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Volume 10 | Number 7 | August 2010 | $4
CoronaBUSINESS
INSIDE: Photos from Monte Carlo | How To Get Involved | Legislative Update | Calendar of Events | More
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE CORONA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
www.CoronaChamber.org www.CoronaChamber.org
Gallery of Non-Profit & Service Organizations Inside
(951) 283-4399
2 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Table of Contents
Volume 10 | Number 7 | August 2010
CoronaBUSINESS
On the Cover
Last year's annual “Our Local Fight”
Walk against breast cancer drew
hundreds of participants. Proceeds
from the Walk stay in our community
and benefit The Foundation for
Community and Family Health's early
detection, screening, and education
programs. For information about this
year's 12th annual walk, see page 19.
Photo by Jim Dorsey Photography
2010 Publications Committee Jason Kimes, Chairman
Phil Adishian Jim Dorsey Bobby Spiegel
Linda Carlberg Stephanie Shapiro Casie Tryon
Pam Cunningham
Publication Staff
Publisher BrandLand Marketing
Advertising Sales Casie Tryon
Printing/Mailing Advantage Mailing
Corona Business Monthly is owned and published by the Corona Chamber of Commerce, which is solely responsible for
its content. It is mailed monthly to all Corona Chamber of Commerce members and to all non-member Corona businesses.
Total circulation: 8,100 copies. For information about advertising, call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350.
Page 10
Page 16
Page 27
Page 28
Legal Opinions 32
New in Town 34
New Chamber Members 35
In Our Community 36
Ambassadors’ Committee Report 37
Calendar of Events 38
Corona Business Archive 40
Referrals 40
M C N 1 n L ¥
Feature Stories
Membership Recognition Luncheon 3
How to Get Involved and 10
Give Back in the Community
Rescue Mission Homeless Shelter 12
The Race to Monte Carlo 16
Gallery of Non-Profit 18
& Community Service Organizations
Corona Public Library: 28
Thriving During Tough Times
2010 Mayor’s Heritage Ball 30
“Midsummer Masquerade”
Monthly Articles
Message from the Chairman 4
Message from the President 5
Legislative Update 6
Building Business Relationships 8
Long-Time Chamber Member 14
Anniversary Recognition 15
Allan Borgen’s Restaurant Review 27
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Gallery of Non-Profit & Service Organizations Inside
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 3 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
The Corona Chamber of Commerce
is pleased to have Stater Bros.
Chairman and CEO Jack Brown as
our guest speaker on October 7
for the Quarterly Membership
Luncheon which is sponsored by
Watermarke Properties.
It will be held at Crossroads Church - 2331
Kellogg Avenue, Corona, CA 92881. Tickets
are now available and Chamber members
receive a special discount - early bird pricing
is $50 per person until August 31, then the
pricing will be $60 per person until
September 30; after that, tickets will be non
member rate at $75 per person. Call the
Chamber today at (951) 737-3350.
Mr. Brown is Chairman of the Board and Chief
Executive Officer of Stater Bros. Supermarkets,
a Fortune 500 Company in 2004 and was
voted America's Retailer of the Year in 2001
and 2004. He has spent nearly 60 years in
the supermarket industry, has served as a
President and Chief Executive Officer for over
27 years and as a Chairman of the Board for
over 20 years.
A native of San Bernardino, Mr Brown began
his supermarket career as a box boy at Berk's
Market Spot in his hometown at the age of 13
after the death of his father. He attended San
Jose State University on a football scholarship
and then attended UCLA majoring in Business
Administration. He is a Navy Veteran.
A full bio on Mr. Brown is accessible by
logging on to our web site:
www.CoronaChamber.org where a full
listing of awards and recognition bestowed
upon him are mentioned. One particular
award that sums up this great humanitarian
was awarded from the Congressional Medal
of Honor Society for his dedication to
promoting and perpetuating the principles
upon which our nation was founded;
“Courage, Sacrifice and Selfless Service.”
The award was presented in person by five
Medal of Honor Recipients.
Attending the luncheon to hear Mr Brown
will enable you to hear from one of our local
American Heroes - as he will share his
business and professional life snippets which
have guided him through life and enabled
him to serve our communities. Additionally the
Chamber will recognize five member
organizations with awards. Also attending will
be approximately 100 students from the
Corona Norco Unified School District for their
Career Day. Again we encourage you to call the
Chamber today to reserve your table or seat
(951) 737-3350.
MEMBERSHIP RECOGNITION LUNCHEON
Jack Brown,
Stater Bros. Chairman and CEO
4 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN
kerry Þendergast
Giving Back
ot-for-profit organizations play a vital role
in strengthening communities and improving
the quality of life for all of us. Unlike for-profit
enterprises, these organizations solely exist to
provide programs and services that benefit the
needy and less fortunate members of society.
These essential services are often programs
that are either overlooked or otherwise not
made a priority by governmental institutions.
By filling in the cracks and narrowing the
gaps, these civic organizations accomplish
their goals by motivating their volunteers,
donors and beneficiaries.
According to the National Center for Charitable
Statistics (NCCS), more than 1.5 million
nonprofit organizations are registered in the
U.S. This number includes public charities,
private foundations, and other types of
non-profit organizations, including chambers
of commerce, fraternal organizations and
civic associations.
The Greater Corona Valley is also home to
numerous not-for-profits that provide badly
needed services right here in our own
community. Especially during these
challenging economic times, the needs are
greatly increasing while the resources are
dwindling, which brings the topic of corporate
giving and volunteering to the forefront of
the discussion.
While some of the larger organizations rely on
grants and endowment funds, the vast majority
of the rest count on donations from
Volunteering in America is Up
The Corporation for National and Community
Service reports that volunteerism in America
is on the rise. The number of Americans
volunteering in their communities jumped up
significantly in 2009. While it is to be seen if
the rise is sustainable, it is an indicator that
especially when times are tough, people do
indeed extend a helping hand. The needs are
higher, so the resources have to be in tandem
to meet the demand.
Corporate Giving and Social Responsibility
Corporations have a duty to support and align
themselves with the not-for-profit organizations
that focus on values that are in line with that
of their own. This should be not only as a
sense of obligation, but also as a way of
garnering good will and trust in the very
communities corporations operate – after all,
improved community relations also makes
good business sense.
So, this summer evaluate your personal and
business resources; and find your own way
of contributing and taking the initiative to help
meet our growing social needs. There is no
such thing as a small deed and you will
undoubtedly be rewarded for your efforts.
- Kerry L. Pendergast, Chairman of the Board
individuals and businesses within the local
communities they operate. Money is a constant
topic of conversation among nonprofit leaders:
How much do we need? Where can we find it?
Why isn't there more of it? In tough economic
times, these types of questions become more
frequent and pressing.
We all have our own reasons for deciding to
help, donate, volunteer and encourage those
who have already rolled up their sleeves to do
the mundane, hard, but very important work.
We may do it because of self interest, knowing
that the cause benefits us in a direct or
indirect way, or we may do it from simple
altruism. No matter what the reason behind it
is, the most important thing is knowing that we
all have a duty to participate in the renewal
and recovery of the communities we live in.
That is why it is crucial that we carve out some
time from our busy lives and give back;
because giving back is not merely an act
of generosity, but because it is also an act
of responsibility.
In this issue of the Corona Business Monthly,
you will get reacquainted with several of the
area's active civic organizations.
The membership roster of our chamber
includes civic, religious and educational
organizations that are doing incredible work
helping needy individuals, comforting families
in crisis, raising money for cures, fighting
hunger, working with the youth and children,
as well as preventing homelessness and abuse.
N
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 5 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
prinkled throughout this issue are articles
and advertisements from various non-profit
agencies and organizations. The greater
Corona area is blessed to have so many in this
arena, and space could not be provided for all
organizations. We encourage you to view the
Chamber's website for a complete listing.
Equally, we are very fortunate to have so many
wonderful individuals who volunteer their
time, resources and financial support. Part of
our success as a community is because of
these organizations and the many volunteers.
If you are looking to donate time, money or
products, we have a menu of organizations
you can select from.
This month's theme enables those organiza-
tions to advertise or submit articles. Another
key component is the volunteer – the heart
of giving. It is a common thread in our
community. Going back many years, when our
now 23-year-old daughter was in first grade,
her teacher pulled Karen and me aside to
share about the need for a blood transfusion
for another first grader. After a few phone
calls, and assistance from the Corona Chamber
and many generous people, a full event was
created which not only drew blood, but tested
volunteers for bone marrow matches. While
no matches that day were for the little girl
from Corona, two other matches for people in
different parts of the world were found.
Ironically enough, the day we held this event,
a perfect match for her was found overseas!
This past May I came across this once little
girl who is and now a healthy and beautiful
wife. Miracles happen daily. Along with
miracles, generosity and kindness prevail.
Our chair for this magazine, Jason Kimes,
came under tough times and health issues as
he broke his leg earlier this year. He had no
insurance and limited access to care – until a
group of “wonder women” decided to raise
awareness and funds, and doors were opened
in the process. From professionals doing pro
bono work to little children giving their
allowances, the money began and the end
result (his final surgery) is scheduled to
happen during this month!
The most recent event I witnessed was the
outpouring of love and support for a young
man who has battled brain cancer for over a
decade and whose future looks bleak, at best.
His wish was to have the family travel to
Hawaii for a final family vacation. With only
days notice and an email blast to our member-
ship, soon there were five condos/ timeshares
offered, as well as plenty in monetary
donations. Seeing the many photos from their
successful trip has been very rewarding.
What in the world does any of this have to
do with business? The Chamber is about
commerce – driving the dollar. As I have
become aware throughout my life, we need to
give to others who are less fortunate. At times
I feel this is my insurance not to be in their
shoes, or a simple thanks to the Almighty for
sparing me the tragedy someone else is going
through. As you read through the articles in
this issue and take time to learn about the
non-profit organizations in our community,
you will find the unbelievable jobs these
groups do. If the Foundation did not provide
immunizations for the students in school,
then the cost to the district for loss of student
enrollment would be increased. If the Y
(formerly YMCA) stopped offering their
programs, where would those children be?
The volunteers in the Corona Fire Safety
Foundation fund items not budgeted for in the
Fire Department or Trauma Intervention
Program, whose volunteers enable emergency
personnel to function at what they do best
while attending to the families and friends of
those in crisis. These organizations (and all of
the others) make our community great.
This community is so blessed to have so many
wonderful businesses that add to its success.
As you log onto our website you will see the
new look and feel of our Chamber.
We're always working hard to improve the
services that we offer to our members, and
this is just one step toward providing better
accessibility for both our members and the
community as a whole.
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
8obby 5p|ege|
A Giving Business Community
5
6 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
he Corona Chamber opposes AB 2187,
a statewide proposal that increases criminal
penalties for an employer who willfully fails to
pay wages due to an employee who has been
discharged or who has quit within 90 days of
the date wages are due. The Corona Chamber
does not support intentionally refusing to pay
any employee wages that are due. However,
AB 2187 goes too far by charging an employer
with a misdemeanor punishable by a fine up to
$10,000, and/or imprisonment for not more
than six months.
“The Corona Chamber is concerned that in
cases where an employer and an employee
are in the process of finalizing a wage claim,
AB 2187 might unfairly turn an employer into
a criminal over legitimate disputes,” stated
Cynthia Schneider, Chair of the Corona
Chamber Legislative Action Committee.
Specially, AB 2187 provides a very loose
definition of "willfully fails" so that it could
be construed to apply to wage disputes that
often cannot be resolved within 90 days.
For example, an employer and employee
who disagree over the amount of wages due.
In such a case, a Labor Commissioner
determination could take longer than 90 days.
AB 2187 could also be construed in such a
way that it could criminalize almost any
wage-based lawsuit, such as overtime and
meal and rest period class actions that might
affect whether an employee was paid
"all wages due" at the end of their term of
employment. These lawsuits have statutes of
limitation from one to more than three years
and with appeals, could be in the court system
for years.
The threat of criminal prosecution under this
bill could unfairly force an employer to drop
an otherwise reasonable defense against a civil
action. Moreover, opponents express concern
that jail time and fines could be imposed
against individual employees who were
following the directions of the employer since
the employer's "agents" and "employees" are
Log on to: www.CoronaChamber.org and
click on the Corona Advocacy link for more
information on this and other items of
importance tracked by the Corona Chamber
of Commerce.
subject to liability under this bill. This might
include all the employees in the payroll
department and all the way up the
supervisorial chain.
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Corona Chamber Opposes Attempt to Criminalize Employers
1
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 7 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
n 2008, the Corona Chamber of Commerce
supported Proposition 11, which passed with
voter approval in November. Proposition 11
reformed the way state legislators are elected.
In the past, every 10 years following a
nationwide census, the federal government
draws new boundary lines, or districts,
for each member of the California State
Senate, Assembly and Board of Equalization.
Proposition 11 transformed this process and
developed a 14-member citizen-based
commission charged with determining district
boundaries every 10 years.
Prior to Proposition 11, the California State
Legislature determined their district
boundaries through a process known as
redistricting. The Chamber believed the old
redistricting process was a conflict of interest.
In November 2010, voters will again have an
opportunity to reform the way the district
boundaries are determined. This time,
Proposition 20 (the Voters FIRST Act for
Congress) proposes to expand the scope of
Proposition 11 by extending the process to
Congressional districts. The Corona Chamber's
Legislative Action Committee recently voted to
support Proposition 20 for the November
2010 statewide ballot.
"Redistricting reform has been one of the top
legislative priorities of the Corona Chamber
since early 2008," stated Cynthia Schneider,
Chair of the Corona Chamber's Legislative
Action Committee. "Proposition 11 did not go
far enough by including Congressional
districts, so we are pleased to support
Proposition 20 to complete the deal on true
political reform," continued Schneider.
The Corona Chamber will review and take
positions on other November 2010 statewide
ballot measures in the coming months.
Below is a current list of measures on the
November ballot:
Proposition 18: Safe, Clean, and Reliable
Drinking Water Supply Act of 2010
The bond authorization appears in SBX7 2
(Cogdill; D-Modesto). Bond funding includes
$3 billion for new water storage (including
reservoirs), $2.25 billion for Delta restoration,
$1.785 billion for conservation and watershed
protection projects throughout the state, $1.4
billion for water supply reliability, $1.25 bil-
lion for water recycling and conservation, $1
billion for groundwater protection and water
quality projects, and $455 million for drought
relief. The Governor has asked the Legislature
to postpone Proposition 18 until the November
2012 election. The Legislature will consider
this once they return from summer recess.
Corona Chamber Position:
The Corona Chamber supported legislation
to place this bond on the ballot and will
determine its position on this measure in
August 2010.
Proposition 22: Local Taxpayers,
Public Safety, and Transportation Act
This Proposition would prohibit the state from
taking, borrowing or redirecting local taxpayer
funds dedicated to public safety, emergency
response and other vital local government
services. Furthermore, the act would protect
vital, dedicated transportation and public
transit funds from state raids.
Corona Chamber Position:
Support
Proposition 23: Suspension of AB 32
Also known as the California Jobs Initiative,
Proposition 23 would delay the operation and
implementation of AB 32 until California's
unemployment rate returns to the levels that
existed at the time of its adoption, 5.5% or
less, for four consecutive calendar quarters.
Corona Chamber Position:
Support
The Corona Chamber is currently reviewing
the other propositions on the November ballot.
Look for more information in next month’s
issue of Corona Business Monthly.
Log on to: www.CoronaChamber.org and
click on the Corona Advocacy link for more
information on this and other items of
importance tracked by the Corona Chamber
of Commerce.
Corona Chamber Supports November
Statewide Ballot Redistricting Proposal
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LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
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Right: Participants at the inaugural
Jazzercise with the Stars event at Santiago
High School were treated to a great workout
by various community groups in an effort to
raise money for The Foundation for
Community and Family Health. This year,
Riverside Community College's Norco campus
took home the coveted mirror ball trophy for
best routine, voted on by crowd approval.
8 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
bu||d|ng bus|ness re|at|onsh|ps
Left: Sugar | Tart Desserterie baker
Brandi Coleman Valdez and owner Keith Nguyen show off some of the delectable
treats offered at the bakery. Located at 2795 Cabot Dr., Ste. 104 in the heart of
the Promenade Shops at Dos Lagos, this eatery offers treats for walk-ins and creates
customized cakes and desserts for special occasions. Call them at (951) 277-7713
or visit www.itartsugar.com today!
Right: Participants for The American Cancer Society's 26th Annual Relay
for Life spent 24 hours walking in honor and in memory of those who are and who have
battled cancer. This year there were 97 teams, 1,425 participants and over $212,000 was
raised. For assistance or information on how to get involved, the Riverside chapter of the
ACS is located at 1240 Palmyrita Ave., Ste. A. and can be reached at (951) 300-1223
or online at www.cancer.org.
Above: 2010 Inland Empire Arthritis Walk participants begin the leisurely 5K course
at the historic Fairmount Park in Riverside. The annual event, held to raise money and
awareness for programs and research, boasts a mission tent to garner advocacy
support, a VIP reception, team tailgate area, Kid Zone and more. For information on
how to volunteer or what programs and support are available, call (951) 320-1540
or visit www.arthritis.org.
Right: Malcolm Miller, Mayor of Norco, and Mike Bandfield, owner of Corona Motorhome
Rentals, enjoy the spacious interior of one of Mike's motorhomes during the grand
opening of their new location at 2441 Hamner Ave. in Norco. They rent RV's, trailers,
quads and more! For all of your road trip needs, call (951) 906-2972 or visit them online at www.coronamotorhomerentals.com.
Left: Good Morning Corona sponsors Altura Credit Union set up
to answer any questions about banking. Visit www.alturacu.com for
information on which plan would fit you best.
Join us for our next Good Morning Corona on August 26th at Eagle Glen
Golf Club, sponsored by Corona Life Services. Call the Chamber at (951)
737-3350 or visit us online at www.CoronaChamber.org to register today!
Left: Jeanette Singh and her husband Raj, President of the University of Riverside,
receive their membership plaque and Gold Seal Award from Corona Chamber
President/CEO Bobby Spiegel at their recent grand opening event. Located at 11840 Pierce
St. in Riverside, the university offers various academic programs from the Bachelor to
Doctorate degree levels. Stop by or give them a call at (951) 637-0100 to
see how their school can fit your academic needs! www.uofriverside.com.
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Right: Corona City Council member
Eugene Montanez congratulates
Crystal Sharp Image owner and
photographer Ben Perales on the
grand opening of his new studio at
905 E. Sixth St. By offering photo,
video and printing services, you're
sure to find what you're looking for.
Call (951) 808-4987 today to
schedule your appointment!
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 9
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Left: 2009 Chairman of the Board Linda A. Pearson (left, Corona Regional Medical Center)
and 2010 Chairman of Finance Chris Miller (right, Thomas Miller Mortuary), present Jim and
Nancy Irwin of Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co. with their membership plaque and Gold
Seal Award for their contribution to the Corona community by offering a wide range of
aircraft parts and pilot supplies. They are located at 225 Airport Cir. and can be reached
at (951) 372-9555. You can also visit them online at www.aircraftspruce.com.
Above: Robert and Blanca Cisneros (center),
independent distributors of Body by ViSalus,
are flanked by Ryan Blair, CEO of ViSalus
Sciences, and Karen Spiegel, Mayor of Corona,
as they receive the coveted Gold Seal Award for
their contribution to the Corona community.
Their goal is to help others make over their lives!
To find out more about their products and
business structure, contact Blanca at
(951) 454-3113. You can also visit their
website, www.aboundantlife.myvi.net.
bu||d|ng bus|ness re|at|onsh|ps
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Above: Attendees of the 11th Annual Great
Taste receive a sample from the Sizzler, just one
of 26 area restaurants who gathered to sample
their cuisine to the community. This annual event
raises money for the Corona Police Community
Partnership and the Corona Fire Safety
Foundation, which work year-round to support
special projects and prevention programs. This
event boasts delicious food and a live band, and
is a great time for all.
www.greattastecorona.com.
Right: Keynote speaker Kenneth Gray, Riverside County
Superintendent of Schools, was on hand to update Good
Morning Corona attendees on the state of our school system.
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Left: Larry Rubio of the Riverside Transit Agency,
2010 Chairman of the Board Kerry Pendergast
(Premier Service Bank) and Sheldon Peterson of the Riverside County Transportation Commission
were on hand to speak at our quarterly Government and Transportation Luncheon at the Sizzler
restaurant. There, attendees were given an update on current and future transportation projects.
Photo by Jim Dorsey Photography
On March 31, Steve Klein sat at a table at TAPS Fish House & Brewery
in Corona at Soroptimist’s annual luncheon honoring a number of
women for their volunteerism. Among them was his wife Sandy,
who was recognized with the Women of Distinction award for
economic and social development.
Since they moved to Corona in
1978, Sandy has accumulated
enough plaques and certificates
to cover a good part of the Great
Wall of China. Steve would often
accompany her to the awards
ceremonies, so this luncheon,
sponsored by Soroptimist
International of Corona, was
hardly the first time he was
applauding her efforts. But it did
prompt a comment to another
guest at his table.
“I've lived in places all over the
planet,” Steve recalls saying,
“but there's more volunteer
work going on here than anywhere else I know. It's like some
magnetic energy that attracts people to Corona that makes it a
unique community. People here really care;
it's part of their DNA.”
It could be one person, such as Sandy. Or it
could be thousands of people. On June 26,
about 3,000 of them took a walk around
Santana Regional Park-and kept walking
around it-and when the last pair of sneakers
was removed 24 hours later, $225,000 had
been raised by the American Cancer Society
at its annual Relay for Life.
The walkers represented 106 teams and
included 309 self-identified cancer survivors.
"Volunteerism is the heart and soul of the
American Cancer Society,” said Diane Barron,
volunteer event chair. “The Relay For Life of
Corona was managed by an amazing group of
dedicated volunteers, from those on our
planning committee who worked year-round
on the event, to those volunteer team
captains who recruited other volunteers to be
on their team to raise funds for the fight
against cancer, to those who came to
entertain us and inspire us for 24 hours.
All were volunteers who have been touched by cancer and want to do
something about it. Volunteerism feeds your spirit, and allows you to
make a difference in the world.”
At the Soroptimist
luncheon, awards
were presented to
seven women,
most of them with
a long history of
contributing to
the community.
The exception was
Nicole Gehlbach,
who at 18 years
of age represents
the next generation
of volunteerism.
Nicole, who graduat-
ed in June from Santiago High School, received the Violet Richardson
Award for establishing a campus chapter of Invisible Children,
a non-profit organization that is improving the lives of children in the
war-torn country of Uganda.
10 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
How to Get Invol ved and Gi ve Back in the Community
by Peter Fischetti
Above: The next generation of volunteers:
Nicole Gehlbach (center) with members of
Invisible Children
Above: Sandy Klein (front) shows
some of the awards she’s received
over the years while her husband
Steve cheers her on
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 11
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
As a junior, Nicole learned about the organization through Canyon Hills
Friends Church in Yorba Linda, where her family had lived until moving
to Corona seven years ago. Remarkably, the chapter has grown in a
year from 10 to 70 members. To provide children half a world away
with the necessities of life, from proper sanitation to educational tools,
Nicole directed a fundraising drive through a book collection. Even
more remarkably, 30,000 books were donated. “The Lord left them,”
she said, adding, “My parents, who are wonderful people, stored them
in the garage.”
Books came from classmates, libraries, teachers and churches. “I get
the credit,” she said, “but I couldn't have done it without the help of
my classmates. The books were resold to a company, and the money
was used for education. We have to get them out of the poverty cycle.”
Volunteering comes naturally to Nicole. “I have a heart for helping
people,” she said. During her first two years in high school,
she traveled to Juarez, Mexico to help rebuild churches and
medical clinics. And, not surprisingly, she's chosen the noble
profession of nursing, and will start her studies in the fall at Seattle
Pacific University.
As she listened to the introductions of the other award winners at the
Soroptimist luncheon, Nicole recalled, “I couldn't believe some of the
stories. The courage of those women is outstanding.”
Nicole received a cash award from Soroptimist, which provides
scholarships and other support to deserving women in the community.
One of its major fundraisers that make that possible is the Chocolate,
Wine & Jazz event, which will be held on Saturday, Oct. 23 at
Crossroads Riverview Park. For more information, visit
www.sicorona.org.
Soroptimist International of Corona is just one of more than three
dozen Chamber-member organizations – from the Arthritis Foundation
to the “Y” – that make a difference in the Corona area. Sol Shapiro,
who is chairman of the Chamber's Community Services Network,
notes, “Almost every non-profit organization needs volunteers.
Most need additional help during seasonal fundraisers or events.
The Chamber maintains a community calendar that lists what's
happening around town with these groups. While some have special
needs that require additional training, most will accept volunteers,
including students, without much restriction.”
For example, he says, “Many churches provide volunteers to help
God's Kitchen prepare meals at the Circle of Hope Family Shelter.
Most schools have food drives for the Corona-Norco Settlement House.
Several community walks are scheduled throughout the year for
worthwhile organizations that can use volunteers for those events.
An individual simply needs to decide which area interests them.”
An easy way to volunteer is by calling 211 from any phone. You'll
reach the Riverside County Volunteer Center, which coordinates
volunteer needs and matches them with suitable opportunities.
Or visit www.cnunitedway.org and click on Volunteer to register
online. Or stop by the Corona Library, the Animal Shelter or…the list is
endless. A listing of non-profit organizations can also be found on
www.coronachamber.org.
Fortunately, Corona's volunteer resources seem endless as well.
Sandy Klein and so many of her contemporaries represent the present;
Nicole Gehlbach and her classmates are the future. And that future
appears bright.
Within a very short time, in response to
an admirable community effort, children
will no longer be sleeping in cars, or on
mats on cement floors. The children will
be resting in comfortable beds and will
be fed hot, nutritious meals three times a
day, and their families will be on the road
to recovery.
The community force behind the solution
to the problem of homelessness in our
city is The Corona-Norco Rescue Mission
(CNRM); it's a collaborative effort between
some old friends and some new, exciting
people. The Circle of Hope Family Shelter
and God's Kitchen have formed an alliance
with the Orange County Rescue Mission
to create a fresh approach to addressing
the needs of the homeless in the Corona-
Norco Area. Crossroads Christian Church
has been asked to join the group as a
resource for personnel and as a linchpin
for rallying the community behind CNRM's
efforts. Fifteen other area churches are
also involved, joining many staff and
volunteers in ongoing efforts to reach out
to the homeless.
The history of the existing shelter has been
one of long-term community involvement,
including fundraising by Corona-Norco
United Way, local churches and restaurants
to lend support to God's Kitchen. In 2006-
2007, a huge outreach to local businesses
was spearheaded by the Corona Chamber
of Commerce and then-Chairman Cynthia
Schneider. The purpose of the outreach
was to stave off the imminent closure
of the Shelter due to lack of funding.
The response of the business community
was impressive. Over $120,000 was raised
in a six-week period. As the new Orange County Rescue Mission steps in, the face of
leadership will change, but the need for committed community support remains strong.
Jim Palmer, President of the Orange County Rescue Mission and the Corona-Norco Rescue
Mission, has already thrown the full financial weight of their current supporters from the
Corona-Norco area behind the project. Bill Reimer from his staff will take the lead role as
Chief Program Officer. Todd Holtkamp from Crossroads Christian Church is leading the
volunteer effort to refurbish and ready the current facilities for future use. On June 12,
the community was invited to attend a meeting to learn more about the project and to sign
up as volunteers. “I was moved when each of the speakers got up to speak about their
vision and their part in this project,” stated Jim Palmer. Corona Mayor Karen Spiegel shared
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010 12 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Rescue
Mission
Homeless
Shelter
by Mike Long
Above: The Corona-Norco Rescue Mission at work
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 13 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
the City's excitement about the project and Dan Raatjes, Vice President of
Lennar, shared how he felt that God brought him to this cause and to us.
The response to this community meeting was tremendous! Hundreds of
people attended and over 190 people signed on as volunteers during the
meeting, with 200 more people signing up by the end of the weekend.
The immediate need is for assistance with construction help and donations
of household furnishing and commercial kitchen items. If you would like to
help out, it is not too late. The shelter is hosting a pancake breakfast on
August 7 at 8:00am at the Shelter. This is an opportunity to tour the
Corona/Norco facility and discuss the construction changes that will be made
in the months to come.
Plans to purchase new property and expand
the Shelter's scope of work have already
begun. The plan is to model the new facility
and program after the programs being
offered at the Orange County Rescue
Mission, a 5-acre complex located on the
historic Tustin Lighter than Air Base.
For more information on the shelter or to
volunteer, please visit
www.facebook.com/coronanorco or
contact Todd@crossroadschurch.com to
find out how you can volunteer.
Mike Long is the Executive
Pastor at Crossroads Christian
Church where he oversees the daily
operations and finances
of the ministries of their church
and school.
14 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
funding to Peppermint Ridge (for people with
disabilities), the Corona-Norco Settlement
House (providing food, clothes and shelter for
the needy), the Cancer, Heart and Lung
Society, plus Crime Prevention and support of
the Hugh O'Brien Youth Leadership, to name
only a few. In addition, many members of the
WIC volunteer their time at other non-profit
organizations throughout Corona.
“Our main source of income is renting the
clubhouse,” added Macomber. “We also have
two fundraisers per year: a spaghetti dinner
and a pancake breakfast.” The next spaghetti
dinner will be in November, at which
prospective members are always welcome.
Macomber added that membership is only $50
per year, and monthly meetings feature a
luncheon and diverse programs from fashion
shows and International musicians to
seeing-eye dogs and UNICEF.
The club is located at 1101 S. Main St.
in Corona and can be reached at
(951) 737-2411. To learn more about the
Woman's Improvement Club, visit their website
at www.coronawomansclub.org. For
information about renting the historic
clubhouse for a special event, email
info@coronawomansclub.org.
“The Club's objectives, then as now,”
explained Maureen Macomber, president of
WIC, “were to bring together the women of
Corona and environs to discuss the welfare of
their cities and mutual improvement of
members.” In addition, WIC promotes
“friendliness and the general welfare of the
community,” and furthers the education of
women. As with other Woman's Improvement
Clubs across the U.S., the Corona branch
participates in a wealth of community civic
and social projects, donating $12,000 this year
in scholarships to local schools, as well as
Now into its second century, the Woman's
Improvement Club (WIC) is one of the
oldest non-profit philanthropic organizations
in Corona. It was created in 1899 by Stella,
Helen, and Anna Platt – ranging in age from
47 to 54 – the daughters of the Rev. Adam
Wakeman Platt and his wife, Sarah
McAllaster Platt.
The ladies' first priority was to improve their
community, even taking it upon themselves to
clean streets and “agitate” for a permanent
sanitation department. At that time, Corona's
population was barely 1,500, but within a
dozen years Corona would be shipping more
oranges and lemons than any other town in
Southern California – The Lemon Capital of
the World – and this, combined with
increased housing development, swelled the
population and membership in the Woman's
Improvement Club. The three sisters were an
important impetus in the founding of Corona.
One of the most notable accomplishments of
WIC was the building of its clubhouse in 1913,
which continues to be the vibrant hub of the
group. If those walls could talk, a hundred
years of Corona's social life could fill several
fascinating books. The distinctive building
(selected for the National Registry of
Historical Places in 1989), features banquet
facilities, a large stage and dance floor, and is
rented to the public for parties and special
events. For members and guests there is also
an arts and crafts department,
bridge tournaments, discussion groups,
and free Yoga and exercise classes.
LONG-TIME CHAMBER MEMBER
Woman's
Improvement
Club
by Hollie Davies
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Above: Members of the Woman’s Improvement Club show their American Spirit at the
Main Street USA parade in Corona
Above: Woman’s Improvement Clubhouse
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 15 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
37-YEAR MEMBER
Carl's Jr./Bernard Karcher Investments, Inc.
27-YEAR MEMBER
Corona Firefighter's Association,
IAFF Local #3757
26-YEAR MEMBER
Soroptimist International of Corona
23-YEAR MEMBER
ADV/Corona Counseling Center
22-YEAR MEMBER
Foothill Engineering Co.
20-YEAR MEMBER
Thoro Packaging
16-19 YEAR MEMBERS
Ameriflex
Re/Max All Stars Realty - Englin
11-15 YEAR MEMBERS
Community Bank
Law Offices of Mary Jean Pedneau
Lucas Oil Products
McDonald's #11642 - McKinley
6-10 YEAR MEMBERS
Backwoods BBQ Steakhouse & Catering
Cars - Corona Collision Repair, Inc.
Compaccess
Computer Sciences Corporation - Norco
Corona Heritage Park & Museum
Datatel Network Cabling, Inc.
Financial Investors Group
Harvey's Autotech
Jim Bradley Economic
Development Consultant
Mi Tortilla Mexican Grill
R C Product Development & Engineering
Safeguard Investment Advisory Group
Sam's Club
1-5 YEAR MEMBERS
BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse
Eduardo's Mexican Restaurant
Farmers Insurance Business Dev. Center
Filter Engineering, Inc.
Hampton Inn
Holstrom, Sissung, Marks & Anderson,
APLC
Jacobs
Lagenberg & Associates
Liberty Mutual Insurance
Mission Ambulance, Inc.
OnTrac
Pierce Brothers Crestlawn Memorial Park
and Mortuary
PreScreen Solutions
Quikrete of Southern California
Real Pros Real Estate Group, Inc.
Riverside Workforce Dev. Center
SendOutCards
Six-Pac Recycling Corporation
Stang Industries, Inc.
Team Referral Corona
US Bank
Verizon Wireless
Witt Company
Anniversary Recognition
Corona at Eagle Glen
2225 Eagle Glen Pkwy
NW Corner of I-15 & Cajalco
(951) 371- ENVY (3689)
16 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
A Special Thank You
“This event would not have happened
without the support and dedication
of our committee, plus the many
individuals and businesses who
gave of their time, energy and
resources, our outstanding Chamber staff,
and the many volunteers who worked
so hard to make this year’s
‘Race to Monte Carlo’ a huge success.”
– Mark Neely, Committee Chair
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 17 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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18 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Honda Cars of Corona will donate
$100 for every car purchased with
the mention of this web link.
Proud Host of
The Vial of Life is an emergency preparedness program.
The main component is the “Personal Information Sheet”.
This sheet allows you to compile personal information
and have it available for 911 responders in the event of
an emergency. 911 responders (fire, paramedics or police)
can easily access your important information and more
effectively provide aid to you. The program is provided
free of charge due to the support of the Corona Fire
Safety Foundation (IRS 501c3 non-profit, charitable organization) and
the Corona Regional Medical Center.
"Providing a partnership between the community and the Corona Fire
Department to expand public safety for the citizens of Corona."
The Corona Fire Safety Foundation is a non-profit benefit corporation
formed in November, 1998. It is organized under the Non-Profit Public
Benefit Corporation Law for charitable purposes. Its board members
contribute personal knowledge and expertise, act as advocates for the
organization in the community and contribute knowledge of community
issues and matters related to the organization.
For more information contact:
Corona Fire
Safety Foundation
400 S.Vicentia Ave., #215
Corona, CA 92882
(951) 736-2373
www.coronafiresafetyfoundation.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 19
Our Local Fight Against Breast Cancer
On Saturday, September 25th the city of Corona will turn pink for a
day. That's when thousands of Inland Empire residents will meet at the
Promenade Shops of Dos Lagos to take a stand against Breast Cancer
and walk to save lives in the 12th annual Our Local Fight - Breast
Cancer Walk.
Last year more than 4,500 men, women and children participated in the
event which is hosted by The Foundation for Community and Family
Health. The purpose of Our Local Fight is to fund the Breast Health
Detection program run by The Foundation for Community and Family
Health. “While other walks raise money for national or global research,
all proceeds from our Walk stay right here in our community and provide
direct diagnostic support for women in need through our Health Detection
program,” shared Kristi King, Manager of the Health Detection program for
the Foundation.
The Breast Health Detection program was created to bridge the gap
in service to women under 50 who have no medical insurance or who
are underinsured. The program is responsible for providing women in our
community with critical breast health diagnostic, care including health
screenings and prevention education.
The Foundation for Community and Family Health strives to combat
breast cancer by expanding the number of screenings for breast cancer
in the Inland Empire and increasing access to quality cancer detection and
diagnostic services for our community. The success of the program is a
reflection of the joint effort between the Foundation and local authorized
medical providers in the Inland Empire. Significant steps are being made to
educate women about the benefits of screening and early detection.
This year your company can contribute to the successful efforts of the
Foundation by forming a Walk team. Teams who have participated in past
walks report an incredible experience and sense of pride in their efforts
to make a difference in the lives of families facing Breast Cancer. Make this
your cause! Form a team and make a difference. The team with the
largest number of walkers and the team raising the most money for the
cause will enjoy pre-walk marketing exposure, recognition from the stage
and will have a team photos taken that will be used in future advertising
for the Walk.
Every 13 minutes, a life is lost to Breast Cancer.
Every step you take can help to save the life of a woman in our
community. PLEASE join us in the fight.
For information about the Walk for Health or our Health Detection
Program please call The Foundation at 951-270-0536 or visit
www.OurLocalFight.org to register yourself or start a team!
The Foundation
for Community
and Family Health
815 W Sixth St., Ste. 110
Corona, CA 92882
(951) 270-0536
www.communityandfamily.org
20 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Prevent Child Abuse Riverside County (PCARC) is our
community's designated lead agency for the prevention of child
abuse and neglect. We work to promote strong families
and child safety through advocacy, public awareness, education
and community programs through our network of volunteers.
Currently, we have eight local “collaboratives” established
throughout Riverside County to promote our mission of
protecting children from abuse and neglect.
The Corona/Norco chapter meets regularly on the 4th
Thursday of the month from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the
Foundation located at 815 Sixth St., Ste. 110 in Corona.
Come visit as we plan events, activities and trainings targeted
towards specific child abuse prevention goals and strategies.
Eagle Glen Golf Club has joined forces with Prevent Child Abuse Riverside
County to make a difference in the lives of abused and neglected children.
Join us Every Monday night at Eagle Glen Golf Club as we watch America's
favorite football teams battle-it-out on the road to Super Bowl! Meet Former
NFL All pros for commentary and autographs. Admission is free and a
portion of buffet and beverages will be donated to child abuse prevention!
Win tickets to our Super Bowl Event on Sunday, February 6, 2011
at Eagle Glen Golf Club.
For more information contact:
Prevent Child Abuse
Riverside County
www.pcariverside.org
Sandra Davalos
951-686-5581
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 21 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Our 54th annual pancake breakfast will be
Saturday, September 11, 2010, from 7:00 AM
to 11:00 AM at the City of Corona Library
located at 650 South Main Street. Tickets are
$5.00, at the door. The proceeds are used by
the club to provide FREE Eye Exams and Glasses
for needy Corona-Norco School Children,
provide dictionaries to local area third grade
students, and provide scholarship money to
graduating high school seniors as well as many
other vision related charities.
Corona Host Lions Club was established in 1923.
Our Club is the oldest premier service club in
Corona. Our weekly meetings are at noon on
Thursdays at:
Sizzler Restaurant
1461 Rimpau Ave.
Corona, CA 92879
For more information:
Corona Host Lions
P.O. Box 244
Corona, CA 92878-0244
www.coronahostlions.org
Corona Host
Lions Club
TIP of Corona was founded in March 1996. TIP of Corona, Inc. is
an all volunteer, non-profit, public benefit corporation serving the
citizens of Corona and surrounding communities.
We are dedicated to providing support to emotionally
traumatized citizens immediately after tragedy strikes.
We are specially trained, citizen volunteers who are
available 24/7/365 to be called upon by emergency
responders (hospital personnel, police officers,
firefighters and paramedics) to assist family members,
witnesses and other bystanders in the first few hours
following a tragedy wherein victims and survivors
often feel hopeless, confused and in emotional shock.
Victims and survivors are often confronted with
circumstances and situations for which they are
totally unprepared, and they often feel devastated,
alone and overwhelmed.
For more information contact:
TIP Corona
400 Vicentia Ave., #215
Corona, CA 92882
Voicemail (951) 736-2373
Bob Auth
(951) 735-4936
www.tipcorona.org
The next Training
Academy for the
Trauma Intervention Program (TIP) will begin
on Thursday, October 7, 2010 at 7:00 PM.
There is no cost for the Training Academy itself,
however, there is a $30 fee to cover the cost of
the training manual and materials.
A list of volunteer requirements can be found on our website.
22 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Welcome to Congregation Beth Shalom.
You will find a warm and comforting place within the
CBS family.You will find spiritual sustenance within our
sanctuary, intellectual challenge within our programs,
and personal connection within our community.
Congregation Beth Shalom is inclusive and non-
judgmental. Our members come from varied
backgrounds, abilities and levels of observance.
CBS programs and services are designed to enhance
the life of everyone who enters our doors.
Services are warm and inviting. Members of
Congregation Beth Shalom join together in a
traditional and contemporary blend of Hebrew
and English, in word and song.
Worship at CBS is egalitarian, both men and women
can lead services, count in a minyan, and read from
the Torah. Our Cantor and Ritual Committee
members work together to create a warm and relaxed
atmosphere in which all our members feel at home.
Children are encouraged to participate in services at
their age-appropriate level, whether it's just listening
or practicing for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah.
Many of post Bar/Bat Mitzvah students continue to
be active in leading services and all members are
encouraged to participate at whatever level they feel
comfortable. Our siddurim (prayer books) are written
in a modern, intimate style, with more gender-inclusive
language. Transliterations are provided for those who
can't read Hebrew.
We have weekly Erev Shabbat services followed
by refreshments and time for getting to know one
another. The first Friday of the month is a Family
Service. Saturday morning Shacharit services are
held monthly. Check our calendar for Shabbat
service dates.
Upcoming Events Include:
August 15 Summer Bash Social Event & Pool Party
(see website)
August 20/21 An Event with Rabbi Larry Seidman -
“The Rational Rabbi” (see website)
September 4 S'lichot 10 PM
September 8 Erev Rosh Hashanah 6:30 PM
September 9 Rosh Hashanah Services 9 AM & 6:30 PM
September 10 Rosh Hashanah Morning Service 9:00 AM
September 17 Kol Nidre 6:15 PM
September 18 Yom Kippur 9:00 AM & Break-the-Fast
at the conclusion of Yom Kippur
September 22 Sukkot 6:00 PM
October 1 Simchat Torah / Consecration 6:00 PM
(New Member Dinner immediately following)
November 9 Annual Holocaust Speakers Series
November 2 Holiday Bazaar 11:00 AM
December 1 Community Menorah Lighting to
Celebrate Chunukah 6:00 PM
December 5 Annual Chunukah Party with CBS
(see website)
Building
Holidays
Cantor
Tradition
Music
Services
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 23
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Throughout the year, CBS offers a wide variety of social
events to enhance the sense of chaverim. Non-members
are always welcome to attend and get to know us.
Every event features delicious food!
Other Events to Look Forward to this Year:
• Adult Social Nights
• Bagel Brunches
• Chanukah Party
• Community Seder
• Dinner in the Sukkah
• Gift Shoppe with Jewish items &
Entertainment books (See website)
• Holiday Bazaar
• Interfaith Dinners
• Discussions on the Holocaust
• New Member Shabbat
• Purim Picnic
• Sukkah Building Party
• Summer Bash
• Wine Tasting Evening
• Yom HaShoah Program
• Youth Group Events
Our educational program is designed to provide
a learning environment in which each child will
come to love and understand his/her Jewish
heritage. We offer Religious and Hebrew school
for our youth from kindergarten, through B'nai
Mitzvah, and through Confirmation.
Our experienced staff teaches the traditions
for our students along with basic Jewish
synagogue skills, providing familiarity with
services, synagogue life, basic customs,
and rituals.
For more information contact:
Congregation Beth Shalom
2790 California Ave.
Corona, CA 92881
Bruce Williams,
President of the Congregation,
(951)734-8045
Bobby Spiegel,
VP of Membership,
(951)733-1836
www.CBSofCorona.org
Youth Outings
Religious School
Community
Tree Planting
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24 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Join us in the fight for a cure against diabetes.
Your support means a brighter future for kids
like Sara and Kaitlyn.
In 1999, I was a six year old girl whose world was turned upside down
when diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. My family was strong as can be
but there were times of the feeling of utter loss of hope and
helplessness. We were never alone though. JDRF was always there to
be that shoulder we leaned
on when stress and sorrow
ate away our strength. Its 2010
and I'm a senior in high school,
ready to accomplish some
great things as a young adult
and I could not have done it
without the support and love
found in JDRF.
Sara Rodriguez - JDRF Inland Empire Chapter,Youth Ambassador
The Kids That Care Annual Craft, Cookie, & Lemonade Stand raises money
for JDRF. This team and fundraiser were brought on by me, Kaitlyn Malarkey,
and my family and friends. We do this because I am a Type 1 Diabetic; have
been for 11
1
⁄2 years and quite frankly I want a cure! Everything we put out is
made by my family and friends. Everything is sold by donation only. All of the
money raised goes straight to JDRF to go towards a cure. We have been
doing this for 5 years now and don't plan to stop until I get my cure!
Kaitlyn Malarkey - JDRF Inland Empire Chapter,Youth Ambassador
JDRF Inland Empire Chapter
2023 Chicago Ave., Ste. B-13
Riverside, CA 92507
(951) 784 - 4156
www.jdrfinlandempire.com
* Space for this advertorial generously provided by Circle City Marketing LLC.
If you are interested in attending
a Rotary meeting, contact
Circle City Rotary Club
Mike Ryan, Club Secretary
(951) 858-4085
MR@Mr-InsuranceServices.com
Mike Long, Club President
(951) 737-4664 ext. 3013
www.circlecityrotary.com
President 2010-2011 Mike Long (Crossroads Church)
President 2011-2012 Linda Pearson (Corona Regional Medical Center)
Past President (2009-2010) Bobby Spiegel (Corona Chamber of Commerce)
Governed by the 4-Way Test – “Is it the Truth? Is it Fair to All Concerned?
Will it Build Good Will and Better Friendships? Will it be Beneficial to
All Concerned?”
This is the way Rotarians around the world have conducted their business and
personal affairs for decades. Each Rotary club has commonality and yet uniqueness.
Rotary clubs world wide exist exclusively to provide service to the communities
they represent and to the world. Becoming a member of a Club provides
business owners and executives with the desire to reach beyond their own
business boundaries for an opportunity to serve others. Opportunities abound
in Rotary service and members can choose to participate in a variety of
local projects.
Locally the Circle City Rotary Club works through its areas of
service for community, vocational, educational, and international.
Our club meets every Wednesday morning at 7:30 AM at
Eagle Glen Golf Club (1800 Eagle Glen Parkway, Corona, CA 92883).
“Senior Prom”
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 25
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
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26 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
The Corona Police Community Partnership or “CPCP” is a group
of community members that support our local everyday heroes on
the police force. CPCP is a non-profit organization and has been in
Corona for over 20 years. Through our signature event The Great
Taste we raise funds to give scholarships to local high school students
and help the police buy equipment that brings them closer to the
community. CPCP is active in the Corona police department's K9
program, Crime Prevention program, Public Safety day and the Kids
and Cops Holiday Magic event. We are looking for new members to
help expand our group, so that we can do more community events
and bring more support to the police department in their effort to
build a relationship with the community.
Corona Police
Community Partnership
730 Corporation Yard Way,
Corona, CA 92880
(951) 736-2310
Fax (951) 739-4899
www.discovercorona.com
“The community and Police,
working together for a safe Corona”
Corona Police
Community Partnership
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 27 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Corona Restaurant Review
HomeTown Buffet
Allan is a member of the Southern California Restaurant
Writers and International Food, Wine and Travel Association
and can be heard every Saturday afternoon from 3 to 5 pm
on the Let's Dine Out Radio Show on KTIE 590am. Email
Allan at allan@ktie590.com or call him at (909) 910-3463,
or visit his website, www.LetsDineOutShow.com.
Over the years, I have eaten at various HomeTown Buffets and have
walked away disappointed. But being an objective restaurant reviewer,
I decided to go and boy was I in for a surprise! When I walked in, I was
greeted by a friendly, smiling cashier who politely asked me if I have
been to HomeTown before. When I told her I have, she then welcomed
me back and I was politely escorted to a clean table. Within 30
seconds or so, a smiling and enthusiastic server came to my table,
introduced herself to me and told me that she was going to be my
server and if I needed anything, she would take care of it. It was a
great start, but how was the food? After taking a few notes, I was off
to see what culinary delights I could find.
The large restaurant was full of people (I went during lunch time),
but to my surprise, almost all of the pans and bowls of food were filled
with freshly made items and replenished throughout my stay on a
timely basis. This was another positive area that I've had problems
with at other restaurants I have journeyed to in the past.
As for the quantity of the food, they had just about every type of food
that people would normally order at traditional sit down restaurants.
We're talking lots of salads, three soups that were delicious, about four
different types of vegetables, sides like mac & cheese, mashed
potatoes with gravy, bread stuffing, french fries, baked beans,
Mexican Beans, a taco bar with all of the fixings, and a host of
tempting main entrees.
My favorite was the sweet ketchup - and tomato - covered meatloaf,
followed by the crispy and tasty fried chicken, the nicely seasoned
baked chicken and fish, fried fish, Polish Sausage, cut up slices of
calzones with sausage, pepperoni and mozzarella cheese,
cheese pizza and teriyaki chicken, plus a whole lot more.
For dinner, you can expect to find many items throughout the week like
carved roast beef & ham, BBQ pork steaks, beef brisket, grilled pork
loin, sirloin steaks, beef ribs, Bourbon Street chicken, pot-roast,
shrimp, roast turkey, orange chicken, etc.
For dessert, there were cakes, jello, a warm peach cobbler, a great
hot chocolate pudding cake, cookies, bread pudding, carrot cake,
soft serve ice cream, and many sugar free desserts.
After walking around and tasting most of the dishes, I met up with Jim
Emerson, the Food Bar Manager who is on a mission to provide the
freshest food to his customers with uncompromising service. Seeing
his staff smiling and paying attention to their customers and the food
stations showed me that his high expectations sure rubbed off on the
other staff. After my meal, I was lucky enough to tour the kitchen and
saw something I did not expect to see from a restaurant such as this.
Almost everything is made fresh and in small batches to ensure the
best quality. Pork chops and chicken were grilled, soups were made
fresh daily, as were the beans, meatloaf, roast beef, ham, turkey and
almost everything else they serve. Try to find that at large chain
restaurants who often get their food from a large commissary in bags.
Jim told me that about 95% of the items served at HomeTown are
made fresh and there is a rule that if a tray is less than 50% full,
it must be replenished. I also saw a kitchen staff member remove a
pizza that was evidently sitting in the warmer for a longer than
normal period of time and replace it with a fresh one. Things like this
really gave me a new appreciation of just what HomeTown Buffet is
all about.
Another nice touch is when servers walks around the dining room
offering customers special items like freshly baked cinnamon rolls,
cheese biscuits, bread sticks, egg rolls, etc. This personalized service
was nicely received by the grateful customers and gave one the
feeling of what HomeTown service is all about.
On the weekends, they offer a terrific breakfast buffet that includes
made-to-order omelets, pancakes, waffles, french toast, sausage,
bacon, hand carved ham, a full cereal and yogurt bar, a variety of
breads and rolls, biscuits and gravy, potatoes, plus a whole lot more
(including desserts), for only $4.95.
In closing, my overall impression was that for the large number of
people that dine there, the quality of the food and the affordable
prices, HomeTown Buffet is a great alternative to fast food or if you
enjoy trying a variety of food. By the way, I am currently on a low-carb
diet, and there was plenty of food for me to enjoy and for those who
are also watching their weight, you should have no problems finding
items that you can eat. One last thing, recently, beverages that were
once included in the price of the meal now cost $1.49. Still a great
deal considering they added a Cappuccino machine as well as
icee-like beverages along with the multitude of sodas, teas, coffee
and juices that they offered in the past.
HomeTown Buffet
390 N. McKinley Ave. / Corona, 92879
(951) 273-0573
Hours: Monday - Friday 10:30am to 9pm
Saturday & Sunday 7:30am to 9pm
Price Range: Lunch $6.99 Adults
Dinner $9.99 Adults
Children 2-3 yrs: $0.99, 4-7 yrs: $2.99, 8-11 yrs: $4.99
American Cuisine
Allan Borgen’s
Above: Delicious roast beef freshly prepared
in the oven for hungry guests
Above: Two HomeTown Buffet servers with
special goodies to hand out
Above: Food Bar Manager Jim Emerson in center
with staff
28 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
“Libraries are community
treasure chests,
loaded with a wealth of
information available to
everyone equally, and the
key to that treasure chest
is the library card.”
- Former First Lady Laura Bush
The Corona Public Library serves over
600,000 visitors annually and provides
everything from beginning computer
classes to downloadable e-books to magic
shows. Remember the advertising
campaign, “It's not your father's
Oldsmobile?” We can assuredly say we're
not your father's library. The days of
libraries being hushed, meek places for
books are long over. At the Corona Public
Library we definitely have books, and
checked out over 1 million books and
audiovisual materials last year. But libraries
have also become important community
centers, where anyone can go for
educational, and recreational, assistance.
Author Marilyn Johnson said, “Libraries
are…an effective leveler of privilege.”
This is illustrated on a daily basis as those
who need employment or information pour
through our doors, looking for help. Adults
who have found themselves out of work
suddenly need to learn computer skills to
become more marketable. Most jobs now
require online application filing, and many
residents are now without home
computers. We get families looking for an
inexpensive way to entertain their children
and check out movies and books, or attend
safe, fun, free events. Teens hang out in
our teen room, looking for something to do
and ways to meet kindred spirits. We get
The Foundation also holds an annual
fundraiser to assist with literacy and
technology needs. This year's fundraiser,
“Library Love In” will be held on
Saturday, September 25 at 7pm.
Advance tickets are $50. Live music,
great food from local restaurants and a
groovy, casual vibe gives all attendees a
fun, relaxed evening and a great way to
support our programs.
The Foundation is also offering a new
Legacy Path opportunity, where donors
can purchase a brick, have it inscribed and
be a part of a historical path which will be
built near the front door of the library,
in our citrus tree area. Current Foundation
President Phyllis Russell is committed to
building the group's membership and has
a dynamic board which meets monthly.
Please visit the Foundation's website at
www.cplfound.org and consider becoming
a member, being part of the historic Legacy
Path or attending our cool “Love In” event!
The Friends of the Corona Public Library,
with President Jason Scott at the helm
(Mr. Scott also serves as a city Council
member), has a long tradition, since 1964,
of providing for the library. Donating funds
generated through their immensely popular
Book and Gift Shop, the Friends provide
support for the library's McNaughton
bestseller leased book collection,
which allows our patrons to check out the
newest, just-published books. The Friends
are also responsible for funding our author
programs, art workshops, teen activities,
children's programs, summer reading
incentive programs, our annual
photography contest, holiday music and
décor, “California Environments” murals in
the Children's Room, the lobby aquarium,
Book-a-Palooza, summer music series,
and more. The Friends offer a year-long
“Adopt-a-Book” program, where every
dollar donated towards new books is
residents who want to do research on a
pressing medical issue or the purchase
of a new car. These are the users who walk
through our doors. Thanks to our two non-
profit groups, the Friends of the Library
and The Library Foundation, the Corona
Public Library is able to continue offering
crucial services, even during this
challenging time of budget tightening.
The Library Foundation, through a program
with Dollar Self Storage where proceeds
from recycled e-waste provide funding
for computers, have expanded our
Internet stations so more members of
the community, can look for jobs online,
create resumes and access our employ-
ment resource databases. This fund is also
providing a new
downloadable
e-book service.
Corona Public Library:
Thriving During Tough Times
by Julie Fredericksen, Library Director
The Friends of the Corona Public Library
Book and Gift Shop
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Right: Library
Foundation President
Phyllis Russell and
Board member Paula
Montanez had a
groovy time at last
year’s “Love In.”
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 29 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
matched. This fantastic program has
allowed for a steady stream of new
materials for our library users, with the
donor's name displayed in each book.
Please visit the Friends of the Library's
website at www.friendsofcpl.org for
more information and consider becoming
a Friend, or stop by and pick up some
books in the Book Shop; it's the best deal
in town!
And as far as libraries not being your
father's Oldsmobile? I'm proud to say that
my father visits the Corona Public Library
all the time. It's his library, and it's yours;
it's here for all of us.
Above Left and Below:
Two of the “California Environments”
murals in the Children’s Room
typical of early California's citrus boomtowns. The museum and park
are an important educational resource, and are even featured as part of
the 3rd grade curriculum for the Corona-Norco Unified School District.
Everyone living in the area should check it out. The history of what was
once a tiny agricultural town is quite amazing.
The park encompasses 4.5 acres and features the Corona Heritage
Museum, which is housed in the 10,000 square foot company store
built in 1937; field trips for school children; free educational tours;
three homes from the ranch's heyday, including the founder's 1911
Hampton House; a half-acre Lisbon lemon grove, planted in 2000 as
an homage to the city's history; an “urban forest” of mature trees and
Memorial Garden; the Call Ranch House, which moved to the park in
2005 and is currently in restoration; the Corona Rail Road Museum
and Corona Art Association; and the Artist in Residence program,
which features six working artist studios and art instruction.
The Corona Heritage Foundation's vision for the Corona Heritage Park
is to preserve a significant cross section of Corona's history, to provide
a permanent location for historic buildings, and to establish unique,
educational and entertainment opportunities for generations of visitors.
30 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
2010 Mayor’s Heritage Ball
Midsummer
Masquerade
osted by the Corona Heritage Foundation, this year's Mayor's
Ball will be an unforgettable “Midsummer Masquerade,” complete with
cocktails, dinner, a decorative mask contest, auction and dancing, and is
always the talk of the town for its great entertainment, fun atmosphere
and delicious food.
“Cheap Sax” will headline the evening and keep attendees on their feet
with their upbeat dance covers of artists like Prince, Journey, AC/DC,
Billy Joel, The Beatles, Elvis and more. All proceeds from the evening
benefit the Corona Heritage Foundation, which was established in 1988
to restore, develop and run the Corona Heritage Park and Museum,
located at the headquarters of the historic Foothill Lemon Ranch.
During the Mayor's Ball, revelers will be able to see directly where their
money is going, since the Midsummer Masquerade will be held at
Heritage Park. This beautiful, historic locale is not only in great
condition and easily accessible, it's unique to Corona's history and
H
Saturday, August 28 at 7pm
Corona Heritage Park,
510 W. Foothill Pkwy., Corona, CA 92882.
Tickets are $75 per person or $100 per couple.
Featuring music by “Cheap Sax”
“Great Entertainment, Fun Atmosphere,
and Delicious Food”
For more information and to purchase tickets,
visit www.mayorsheritageball.org or contact event
chair Rebecca Spiegel of As You Like It Productions at
(951) 737-8025.
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 31 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
With all this park has to
offer, it's clear why this
year's event will be
held there.
This semi-formal event
will be held on Saturday,
August 28 at 7pm at the
Corona Heritage Park,
510 W. Foothill Pkwy.,
Corona, CA 92882.
It will be a true masquer-
ade, and attendees are
encouraged to wear a
mask. Tickets are $75
per person or $100
per couple. For more
information and
to purchase tickets,
visit www.mayorsheritageball.org or contact event chair Rebecca Spiegel of As You
Like It Productions at (951) 737-8025. You can also check out the event page on
Facebook. Just search for Corona Mayor's Masquerade Ball. We can't wait for you to
join us under the stars for a magical and exciting evening of music, food, friendship
and dance!
Photos furnished by Heritage Park
Above & Right: Last year’s black tie event drew a large crowd
and this year’s semi-formal event is sure to be amazing!
always encourage my tenant clients to exercise “due diligence”
when they are considering a lease. “Due diligence” is a review of the
lease and related documents and a careful inspection of the property.
There is no such thing as a standard lease, but there are typical leases.
For example, the AIR Standard Industrial/Commercial Multi-Tenant
Lease--Gross is often proposed by landlord's brokers for multi-tenant
office or commercial property. I review this lease (or similar leases)
several times a month. Here's some of what I tell my tenant clients
about this lease:
Read the lease. Read the lease. Read the lease.
I already know what the lease says. You need to do the same. I know
the lease is written in legalese, but if there are sections you don't
understand (and there will be) make a note and I'll explain them
to you. Unless you indicate sections that require an explanation,
I will highlight only those sections that raise significant legal issues.
Once you sign, you're stuck; so never sign a lease you haven't read
or don't understand. First, do what I do: Put the lease in your
copier and enlarge it at least 150% so you can read it.
Do the math on the CAMS.
CAMS are Common Area Maintenance charges. This lease specifies the
tenant's percentage share of CAMS expenses without disclosing the
formula. The proper formula for a tenant's share of CAMS is the ratio
that the tenant's rentable area bears to all of the rentable area in the
center. Sometimes landlords try to make the smaller tenants pay more
than their fair share of CAMS so they can give the larger tenants free
CAMS, so do the math. Likewise, review the definition of what is
chargeable to you and the other tenants as CAMS.
The landlord does not guarantee that the premises comply
with the law, only that the landlord has no knowledge of
any violation.
Sec. 2.3 says that the landlord warrants (this means promises) that
to the best of the Landlord's knowledge the premises comply with
various laws known as the “Applicable Requirements”. However,
the landlord has no liability to fix the any violations of the Applicable
Requirements when, for example, the landlord just purchased the
property at a foreclosure sale and has no knowledge of the violations.
The key here is to check and recheck the condition of the property
and not to rely on what you have been told by the landlord (that's the
diligence in “due diligence”).
Don't assume that you can use the property in the same
manner the prior tenant used it.
Sec. 2.3 says you are responsible for the zoning that applies to your
use. In most cities, if the property has been rezoned and has sat
vacant for six months, the old zoning no longer applies and the property
can only be used in compliance with the new zoning. With so many units
sitting vacant for so long, the current zoning must be verified to rule
out this problem. By the way, don't take the city planner's word for the
zoning. Get the actual copy of the actual zoning language that is
applicable to your unit.
You are responsible for maintaining the premises. You may
even have to pay to replace various systems.
Sec. 7.1 makes the tenant responsible for maintaining the premises and
various operating systems such as HVAC, plumbing, electrical, windows,
doors, and plate glass in good working order, condition, and repair,
regardless of whether the need for maintenance occurs from any prior
use, the elements, or the age of the premises (looks to me like a good
reason to avoid older units). If the repair costs exceed more than 50%
32 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
LEGAL OPINIONS
REVIEWING YOUR LEASE
REQUIRES “DUE DILIGENCE”
by David Saunders
I
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 33 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
of the cost of repairing an item, the Landlord
can replace the item and charge you the cost
over a 12 year amortization period.
Check the Rules and Regulations.
Sec. 2.9 authorizes the landlord to establish,
amend, and enforce “reasonable” rules and
regulations for the use of the common area.
I've seen some rules that I don't think are
reasonable such as requiring employees to
park behind the building. The real kicker
is the ability of the landlord to change the
rules mid-term.
Verify the cost of insurance.
Article 8 requires you to obtain and pay for
certain types of insurance. Make sure you
get an insurance quote for all the insurance.
Many tenants are unpleasantly surprised by
the cost of their insurance.
Don't forget the addenda.
These are extra pages with additions or
changes to the lease. Don't overlook these
items. Landlords sometimes add significant
new terms in the addenda such as arbitration
clauses. I'll discuss the pros and cons of
arbitration in my next article.
You are responsible for
ADA compliance.
The Americans with Disabilities Act may
require extensive and expensive structural
revisions to the property. Sec. 49 puts this
burden on you.
Modify the lease form.
Landlords used to say that they wouldn't
modify their lease forms. While that may
have been the rule in the old market,
today's market requires landlords to do
everything they can to lease their units,
including modifying their pre-printed lease
forms where appropriate.
David R. Saunders represents
clients in real estate, land use,
and general business matters.
His firm, Clayson, Mann, Yaeger
and Hansen, has been a member
of the Corona Chamber of Commerce
since 1910. He can be reached at
(951) 737-1910 and visit his
website at www.ClaysonLaw.com.
It is always advisable to consult with qualified legal
counsel about your own particular situation, in that
these matters can vary substantially in degree and nature.
Membersh|p |n the Corona Chamber of Commerce cou|d
be one of the smartest bus|ness dec|s|ons you'|| ever make.
Chamber membersh|p, a bus|ness essent|a|.
5|nce 1915, your Corona Chamber has been prov|d|ng bus|ness
w|th resources for prosper|ty. Ca|| the Chamber off|ce
today at (951) 737-3350 to |earn more about
how be|ng a member can benef|t your bus|ness.
34 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Corona Chamber members Ed and Val Munson
have adapted their businesses to the changing
times. About 2
1
⁄2 years ago, the Munsons
switched from the warehouse and distribution
business to a garden-accessory company. They
opened The Front Porch, a 1,000 square-foot
store, near their Lake Mathews-area home.
On March 1, 2010, the Munsons drastically
upgraded their business by moving to the
5,000 square-foot building, formerly a carpet
store, at 1701 Hamner Ave. in Norco.
They gave the business a Southwest flavor by
painting it orange, green and yellow. The new
property has been a hit with customers who
have swarmed the place looking for patio
furniture, wall décor, live plants, pottery,
and animal wall décor for their homes.
“I'm so excited about this place,” said Corona
resident Kris Johnson. “You have a
tremendous selection. It's like everywhere you
look, there's something I would like to have.”
Norco resident Pippa Ariss was equally
gushing in her praise. “It's all kinds of
beautiful pottery,” Ariss said. “I love them
[the Munsons]. They're nice people. They
have good business minds.”
The Val Munson that customers and employees
know at the store is not the same person who
has shared her life with Ed over the last 20
years. “[The store] is her world,” said Ed.
“She loves every minute of it. She loves all of
the customers. At home she is a very nice, shy,
quiet person.”
Says Val, “I've grown with the store. It's forced
me to be a little bit more open. I become an
actual different person. When I'm at home,
I am as quiet as a mouse. [Here], I'm just as
much as the plants are: I'm alive and bubbly.
I'm excited to see somebody to be in here.
We painted the store. I love the colors.”
She says the two cities have greeted them
with a smile. “Norco and Corona have actually
opened their arms to us and we were
surprised,” she said.
Ed Munson agreed, stating, “The Corona
Chamber has helped tremendously. They've
done a lot to support us. We've done a lot to
support them. They continue to bring more
traffic our way, helping promote our store.”
Val said the Corona Chamber has offered a
variety of ways to put their name out to the
public “so people know who we are,” and that
the location just south of the Second St.
on-and-off ramp to Interstate 15 has been
ideal. “It's almost in the middle of everything,”
Val stated. “The first thing they tell us is that
they see the signs.”
Front Porch
by Jerry Soifer
NEW IN TOWN
She also believes The Front Porch has
succeeded because they use their experience
as distributors to cut out the middleman.
They offer customers prices normally set by
distributors. “If it normally costs $100,
the customer pays $50 to $75 (on average,
at The Front Porch),” she said.
The Munsons travel to central Mexico to look
for pottery to sell to their customers. They also
offer products from Germany, Italy, China and
Vietnam. They say they try to support local
artists whenever possible.
The Munsons are bringing a sense of
self-assurance to the future. “We don't know
how this is going to evolve,” says Val.
“We want to be known as a store that is
constantly evolving. To what, we don't know.”
The Front Porch is located at 1701 Hamner
Ave. in Norco. The shop can be reached at
(951) 789-6466 or
frontporch1@live.com.
Above: Ed and Val Munson, owners of Front Porch
P
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kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 35 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
New Chamber Members
Car Wash - Full Service
Sixth Street Car Wash & Detailing
416 W. Sixth St.
Corona, CA 92882 (951) 737-2522
Arthur Saryan
www.sixthstreetcarwash.com
Contractor - Construction
The Ortiz Company
120 N. Joy St.
Corona, CA 92879 (951) 738-9400
Paul Ortiz
Health/Fitness
Embody Fitness
1535 E. Ontario Ave., Ste. 104, Bldg. C
Corona, CA 92881 (714) 287-0669
Diane Boyle
Insurance
Anita Medel State Farm Agency
122 E. Sixth St.
Corona, CA 92879 (951) 734-5300
Anita Medel
Manufacturers - Solar Structure
Solade Concepts
Corona, CA 92881 (800) 991-3013
Andrew Ferrick
www.offtheroofsolar.com
Tree Service
Roley & Associates, Inc.
Corona, CA 92881 (951) 279-6096
Dale Roley
www.roleyandassociates.com
Truck Sales - Commercial
Freeway Isuzu Truck & Vans
1655 W. Sixth St., Ste. 111
Corona, CA 92882 (951) 278-3799
John Palmieri
www.FreewayIsuzuTrucks.com
36 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
August 2010
TV Guide
Produced by Tina Hunt
August 3 Salute to our Armed Forces
Host: Kerry Pendergast, 2010 Corona Chamber
of Commerce Chairman of the Board
Special Guest: US Armed Forces
Sponsor: Corona Chamber
August 10 & 17 Meet the Mayor
Host: Tina Hunt
Guest: Mayor Karen Spiegel
“How your city government works”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit Organization
August 24 Youth and Corona Mayor
Host: Tina Hunt
Guest: Mayor Karen Spiegel
“The Mayor meets with local children”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit Organization
August 31 Corona Youth
Host: Tina Hunt
Guest: Mayor Karen Spiegel
“City Government - where do youth fit?”
Sponsor: Today's Youth Non-Profit Organization
Coming in September:
Good Morning Corona Highlights
In Our
Community
Airs on Time Warner Cable TV
(Channel 29) at 7 p.m.
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 37 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
ancy Fay began her teaching career in 1962 in Salem, NH, coming to CA in 1966 where she met and
then married her husband and fellow teacher, Charlie Fay. She taught in the Corona-Norco schools until
they had children of their own. When both children were in the junior high, Nancy began teaching at the
California Rehabilitation Center in Norco, first as a teacher and then as the Supervisor of Academic Instruction.
Nancy attended many Chamber functions with her husband, who was an ambassador for several years.
She retired from the prison after her husband passed away, and joined the Woman's Improvement Club
of Corona. There she became the liaison between the club and the Chamber as their representative for the
Community Services Network. She then became an Ambassador.
As an Ambassador, she has had the pleasure of meeting many new friends and helping the Chamber in
support of the community that has been her home for the last 44 years. She was also the Volunteer of the
Quarter in September 2009.
To become an Ambassador, call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350
Ambassadors’ Committee Report:
Ambassador of
the Quarter:
Nancy Fay
Woman’s
Improvement Club
cdfpogo1@earthlink.net
N
Why shou|d ¥CUk bus|ness be a member of the Corona Chamber?
- Make new bus|ness contacts
- Market your products and serv|ces
- Lnhance your management sk|||s
- Ga|n a vo|ce |n government
Io|n 1oday!
Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
38 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org
Calendar of Events
Events listed are open to the public. Call contact person before the event
to verify time and place. Some events are free, while others are not.
For a complete listing of community events, call the Chamber at
(951) 737-3350, or go to www.CoronaChamber.org for the latest updates.
Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Sunday, August 1 3PM
PEDALIN' WITH A PURPOSE
3,000 MILE BIKE RIDE FINALE
Cost: FREE
Location: Dos Lagos Amphitheatre
2780 Cabot Dr.
Contact: www.pedalinwithapurpose.com
Monday, August 2 10AM
EASTVALE FIRE STATION
NO. 27 GROUNDBREAKING
Cost: FREE
Location: 7067 Hamner Ave.
Contact: (951) 955-3173
Monday, August 2 12PM
COMMUNITY SERVICES
NETWORK MEETING
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Wednesday, August 4, 11, 18 & 25 6-9PM
BOB'S BIG BOY CAR SHOW
Cost: FREE
Location: 3521 Hamner Ave, Norco
Contact: Charyle (951) 280-3388
Wednesday, August 4 & 18 6:30PM
CORONA CITY COUNCIL MEETING
Cost: FREE, open to the public
Location: Council Chambers
400 S. Vicentia Ave.
Contact: City of Corona Management Services
(951) 736-2370
Thursday, August 5, 12, 19 & 26 9AM
S.C.O.R.E
Business counseling & advice
Cost: FREE
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Call Chamber for Appointment (951) 737-3350
Thursday, August 5 & 12 11:30AM
CORONA NETWORKING $OLUTIONS
Cost: $20 ($15 with RSVP)
Location: Marie Callender's
160 E. Rincon Ave.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Saturday, August 7 10AM
COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE BACKYARD
COMPOSTING PROGRAM WORKSHOP
Cost: FREE
Location: Norco Library
3954 Old Hamner Rd.
Contact: (951) 486-3200
Monday, August 9 12PM
AMBASSADORS MEETING
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Thursday, August 12 5PM
THE HEALTHY CHOCOLATE GROUP
GRAND OPENING/RIBBON CUTTING
Cost: FREE
Location: Ayres Suites
1900 W. Frontage Rd.
Contact: Stan Skrocki (951) 207-2989
Thursday, August 26 6:30AM
GOOD MORNING CORONA
Sponsor: Corona Life Services
Cost: $20 members ($15 if paid by 8/19)
$30 non-members
Location: Eagle Glen Golf Club
1800 Eagle Glen Pkwy.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Saturday, August 28 9AM-1PM
BARK FOR LIFE
Sponsor: The American Cancer Society
Cost: $20 per dog ($10 each additional dog)
Location: Lee Pollard High School
185 Magnolia Ave.
Contact: Colleen Cain (951) 205-7811
Saturday, August 28 6PM
MAYOR'S BALL
Cost: $75 per person/$100 per couple
Location: Heritage Park
510 W. Foothill Pkwy.
Contact: Rebecca Spiegel (951) 737-8025
Tuesday, August 31 7:30-9:30AM
SEMINAR: LOW COST
MARKETING STRATEGIES
Sponsor: SCORE Counselors to Small Business
Cost: $25 or $60 for series of 3
$30 walk-in
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: www.123signup.com/register?id=mbrrq
Wednesday, September 1 & 15 6:30PM
CORONA CITY COUNCIL MEETING
Cost: FREE, open to the public
Location: Council Chambers
400 S. Vicentia Ave.
Contact: City of Corona Management Services
(951) 736-2370
Thursday, August 14 10AM
COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE BACKYARD
COMPOSTING PROGRAM WORKSHOP
Cost: FREE
Location: Perris Library
163 E. San Jacinto Ave.
Contact: (951) 486-3200
Tuesday, August 17 7:30-9:30AM
SEMINAR: BUILDING A BUSINESS
CASE FOR SOCIAL MEDIA
Sponsor: SCORE Counselors to Small Business
Cost: $25 or $60 for series of 3, $30 walk-in
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: www.123signup.com/register?id=mbrnk
Saturday, August 21 3-5PM
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE &
KIDS BREAK AND RUN
Cost: $30 Chamber member/guest
$45 Non-member
* Bring your own attacker at no charge
* Kids free w/paid parent attending
women's self defense
Location: All American Karate
405 S. Corona Mall
Contact: (951) 736-0635 to register
Tuesday, August 24 7:30-9:30AM
SEMINAR: E-COMMERCE
SALES METHODS
Sponsor: SCORE Counselors to Small Business
Cost: $25 or $60 for series of 3, $30 walk-in
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: www.123signup.com/register?id=mbrhs
kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org 39 Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Thursday, September 2, 9 & 23 11:30AM
CORONA NETWORKING $OLUTIONS
Cost: $20 ($15 with RSVP)
Location: Hometown Buffet
390 N. McKinley St.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Saturday, September 11 7-11AM
CORONA HOST LIONS ANNUAL PANCAKE
BREAKFAST
Cost: $5
Location: Corona Library
650 S. Main St.
Contact: Dave Crisp (951) 273-1917
Saturday, September 11 7:30AM
BLOOD DRIVE -1:30PM
Sponsor: The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints
Cost: FREE
Location: 1123 S. Lincoln Ave.
Contact: Darrell & LouAnn McPhie
(951) 735-3985
Monday, September 13 12PM
AMBASSADORS MEETING
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Tues, Sept. 21 - Thurs, Sept. 23 8AM
CORONA CHAMBER
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
Interested in helping? Call us today.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Saturday, September 25 7AM
“OUR LOCAL FIGHT”
BREAST CANCER WALK
Sponsor: The Foundation for Community
and Family Health
Cost: Various pledges
Location: Promenade Shops at Dos Lagos
www.communityandfamily.org
Saturday, September 25 10AM
COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR
Sponsor: Corona Community A.M.E. Church
Cost: FREE
Location: 321 E. Sixth St.
Contact: Barbara Lowry (951) 316-0401
Health screenings, demonstrations, activities
and informational booth. Booth spots available.
Tuesday, September 28 4:30PM
NEW MEMBER RECEPTION
Cost: FREE to new members
Location: Backwoods BBQ & Steakhouse
370 N. McKinley St.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Thursday, September 30 6:30AM
GOOD MORNING CORONA
Sponsor: Premier Service Bank
Cost: $20 members ($15 if paid by 9/23)
$30 non-members
Location: Eagle Glen Golf Club
1800 Eagle Glen Pkwy.
Contact: Corona Chamber (951) 737-3350
Thursday, September 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 9AM
S.C.O.R.E
Business counseling & advice
Cost: FREE
Location: Corona Chamber of Commerce
904 E. Sixth St.
Call Chamber for Appointment (951) 737-3350
Coming on October 7th
BUSINESS EXPO
CAREER DAY / JOB FAIR
QUARTERLY LUNCHEON
Call the Corona Chamber for details
at (951) 737-3350
Larn $25 |n
Chamber Do||ars
and a IkLL Ad |n
Cur Magaz|ne
Are you doing business with a
non-Chamber business? Do you
have a friend who could benefit
from Chamber membership?
Of course you do!
The Chamber is providing some
motivation for you to refer
potential members:
First, when your prospect joins the
Chamber, your name, company and
phone number will be listed in the
Corona Business Monthly.
Second, you’ll receive $25 credit
towards up to half of any Chamber
purchase, such as your own
membership fees and attendance at
Chamber events.
Finally, when you refer five
applicants who become Chamber
members, you’ll receive a FREE
one-eighth page color ad in Corona
Business Monthly – a $480 value!
For a referral form and more
information about the program,
call the Chamber at (951) 737-3350.
Thank you to the following member
for referring a new member:
40 kead C8M on||ne at www.CoronaChamber.org Corona 8us|ness Month|y | August 2010
Tamara Schaefer
Paychex, Inc.
(951) 202-3567
Coming in September:
Call us for details (951) 737-3350
8/31/10.
904 East Sixth Street
Corona, CA 92879
PRESORTED
STANDARD
US POSTAGE
PAID
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