement is due mostly to the excellent cooperation of clubs regarding monitoring flower expenses. Such savings, of course, mean there will be more funding for the Restoration Committee and other important GCV programs. Congratulations everyone on a job well done.

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OTHER 2 SHOW W
Photos by Linda Consolvo

King of Show, ‘Signature’ Emily Barbee, Garden Club of Gloucester

Right: Best Novice Arrangement Class 42, Piankatank River Pot-et-fleurs Peyton Wells, The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

Best Member Club Collection Suzanne LaPrade Garden Club of the Northern Neck

Grateful Appreciation to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel

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006 ROSE WINNERS
Placement and Text by Fleet Davis

Princess of Show, ‘Dublin’ Mr. and Mrs. Howard Jones

Left: Most Creative Arangement Class 41, Dragon Run Moribana Style Ikebana Matilda Bradshaw Mill Mountain Garden Club

Rose Chairman’s Display Pat Taylor The Boxwood Club

and Hildrup Transfer for Support of The GCV Flower Shows

DECEMBER 2006

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Growing Good Roses
By Pat Taylor, GCV Rose Chairman The Boxwood Garden Club

RoseNotes

Those in attendance left the show with a "wish list" of rose varieties to plant in their gardens. Now is the perfect time to address the requirements that will enable you to grow good roses for personal enjoyment and for entering in next year's Rose Show. Plan which roses you will add to your garden by checking the recommended varieties on the Rose Page of The GCV Website. Then thoughtfully consider the results of this year's efforts in your rose garden. Sometimes even highly rated rose varieties, which are planted in good soil and receive at least six hours of sun each day, fail to thrive. If watering sufficiently, fertilizing properly and spraying preventatively for black spot netted you mediocre, spindly rose bushes with disappointing blooms, you need to check your soil's pH. This procedure is an extremely important aspect of growing good roses as an incorrect pH level will lock a fertilizer's nutrients in the soil and render them unavailable to the plant. Roses prefer a pH around 6.5 (a range between 6.2-6.8). Since pH is measured on a scale ranging from 1-14, the middle number on the scale, 7.0, represents a neutral pH. A slightly acidic reading of 6.5 is ideal for roses. Soils in Virginia tend to be naturally acidic. Also, virtually everything we do to pamper our roses (adding organics to the soil, fertilizing and spraying) causes the soil to become even more acidic. Therefore, it is usually necessary to add ground limestone, an alkaline substance, to raise the soil's pH. Late fall and early winter are the ideal times to address this task as it takes several months after adding limestone for the pH to begin to rise. There are several ways to check your pH. Scoop soil from several locations in your garden, take it to your local nursery or feed store and procure a "soil box." Ship the box to Virginia Tech. In several weeks you will receive a soil analysis that includes the pH reading, as well as a breakdown of nutrient contents. This process should be performed every few years. In the interim, a pH meter (the 'Kelway HB-2 Professional pH Tester' from Rosemania.com) gives an accurate reading of pH levels. For a large garden or for immediate results, this apparatus is well worth the investment. Once your soil has attained the correct pH, your roses will be ready to "take off" in the spring.

T

he Garden Club of Virginia’s 68th Rose Show, adeptly hosted by The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula, was a huge success. A myriad of gorgeous blooms graced both the horticultural exhibition tables and the arrangements.

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Daffodil Notes
The Dirt on Daffodils
By Glenna Graves, GCV Daffodil Chair The Spotswood Garden Club The GCV Daffodil Committee offers a collection of sturdy and beautiful daffodils each year called the Tried and True Collection. These bulbs have substance and good strong foliage and bloom color categorized by these three characteristics: 1) a good Constitution freedom from disease, strong foliage and good increase; 2) Impact - good color, texture and poise showing above the foliage; and 3) Resistance to Weather - durability, variability, and resistant to sunburn. Each year we try to provide bulbs in various divisions, colors and seasons of bloom that could be entered in a show and perhaps win a blue ribbon. We provide three bulbs of each variety to give you a good show that first year. With two or three years of multiplication, you will have a wonderful landscape display. As members of the American Daffodil Society or The Daffodil Society of England, you receive journals that are filled with good information on culture of the daffodil, new bulbs that have just been introduced, diseases that can attack your bulbs and treatment suggestions as well as recommendations of sturdy cultivars. The Royal Horticultural Society with test gardens at Wisely, United Kingdom, is another good resource for daffodil gardeners. The Society tests cultivars from the United States, Holland and the United Kingom for a two-year period and gives the winner the Award of Garden Merit. The AGM has very strict criteria and is aimed at promoting those cultivars that the Society recommends for the general gardener. The top ten AGM daffodils, in alphabetical order, are: Bravoure 1 W-Y; Broomhill 2 W-W; February Gold 6 Y-Y; Gold Convention 2 Y-Y; Jetfire 6Y-O; Quail 7 Y-Y; Rapture 6 Y-Y; Rijnveld's Early Sensation 1 Y-Y; Salome 2 W-PPY; Tete-a-Tete 12 Y-Y. Other Tried and True Daffodils are: Division 1 Golden Rapture, Golden Vale, Goldfinger, Mount Hood, Silent Valley, Little Beauty, Trumpet Warrior. Division 2 Camelot, Gold Beach, Golden Aura, Saint Keverne, Carlton, Bantam, Ceylon, Carib Gypsy, Pineapple Prince, Homestead, Ice Follies, Misty Glen, High Society, Notre Dame, Salome, Bradbury Rings, Triple Crown, Division 3 Verona, Purbeck, Segovia Division 4 Tahiti, Yellow Cheerfulness, White Lion Division 5 Hawera, Lemon Drops, Ice Wings Division 6 Peeping Toms, Itzim, Foundling, Mite Division 7 Quail, Sweetness, Chitchat, Indian Maid Stratosphere, Pipit Division 8 Highfield Beauty, Falconet, Hoopoe, Geranium, Avalanche Division 9 Actaea, Cantibile Division 11 Triginometry Division 12 Jumblie, Tete-a Tete DECEMBER 2006
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Grow and Show
By Mary Nelson Thompson, GCV Lily Chairman The Franklin Garden Club

Lily Notes

A

t the September 27th Lily Program and Workshop, 42 GCV members enjoyed a fabulous educational presentation, "Growing, Showing, and Arranging Lilies,” given by Laura Anne Brooks of The Middle Peninsula

Garden Club. After lunch, The GCV Lily Committee, under the direction of Genie and David Diller, helped us learn about classification, through beautiful slides and "hands on" experience. All present agreed that this format was a great way to learn about lilies. We learned the fine points of lily planting. Prepping the soil with 1/3 topsoil, 1/3 sand and grit, and 1/3 organic matter in a raised bed will sustain the bulbs through winter. Planting the bulbs in a sunny or dappled shade site with good air circulation will encourage growth. Adding one tablespoon of low nitrogen fertilizer or Bulb Tone mixed in the bottom of the hole when planting and a sprinkling of fertilizer over one to two inches of mulch will feed the bulbs. Watering well after planting is important, and you must water them every week to assure there will be enough moisture. The raised bed should prevent soggy soil during rainy times. We were reminded to label the bulbs when planting to make identification easier this summer. Labels may be made from materials at home or purchased at garden centers. After planting, the schedule for feeding your bulbs is simple. Fertilize when the emerging plants are three to four inches, again at 12-13 inches, and top dress after blooming. In areas that receive late frosts, young plants can be covered with a light sprinkling of pine straw or leaves for protection. with Daconil. In many gardens, deer, rabbits, moles and voles are a menace. Planting bulbs with PerLite mix (sharp gravel) and balled up fishing line will help the vole problem. To deter the voracious deer, the following methods have produced results for some of our members: Bottex, pepper wax, dog hair, urine, Liquid Fence, powdered eggs mixed with garlic with tall fencing all around. Chicken wire around tomato cages will keep rabbits and chipmunks at bay. As plants mature, watch for insect damage, which can be treated by various commercial products. Fungus can be treated

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Contemporary Designs
By Judy Perry The Elizabeth River Garden Club he late 20th Century saw a dramatic increase in new and creative designs in the world of art. This spilled over into floral design as arrangers were capturing the essence of abstract, pop and other new art forms and interpreting them with flowers. The same boldness and experimentation knocked down traditional boundaries to create exciting new floral designs. Arrangers were emboldened to stretch their imaginations, throw out old rules and strive for pure design for design's sake. The results of this revolution in the floral art world have been labeled Contemporary Designs. We find new style names such as Phoenix Design, Creative Line, New Convention Design, Parallel Design, Assemblage, Creative Botanical, Illuminary, Abstract and Underwater Design. The Garden Club of Virginia Flower Shows encourage our interest in Contemporary Designs by always including them in the show schedules. With this in mind, The Elizabeth River Garden Club has published a new book, Styles of Flower Arranging - Contemporary Designs. It is a companion volume to the original Styles of Flower Arranging - A Primer, and is filled with information on how to create the myriad of contemporary designs that we see today. The book is $10.00 plus $1.50 shipping. The first book continues to be available also for $10.00 plus shipping. Inquire about reduced shipping costs of multiple books. Send requests to The Elizabeth River Garden Club, Book Order, PO Box 7923, Portsmouth, Virginia 23707.

T

Assemblage

Waterfall Design

Creative Botanical

Editor's note: This book is a wonderful resource but not to be confused with The GCV Flower Shows Handbook. DECEMBER 2006
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SPECIAL GROUP RATES!

Maymont … embracing the banks of the James for more than a century in celebration of gardens and elegance. This February, come explore A Great Tradition of gardening and outdoor living in Virginia at the Maymont Flower & Garden Show!

• Lush Full-Scale Landscape Exhibits • Great Garden Marketplace • Expert & Entertaining Speakers
February 22-25, 2007
Don’t miss popular speaker, author and award-winning landscape designer JON CARLOFTIS

Greater Richmond Convention Center Richmond, Virginia
Thur.-Sat. 9am-8pm / Sun. 9am-4pm Tickets: $14 / Half-Off After 5pm Group Rates: $11 for 10-39 / $10 for 40 or more 800-332-3976 • 804-897-1774

www.MacEvents.com

DECEMBER 2006

18TH ANNUAL

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To Seed or To Mulch
By Geri Ridenhour The Garden Study Club s winter sets in and we look at our trees giving up their colorful leaves, we make plans for next year. We ponder whether it is better to scratch up the surface of the ground under that large tree and disperse a premium grass seed or throw in the trowel and do nothing. Well, before you cast a withering glance towards that magnificent tree, let's sit down, have a cup of your favorite beverage, and talk about what can be done to remedy those spots where the grass has all but given up. Grass and trees can co-exist in the same yard, but it does take some extra consideration on your part. For in the competition for survival, the root system of your grass will inevitably lose against the many strong roots of a tree. Rather than fight this fact of nature, let's plan a yard that works WITH nature's ways. Think of a large mulch bed around your trees. Forget that little frill of mulch at the base; do your tree's root system a favor and widen that mulch to the tree's drip line. In that way, the tree roots are not competing with grass or other material for moisture and your tree will be set off as the true specimen that it is. Winter is the perfect time to stand back from your house and see where you can expand your beds. Landscaping of other houses and commercial buildings can provide examples. The idea of removing lawn and expanding mulch is gaining ground across the country as baby boomers tire of the endless watering, fertilizing, and mowing and look for ways to enjoy their weekends outdoors in a fashion that does not involve hours of yard work. This concept also allows us to use less fertilizer and other unnatural yard products, some of which inevitably find their way to our local streams. So think back to resorts and arboreta, think back to visits to botanical gardens, and make plans to enlarge your mulched areas and reduce the grass area of your lot. Your trees and the environment will thank you!

A

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THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

CONTRIBUTIONS
Report Period From 7/1/06 Through 9/30/06
Common Wealth Fund
Gifts: In Honor of: Donor:
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Ritter, Jr.

Donor:

Margo Eppard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of Fairfax Kathleen O. Frazier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Warrenton Garden Club Margaret Kincheloe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of Fairfax

Kent-Valentine Library
Gift: Donor:
Lee V. Snyder

Restoration
Gift: In Honor of: Donor:
Mr. and Mrs. Josiah P. Rowe III

Donor:

William D. Rieley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Winchester-Clarke Garden Club Millicent W. West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lorraine Warren Strickler

The Garden Club of Virginia Endowment
Gifts: Donor:
Berenice D. Craigie Hubard Family Trusts Patricia R. King Mrs. Frederic W. Scott

In Honor of:

Donor:

Sally Guy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton Mrs. Herbert L. Aman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mrs. Robert S. Brewbaker, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Franklin Garden Club Deedy Bumgardner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sally Guy Brown Judge and Mrs. Rudolph Bumgardner III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nan C. Freed Mrs. Rudolph Bumgardner III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. and Mrs. Scott M. Spence Mrs. Ashburn Cutchin III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Franklin Garden Club Mrs. Charles C. Freed, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. and Mrs. Scott M. Spence Nan Freed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deedy Bumgardner Mrs. Leonard Hoerneman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Linda Holden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore Dr. and Mrs. James Hundley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mr. and Mrs. David Lay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. McDaniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deedy Bumgardner Mary Hart Darden Lucy R. Ellett Kimbrough K. Nash Mina W. Wood Mrs. J. Frederick Moring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

DECEMBER 2006

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Mrs. Albert C. Pollard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mrs. William Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Susan M. Ramsey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck J. Randy Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. J. Gordon Kincheloe Mrs. R. Gordon Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Page Sullenberger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deedy Bumgardner Mrs. Lester Terhune, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Mrs. Harvey K. Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. and Mrs. Scott M. Spence Mina Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deedy Bumgardner Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Wood III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nan C. Freed Mr. and Mrs. Scott M. Spence

In Memory of:

Donor:

Marian Hornsby Bowditch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Hampton Roads Garden Club Mrs. Evelyn Hardison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alice Koziol Dorothy D. Kellam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Estate of Dorothy D. Kellam Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Wehner, Jr. Mr. James Gordon Kincheloe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. W. H. Garner Mrs. Bruce Thomson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Robert L. Galloway Granville Gray Valentine, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Ruffin Tyler

The GCV Conservation Fund
Gift: In Honor of: Donor:
Berenice D. Craigie

Donor:

Mrs. Mills Godwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. and Mrs. Warren L. Romans Marsha Merrell, GCV Conservation Chairman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betty Byrne Ware

In Memory of:

Donor:

Elinor Odell Saunders Felton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeanette Felton McKittrick Lilian Hinton Slaughter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Upshur Brown

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THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA CALENDAR
December 1, 2006 - May 31, 2007
December 1 January 15 January 15 January 22 March 1 April 3-5 April 15 April 21-28 May 8-10 May 17 May 31 Deadline: nominations for the deLacy Gray Memorial Medal Deadline: nominations for the Massie Medal Deadline: Journal submissions for March issue Speaker Series Legislative Field Day Deadline: Common Wealth Award nominations The GCV Daffodil Show - Fredericksburg Deadline: Journal submissions for June issue Historic Garden Week in Virginia The GCV Annual Meeting Horticulture Field Day - Charlottesville Deadline: nominations for the Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale Award for Conservation

The Garden Club of Virginia Journal (USPS 574-520) 12 East Franklin Street Richmond, Virginia 23219

Periodicals Postage Paid At Richmond, Virginia And Additional Offices

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