You are on page 1of 478

Improving BEM‐based Aerodynamic Models  Improving BEM‐based 

Improving BEM‐based Aerodynamic Models                                         Tonio Sant
in Wind Turbine Design Codes
Aerodynamic Models 

in Wind Turbine Design Codes
The wind energy industry is experiencing remarkable growths annually. 
Despite  the  great  progress  made,  further  cost  reductions  in  turbine 
technology  are  necessary  for  wind  energy  to  reach  its  full  potential  in 
in 
terms of the large‐scale supply of electricity. Improving the reliability of 
aerodynamic models embedded in the design software currently used in  Wind Turbine Design Codes
industry  is  indispensable  to  guarantee  reductions  in  the  cost  of wind 
energy.

Due to its relatively high computational efficiency compared to free‐wake 
vortex  methods  and  CFD,  the  Blade‐Element‐Momentum  theory  still 
forms the basis for many aerodynamic models. Yet various experimental 
campaigns  have  demonstrated  that  BEM‐based  design  codes  are  not 
always  sufficiently  reliable  for  predicting  the  aerodynamic  load
distributions on the wind turbine blades. 

In  this  Doctoral  thesis,  a  detailed  investigation  of  the  aerodynamics  of 
wind  turbines  is  described  with  the  aim  of  providing  a  better 
understanding of the limitations of the BEM theory. This work identifies 
the  importance  to  pursue  turbine  aerodynamics  and  modelling  with an 
integrated  approach,  emphasising  on  the  need  to  understand  the  local 
blade  aerodynamics,  inflow  distribution  as  well  as  the  geometry  and 
vorticity  distribution  of  the  wake.  To  enable  this  approach,  new
analytical  methodologies  were  developed  which  compensate  for  the
limitations in experimental data. Guidelines are presented for developing 
improved models for BEM‐based aerodynamics codes for wind turbines.

ISBN: 978‐99932‐0‐483‐1

Delft University Wind Energy Research Institute
DUWIND

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering
University of Malta

January 2007

Tonio Sant

                                                                                                                                                                                              

Improving BEM-based
Aerodynamic Models
in
Wind Turbine Design Codes

Proefschrift

ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor
aan de Technische Universiteit Delft,
op gezag van de Rector Magnificus prof. dr. ir. J.T. Fokkema,
voorzitter van het College voor Promoties,
in het openbaar te verdedigen
op maandag 22 januari 2007 om 15:00 uur
door

Tonio SANT
Bachelor of Engineering, University of Malta
geboren te Malta

                                                                                                                                                                                              

Dit proefschrift is goedgekeurd door de promotor:
Prof. dr. ir. G.A.M. van Kuik

Toegevoegd promotor:
Dr. ir. G.J.W. van Bussel

Samenstelling promotiecommissie:

Rector Magnificus, voorzitter
Prof. dr. ir. G.A.M. van Kuik, Technische Universiteit Delft, promotor
Dr. G.J.W. van Bussel, Technische Universiteit Delft, toegevoegd promotor
Prof. dr. ir. drs. H. Bijl, Technische Universiteit Delft
Prof. dr. ir. H.W.M. Hoeijmakers, University of Twente
Prof. ing. P.P. Farrugia, University of Malta
Ir. H. Snel, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands
Dr. S.J. Schreck, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Key words: wind turbine, aerodynamics, blade-element momentum theory, vortex
theory, angle of attack, aerofoil data

This PhD thesis was supported by the University of Malta and Delft University of
Technology.

Published and distributed by author in cooperation with:

DUWIND Department of Mechanical Engineering
Delft University Wind Energy Institute Faculty of Engineering
Kluyverweg 1 University of Malta
2629 HS Delft Msida, Malta
+31 15 278 5170 +356 2340 2360
www.duwind.tudelft.nl www.eng.um.edu.mt

ISBN: 978-99932-0-483-1

Copyright © 2007 Tonio Sant

All rights reserved. Any use or application of data, methods or results from this thesis will
be at the user’s own risk. The author accepts no liability for damage suffered from use or
application. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form, by print, copy or in any
other way without prior permission from the author.

Cover picture: Courtesy of REpower Systems AG

Printed in Malta by Print Right Ltd, Marsa.

                                                                                                                                                                                              

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                To my wife Maris and family 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

Summary 
 
   Due to its relatively high computational efficiency compared to free‐wake vortex methods 
and CFD, the Blade‐Element‐Momentum theory still forms the basis for many aerodynamic 
models  integrated  in  design  software  for  horizontal‐axis  wind  turbines.  Yet  various 
experimental  campaigns  have  demonstrated  that  BEM‐based  design  codes  are  not  always 
sufficiently reliable for predicting the aerodynamic load distributions on the wind turbine 
blades. This is particularly true for stalled and yawed rotor conditions. Thus, it is presently 
necessary  to  try  to  improve  BEM  methods  in  order  to  provide  more  cost‐effective  wind 
turbine designs and hence reduce the cost of wind energy. 
 
In  this  thesis,  a  detailed  investigation  of  the  aerodynamics  of  wind  turbines  in  both  axial 
and yawed conditions is carried out based on wind tunnel measurements with the aim of 
providing a better understanding of the limitations of the BEM theory. This work identifies 
the  need  to  pursue  turbine  aerodynamics  and  modelling  in  an  integrated  approach, 
emphasising on the need to understand the local blade aerodynamics, inflow distribution as 
well as the geometry and vorticity distribution of the wake. To enable this approach, new 
methodologies  and  analytical  models  are  developed  which  compensate  for  the  limitations 
in experimental data. Among these models is a free wake vortex code, which is based on a 
prescribed  bound  circulation  distribution  over  the  rotor  blades.  This  free‐wake  vortex 
model HAWT‐FWC is developed and validated using the hot‐film and the tip vortex smoke 
visualisation data from the TUDelft rotor experiments and will be used to generate induced 
velocity distributions for the measured aerodynamic load distributions at the NREL Phase 
IV wind turbine.  
 
 
In  this  research  project,  the  aerodynamics  of  two  different  wind  turbine  rotors  is 
investigated:  
(1) The  TUDelft  model  rotor  which  is  tested  in  the  open‐jet  wind  tunnel  facility  at  Delft 
University  of  Technology.  Detailed  hot‐film  measurements  are  performed  in  the  near 
wake  of  the  model  rotor  when  operating  in  attached  flow  conditions  over  the  blades 
(low  angles  of  attack).  The  measurements  are  taken  at  different  planes  parallel  to  the 
rotorplane, both upstream and downstream. Smoke visualisation experiments are also 
carried out to trace the trajectories of tip vortex cores in the rotor wake in attached and 
stalled  flow  conditions.  These  experiments  are  carried  out  in  close  collaboration  with 
Wouter Haans, a Phd colleague at TUDelft. However, due to limited dimensions of the 
blades it is not possible to measure the aerodynamic blade load distributions directly. 
By  applying  blade‐element  theory  a  methodology  is  developed  to  estimate  the  time‐
dependent  aerodynamic  load  distributions  at  the  rotor  blades  from  the  hot‐film 
measurements: 
 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

(i) initially,  inflow  velocities  at  the  blades  are  estimated  from  the  hot‐film 
measurements taken at the different planes parallel to the rotorplane. 
(ii) the results from step (i) are used to derive the steady/unsteady angle of attack 
and the relative velocity distributions at the blades.  
(iii) the results from step (ii) are used in an advanced unsteady aerofoil model to 
yield the distributions for bound circulation and aerodynamic loading at the 
blades. A new and efficient numerical method for implementing this aerofoil 
model in rotor aerodynamics codes is developed.  
       
Both  the  inflow  measurements  and  the  derived  aerodynamic  loads  on  the  TUDelft 
rotor are used to carry out a detailed investigation of the BEM theory when modelling 
both  axial  and  yawed  conditions.  Two  different  approaches  are  applied:  the  first 
approach  in  which  the  inflow  measurements  and  aerodynamic  loads  are  used  to 
compute  separately  the  momentum  and  blade‐element  theory  parts  of  the  BEM 
equation  for  axial  thrust.  The  discrepancy  between  the  two  parts  is  a  measure  of  the 
incapability  of  the  BEM  theory  to  model  axial  or  yawed  conditions.  In  the  second 
approach, a typical BEM code is employed to model the TUDelft rotor and the results 
are  compared  with  those  obtained  from  the  hot‐film  measurements.  Despite  the  fact 
that  only  attached  flow conditions  are  being  studied  and also  the  fact  that  the  results 
derived  from  the  inflow  measurements  have  a  rather  high  level  of  uncertainty  in 
general,  this  comparison  results  in  a  better  understanding  of  the  limitations  of  BEM‐
based design codes and further insight is obtained of how these can be improved. 
 
(2) The  NREL  Phase  VI  wind  turbine  which  was  extensively  tested  in  the  NASA  Ames 
wind  tunnel  in  2000.  The  experimental  data  required  for  the  study  are  obtained  from 
the  NREL.  This  data  consists  of  time‐accurate  blade  pressure  measurements  for  the 
rotor operating in both axial and yawed conditions together with measurements of the 
local flow angles measured at different radial locations in front of the blades using five‐
hole probes. The experimental data also consists of strain gauge measurements for the 
output  torque  and  the  root  flap/edge  moments.  However  detailed  inflow 
measurements at the rotor are not performed. In this thesis, a novel and comprehensive 
methodology  is  presented  for  using  the  blade  pressure  measurements  in  conjunction 
with  the  free‐wake  vortex  model  HAWT‐FWC  to  estimate  the  angle  of  attack 
distributions  at  the  blades  more  accurately,  together  with  the  induced  velocity 
distributions  at  the  rotorplane  and  wake  geometry.  This  methodology  consists  of  the 
following sequence of steps: Initially, a spanwise distribution for the angle for attack is 
assumed at the blades. This is then used together with the values of Cn and Ct obtained 
from  the  blade  pressure  measurements  to  estimate  the  lift  coefficients  at  the  blades. 
Using the Kutta‐Joukowski law, the bound circulation distribution at the blades is then 
determined  and  prescribed  to  HAWT‐FWC  to  generate  the  free  vortical  wake.  The 
induced velocity at the blades is estimated and used to calculate a new angle of attack 
distribution.  The  process  is  repeated  until  convergence  in  the  angle  of  attack  is 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

achieved. One advantage for applying this methodology is that the solution is in itself 
unsteady  and  could  be  readily  applied  to  study  yawed  conditions,  under  which 
complex aerodynamic phenomena are known to occur (e.g. dynamic stall and unsteady 
induction). A second advantage concerns the fact that the wake geometry is inherently 
part of the solution. Thus it is possible to derive the pitch and expansion of the helical 
wake  from  the  measured  Cn  and  Ct,  which  otherwise  can  be  obtained  using  time‐
consuming  smoke  visualisation  experiments.  The  three‐dimensional  vorticity 
circulation distribution in the wake can also be investigated under different operating 
conditions. 
 
 
Using the above methodology, new 3D lift and drag aerofoil data are derived from the 
NREL  rotor  blade  pressure  measurements.  This  new  data  is  considerably  different 
from  the  corresponding  2D  wind  tunnel  aerofoil  data  due  to  the  presence  of  blade 
tip/root  loss  effects,  stall‐delay  or  else  unsteady  conditions  resulting  from  rotor  yaw 
(mainly  dynamic  stall).  The new  3D  lift  and  drag  aerofoil  data  is  then  used   improve 
BEM  load  predictions  in  axial  and  yawed  conditions.  It  is  found  that  with  this  new 
data,  the  BEM  predictions  improved  considerably  even  when  dealing  with  highly 
stalled and yawed conditions. For yawed conditions, new inflow corrections to account 
for skewed wake effects in BEM codes are also derived.  
 
From  this  research,  it  is  possible  to  draw  guidelines  on  how  BEM‐based  models  can  be 
improved. These guidelines can be summarised in two: 
 
(1) Improvement  of  aerofoil  data:  It  is  clear  from  this  study  that  BEM  predictions  improve 
substantially  when  more  accurate  3D  aerofoil  data  is  used.  In  this  thesis,  a  new 
engineering  model  for  3D  lift  and  drag  coefficients  in  axial  conditions  is  developed 
based  on  the  measurements  on  the  NREL  rotor.  A  similar  model  for  unsteady 
conditions is not developed since the amount of derived unsteady aerofoil data was to 
a  certain  extent  limited.  Yet  this  data  is  very  useful  for  other  researchers  to  develop 
such improved models. 
 
(2) Improvement  of  engineering  models  for  skewed  wake  effects  in  yaw:  The  BEM  theory  is 
incapable with modelling the effects of a skewed wake on the induction at the blades 
that result in yawed rotors. Various engineering models to correct for this incapability 
are developed in the past years and are used in state‐of‐the art design codes. Yet this 
study  has  demonstrated  that  such  models  are  limited  for  two  reasons  and  better 
models are required:  
(a) first of all, the unsteady and periodic induction distribution at the blades resulting 
from rotor  yaw may  have a  higher harmonic content than that catered for by these 
presently  available  engineering  models.  Also  the  unsteady  distributions  are 
dependent not only on the yaw angle but also on the operating tip speed ratio and 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

rotor  geometry.  This  study  has  shown  that  because  the  aerodynamics  of  yawed 
rotors  is  complicated,  it  is  vital  to  introduce  more  theoretically  comprehensive 
models.  An  approach  is  proposed  for  interfacing  BEM‐codes  to  prescribed‐wake 
vortex models when treating yawed conditions; 
 
 (b) secondly, the currently available models only correct the local axial induction at the 
blades to the corresponding annular‐averaged value. This study shows that, due to 
the  deficiency  of  the  axial  momentum  equation  in  yaw,  the  annular‐averaged  axial 
induction  computed  by  BEM  may  also  need  to  be  corrected.  It  is  found  from  the 
analysis on both the TUDelft and NREL rotors that this correction not only depends 
on  the  rotor  yaw  angle  but  also  on  the  operating  axial  thrust  coefficient.  An 
engineering model to model this correction is required if BEM predictions in yawed 
rotors are to be improved. 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

Samenvatting 
 
  Vanwege  relatief  lange  rekentijden  van  vrije‐zog  wervel  methoden  en  numerieke 
stromings dynamica (Computational Fluid Dynamics of CFD in het Engels) vormt de Blad 
Element  Impuls  (Blade  Element  Momentum  of  BEM  in  het  Engels)  theorie  nog  steeds  de 
basis  van  ontwerp  programmatuur  voor  horizontale‐as  windturbines.  Verscheidene 
meetcampagnes  hebben  echter  aangetoond  dat  BEM  ontwerpcodes  niet  altijd  voldoen  om 
de  aerodynamische  belastingsverdelingen  op  windturbinebladen  nauwkeurig  te 
voorspellen. Dit geldt in het bijzonder voor rotoren in overtrek en in scheefstand. Daarom is 
het belangrijk de BEM methoden te verbeteren, om zo rendabeler windturbineontwerpen te 
maken en daarmee de kosten van windenergie te reduceren.  
 
In  deze  dissertatie  is  een  uitgebreid  onderzoek  uitgevoerd  naar  de  aerodynamica  van 
windturbines  in  zowel  rechte  aanstroming  als  scheefstand,  gebaseerd  op 
windtunnelmetingen,  met  het  doel  een  beter  begrip  van  de  beperkingen  van  de  BEM 
theorie  te  krijgen.  Deze  studie  maakt  de  noodzaak  duidelijk  om  een  integrale  aanpak  te 
volgen  in  turbine  aerodynamica  en  modellering,  met  nadruk  op  de  locale 
bladaerodynamica, de verdeling van de aanstroomsnelheden en de positie en sterkte van de 
wervelsterkte  in  het  zog.  Om  deze  aanpak  mogelijk  te  maken,  zijn  nieuwe  methoden  en 
analytische  modellen  ontwikkeld  welke  de  beperkingen  van  experimentele  data 
compenseren. Een van deze modellen is een vrij wervelzog model dat is gebaseerd op een 
voorgeschreven circulatieverdeling over de rotorbladen. Dit vrije wervelzog model HAWT‐
FWC,  is  ontwikkeld  en  gevalideerd  met  de hittefilm  en  de  tipwervel  rookvisualisatie  data 
uit  de  TUDelft  rotor  experimenten,  en  zal  worden  gebruikt  om  de  geïnduceerde 
snelheidsverdelingen bij de gemeten aerodynamische belastingsverdelingen te bepalen.  
 
 
In  dit  onderzoeksproject  is  de  aerodynamica  van  twee  verschillende  windturbinerotoren 
onderzocht: 
(1)   De TUDelft modelrotor die getest is in de open‐straal windtunnel van de Technische 
Universiteit  Delft.  Gedetailleerde  hittefilm  metingen  zijn  uitgevoerd  in  het  nabije  zog 
van  de  modelrotor  bij  aanliggende  stromingscondities  over  het  blad  (kleine 
invalshoeken).  De  metingen  zijn  uitgevoerd  in  verschillende  vlakken  parallel  aan  het 
rotorvlak,  zowel  stroomopwaarts  als  stroomafwaarts.  Rook  visualisatie  experimenten 
zijn ook uitgevoerd om de banen van de tipwervelkernen in het rotor zog te bepalen bij 
zowel  aanliggende  als  overtrokken  stroming.  Deze  experimenten  zijn  uitgevoerd  in 
nauwe samenwerking met Wouter Haans, een collega‐promovendus aan de TUDelft in 
hetzelfde  vakgebied.  Vanwege  de  beperkte  afmetingen  van  het  rotorblad  is  het  niet 
mogelijk  de  aerodynamische  belastingsverdelingen  op  het  blad  te  meten.  Om  de 
verdeling  van  de  tijdsafhankelijke  aerodynamische  belastingen  op  de  rotorbladen  te 
schatten  uit  de  hittefilm  metingen  is  op  de  volgende  wijze  gebruik  gemaakt  van  de 
bladelement theorie: 

     Zowel  de  instroommetingen  als  de  berekende  aerodynamische  belastingen  op  de  TUDelft rotor zijn gebruikt om een gedetailleerd onderzoek uit te voeren naar de BEM‐ theorie voor het modelleren van en rechte en scheve aanstroming.      (iii) de resultaten uit stap (ii) zijn gebruikt in een geavanceerd instationair model                          voor profielaerodynamica. Tijdens de experimenten zijn  ook  rekstrookmetingen  van  het  koppel  en  de  klap‐  en  zwaaimomenten  aan  de  bladwortel  verricht.                                                                                                                                                                                            (i)  eerst zijn de instroomsnelheden ter plekke van de bladen geschat uit hittefilm                           metingen in de verschillende vlakken parallel aan het rotorvlak. in het algemeen tamelijk onnauwkeurig zijn.  die  benodigd  zijn  voor  het  onderzoek. Deze  wordt  dan  gebruikt  om. Deze methode bestaat uit de volgende reeks stappen: eerst wordt een verdeling  in spanwijdterichting van de invalshoek ter plaatse van de bladen aangenomen. Twee verschillende  methoden  zijn  gevolgd:  de  eerste  methode  waarbij  de  instroommetingen  en  de  aerodynamische  belasting  gebruikt  worden  om  afzonderlijk  de  impuls  en  de  blad‐ element theorie waarden voor de axiaalkracht in de BEM vergelijking te berekenen. De  discrepantie  tussen  deze  twee  waarden  is  een  maat  voor  de  toepasbaarheid  van  de  BEM‐theorie voor axiale of scheve aanstromingscondities.  gemeten  op  verschillende  radiale posities voor de bladen met vijfgats‐drukmeters..    (2)  De  NREL  Fase  VI  windturbine  die  uitvoerig  getest  werd  in  the  de  NASA  Ames  windtunnel  in  2000. Ondanks het feit dat enkel aanliggende  stromingscondities bestudeerd zijn en het feit dat de resultaten. die bepaald zijn uit de  instroommetingen.  werden  verkregen  van  het  NREL. de verdelingen van de geïnduceerde snelheid in  het rotorvlak en de zoggeometrie nauwkeuriger te bepalen door gebruik te maken van  de  drukmetingen  op  het  blad  in  combinatie  met  het  vrije‐wervel  zogmodel  HAWT‐ FWC.  de  liftcoëfficiënten  op  de  bladen  te  schatten.  De  experimentele  data. In de tweede methode is een  echte  BEM‐code  gebruikt  om  de  TUDelft  rotor  te  modelleren  en  zijn  de  resultaten  vergeleken met die uit de hittefilm metingen. leidde dit tot een beter  begrip  van  de  beperkingen  van  op  BEM  gebaseerde  ontwerpcodes  en  tot  een  verder  inzicht in hoe deze te kunnen verbeteren. om de verdelingen van de gebonden wervelsterkte                           en de aerodynamische belastingen op de bladen te bepalen.  Deze  data  bestaan  uit  tijdsafhankelijke  drukmetingen  op  het  roterende  blad  in  zowel  rechte  aanstroming  als  scheefstand. In deze dissertatie is een nieuwe en uitgebreide methode toegepast om de  invalshoekverdelingen op de bladen.  samen  met  de  Cn‐  en  Ct‐waarden  verkregen  uit  de  drukmetingen  op  de  bladen.      (ii) de resultaten uit stap (i) zijn gebruikt om de stationaire/instationaire                          invalshoek en de verdeling van de relatieve snelheden ter plekke van de bladen                           af te leiden.  .  Gedetailleerde  instroommetingen  aan  de  rotor  zijn  echter  niet  uitgevoerd.  Voor het                          implementeren van dit instationalire profielmodel in rotoraerodynamica codes                          is een nieuwe efficiënte methode ontwikkeld.  gecombineerd  met  metingen  van  de  locale  stromingshoek.

 Een voordeel van het  toepassen van deze methode is dat de oplossing inherent instationair is en rechtstreeks  toegepast  zou  kunnen  worden  voor  het  bestuderen  van  scheefstand.                                                                                                                                                                                        Gebruikmakend  van  de  wet  van  Kutta‐Joukowski  wordt  dan  de  verdeling  van  de  gebonden  wervelsterkte  op  de  bladen  bepaald  en  opgelegd  aan  HAWT‐FWC  om  het  vrije wervelzog te generen.  Een  vergelijkbaar  model  voor  instationaire  omstandigheden  is  niet  ontwikkeld  omdat  er  onvoldoende  instationaire  profiel  gegevens  afgeleid  konden  worden. In deze dissertatie is een nieuw engineering model voor driedimensionale lift‐ en  weerstandscoëfficiënten  in  rechte  aanstroming  ontwikkeld  gebaseerd  op  de  metingen  aan  de  NREL  rotor.  waarvan  het  bekend is dat complexe aerodynamische processen optreden (bijvoorbeeld dynamische  overtrek  en  instationaire  inductie).  Dit  proces  wordt herhaald totdat convergentie van de invalshoek bereikt is.     Uit  dit  onderzoek  volgen  richtlijnen  voor  de  wijze  waarop  op  BEM  gebaseerde  modellen  verbeterd zouden kunnen worden.  Ook  voor  andere  operationele  condities  kan  op  deze  wijze  het  driedimensionale wervelzog worden bepaald en onderzocht.  Het  is  dus  mogelijk  uit  de  gemeten Cn en Ct de onderlinge afstand en de expansie van het spiraalvormige zog af  te  leiden.  Een  tweede  voordeel  betreft  het  feit  dat  de  zoggeometrie  een    inherent  deel  van  de  oplossing  is.     Met  behulp  van  deze  methode  zijn  nieuwe  driedimensionale  lift‐  en  weerstand‐  profieldata bepaald uit de drukmetingen op de NREL rotorbladen.    (2) Verbetering van engineering modellen voor de effecten van het zog in scheefstandcondities: de  BEM  theorie  is  niet  in  staat  de  effecten  van  een  scheef  zog  op  de  inductie  ter  plaatse  van de bladen te modelleren.  De  nieuwe  driedimensionale lift‐ en weerstandswaarden voor het profiel zijn vervolgens gebruikt  om verbeteringen in BEM berekeningen voor rechte aanstroming en scheefstand aan te  brengen. De BEM resultaten zijn aanzienlijk beter met deze nieuwe data. Voor scheefstandcondities zijn  ook  nieuwe  instroomcorrecties  afgeleid  om  BEM  codes  corrigeren  voor  scheefstandeffecten. zelfs wanneer  het condities betreft met sterke overtrek en scheefstand. Deze richtlijnen kunnen als volgt worden samengevat:     (1) Verbetering  van  profieldata:  het  blijkt  duidelijk  uit  deze  studie  dat  BEM  voorspellingen  aanzienlijk  verbeteren  wanneer  nauwkeuriger  driedimensionale  profieldata  gebruikt  worden. Deze nieuwe data  verschillen aanzienlijk van de tweedimensionale windtunnel profieldata vanwege blad  tip‐ en wortel‐verlies effecten. De geïnduceerde snelheid ter plaatse van de bladen wordt  geschat  en  gebruikt  om  een  nieuwe  invalshoekverdeling  te  berekenen.(voornamelijk  dynamische  overtrek). Verscheidene engineering modellen ter correctie hiervan  .  Desalniettemin  zijn  deze  data  erg  bruikbaar  voor  andere onderzoekers om verbeterde modellen op te stellen. uitstel van overtrek of ook instationaire effecten die het  gevolg  zijn  van  scheefstand.  welke  anders  verkregen  kan  worden  uit  tijdrovende  rookvisualisatie  experimenten.

   .                                                                                                                                                                                        zijn  de  laatste  jaren  ontwikkeld  en  toegepast  in  moderne  ontwerpcodes. de gemiddelde axiale inductie over de annulus berekend door BEM ook  gecorrigeerd moet worden.  maar  ook  van de gehanteerde tipsnelheden en de rotorgeometrie. vanwege de complexiteit van de aerodynamica van rotoren in scheefstand. ten gevolge van een fout in de axiale impulsvergelijking in  scheefstand.  Deze studie laat zien dat.  Voorgesteld  wordt  om  een  aanpak  te  kiezen  waarbij  voor  het  berekenen  van  scheefstandcondities  een  BEM  code  wordt  gekoppeld  aan  een  eenvoudig‐ wervelzogmodel. Deze studie heeft laten zien  dat.    (b) ten tweede wordt in de huidige modellen alleen de locale axiale inductiesnelheid ter  plaatse  van  de  bladen  gecorrigeerd  met  de  gemiddelde  waarde  over  de  annulus.  Deze  studie  heeft  echter  aangetoond  dat  dergelijke  modellen  om  twee  redenen  een  beperkte  geldigheid hebben en dat betere modellen vereist zijn:     (a)  allereerst  heeft  de  instationaire  en  periodieke  verdeling  van  de  inductiesnelheden  ter plaatse van de bladen in scheefstand waarschijnlijk een hogere harmonische dan  die  in  de  huidige  engineering  modellen  wordt  meegenomen. het  essentieel  is  om  meer  theoretisch  onderbouwde  modellen  te  introduceren. Uit de analyse van zowel de TUDelft als de NREL rotor  blijkt dat de correctie niet slechts afhangt van de scheefstandhoek van de rotor maar  ook  van  de  axiaalkrachtscoëfficiënt.  Bovendien  zijn  de  instationaire  verdelingen  niet  alleen  afhankelijk  van  de  scheefstandhoek.  Een  gecoorigeerd  engineering  model  is  nodig  om BEM voorspellingen bij scheefstaande rotoren te verbeteren.

2     The Momentum Equations ………...……….…... 2                                                           1..…… 11                                                   2.……………....4    Organization of Work ……………….….. 5                                   1..…………………………..1     The Role of Aerodynamics in Wind Turbine Design …………. i    Abbreviations ………………………………………………………. ii       Nomenclature ..1 The Simple Linear Momentum Theory for a Yawed             Actuator Disc .…..… 14                                                 2... 11                                                 2.3 Current Status of Aerodynamic Design Models for                          Horizontal ‐Axis Wind Turbines …….….………..….………....…... 8                                                                                            Chapter 2       Aim of Thesis and Approach………………...……. 25       .... 15                                      2...……………………….…...….…………………………………………….….2     Aim of Thesis …………..…. xi        Chapter 1       Introduction .                                                                                                                                                                                                Table of Contents        Acknowledgements ….…….5    Co‐ordinate Systems Analysis ………….……………….…...…………….3. 23                              3.. 15                                      2.…………..………………….……..….………..………......……...….……….…………….…. 15                                      2....1     Problem Statement……………………………………..…………………….…….……….….3 Development of Free‐wake Vortex Model ......….. 20      Chapter 3       The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory ………...…………………………………………………... 1                                                       1....…….…...…………………………………………………...…...………….2 Research work on the NREL Phase VI wind tunnel turbine.…..….…......3     Approach …………...3.……..……………….…….…………. iii    List of Developed Software Codes ….  23                             3.….………………………….......……………...……………..…….…………………...2     Principles of HAWT Aerodynamics ………..……….. 18                                                   2....3..….….………………………….….1 Research work on the TUDelft wind tunnel turbine ... 17                                     2..….……………………….……..

..………..2 Results from Approach B………...……… 31                                              3..…...2 Program Structure………........ 48                                         4....…....………………………...…. 27                                               3.… 182                                       4.5     Corrections to the Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory .…………….....3  Developed Software Tools …...……. 26                                       3. 26                                       3..…..……………………………..…….…..6     Description of Program HAWT_BEM ........5 Quantification of Errors in Deriving Blade Loading due to                                                Errors in Inflow Measurements…………….3. 26                   3..…………………….…………………….…………......3.6 Results and Discussion..2 The Induced Velocity at Each Blade Element………….....188                             4.…..…. 45                                                           4.3     Estimating the Aerodynamic Loads at the Blades                                      from the Wind Tunnel Inflow Measurements..….……. 29                                     3...….4     The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Equations ……....... 49                                      4.…………..………..………….. 43      Chapter 4      Aerodynamic Analysis of the Delft Model Turbine …..………….3..2...3.. 87                                       4......... 30                                         3......……………... 87                                       4..98                                       4...…………………….…………….....5 The Blade‐Element Equations for Thrust and Torque...2..2....2     Wind tunnel Measurements ….…. 40                                         3.... 28                                               3....….….3..…....…………..3 Flow Velocity Relative to a Moving Blade Element..….……....4 Aerodynamic Loads…………………………….…………………….…...…….... . 121                                       4... 207        ..…...…….……........1 Results from Approach A….4     Investigating the Limitations of the BEM Theory for             Axial/Yawed Wind Turbines....1 Wind Tunnel ………….3........…….…..3..4  Assessment of Wind Tunnel Blockage Effects ….......……….….….….. 183                                       4.. 40                                       3..……...……..6...…....3 Part II: Smoke Visualization Measurements ……......………………...1 The Blade‐Element Velocity …....….…….……….……...…..…………...….……………….... 110                                       4...                                                                                                                                                                                                                 3.…. 128                             4.………..5     Conclusions………….…..…..…………….…………....3...4......…...6.....4.....3.3..2  A Theoretical Method for Finding the Unsteady Lift                                                 Coefficient in Attached Flow for a Rotating Blade in Yaw ….3......3     The Blade‐Element Theory ……......…….2 Part I: Inflow Measurements ……………………………….. 90                                       4... 45                                                       4..………......... 76                                                            4....1     Introduction ………………......1 Time‐based Numerical Solution for the BEM Equation……....………....……………………………………..….1 Methodology……………………………..... 48                                      4..

.… 211                                                       5.....………………..…...1     Modelling of Aerofoil Data....4     BEM Predictions for the NREL Phase VI Rotor with New                                             Aerofoil Data and Inflow Corrections ……...……..…………………….…….….. 222                                       5.4 Numerical Solution.4....………………………… 397                                                       7.…….3.…..… 285                                       6..……………..... 221                                       5..….2 Near Wake Model..….3    Verification and Validation of Free‐Wake Vortex Model ….… 274           Chapter 6      Aerodynamics Analysis of the NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine……. 279                                                                6.….….………….3.....…………......                                                                                                                                                                                        Chapter 5      Development of a Free‐Wake Vortex Model ………..…...3...…………………………..... 283                                       6..………………….……………..………………….2.……………………………...……...2     Free‐wake Vortex Numerical Model …….……..…...….……….1 Methodology……….………….4.………………....……..3 Far Wake Model..…………...3...………..….2     Correcting for skewed wake effects in yaw……………………...…… 397                                                        7.…………….…………………………....2 Axial Conditions……….… 211                             5.5 Program Structure…………...….………....…….…. 212                                          5. 393          Chapter 7      Guidelines for Improving the Reliability of BEM‐based Design                           Codes …….…………...1 Verification and Validation Methodology……….…….…..…………………...….……………………….1    Introduction ..…......…….………….. 226                                                5.. 403                                                   7..…… 373                                     6.………..……......2    NASA/Ames UAE Wind Tunnel Data Used .………………….………………………………..……...…..…………………..2.…. 234                                             5.…………………….…… 277                                                            6.…………………….… ………………………………..……….…. 283                                       6... 213                                       5.………..….………..….....3 Yawed Conditions……...2...….... 228                                       5.2..5    Conclusions..…….….3     Estimating the Angle of Attack from Blade Pressure                                                       Measurements using the Free‐Wake Vortex Model …….…………....……………...1 Blade Model......….......……..……. 277                                                       6..3..……….……….1 Axial Conditions……..….1 Development of engineering model using a heuristic   ..…. 212                                       5..2 Yawed Conditions……. 362                                        6....…….4    Conclusions….… 320                                                           6.2.2 Results and Discussion…….…… 363                                       6... 228                                       5.……..…….....2..…..1     Introduction …………………………......….…...……….

… 404                                       7.….………………………………………….……..... 449           Author Publications .….                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               approach based on Fourier series….…………..….………..……………………….......………….......… 411      Chapter 8      Project Outcome..…………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………. 446       Curriculum Vitae .....…..........……………………….…...……....…….2     Conclusions ..………...…. Conclusions and Recommendations .….……….... 417                                         References …….….………. 436                    Appendix D   Linear and Spline Numerical Interpolation………. ..… 450    .3     Recommendations …………………………………….…419    Appendices                      Appendix A   Maximum Power Coefficient for a Yawed Actuator Disc ….....…………………………………….……...….……………..............3 Correction to the axial momentum equation for                                                  yawed rotors ….. 429                    Appendix B    Calculation of Aerodynamic Loads Induced at the                                              Yaw Bearing …………………………………………………...... 416                             8. 413                                                        8... 441                    Appendix E   Vortex Filament Stretching …..2.…………………………….....….……….….…...…….2.… 413                                                       8....…....…..………………..… 405                                       7...…………………………………...1     Project Outcome ....……. 432                    Appendix C   Calculation of the Induced Velocity from a Vortex Filament                                                                                     using the Biot‐Savart Law …….….…………………….…………….2 Alternative approach using prescribed‐wake vortex                                                 model …..…..

 completion would have never been  reached. especially in the most  difficult moments.  Scott  Schreck  and  his  colleagues  at  the  National  Renewable  Energy  Laboratory  are  acknowledged for providing the data of the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiments. Gerard van Bussel for their guidance and the invaluable  advices  they  gave  me  during  my  research. Toni Subroto. Without their patience and encouragement.  Peter  Paul  Farrugia for giving me the opportunity to carry out this work and for relieving me from my  duties at the University of Malta to be able to finish my studies on time. September 2006  i  .  which  saved  me  lots  of  time  and  allowed  me  to  concentrate  on  my  work  during  my  short  stays  in  Delft.  Sander  Mertens  and  Albert  Bruining.    Most of all. Wim Bierbooms.  Gijs van Kuik and co‐supervisor dr. dr. Eric van der Pol and  former  colleagues  Nord  Jan  Vermeer. This data  was very stimulating for the intended research work.  Carlos  Ferriera.  I  am  greatly  indebted  to  prof. Martin Muscat.  I  would  like  to  extend  my  gratitude  to  my  other  colleagues  at  the  wind  energy  research  group  at  Delft  University  of  Technology  for  their  hospitality. Dick Veldkamp. My  colleague  at  the  University of Malta. is acknowledged for his support in facilitating my  access to the Mechanical Engineering Computer Lab required for the extensive computations. Many thanks also go  to the University of Malta and Delft University of Technology for the financing of the project.    The members of the Doctoral Examination Committee are also thanked for their attention to  this thesis. I would like to express my heartfelt thanks to my supervisor prof.  sharing    their  knowledge  and  for  offering  fruitful  suggestions:  Ruud  van  Rooij. ir.  Sylvia  Willems  is  thanked  for  her  practical  assistance.    Dr.  Nando  Timmer. dr.    I  am  very  grateful  to  Wouter  Haans  for  his  cooperation  in  the  experimental  work  on  the  TUDelft wind tunnel turbine and for the many discussions we had throughout the course of  this  work.                                                                                                                                                                                        Acknowledgements    This Phd thesis would have not been possible without the support and help of many people.  Our  secretary.    First of all I am thankful to God for granting me the health and energy.  Many  thanks  also  go  Simon  Toet  for  his  technical  assistance  in  using  the  wind  tunnel  equipment. I would like to express to gratitude to my wife Maris and family for their support  and prayers. Michiel Zaaijer.  ing.ing. Herman Snel and Gerard Schepers from  the  Energy  Research  Centre  of  the  Netherlands  as  well  as  Jeppe  Johansen  from  the  Risø  Laboratory of Denmark are also thanked for their interest and valuable discussions.                                                                                                                            Tonio Sant                                                                                                          Delft.

 USA    PIV – Particle Imaging Velocimetry    TUDelft – Delft University of Technology. the Netherlands  NREL – National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The Netherlands    UAE – Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment    WECS – Wind energy conversion system                        ii  . USA  NLR – National Aerospace Laboratory.                                                                                                                                                                                        Abbreviations  AEP – Annual Energy Yield  ATC – Annual Total Cost    BEM – Blade Element Momentum Theory  BET – Blade Element Theory    COE – Cost of Energy  CFD – Computational Fluid Dynamics    DTU – Denmark Technical University     ECN – Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands  EAWE – European Academy of Wind Energy  EWEA – European Wind Energy Association    HAWT – Horizontal‐axis wind turbine    IEA – International Energy Agency    NASA – National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

c    ‐ radial induction factor at blade lifting line ( = ur.c      ‐ axial induction factor at blade lifting line ( = ua. corrected for parallax     effects (m)  da     ‐ distance between rotor hub centre and yaw bearing centre (m)  dAη ‐ tangential (chordwise) component of aerodynamic loading at a blade element     (N/m)     dAζ     ‐ normal component of aerodynamic loading at a blade element (N/m)     dT      ‐ axial thrust loading at a blade element (N/m)     dT2D    ‐ axial thrust loading at a blade element computed from 2D lift and drag       coefficients (N/m)    dT3D     ‐ axial thrust loading at a blade element computed from 3D lift and drag      coefficients (N/m)  dQ       ‐ torque loading at a blade element (Nm/m)    dQ2D ‐ torque loading at a blade element computed from 2D lift and drag       coefficients (Nm/m)  dQ3D    ‐ torque loading at a blade element computed from 3D lift and drag      coefficients (Nm/m)  f  ‐ Prandtl tip and root loss factor  fd              ‐ parameter used to correct 2D drag coefficient for 3D effects  iii .c/RΩ)  a3         ‐ azimuthally (annular) averaged radial induction factor ( = ur/U)  a3.m ‐ optimum disk averaged axial induction factor for a given yaw angle  a1.                                                                                                                                                                                        Nomenclature      a  ‐ index to represent vortex age of trailing or shed vortex filament or parameter     used in engineering model for stall‐delay or wake skew angle or parameter     equal to ½ in unsteady aerofoil theory for attached flow  a1       ‐ disk averaged or azimuthally (annular) averaged axial induction factor      ( = ua/U)  a1.c      ‐ tangential induction factor at blade lifting line ( = ut.c/U)  a2     ‐ azimuthally (annular) averaged tangential induction factor ( = ut/RΩ)  a2.c/U)  b     ‐ index to represent blade number or parameter used in engineering model for     stall‐delay or parameter equal to half chord length in unsteady aerofoil       theory for attached flow (m)  b1      ‐ constant in exponential decay function approximating Wagner’s function  b2 ‐ constant in exponential decay function approximating Wagner’s function  bs     ‐ mid‐span of elliptical wing (m)  c     ‐ local blade chord (m)  co       ‐ maximum chord length of elliptical wing (m)  d      ‐ rotor diameter (m) or parameter used in engineering model for stall‐delay or     distance measured from smoke visualisation photo.

                                                                                                                                                                                        fl        ‐ parameter used to correct 2D lift coefficient for 3D effects  fr       ‐ Prandtl root loss factor  ft        ‐ Prandtl tip loss factor  fL       ‐ aerodynamic blade lift loading (N/m)  fQ     ‐ aerodynamic blade torque loading (Nm/m)  fT       ‐ aerodynamic blade thrust loading (N/m)  h  ‐ perpendicular distance of vortex filament from a given point (m) or      parameter used for  engineering model for stall‐delay or angular calibration      constant for hot‐film probe or vertical distance between smoke visualisation      plane and measuring grid (m)  i    ‐ blade station number or trailing vortex number or index to denote radial     location of hot‐film probe in measuring plane  ip          ‐ index to denote radial location of point at which the induced velocity is     computed by prescribed‐wake or free‐wake vortex model  j       ‐ index to denote angular position of hot‐film probe in measuring plane  jp  ‐ index to denote azimuthal location of point at which the induced velocity is        computed by  prescribed‐wake or free‐wake vortex model  k      ‐ angular calibration constant for hot‐film probe or index to number of vortex      filament along a given helix in prescribed‐wake vortex model or reduced      frequency  ka ‐ parameter to correct axial momentum equation for yawed conditions  kc      ‐ ratio of the exit jet velocity to the true free‐stream velocity  ke ‐ ratio of the axial induced velocity at the tunnel exit computed by the      prescribed‐wake vortex  code to the tunnel exit jet velocity  l     ‐ length of vortex filament (m)  m         ‐ index to represent rotor time step  n    ‐ total number of blade stations and trailing vortices per blade or constant for      speed calibration  of hot‐film  nRev    ‐ number of rotor revolutions to generate free‐wake  nfwRev    ‐ number of helical revolutions in far wake model of free‐wake code  nwRev  ‐ number of helical revolutions in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model  p       ‐ tip vortex pitch measured along a direction parallel to the free‐wind speed        (m)  pw ‐ tip vortex pitch taken along a direction parallel to the rotor axis (m)  pfw  ‐ tip vortex pitch in far wake model of free‐wake code (m)  r  ‐ position vector or radial location along blade (m)  rc       ‐ viscous core radius of vortex filament (m)  rceff      ‐ viscous core radius of vortex filament. corrected for filament strain effects (m)  rw      ‐ radial location of vortex node on a given helix in prescribed‐wake vortex       model (m)  s    ‐ reduced time  t    ‐ time (sec)  iv  .

.                                                                                                                                                                                        ua        ‐ disk‐averaged or azimuthally (annular) averaged axial induced velocity (m/s)  ua.c ‐ axial flow velocity at blade lifting line (along the y axis).c     ‐ radial induced velocity at blade lifting line (m/s)  ux ‐ tangential induced velocity (m/s)   uy    ‐ axial induced velocity (m/s)   uz     ‐ radial induced velocity (m/s)   uX ‐ induced velocity at near wake node along the X axis (m/s)  uY    ‐ induced velocity at near wake node along the Y axis (m/s)  uZ       ‐ induced velocity at near wake node along the Z axis (m/s)  û      ‐ 3D induced velocity vector at blade element (m/s)  ûc    ‐ 3D induced velocity vector at blade element in BEM.c     ‐ tangential induced velocity at blade lifting line (m/s)  ur        ‐ azimuthally (annular) averaged radial induced velocity (m/s)  ur. A1.A3 ‐ amplitudes in Fourier series‐based engineering model for skewed wake       effects  A1 ‐ constant in exponential decay function approximating Wagner’s function  A2 ‐ constant in exponential decay function approximating Wagner’s function  Aη ‐ tangential (chordwise) aerodynamic load at blade element acting along the η     axis (N)  Aζ ‐ normal aerodynamic load at blade element acting along the ζ axis (N)  B  ‐ total number of blades in rotor or constant for speed calibration of hot‐film  BF ‐ blockage factor for rotor in wind tunnel  Cd      ‐ drag coefficient  v  .aver     ‐ azimuthally (annular) averaged axial flow velocity in rotor wake (along the y       axis) (m/s)  wa. Maybe directly on       lifting line or at a given axial distance from it (m/s)  wb        ‐ velocity of fluid bypassing rotor wake (m/s)  wh    ‐ horizontal flow velocity in rotor wake (along the Xa axis) (m/s)  wr    ‐ radial flow velocity in rotor wake (along the z axis) (m/s)  wt     ‐ tangential flow velocity in rotor wake (along the x axis) (m/s)    wv    ‐ vertical flow velocity in rotor wake (along the Za axis) (m/s)  z     ‐ parameter for viscous modelling of vortex core   A  ‐ rotor cross‐sectional area (m2)  or constant for speed calibration of hot‐film      (V2/0C)    A0. Can be directly on lifting line or at      a given axial distance from it (m/s)  ua.c     ‐ axial induced velocity at blade lifting line. corrected for skewed      wake effects (m/s)  v    ‐ local blade deflection (m)  wa       ‐ axial flow velocity in rotor wake (along the y or Ya axis) (m/s)  wa.exit ‘ ‐ axial induced velocity at tunnel exit jet as computed by prescribed‐wake      vortex model (m/s)  ut      ‐ azimuthally (annular) averaged tangential induced velocity (m/s)  ut..

lin ‐ lift coefficient that would be obtained if the 2D lift slope is extended linearly      beyond stall  Cl.                                                                                                                                                                                        Cd.s    ‐ drag coefficient at stall  Cd.Max ‐ optimum rotor power coefficient for a given yaw angle  Dj     ‐ diameter of open‐jet wind tunnel tube (m)  Dj’  ‐ diameter of tunnel jet at a given downstream distance from rotorplane (m)  D’     ‐ diameter of rotor wake at a given downstream distance from rotorplane (m)  E    ‐ hot‐film voltage (V)  F     ‐ location of rotor hub centre  Fsa     ‐ correction factor used in BEM model to correct for skewed wake effects in       yaw  FA1        ‐ right‐hand side of BEM equation for axial flow (blade‐element theory part)      (m2/s2)  FA2 ‐ left‐hand side of BEM equation for axial flow (momentum part) (m2/s2)  GXB     ‐ geometric influence coefficient for X‐component of induced velocity from     bound vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  GYB  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Y‐component of induced velocity from       bound vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  GZB  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Z‐component of induced velocity from       bound vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  GXT  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for X‐component of induced velocity from     trailing vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  GYT  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Y‐component of induced velocity from      trailing vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  GZT  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Z‐component of induced velocity from    vi  .max    ‐ maximum drag coefficient  Cdp    ‐ pressure drag coefficient  Cn    ‐ normal coefficient  Cm    ‐ moment coefficient  Cl        ‐ lift coefficient  Cl.3D   ‐ drag coefficient corrected for 3D effects (tip/root loss and/or stall delay)  Cd.2D   ‐ drag coefficient for 2D flow  Cd.2D     ‐ lift coefficient for 2D flow  Cl.3D      ‐ lift coefficient corrected for 3D effects (tip/root loss and/or stall delay)  Cl.2D‐MIN ‐ minimum drag coefficient for 2D flow  Cd.s ‐ lift coefficient at stall  Clc ‐ circulatory lift coefficient  Clnc ‐ non‐circulatory lift coefficient  Ct    ‐ tangential coefficient  CT ‐ rotor axial thrust coefficient  CQ ‐ rotor torque coefficient  CP      ‐ rotor power coefficient  CP.

  Kv    ‐ correction factor applied to Biot‐Savart equation to correct for viscous core      effects  L    ‐ distance taken from smoke visualisation photo.                                                                                                                                                                                          trailing vortex in wake of prescribed‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  H  ‐ tower height or vertical distance between smoke visualisation camera and      measuring grid (m)  IBX  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for X‐component of induced velocity from        bound vortex in near  wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  IBY  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Y‐component of induced velocity from      bound vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  IBZ  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Z‐component of induced velocity from      bound vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ISX    ‐ geometric influence coefficient for X‐component of induced velocity from       shed vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ISY  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Y‐component of induced velocity from       shed vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ISZ     ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Z‐component of induced velocity from       shed vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ITX  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for X‐component of induced velocity from       trailing vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ITY    ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Y‐component of induced velocity from       trailing vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  ITZ  ‐ geometric influence coefficient for Z‐component of induced velocity from       trailing vortex in near wake of free‐wake vortex model (m‐1)  K  ‐ parameter used in BEM model to correct for skewed wake effects using the      Glauert model or function used to smoothen experimental data using the      Gaussian kernel.w   ‐ outer wake boundary radius for prescribed‐wake vortex model (m)  Rt. uncorrected for parallax      errors (m)  LFA    ‐ local flow angle (deg)  LSSTQ  ‐ low‐speed shaft torque (Nm)  Mtot ‐ total number of time‐marching steps in free‐wake code  O  ‐ location of rotor yaw bearing centre  P  ‐ rotor power developed (W)  Q  ‐ rotor output torque (Nm)  QNORM ‐ dynamic pressure (N/m2)  R    ‐ rotor tip radius (same as Rt) (m)  Rr ‐ rotor hub radius (m)  Rt ‐ rotor tip radius (same as R) (m)  Rr.w      ‐ inner wake boundary radius for prescribed‐wake vortex model (m)  Rt.w1   ‐ outer wake boundary radius for prescribed‐wake vortex model at the first tip      vortex core location (m)  vii .

Xa ‐ measured effective flow velocity with hot‐film aligned along the Xa axis (m/s)  Veff.ζ ‐ absolute velocity component of blade element along the ζ axis (m/s)  VA.w2 ‐ outer wake boundary radius for prescribed‐wake vortex model at the second      tip vortex core location (m)  Re    ‐ Reynolds number at blade section  ReleaseRoot  ‐ radial location at which inboard edge of vortex sheet is shed from blade in     prescribed‐wake vortex model (expressed as fraction of R)  ReleaseTip  ‐ radial location at which outboard edge of vortex sheet is shed from blade in     prescribed‐wake vortex model (expressed as fraction of R)  RCTF  ‐ relative computational time factor for free‐wake solution  REM  ‐ blade root edge bending moment (Nm)  RFM  ‐ blade root flap bending moment (Nm)  Sc    ‐ viscous core growth constant (sec)  T    ‐ tower base location or rotor axial thrust (N)  Ta    ‐ measured flow temperature (0C)  Tf ‐ preset flow temperature (0C)  U  ‐ free windspeed or wind tunnel speed (m/s)  Ujet ‐ open‐jet tunnel exit velocity (m/s)  Up ‐ flow velocity component measured along xp axis of hot‐film (m/s)  Ux ‐ free windspeed component parallel to rotor disk (m/s)  Uy ‐ free windspeed component normal to rotor disk (m/s)  U’  ‐ resultant flow velocity at yawed actuator disc in accordance with simple     momentum theory (m/s)  V    ‐ flow velocity relative to aerofoil (m/s)  Veff    ‐ measured effective flow velocity by hot‐film (m/s)  Veff.Ya    ‐ measured effective flow velocity with hot‐film aligned along the Ya axis (m/s)  Veff.                                                                                                                                                                                        Rt.Za ‐ measured effective flow velocity with hot‐film aligned along the Za axis (m/s)  Vp ‐ flow velocity component measured along yp‐axis of hot‐film (m/s)  Vn   ‐ normal component of flow velocity relative to blade section (m/s) Vr ‐ 2D resultant flow velocity relative to blade section acting in η‐ζ plane (m/s)  Vrel    ‐ 3D resultant flow velocity relative to blade section (m/s)  Vt ‐ tangential component of flow velocity relative to blade section (m/s)  Vη    ‐ tangential component of flow velocity relative to blade section (same as Vt)      (m/s)  Vζ ‐ normal component of flow velocity relative to blade section (same as Vn) (m/s)  Vξ ‐ radial component of flow velocity relative to blade section (m/s)   VA.η    ‐ absolute velocity component of blade element along the η axis (m/s)  VA.ξ ‐ absolute velocity component of blade element along the ξ axis (m/s)  Wp ‐ flow velocity component measured along zp axis of hot‐film (m/s)  WX    ‐ velocity of near wake node along the X axis in free‐wake vortex code (m/s)  WY ‐ velocity of near wake node along the Y axis in free‐wake vortex code (m/s)  WZ    ‐ velocity of near wake node along the Z axis in free‐wake vortex code (m/s)  viii .

ϕ3    ‐ phase angles in Fourier series‐based engineering model for skewed wake    ix  .. ϕ1.c between that predicted by prescribed‐wake vortex code     and that obtained from hot‐film measurements by assuming that the free‐     stream velocity is equal to the tunnel exit jet velocity (%)  εkc   ‐ error in the calculated axial induced velocity due to discrepancy between     tunnel‐exit velocity and true free‐windspeed (%)  εQ   ‐ error in the derived blade torque loading due to errors in the inflow     measurements (%) εT   ‐ error in the derived blade axial thrust loading due to errors in the inflow      measurements (%)  εwa.                                                                                                                                                                                        Yap ‐ axial distance of plane parallel to rotorplane at which induced velocity     distribution is computed using prescribed‐wake or free‐wake vortex model      (m)           Greek Nomenclature    α   ‐ angle of attack (deg) or viscous core growth constant  αο ‐ zero lift angle of attack (deg)  αe ‐ equivalent angle of attack. accounting for unsteady effects (deg)  αsweep ‐ sweep angle of attack (deg)  αs ‐ stalling angle of attack (deg)  α     ‐ rate of change of angle of attack with time (deg/s)  β  ‐ blade coning angle (deg) χ  ‐ rotor axis tilt angle (deg) χs   ‐ wake skew angle (deg) δ  ‐ cut‐off distance (m) δv    ‐ viscous core diffusivity coefficient  ε   ‐ vortex filament strain  εa   ‐ relative error in ua.c   ‐ error in the flow velocity at the lifting line obtained from the inflow     measurements (%)  φ   ‐ rotor or blade azimuth angle (deg) or indicial response function derived by     Wagner for unsteady aerofoils  φp ‐ angular position of hot‐film probe (deg)  φw ‐ angular position of wake vortex filament node in prescribed wake vortex       model (deg)  γ    ‐ parameter used in the cosine segmentation of radial segments of lifting lines      (deg)  λ  ‐ rotor operating tip speed ratio  µ   ‐ blade aspect ratio  µa ‐ air dynamic viscosity (Ns/m2)  ϕ    ‐ local inflow angle (deg)  ϕ0..

MAX   ‐ maximum bound circulation along elliptical wing (m2/s)  ΓB.2D   ‐ bound circulation based on 2D lift coefficient (m2/s)  ΓB.3D   ‐ bound circulation based on 3D lift coefficient (m2/s)  ΓT   ‐ trailing circulation (m2/s)  ΓS   ‐ shed circulation (m2/s)  x  .                                                                                                                                                                                          effects (deg)  ω     ‐ bandwidth used in smoothing method using the Gaussian kernel  θ  ‐ local blade pitch angle (deg)  θtip   ‐ pitch angle at blade tip (deg)  ρ  ‐ density of air (kg/m3) τ  ‐ index to denote time step  τtot ‐ total number of equally‐spaced time steps in one whole rotor revolution   τp  ‐ index to denote azimuthal location of point at which the induced velocity is      computed by  prescribed‐wake or free‐wake vortex model  υ   ‐ kinematic viscosity of air (m2/s)  ξn ‐ relative error when varying n (%)  ξfw   ‐ relative error due to far wake (%)  ξwp   ‐ relative error for wake periodicity (%)  ξ∆φ ‐ relative error when varying ∆φ (%)  ζ    ‐ vorticity (s‐1)  ∆  ‐ phase shift angle used in the Boeing‐Vertol model for dynamic stall (deg)  ∆φ   ‐ azimuthal step for one rotor revolution (deg)  ∆τ   ‐ incremental time step (sec)  Ω  ‐ rotor angular speed (rad/s)  Θ  ‐ collective pitch angle of blade (deg)  Ψ  ‐ yaw angle (deg)  Γ   ‐ circulation (m2/s)  ΓB   ‐ bound circulation (m2/s)  ΓB.

                                                                                                                                                                                        List of Developed Software Codes      HAWT_BEM – Blade‐element momentum model    HAWT_LFIM – Model to derive aerodynamic loads from wake inflow measurements    HAWT_PVC  –  Prescribed‐wake vortex model    HAWT_FWC – Free‐wake vortex model            xi  .

  an  enlarged  global  economy and an improved standard of living all contribute to greater demands for energy. A major barrier is cost since wind energy  has to face fierce competition from conventional sources of energy based on fossil‐fuels and  nuclear  energy.000 Terawatt hours (TWh)/year.  The  1  . Introduction          Energy  is  fundamental  to  economic  and  social  development.  We  are  still  heavily  dependent  on  oil  resources  which  will  eventually  become depleted within a few decades.  Climate  change  is  not  just  an  environmental  threat  but  also  an  economic  threat. Energy consumption is also expected to increase up  to  about  40%  by  the  year  2010.  An  increasing  world  population.     Wind  energy  is  one  of  the  most  effective  power  technologies  that  is  ready  today  to  be  deployed  globally  on  a  scale  that  can  aid  in  tackling  this  problem. [23]).  more  severe  droughts  and  health  issues  will  increase  insurance  costs radically in the future. This is considered  to be very high for an industry manufacturing heavy equipment.  which  is  over  twice  as  large  as  the  projection  for  the  world’s  entire  electricity  demand  in  2020  (EWEA. Backed by effective policies.  we  are  facing  the  greatest  threat  to  our survival  on  planet  earth:  global  climate  change. cost reductions in the technology of 30 to 50% are still necessary.  The  initial  capital  cost  of  the  turbines  also  decreased from 3500Euros/KW to about 1000Euros/KW.  Lack  of  resource  is  therefore  unlikely  to  be  a  barrier  to  a  penetration of wind energy in the energy market.                                                                                                                              Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                              1.  At  the  same  time. especially in Europe which has a share of 70%  of the global wind energy industry. the wind energy industry  is experiencing a remarkable growth of 20‐25% per annum (EWEA. the  size of wind turbines increased rapidly from about 15m diameter having a capacity of 50kW  to  about  120m  having  a  capacity  of  5MW.  significant  further  cost  reductions  are  necessary.  Wind  energy  is  a  significant  and  powerful  resource  and  is  safe.  clean  and  abundant.  Research  and  development  work  could  contribute  up  to  40%  of  those  reductions. A number of assessments confirm  that  the  world’s  wind  resources  are  enormous  and  well  distributed.  The  total  available  resource that is technically recoverable is estimated to be 53.  Rising  sea  levels.  In  the  IEA  report  “Long‐ Term Research and Development Needs for Wind Energy for the Time Frame 2000 to 2020”  [94].  On  the  dawn  of  the  21st  century  we  are  being  faced  with  one  of  the  toughest  challenges  ever  –  that  of  securing  energy  supply.  Greenpeace.  [24]). In the past 20 years.  wind  energy  still  has  a  long  way  to  go  before  it  reaches  its  full  potential  in  terms  of  the  large‐scale  supply  of  electricity.  it  has  been  estimated  that  if  wind  energy  is  going  to  supply  10%  of  the  world’s  electricity needs by 2020.  While  it  can  already  be  cost  competitive  with  newly  built  conventional  plants  at  sites  with  good  wind  speeds.  It  is  being  very  successful in penetrating the energy market.  Despite  the  great  progress  made.

  materials.          Electrical power Mechanical generation   Control transmission   Siting   Aerodynamics     Design Objectives Operation &  Structure 1.  wind  turbines  must  be  adapted  to  specific  meteorological  and  topographical  characteristics  of  each  particular  site. It is composed  of  subsystems working  together  in  a  tightly  coupled  manner.  reduce  overall  costs  and  maximize  the  lifetime  of  the  system  (see  Fig.2). Basically three  types  of  models  are  integrated  in  the  design  process:  (1)  an  aerodynamics  model  that  estimates  the  aerodynamic  performance. The design approach is multi‐disciplinary and  integrates  several  branches  of  engineering  including  aerodynamics.    1. 1.  mechanical. (2) a structures model that will calculate the total loads  and induced stresses on the load bearing components resulting from the aerodynamic loads  (computed by the aerodynamics model) and due to gravity and dynamics.  1.  control  and  manufacturing  engineering.  Furthermore.   These objectives will determine the minimum cost of energy (COE).                                                                                                                              Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                            challenge faced by the wind energy community is to produce more cost‐competitive wind  turbines through highly optimized designs.    A  typical  design  process  starts  off  with  the  identification  of  sub‐systems  and  components  making up the whole wind energy conversion system (WECS) (see Fig.1).  This  makes  the  design  of  a  Horizontal‐Axis  Wind  Turbine  (HAWT)  a  complex  process  that  is  characterized  by  several  trade‐off  decisions  aimed  at  finding  the  optimum overall performance and economy. This model will  2  .1 The Role of Aerodynamics in Wind Turbine Design        A wind turbine is a complex system working in a complex environment. Maximize Energy Yield maintenance   2. Reduce Costs   3.1 – Design considerations for a Wind Energy Conversion System. Maximize Lifetime   Grid connection Materials     Fatigue Wind farm layout     Manufacturing Foundation                                           Figure 1.  The  design  objectives  are  to  maximize  energy  yield.  loads  and  annual  energy  yield  (AEP)  for  a  given  rotor geometry and operating site.  electrical.

 Hendriks et al.  It  is  subject  to  three  constraints  that  may  be  conflicting:  (1)  Maximization of power coefficient.    As  illustrated  in  Fig.  1.2). blade shape) that will yield  the  lowest  COE  possible.  together  with  other  costs  required to install and operate the system at the installation site. The aerodynamic design of a HAWT rotor has the objective of  providing the optimized geometry (diameter. The cost model calculates  the  equivalent  annual  total  cost  (ATC)  taking  into  account  all  costs  incurred  over  the  expected  lifetime  of  the  system.2.  the  annual  cost  of  energy  (COE)  is  determined  (equal  to  the  ratio  AEP/ATC)  (see  Fig. For offshore wind turbines. the design process becomes more  complicated  since  it  should  cater  for  more  costly  foundations  and  for  a  tougher  environment.                                                                                                                                     Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                            also estimate the fatigue lifetime of each component.  Mechanical &  Wind speed    electrical losses distribution (Weibull)     Annual Energy Power Coefficient  Power  Power of  produced at site   of rotor of rotor wind turbine (AEP)   Rotor  aerodynamic performance       Aerodynamics model   Objective:   Aerodynamic loads Cost of Energy COE=AEP/ATC     Cost & weight  Cost & weight  Cost & weight Structural  model of rotor of nacelle of tower   Gearbox Yaw drive   Blade Low speed shaft Nacelle structure Hub   Loads & material stress Brakes Controls   Blade flange Generator Other equipment   Cost model Annual Total Cost (ATC)   Maintenance Foundation   Remote monitoring Transport   Grid connection Installation   Other Costs                              Figure 1. number of blades. and (3) a cost model that computes the  expenses  required  to  manufacture  the  WECS  components. and (3) Reduction of  blade loads (see Fig.  aerodynamics  plays  a  vital  role  in  the  design  process  as  it  will  determine  the  AEP  and  the  aerodynamic  loads  which  in  turn  influence  the  costs  of  the  different WECS components. 3  .  Finally.2 – Typical scheme of models for design optimization. 1.  For  description  of  integrated  design  approaches  for  offshore  wind  turbines  refer to work of Kuhn [43]). structure and cost models are altered systematically  to yield the minimum COE.  the  different variables of the aerodynamic. [38] and van der Tempel [92]. (2) Maximization of energy yield.3).  1.  Throughout  the  design  optimization.

 However to maximize the  energy yield. The interaction between these aerodynamic loads and the dynamic behavior  of the system components is known as aeroelasticity. A higher cut‐out wind speed will contribute  to a larger energy yield since benefit will be taken from the high windspeeds (which have  larger energy intensities).                                                                                                                                      Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                           Maximizing the power coefficient will increase the energy yield.  Yet  doing  so  may  increase  the  blade  weight  and  thus the gravitational loads of the supporting structure.     It should be clear that although profound knowledge of aerodynamics is an indispensable  requirement.  the  unsteady  aerodynamic  loads  may  cause  the  WECS  to  become  aeroelastically  unstable  which causes the large vibrations that reduce the fatigue lifetime of the system. This adds to the computational power required by design software tools.        Maximize Power  Maximize Energy          Coefficient Yield       Reduce Loads                                                                                    Figure 1. The aerodynamic loads on the blades act as  external loads. [81]).                                    4  . A prequiste is to ensure that the wind  turbine is aeroelastically stable during the operations. aerodynamic design focused only on maximizing the power coefficient  CP. the power coefficient should be maximized over a wide range of windspeeds.  especially  in  stall‐regulated  turbines  with  the  detriment  of  reducing  the  annual  energy yield (Snel.  This  is  helpful  for  sites  where  the  mean  annual  windspeed  tends  to  be  on  the  low  side.    Wind turbine operation is limited by a cut‐out windspeed beyond which the rotor has to be  brought to a standstill due to high windspeeds.  These  depend  on  the  deformation  (which  may  be  unsteady)  of  the  system  components in response to the external loads. But it was discovered that the maximum CP was only achieved at a small range of wind  speeds.  In the earlier days. Aeroelastic  analysis  demands  that  aerodynamic  models  inherently  form  part  of  structural  dynamics  models. On the other hand.3 – Constraints for aerodynamic design.  it  alone  is  not  sufficient  to  determine  the  loads  and  stresses  on  the  WECS  components. this will push to greater structural demands  resulting from higher loads.  In a complex operating environment. Increasing the chord and twist of the blades will help in increasing  the  energy  yield  at  low  windspeeds.

 resulting in significantly larger aerofoil  coefficients. Stall delay will be described in Chapter 3. The air flowing around the blades  causes the latter to experience lift (resulting from bound circulation around the blades) and  drag forces. The combined action of these forces yields an output torque at the rotor shaft.  which  is  a  schematic  reconstruction  of  the  wake  formed  by  a  rotating  blade  as  observed in flow visualization and field measurements.           Bound circulation r/R   ΓB Blade tip       Rotor hub   Trailing vortices     Blade root   Shed vortices   Rotor axis     Vortex core   ΓRoot   wind ΓTip   Vortex sheet        Figure 1.    The wake from the rotating blade comprises a vortical shear layer or vortex sheet. a Horizontal‐Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a propeller‐type rotor that  extracts  energy  from  the  wind. as shown  in  Fig.    Each rotor blade may be considered as a rotating wing. This is especially noted at high angles of attack when the  phenomenon of stall‐delay is known to take place.  Since  the  turbine  extracts  kinetic  energy  from  the  fluid  stream.4.  The  momentum change of the air will exert an axial thrust on the rotor. Due to the fact that the blades rotate instead of moving linearly  as in a normal wing.4 – Schematic diagram showing wake developed by a rotating blade of a wind turbine. the local aerofoil lift and drag coefficients may be different from those  obtained in 2D wind tunnel data.2 Principles of HAWT Aerodynamics        In simple words.  The rotor also imparts a  swirl velocity component to the air in a direction opposite to that of the shaft.     5  .  the  air  flowing  through  the  rotor  experiences  a  decrease  in  the  velocity.  thereby producing power.  1.                                                                                                                                      Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                           1.

4.  The  former  circulation  is  composed  of  two  vector  components:  trailing  circulation  (ΓΤ)  that  is  released  from  the  blades  in  a  direction  perpendicular  to  the  blade’s  trailing  edge  and  is  related  to  the  spanwise  variation  of  the  bound  circulation  ( ∂Γ B ∂r ).  The  wake  formed behind a HAWT consists of vortex sheets. one per blade (as described in Fig. When the wind speed and rotor speed are constant with time.  The  wake  (slipstream)  boundary  which  is  usually  defined  by  the  radial  location of the tip vortices.5  –  Schematic  diagram  showing  helical  wake  developed  by  a  wind  turbine  in  axial  conditions. The wake vorticity is responsible for slowing down of the air as it flows through the  rotor.  as  illustrated  in  Fig.        Trailing vortices ΓTip         ΓRoot   U         ΓRoot         ΓTip    Figure  1.  It  will  also  alter  the  local  angle  of  attack  at  the  blades.5.                                                                                                                              Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                            The  circulation  distribution  in  the  vortex  sheet  originates  from  the  bound  circulation  (ΓB)  developed  at  the  blades.  The  root  vortex  is  usually  distorted  by  the  presence  of  the  turbine  nacelle  and  consequently  it  is  very  difficult  to  observe  it  in  experiments.  The geometry of the vortex sheet emerging from the blades will change such that the edges  will roll‐up (similar to that observed on a wing in linear flight) to form a tip and root vortex  as shown in Fig. 6  . The vortex sheets will roll‐up to form a  tip  and  root  vortex. 1. shed circulation (ΓS) that is released from the blades in a direction parallel to the  blade’s  trailing  edge  and  is  related  to  variation  of  bound  circulation  with  time  ( ∂Γ B ∂t ).  that trace a helical path as a result of rotor rotation. there is  no shed circulation in the wake.    A HAWT rotor is normally oriented with the wind such that the axis of rotation is parallel  to  the  incoming  wind  velocity  vector  (often  referred  to  as  the  axial  condition).  1. 1.  thereby  influencing  the  aerodynamic forces.4). expands downstream as a consequence of the retardation of the  flow.

 but for both the understanding of the physics and also for     Trailing vortices     Shed vortices ΓTip       U   ΓRoot Ψ             ΓRoot       ΓTip          Figure  1.3 Current Status of Aerodynamic Design Models for Horizontal‐Axis Wind Turbines                           A yawed rotor is one which is operating with its axis of rotation not parallel to the incoming  wind  velocity  vector.    The  flow  field  across  a  wind  turbine  may  be  separated  intuitively  into  two  regions:  the  global  flow  field  which  extends  far  upstream  of  the  turbine  to  far  downstream  and  a  local  (rotor/blade) flow field which is the flow around the individual blades.  the  direction  of  the  wind changes frequently with respect to the rotor axis.  The  hysterisis  effects introduced by dynamic stall may have a negative effect on the aeroelastic damping  behaviour  of  wind  turbine  blades.  1.  Physically these two  parts are inherently tied together. As a result. 7  .  They  reduce  the  fatigue  lifetime  leaving  an  adverse  impact on the economics of the system.6  –  Schematic  diagram  showing  helical  wake  developed  by  a  wind  turbine  in  yawed  conditions.  In  the  real  operating  environment  of  a  HAWT. This yawed condition introduces a cyclic angle of  attack  at  the  blades  and  causes  the  helical  wake  to  become  skewed  as  shown  in  Fig. The phenomenon of dynamic stall will be described  in Chapter 3.           1.6.  yielding an unsteady and complex induction distribution at the rotorplane.  dynamic  stall  takes  place  causing  the  maximum  aerodynamic  loads  to  be  much  higher  than  those  predicted  by  2D  static  aerofoil  data. In fact the wake  is quite similar to that of a helicopter rotor in forward flight with the main difference being  that it expands instead of it contracts. The time‐dependent aerodynamic loads at the blades  will cause shed circulation in the wake. the turbine may operate  in yaw for considerable amounts of time. When the angle of attack at a blade section exceeds  the  aerofoil’s stalling  angle.

    In the past years. Other methods  are much more comprehensive..  the  increased  computer  power  that  will  become  available to the wind turbine designer will make it possible to integrate the more advanced  8  .  especially  free‐wake  vortex  methods  and  CFD. start/stop  sequences and standstill conditions). The interaction between the two   regions is strong: the flow in the global region determines the inflow condition at the rotor  blade  and  the  forces  on  the  blades  (which  can  be  seen  as  a  localized  pressure  change)  influences the flow in the global region.  they  are  still  too  computationally  expensive  to  be  fully  integrated  into  wind  turbine design codes.  but could then be easily adapted to model HAWTs.  Its  limitations  are  mostly  observed  when  treating  stalled  flows  and  unsteady conditions such as in rotor  yaw. Leishman.  Prescribed  or  Free‐wake  Vortex  methods.      It  is  often  thought  that  in  the  future.  Acceleration  Potential methods and CFD techniques. [99]). stall delay and dynamic stall) and (2) inflow models that correct for the uneven  induced velocity distribution at the rotorplane due to skewed wake effects in yaw as well as  for conditions of heavy and/or unsteady loading on the rotor. several corrections were added to BEM codes to improve their accuracy. An overview of these methods may be found in the  following references: (Snel. A brief overview of some of  these models will be presented in Chapter 3. Conlisk.  fast  and  robust  codes  are  required.  However.  Yet  unfortunately. Due to its relatively high computational  efficiency. The complexity of wind turbine design is prohibiting the use of these  more  elaborate  methods  that  are  systematically  used  today  in  other  aerodynamic  applications.3 Current Status of Aerodynamic Design Models for Horizontal‐        Axis Wind Turbines        Since  aerodynamic  modelling  should  ultimately  serve  as  a  design  tool. this theory is simple and lacks the  physics to model the complex flow fields around a rotor and consequently its accuracy may  be  unsatisfactory. The engineering models were developed using  experimental data or using the more advanced models. These were initially developed to treat propeller and helicopter aerodynamics. [50].  with  present  computer  capacity. many aeroelastic design codes still rely on the Blade‐Element‐Momentum (BEM)  theory for predicting the aerodynamic loads. [18].  different  wind  turbines  should  be  modelled over wide range of operating conditions (including yaw.     Various  mathematical  models  exist  to  model  the  aerodynamic  loads  on  rotors:  Blade‐ Element‐Momentum  methods. extreme gusts. [80].           1.  Throughout  the  design  process.  These  mainly  took  the  form  of  engineering  models  that  mainly  fall  under  two  classifications:  (1)  aerofoil  data  models  that  correct  2D  static  aerofoil  for  3D  effects  (blade  tip/root loss.      1. it may be convenient to treat them separately. van Bussel [15] and Vermeer  et al. including CFD.3 Current Status of Aerodynamic Design Models for Horizontal‐Axis Wind Turbines                           modelling.

  Further  research is required to investigate this.  it  was  shown  that  this  method  is  also  sufficiently  accurate  for  stalled  conditions  provided  that  reliable  aerofoil data is used.  In  the  recent  years. [70]). more effort should be made to obtain more reliable  aerofoil  data  from  wind  tunnel  rotor  experiments  and  CFD. This  would  make  research  in  the  field  of  BEM  improvements  futile.    • Thirdly.  they  do  not  necessarily  always  yield  better  results  than  BEM.. Accordingly.  A  typical  example  would  be the inclusion of complex wave and foundation design models for offshore systems.  However.  one  should  keep  in  mind  the  fact  that  the  increased  computer  power  that  will  be  available  in  the  future  for  more  sophisticated  aerodynamic  modelling  will  be  partly  limited  by  the  structural  dynamicists’  request  to  employ  more  accurate  (thus  more  computational  demanding)  structural  analysis  codes.                                            9  .  This  has  been  realized  in  a  recent  European project  (Schepers et al.  Also.  considering  the  present  situation.    • Secondly.                                                                                                                        Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                           models in aeroelastic design codes and thus replacing BEM‐based models completely.  it  is  still  unclear  to  what  extent  is  BEM  accurate  in  yaw  when  reliable  aerofoil  data  is  used.  even  though  the  more  elaborate  methods  are  comprehensive.  the  BEM  method  is  considerably  accurate  when  treating  attached  flow  conditions  (low  angles  of  attack)  in  axial  flow.  there  are  still  various  reasons  why  effort  should  still  be  devoted  to  improving BEM codes:   • First  of  all.

                                                                                                                        Chapter 1 ‐ Introduction                                                     10  .

 Aim of Thesis and Approach      2..  Certain  aerodynamic  phenomena  associated  with  wind  turbine  blades are still poorly known and are therefore challenging to predict accurately.  even  though  the  simplest  operating  conditions  of  a  wind  turbine  were  being  considered  (i. For instance this  was observed a few years ago.e.  In many situations. in particular  when the angle of attack at the blades was large and in yawed conditions.  fundamental  limits  exist  in  the  validity  of  models  used  for  wind  turbine  design  and  certification. When comparing the  predicted  results  by  different  aerodynamics/aeroelastic  codes  from  various  universities/institutions  with  the  measured  data  considerable  inconsistencies  were  found  (Simms  et  al.  In  some  cases.  To‐date.  However. as in the  case of stalled blades and the unsteady effects experienced in yawed conditions. The controlled  environment offered by a wind tunnel provides a set of measurements that is free from the  uncertainties  caused  by  the  different  atmospheric  effects  that  are  always  present  in  open  field tests of turbines. To improve the predictions of BEM‐based design codes.  using  the  experimental  data  to  improve  these  models  is  not  an  easy  task. BEM codes were extensively tested against experimental measurements. the steady and unsteady aerofoil data of a wind turbine blade may differ  considerably  from  that  normally  obtained  in  2D  static  wind  tunnel  experiments.    Wind  tunnel  tests  on  model  turbines  are  indispensable  to  have  a  better  understanding  of  the underlying physics and to improve engineering models for design codes.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                             2. a two‐bladed wind turbine was extensively tested in the NASA Ames  wind tunnel for a wide range of operating conditions (Schreck.1 Problem Statement        In the past years.  a  major  challenge  for  researchers  is  to  better  understand  the  aerodynamic  issues  associated  with  wind  turbines  to  develop  more  rigorous  models  suitable  for  a  wider  range  of  applications  and  to  better  integrate  and  validate  these  models  with  reference  to  good  quality  experimental  measurements.  deviations  of  the  BEM  predictions  from  the  measurements  exceeded  200%. in year 2000.  These  models should also be computationally efficient if they are to be used in design codes. For a given  aerofoil geometry.  As  explained  by  Leishman  [50]. in a blind comparison study organized by the  NREL. In this study. more reliable  aerofoil  data  models  and  inflow  correction  models  are  required. the reliability of such codes was found to be unacceptable.  blade  pitch and yaw angle).  This has shown that the aerodynamic interaction between the rotor  blades  and  the  wake  is  non‐linear  and  more  three‐dimensional  in  nature  than  for  fixed  wings  in  linear  flight.  uniform  windspeed  and  constant  rotor  speed.  Two  major  problems  are  encountered:  11  .  [78]). [73]).

 al.  the  following  set  of  measurement  data  would  be  ideally  required:    (1) Surface  pressure  measurements  using  pressure  tappings  at  different  radial  locations on the blades.     12  .  a  complete  set  of  data comprising  the  above  three  measurement  data  sets  for  a  wind  turbine  operating  over  a  wide  range  of  operating  states  in  both  axial  and yawed conditions is still presently unavailable in the wind energy community.    The angle of attack may be estimated directly from detailed inflow measurements but these  are  not  always  available. Because of the flow field across the rotor is complex.    (2) Measurements of the 3D inflow distribution in the near wake and at the rotorplane  using  different  anemometry  techniques  such  as  hot‐film  anemometry. the probes may distort the flow over the blades and this may cause errors  in blade surface measurements.  Alternatively  flow  direction  probes  may  be  installed  at  different  radial  locations  of  one  blade. the influences of the  unsteady  shed  vorticity  and  the  effects  resulting  from  the  skewed  wake  will  make  the  required correction very difficult to establish. 2. When dealing with yawed conditions.  PIV  and  laser‐doppler techniques.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           • Problem I: Wind tunnel experimental data is usually rare and limited.  To  be  able  carry  out  a  detailed  experimental  investigation  of  a  turbine’s  aerodynamic  behaviour.  This  is  usually  accomplished  using  smoke  visualization  techniques  (Vermeer et al. Also. This is because turbine  testing  is  very  expensive.1. [99]). A correction has to be then applied to estimate the angle of attack from the inflow  angle.2.  the correction that is usually obtained from simple 2D wind tunnel calibration procedures is  unreliable. the normal and chordwise aerodynamic loads may be derived.    Despite  the  fact  that  over  the  past  years  various  databases  of  wind  tunnel  data  have  been  produced.  Also  certain  parameters  may  be  very  difficult  to  measure  accurately.       • Problem  II:  There  is  a  difficulty  in  determining  accurately  the  angle  of  attack.  just  in  front  of  the  leading  edge  to  measure  the  local  inflow  angle (LFA) as shown in Fig.  location  of  the  tip  vortices  and  the  wake  skew  angle  in  the  case  of  yawed  conditions.  To  be  able  to  derive the local aerofoil lift and drag coefficients Cl and Cd from the measured Cn and Ct  obtained  from  blade  pressure  measurements  knowledge  of  the  angle  of  attack  is  required as illustrated in Figure 2. as discussed by Rooij et. the inflow angle may differ significantly from the angle  of attack. [66]. Though.  By integrating these pressures normal and along the local  chordline. due to the influence of the bound circulation at  the blades and the wake vorticity.    (3) Measurements  of  the  wake  geometry  to  establish  the  expansion  of  the  wake..

 The accuracy of this method is limited by the capability of the BEM theory  in  predicting  accurately  the  induction  factors  at  the  rotorplane.2 – Measuring the local flow angle using a flow direction probe. especially in high loading and yawed conditions.  was  used  in  BEM  codes. even though the same blade pressure measurements were being used. [44]. Bruining et al. This method has been applied by Snel et al.  correlation  with  the  experimental  load  measurements  generally  improved.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                             Cthrust   Cn   θ Cd   Cl α    line   chord   Ctorque   plane of rotation Ct θ   α Vn   Vr Cl = Cn cos α + Ct sin α   α Cd = Cn sin α − Ct cos α   Vt                  Figure 2. [13] and later on by  Laino et al.  derived  from  blade  pressure  measurements in conjunction with any of the above methods for finding the angle of attack.    Different  researchers  used  different  methods  for  estimating  the  angle  of  attack  and  consequently  discrepancies  resulted  in  the  derived  lift  and drag data.    Another  method  to  determine  the  angle  of  attack  is  the  so‐called  inverse  BEM  method  which  makes  use  of  the  Blade‐Element‐Momentum  equations  to  estimate  the  axial  and  rotation  induction  factors  from  the  known  blade  loading.    Research  showed  that  when  the  new  aerofoil  data.1– Blade section aerodynamic load coefficients and relative velocity flow components.           line   chord   flow direction probe plane of rotation     α   LFA Vr                        Figure 2.  This  method  would  not  always be reliable. As a  13  .  thereby  finding  the  angle  of  attack. [82]. Yet the problem of accurately deriving the angle of attack for the measurements  remained  a  major  source  of  uncertainty.

 a detailed investigation of the aerodynamics of wind turbines in both axial  and yawed conditions was carried out based on wind tunnel measurements with the aim of  providing a better understanding of the limitations of the BEM theory.  It  goes  without  saying  that.  it  is  very  helpful  that  the  experimental  data  consists  of  the  following  data  sets:  blade  pressure  measurements  (to  derive  the  aerodynamic loading).                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           result.  In this way.1 above.2 Aim of Thesis        In this thesis.  The methodologies were developed for two particular cases:     (i) Case  A:  The  wind  turbine  experimental  data  only  consists  of  detailed  inflow  measurements in the near wake and wake geometry data    (ii) Case  B:  The  wind  turbine  experimental  data  only  consists  of  blade  pressure  measurements. inflow measurements in the near wake and the rotorplane as well as  measurements  concerning  the  wake  geometry.  it  will  impose  restrictions  to  which  detail  the  aerodynamic  analysis  can  be  performed. a deeper aerodynamic study could be performed.  it  may  be  argued  that  the  uncertainty  in  deriving  the  angle  of  attack  is  a  major  stumbling block to carry out a clear quantitative assessment of the trustworthiness of BEM‐ based codes.    The  experimental  data  and  the  new  aerodynamic  data  derived  using  the  respective  methodology  were  used  to  carry  out  a  thorough  assessment  of  a  BEM  code.  The  major  scope of this assessment was to provide guidelines that would be useful in developing new  engineering models. to be able to accomplish a detailed experimental  investigation  of  wind  turbine  aerodynamics.    As already mentioned in section 2.     2.  when  any  of  these  three  data  sets  is  unavailable.                  14  .    Each methodology is described in detail and its limitations examined.  This  study  focused  on  developing  new  methodologies  that  make  use  of  limited  experimental  data  in  conjunction  with  advanced  aerodynamic models to derive the additionally required aerodynamic performance data for  both axial and yawed rotors.

  87.2 above.  The  data  collected  from  these  experiments  [73].  This  is  acceptable  since  small  angles  of  attack  were  being  considered  (attached  flow  conditions).  95]. It is being used as a benchmark by the wind  turbine  aerodynamics  community  in  assessing  the  validity  of  improved  aerodynamics  codes  based  on  BEM.  is  very  extensive  and  is  currently  being  analyzed  by  several institutions through the IEA Annex XX. A series of experiments  were  conducted  on  this  rotor  for  both  axial  and  yawed  conditions  in  the  open‐jet  wind  tunnel  facility  of  Delft  University  of  Technology  with  the  close  collaboration  of  another  Ph.  The  results  from  this  method  were  then compared with those predicted by a BEM code.  Very  briefly.    Unfortunately.3.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           2.      2.2 Research work on the NREL Phase VI wind tunnel turbine    The second part of the project dealt with the NREL Phase VI wind turbine.3 Approach        In  the  research  work.  In  these  15  .  the  apparatus  was  incapable  of  measuring  the  pressure  distributions  over  the blades. The experiments consisted of the following:    a. Detailed  hot‐film  measurements  in  the  near  wake  along  planes  parallel  to  the  rotorplane (both upstream and downstream of the rotorplane)  b.  44. The drag coefficients are estimated from 2D wind  tunnel  static  aerofoil  data.  Finally  the  aerodynamic  loads  at  the  blades  are  computed  using  the  blade‐element  theory  equations. Smoke visualization experiments to trace the tip vortex paths of the turbine wake and  thus obtain detailed regarding the wake geometry. The application of this methodology was limited to attached flow  conditions (low angles of attack) only for which unsteady aerofoil models are known to be  reliable. This turbine was  tested  in  the  NASA  Ames  80ft  X  120ft  wind  tunnel  way  back  in  the  year  2000. A  methodology was developed to derive the time‐dependent aerodynamic load distributions  at  the  rotor  blades  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  in  conjunction  with  an  advanced  unsteady aerofoil model.     2. The advanced unsteady aerofoil model is used to derive the  lift coefficient distributions at the blades.  CFD  or  Vortex  Methods  [19.  the  sequence  of  steps  in  applying  this  method  are  as  follows:    the  angle of attack and flow relative velocities at the blades are first estimated directly from the  hot‐film inflow measurements.1 Research work on the TUDelft wind tunnel turbine    The first part of the project dealt with the TUDelft model turbine.  90.D researcher Wouter Haans.  the  experimental  data  of  two  different  wind  turbines  were  considered:  (1)  The  Delft  University  of  Technology  (TUDelft)  wind  tunnel  model  turbine  and (2) the NREL Phase VI wind turbine.  45.  72.  usually  referred  to  as  the  NASA  Ames  Unsteady  Aerodynamics  Experiments  (UAE).3. The situation was therefore identical to Case A described in section 2.

  The  situation  is  therefore  identical  to  Case  B  described  in  section  2.  time‐accurate  blade  pressure  measurements  were  taken  with  the  rotor  operating in both axial and yawed conditions together with strain gauge measurements for  the output torque and the root flap/lead moments. The process is repeated until convergence in the angle of attack is achieved.  However  a  free‐wake  vortex  model  is  a  more  realistic representation because the wake geometry is allowed to develop freely depending  on the circulation that is shed from the blades into the global flow field. However.  In  this  project  a  novel  and  comprehensive  methodology  is  being proposed for using the blade pressure measurements inconjunction with a free‐wake  vortex  model  to  estimate  the  angle  of  attack  distributions  at  the  blades  more  accurately.  Using  the  Kutta‐Joukowski  law.    The  sequence of steps in applying this method are as follows:  Initially.  together with the inflow distributions at the rotorplane and wake geometry.  it  is  possible  to  estimate  the  bound  circulation  at  the  blades  which  may  then  be  used  to  generate  the  free‐wake. detailed inflow measurements  at  the  rotorplane  were  not  carried  out. this method was applied by Tangler et al.        16  . This is then used together with the values  of Cn and Ct obtained from the blade pressure measurements to estimate the lift coefficients  at  the  blades.  Emphasis here is made in determining the accuracy to which the BEM theory is capable to  model aerodynamic loads in highly stalled and yawed conditions if reliable 3D aerofoil data  are used.  2.    Fig.  Thus the circulation in the wake corresponds to that  around  the  blades. This is even more  important for yawed conditions since the resulting complex skewed wake geometry is more  difficult to prescribe. Another advantage of using a free‐wake vortex method concerns the  fact that the wake geometry is inherently part of the solution.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           experiments.  the  bound  circulation  distribution  at  the  blades is then determined and prescribed to the free‐wake vortex model to generate the free  vortical wake. [90. which otherwise could be obtained using time‐ consuming smoke‐visualization experiments.     The  proposed  methodology  for  coupling  the  blade  pressure  measurements  with  a  free‐ wake  vortex  model  is  based  on  the  principle  that.2  above.  in  a  wind  turbine  wake. a spanwise distribution  for the angle for attack is assumed at the blades. Thus it is possible to derive  the pitch and expansion of the helical wake. 91] but using a prescribed vortex  model  and  treating  axial  conditions  only.  Originally.3  summarises  the  main  problems  and  possible  solution  methodologies  proposed  in  this project for using limited experimental data to investigate in detail the aerodynamics of  wind turbines and perform a thorough assessment of BEM‐based design codes.  it  may  be  assumed that vorticity is conserved.  From  the  blade  pressure  measurements. The new 3D lift  and drag data together with the derived inflow distributions at the rotorplane are then used  to  assess  the  improvement  in  BEM  load  predictions  in  axial  and  yawed  conditions. The induced velocity at the blades is estimated and used to calculate a new  angle of attack.

  This  model  is  somewhat  different  than  other  free‐wake  vortex methods that rely on aerofoil data to iteratively determine the blade loading. It was  specifically designed to be used in the proposed method for finding the angle of attack.3  ‐  The  main  problems  and  possible  solution  methodologies  proposed  in  this  project  for  using  limited  experimental  data  to  investigate  in  detail  the  aerodynamics  of  wind  turbines  and  perform a thorough assessment of BEM‐based design codes. especially for yawed rotor conditions.      Two Problem Cases considered in Project     Case A: Case B:   Experimental data consists of detailed inflow measurements Experimental data consists of blade pressure measurements   and wake geometry data but blade pressure measurements  but detailed inflow measurements and wake geometry data  are not available are not available     Possible Solution Methodology: Estimate aero‐ Possible Solution Methodology: Use blade pressure  dynamic loads from inflow measurements using  measurements in conjunction with a free‐wake vortex   unsteady aerofoil model model to derive the angle of attack together with    This methodology was applied on the TUDelft rotor inflow distributions at rotorplane and wake geometry   This methodology was applied on the NREL rotor   Figure  2. From this prescription. The  input  to  this  code  is  a  prescribed  spanwise  distribution  of  bound  circulation  that  may  be  time‐dependent.1) were used as a bases for the validation. blade pressure measurements   b.2  above)  was  developed  during  this  project.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                             Research Objective: To use experimental data to carry out a detailed investigation of HAWT aerodynamics    and to provide further insight for developing improved engineering models for BEM‐based design codes     Requirements: Experimental data should ideally consist of: a.      2.  wake geometry measurements     Problem Statement: The are two main problems:   (1) Experimental data meeting the above three requirements is usually unavailable (2) Methods used for deriving the angle of attack from measurements are still   unreliable.3 Development of Free‐wake Vortex Model    The  free‐wake  vortex  model  used  to  analyse  the  NREL  rotor  (see  section  2. detailed inflow measurements in the near wake    c.    The  project  also  focused  on  the  verification  and  validation  of  this  new  free‐wake  vortex  model. The hot‐film near wake inflow measurements carried out on the Delft wind turbine  (refer to section 2. These inflow measurements  were used together with the unsteady aerofoil theory and the Kutta‐ Joukowski theorm to  determine the bound circulation distributions at the blades. These distributions were then  17  . the code will generate a wake and then calculates  the 3D induced velocities at different points in the flow field of the rotor.3.3.3.

 Chapter  5  presents  the  details  of  the  free‐wake  model  developed  in  Phase  IV  together  with  its  verification  and  validation  undertaken  in  Phase  V.      2.      Derive bound circulation from hot‐film measurements. A brief literature  survey  of  various  engineering  models  developed  in  the  past  years  for  BEM  is  also  presented.  However  the  measurements are limited to attached flow conditions only. A limitation of this  approach  is  the  uncertainty  due  to  the  employed  unsteady  aerofoil  theory.  This  dissertation  documents  the  work  carried  out  as  follows:  In  Chapter 3. The latter then computed the wake induced velocities and  these were compared with the induced velocities obtained from the hot‐film measurements. 2.  Chapter  6  describes  the  analysis  18  .4). 2. for which the unsteady aerofoil  model  is  considerably  accurate.5 lists these phases  in  a  chronological  order.  Chapter 4 describes in detail the wind tunnel experiments and the aerodynamic  analysis carried out on the TUDelft turbine during Phases I.  smoke  visualization  experiments  were  also  carried  out  on  the  Delft  rotor  to  measure  the  location  of  the  tip  vortex  paths. a review of the BEM theory for a yawed HAWT is presented.4 Organization of Work      The research work was organized into different project phases.    unsteady aerofoil model and Kutta‐Joukowski theorm       Prescribe bound circulation to free‐wake vortex model to generate helical wake and    calculate induced velocities at rotorplane         Validation using hot‐film  Validation using smoke visualization    near wake inflow measurements measurements of tip vortex paths       Procedure: Procedure:   Compare induced velocities from free‐ Compare tip vortical locations from free‐   wake model with those from hot‐film  wake model with those from smoke    measurements visualization   Figure 2.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           prescribed to the vortex model.  Apart  from  inflow  measurements. 2.  The procedure for validating the vortex model is illustrated in Fig. II and III of the project. Fig.4 ‐ Validation procedure of developed free‐wake vortex model using measurement data from  the TUDelft wind tunnel rotor.4.  These  measurements  were  also  used  to  validate  the  free‐wake  vortex  model  (see Fig.

5 – Project Phases.         Phase I: Wind tunnel experiments on the TUDelft model turbine          Phase II: Use hot‐film measurements from experiments of Phase I together with unsteady aerofoil model to determine bound circulation and    aerodynamic loads on blades         Phase III: Assessment of BEM theory for attached flow conditions using the   TUDelft wind turbine as a case study and results from Phase I & Phase II         Phase IV: Development of free‐wake vortex model to be used in the proposed  method for finding angle of attack from blade pressure measurements          Phase V: Verification and validation of free‐wake vortex model using the TUDelft   experimental data obtained using Phase I       Phase VI: Application of proposed method for finding angle of attack from blade   pressure measurements & free‐wake vortex model to NREL wind    turbine         Phase VII: Assessment of BEM theory for attached & stalled conditions    using the NREL wind turbine as a case study and results from    Phase VI        Phase VIII: Guidelines for improving the reliability of BEM‐based design    codes                                                                                                   Figure 2.  From  this  study  further insight on the limitations of BEM codes was obtained and a number of guidelines on  how  the  reliability  of  such  codes  can  be  improved  are  presented  and  discussed.   19  .  These  guidelines are given in Chapter 7.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           accomplished  using  the  NREL  experimental  data  in  Phases  VI  and  VII.

 with the axis normal to this surface.    The  blade  is  considered  to  deflect  in  the  flapwise  direction.  • xp‐yp‐zp  axes  ‐  these  are  the  principal  bending  co‐ordinates.  edgewise  (lead‐lag)  deflections  are  neglected.    In Fig. The  rotor axis may be tilted in the vertical plane by a fixed angle χ.  where  the  zp axis  coincides with the blade’s elastic axis.5 Co‐Ordinate System Analysis        A  pre‐requisite  in  the  aerodynamic  modelling  of  horizontal‐axis  wind  turbines  in  axial  and  yawed  conditions  is  to  have  a  suitable  set  of  co‐ordinate  systems  to  be  able  to  define  accurately  the  position  and  velocity  vectors  of  each  blade  element  together  with  velocity  vectors  of  the  flow  field  in  three‐dimensional  space.  For  the  sake  of  simplicity.  The  required  co‐ordinate  systems.  about  the  yp  axis. In  the X‐Y‐Z  system. Ψ is the yaw angle. 2.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           2. It co‐incides with the yaw axis.  • η−ζ−ξ axes ‐ these are the principal co‐ordinates of the deformed blade along each  point on the elastic axis. The  angle between the zr axis and the z axis is equal to β. The  Xn‐Yn‐Zn co‐ordinate system shown in Fig. The Za axis coincides with the zr axis at φ equal to zero.6 is similar to the Xa‐Ya‐Za but has its origin at  O.e. 2.  which have been adapted from Spera [88] are displayed in Fig. 2.  the Z  axis  coincides  with  the  Z  axis  and  the  angle  between  the  Y  and Y axes is equal to Ψ.  T  lies  on  the  ground  and  vertically  below  O  such  that  distance  H  is  equal  to  the  tower  height. the y  axis becomes parallel to the Ya axis. The hub  centre is at F and is at a distance da from O along the rotor axis.     The coordinate systems whose origin is at F include the:    • xr‐yr‐zr axes ‐ these are rotating axes with the yr axis aligned with the rotor axis. When  β is equal to zero. Each blade may also have a  coning  angle  β  as  shown  in  the  diagram. The Z axis is vertical and aligned with the tower.6.  θ  is  equal  to  the  angle  between the x and  η axis at a given blade element and is equal to the local pitch angle. the X‐Y‐Z axes are the fixed reference system whose origin is at the pivot centre  at O. The Xt‐Yt‐Zt axes are identical to the X‐Y‐Z axes with the only difference that their  origin is at T. • Xa‐Ya‐Za axes ‐ these are non‐rotating axes with the Ya axis aligned with the rotor  axis.  φ is  the  azimuth  angle  of  the  first  blade  and  is  equal to zero when the blade is vertical and pointing upwards. For a rigid rotor these axes coincide with the xp‐yp‐zp axes.    The  coordinate  systems  that  are  located  locally  at  all  the  elements  of  each  rotor  blade  are  the:    • x‐y‐z axes ‐ these are located in the surface of revolution that a rigid blade would  trace in space. The tower base is located at  T.6.  i.  20  .

 yr . X     H     zr β y y θ   Zt x ζ   z. Yn   Deformed blade X Ψ   Rigid Y blade   Xn.  21  . zp ξ θ T   (Elastic axis)   η x Yt   Xt         Za zr   φ   Rotorplane     Rotor axis Ya       Y   Ψ     View standing in front of    rotor looking downstream Wind velocity   Xa                           Figure 2.6 ‐ Co‐ordinate systems used for modelling the wind turbines.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                             Za   Win   d ve Zn locit y Z. Z χ     F   da Rotor axis   χ O   Y   χ   Xa Ψ Ya .

 This will make it much easier to upgrade the  computer codes in the future to cater for aeroelastic effects.                                                                                             Chapter 2 –Aim of Thesis and Approach                           Transformation Matrices    G G A  vector  G in  the  X‐Y‐Z  reference  may  be  transformed  into  an  equivalent  vector E in  the  moving η−ζ−ξ reference frame by means of transformation matrix S where  G G                                                             Eη −ζ −ξ = S * G X −Y − Z     where                                                   S = A6 * A5 * A4 * A3 * A2 * A1   A1…A6  are  orthogonal  matrices  that  transform  from  one  co‐ordinate  system  to  another  where     ⎡ CosΨ SinΨ 0⎤ ⎡1 0 0 ⎤ ⎡Cosφ 0 − Sinφ ⎤   ⎢ ⎥ A2 = ⎢⎢0 1 − χ ⎥⎥ A1 = ⎢− SinΨ CosΨ 0⎥ A3 = ⎢⎢ 0 1 0 ⎥⎥   ⎢0 χ 1 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0 ⎣ ⎢⎣ Sinφ 0 Cosφ ⎥⎦   0 1⎥⎦     ⎡1 0 0 ⎤ ⎡Cosθ − Sinθ 0⎤ ⎡1 0 0 ⎤   ⎢ A4 = ⎢0 1 − β ⎥ ⎥ ⎢ A5 = ⎢ Sinθ Cosθ 0⎥ ⎥ A6 = ⎢⎢0 1 − v'⎥⎥   ⎢⎣0 β 1 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0 0 1⎥⎦ ⎢⎣0 v' 1 ⎥⎦     It is assumed that both  χ and  β are small (<50).                    22  . However these parameters were still included in the mathematical modelling  and the newly developed computer software. In  this thesis.  Also  the  blades  were  very  rigid  and  thus  v’  was  also  taken as zero. v’ is the local blade slope due to flexure. the two wind turbines considered were investigated for conditions of no coning  (β=00)  and  no  rotor  axis  tilt  (χ=00).

 At  the  rotor. incompressible  and with no swirl.  the  fluid  is  considered  to  be  inviscid.  Uy  changes  by  a  value  ua  and  the  flow  velocities  here become                                       U x = USin ( Ψ ) U y + ua = UCos ( Ψ ) + ua           U Skewed wake boundary Ψ UC nΨ o i sΨ US U’ Way upstream UC nΨ os Si Ψ U U’’ +u a Actuator disc UC nΨ Si o sΨ U +u a ' Way downstream Fig. 3.1. The flow velocities are resolved in the plane of  the rotor disc (Ux) and perpendicular to it (Uy). 77.1 The Simple Linear Momentum Theory for a Yawed Actuator          Disc  Under  the  linear  momentum  theory.  The  limitations  of  this  theory  are  discussed  and  a  brief  overview  of  various  BEM  engineering correction models developed over the past years is also presented. 3.1 ‐Yawed actuator disc in skewed flow.  3.    23  . It is assumed that only Uy is affected by the  presence  of the  rotor  plane. The turbine is modelled as an actuator disc (representing a turbine with  an infinite number of blades) which reduces the velocity component normal to it. The Blade–Element‐Momentum Theory       This chapter presents a review of the Blade‐Element‐Momentum (BEM) theory for yawed  HAWTs.  88]. In Fig.  the windspeed is U and the yaw angle is  Ψ.                                                                       Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                               3. It is mainly a reformulation of the theory to be found in many textbooks [53.

1 and 3.m is the axial induction factor that yields the maximum power coefficient  C P . 3.  24  . Max  at  a given yaw angle.2)  Define the axial thrust co‐efficient by                                                                                                                                    T                                                               (3.5)  [Cos ( Ψ ) + 2a ] 1 2 1.96* a1                                                 (3. m . [3] have obtained the following empirical equation for values of (‐a1)  larger than about 0.38 and at zero yaw angle:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           CT ( Ψ ) = 0.  For  a  yawed  rotor.4a  is  invalid  for  high  loading  conditions  in  which  for  CT  approaches  and  exceeds  unity.3 and  putting ua = a1U the following expression for CT results in                                                                                                                       CT ( a1 .    Using the above simple theory. The mathematical solution for Eqt. By substituting Eqts.5776 − 0. 3.4a)    Eqt.                                                                       Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                             These yield a resultant flow velocity at the disc equal to                                                                                                                                     U ' = U 2 Sin2Ψ + (UCosΨ + u )2                                               (3.  Glauert  [30]  expresses  the  momentum  equation  for  the  axial thrust T as                                                                      T = 2 ρ uaU ' A                                                                 (3. Since a wind turbine in its normal operating condition extracts  energy from the fluid stream. Max a1.  it  can  also  be  proved that uaʹ is twice ua.  Anderson et al.4b)    To the authors’ knowledge there is yet no empirical equation available similar to Eqt. m ) [Cos ( Ψ ) + a ] 3 2 2 (                                    CP .5 is presented in Appendix A.  3. m                                 (3.2 in Eqt. Using the  Bernoulli  energy  equation  together  with  the  linear  momentum  equation.4b that  accounts for yawed flow in HAWTs.1)            a   Far downstream the velocity perpendicular to the rotorplane is equal to Uy  + uaʹ. it can be shown that the maximum power coefficient that can  be achieved by a yawed turbine disk is given by    4 ( − a1. 3. m   where  a1. Ψ = ) 1. Ψ ) = 4a1 Sin 2 Ψ + (Cos 2 Ψ + a1 ) 2                                (3.3)  CT = 1 ρ AU 2 2   A is the cross‐sectional area of the rotor disc. 3. then the flow velocity decreases across the rotor and therefore  ua  is  negative.

3.      3.9 1 1. 3. (5.  3.5 0 0 0. This results in                                                 δ T = 4πρ (ua )r (UCosΨ + ua ) + U 2 Sin2 Ψδ r                            (3.6 0.5 0. Using this principle in conjunction with Eqt.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            ΨΨ =0= deg 0 ΨΨ==15 15deg Ψ == 30 Ψ 30 deg ΨΨ==45 45deg Εθτ.1 .6a is invalid and the following equation is used instead                                                                δ T = CT ρπ rU 2δ r                                                              (3.4b 4 3. To find the elemental torque  δQ at a  given annulus.7 0.4 0. 3.  The  elemental  axial  thrust  δT  resulting  from a change in linear velocity in each streamtube is given by substituting Eqt.38U  Eqt.1 results in  25  .2 – Variation of the axial thrust coefficient with the axial induction factor for different yaw  angles as predicted by Eqts.2 and replacing A by the cross‐sectional area of an annular element.8 0.5 1 0.2 0.1 in Eqt.3 0.Ψ) 2 1.6b)                                                                          where CT is an empirical equation similar to Eqt. 3. 3.4β) Eqt.1 0.6a)  2   ua  is  the  azimuthal  averaged  axial  induced  velocity  for  the  given  annulus. 3.  For  (‐ua)>0.5 CT (a1 . it is assumed that the swirl velocities at a given annulus far upstream and  far downstream of the rotor act in imaginary planes parallel to the rotor plane of rotation.4a and b.5 3 2.  The  elemental  torque  is  given  by  the  rate  of  change  of  moment  of  momentum  due  to  the  swirl in the stream tube.a1 Figure  3.2 The Momentum Equations    In deriving the linear and angular momentum equations. the fluid flow stream at the disc is  divided  into  independent  annuli  or  streamtubes.4b.

η = rΩCosθ − Ψ ⎡⎣( da + β r ) Cosθ + v⎤⎦ Cosφ − Ψ rSinθ Sinφ   • • •   ( VA.  It  is  assumed  that  each  blade  behaves  like  a  two‐dimensional  aerofoil  to  produce  aerodynamic forces (lift and drag) and moments (pitching moments). with the influence of  the  wake  and  the  rest  of  the  rotor  contained  entirely  in  an  induced  velocity  at  the  blade  element.8)     3.3.1 The Blade Element Velocity     The velocity of a point A at a given point at radius along the  ξ axis of a rigid blade in the  η−ζ−ξ reference  frame  is  expressed  by  the  following  three  equations  of  motion  given  in  Spera.  The  BEM  theory  is  incapable  of  26  .ξ = ( v ' r − v ) ΩSinθ − Ψ ⎡⎣da + ( v − v ' r ) cosθ ⎤⎦ Sinφ        (3.2 The Induced Velocity at Each Blade Element    In yawed rotors. [88]:    • •   VA.3.  ur  is  the  radial  component  of  induced  velocity.                                                                       Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                                                                        δ Q = 4πρ ( ut ) r 2 (UCosΨ + ua )2 + U 2 Sin 2 Ψδ r                                (3.9)  uˆ = ⎢ua f ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ u ⎥ ⎢ r ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ ua  and  ut  are  the  average  axial  and  tangential  induced  velocities  respectively  at  a  given  annulus.ζ = rΩSinθ + v−Ψ da + β r SinθCosφ +Ψ rCosθ Sinφ )   •   VA.  induced  velocity and rotational velocity) to determine the performance and loads on the entire rotor.3 The Blade‐Element Theory    The blade element theory (BET) is used to calculate the aerodynamic forces (and moments)  on  the  blade  due  to  its  motion  through  the  air  (combination  of  wind  velocity.  3.7)  ut is the azimuthal average tangential induced velocity at the given annulus.  3. the blade‐to‐blade aerodynamic interference and the skewed wake induce  a three‐dimensional induced velocity at each blade element which may  be represented by  the following vector in the xr‐yr‐zr reference frame    ⎡ ut ⎤ ⎢ f⎥                                                                   ⎢ ⎥                                                                       (3.

12)    The magnitude of the resultant flow relative velocity is then given by    Vrel = Vη 2 + Vζ 2 + Vξ 2                                                                                                                                                           (3. The  matrix  A6A5A4  transforms  the  induced  velocity  vector  uˆ from  the  xr‐yr‐zr  frame  into  the  η−ζ−ξ frame.10b)  2 f t = Cos −1 ⎢exp ⎜ − ⎨ ⎣ t⎦ ⎬ ⎟⎥ π ⎢ ⎜ ⎪ r Sinϕ ⎪ ⎟ ⎥ ⎢ ⎜ ⎪ Rt ⎟ ⎣ ⎝ ⎩ ⎭⎪ ⎠ ⎥⎦   ⎡ ⎛ ⎧B ⎡ r R ⎤ ⎫ ⎞⎤                                              ⎢ ⎜ ⎪⎪ 2 ⎢ R − r R ⎥ ⎪⎪ ⎟ ⎥                                     (3. this factor is given by                                                                  f = f t * f r                                                                  (3.  For  the  derivation  of  the  Prandtl  tip/root loss factor refer to [77].      3.11)    The magnitude of the resultant flow relative velocity in the η−ζ plane is given by    Vr = Vη 2 + Vζ 2                                                                                                                                                           (3.  At a given blade radial  position.3.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            calculating  the  radial  component  of  induced  velocity  and  this  is  taken  as  zero.13)        27  .  f  is  the  Prandtl tip/root loss factor that accounts for the fact that the rotor has a non‐infinite number  of blades and for the reduced loading at the tip/root of the blades.4.10c)  2 f r = Cos ⎢exp ⎜ − ⎨ ⎣ t⎦ ⎬ ⎟⎥ −1 t π ⎢ ⎜ ⎪ Rr Sinϕ ⎪ ⎟⎥ ⎢ ⎜ ⎪ ⎟ ⎭⎪ ⎠ ⎥⎦ Rt ⎣ ⎝ ⎩   ϕ is  the  inflow  angle  which  is  described  in  section  3. page 22) is used to transform U from the X‐Y‐Z frame to the η−ζ−ξ frame.3.3 Flow Velocity Relative to a Moving Blade Element    The flow velocity relative to a moving blade element can be computed by transforming the  wind velocity vector from the X‐Y‐Z reference frame to the  η−ζ−ξ reference frame. adding  the induced velocity vector and subtracting the blade element velocity. The flow relative velocity at each blade element becomes                                                                                                                                                              V(η −ζ −ξ ) = SU ( X −Y − Z ) + A6 A5 A4uˆ( xr − yr − zr ) − VA(η −ζ −ξ )                                                                                                                                                           (3. The matrix S (refer  to Chapter 2.10a)  where               ⎡ ⎛ ⎧B ⎡ ⎤ ⎫ ⎞⎤                                               ⎢ ⎜ ⎪⎪ 2 ⎢1 − r R ⎥ ⎪⎪ ⎟ ⎥ (3.

                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            3.  The  two  corresponding angles of attack are:    1.a y     V θ ξ. It contributes to delay the  onset of stall.14)  ⎜ Vη ⎟ ⎝ ⎠   2.3 – Velocity triangles and aerodynamic loads at a given blade element. Fig.3.  28  .4 Aerodynamic Loads    The  aerodynamic  loads  on  each  blade  element  are  assumed  to  act  on  the  ξ  axis  which  is  located at c/4 away from the blade’s leading edge.  the  reference  chordline  and  the  η  axis  are  considered  to  coincide  with  one  another.  b).  3. (b)                   Figure 3.    Blade section       α Trailing Edge         Vζ δqξ. The inflow angle ϕ is equal to the sum of the local values of α and θ. lateral angle of attack (usually defined as the sweep angle):                                                      α −1 ⎛ Vξ ⎞                                                              (3.  Since  the  flow  relative  velocity  has  three  components.  a)  and  the  other  in  the  η−ξ  plane  (Fig.15)  sweep = tan ⎜ V ⎟ ⎝ ζ ⎠ αsweep indicates the presence of spanwise flow and its direction.     In  Fig. z η Vr   α δA ζ ζ Vη Leading Edge   δAη αsweep     α Vξ θ η   ϕ   η x Fig. The aerodynamic loads are also shown.3 shows the velocity triangles on a  blade element at a given radius. 3.3.  there  are  two  velocity  diagrams:  one  in  the  η−ζ  plane  (Fig. (a) Fig. normal angle of attack:                                                          α = tan −1 ⎛ Vζ ⎞                                                                   (3.

a  – relative eccentricity of the elastic centre of aerofoil                 xa.  the  rotor  axial  thrust and torque due to a blade element are given by                                                                                                                                                                             δ T = δ Aζ Cosθ − δ Aη Sinθ                                                                                                                                                        (3. Re)Vζ ⎤⎦ δ r (3.18)  2   xa. The Reynolds number  at the element is taken as  ρV c   Re = r µa                                                                  (3.20b)                  29  . Re)Vη + Cd (α .20a)    ( δ Q = rCos β δ Aη Cosθ + δ Aζ Sinθ )                                                                                                                                                         (3.3.19)  c where                 δqξ.a                                                        ee.c − xe.c  – distance from leading edge to aerodynamic centre (usually c/4) (m)                 xe.3  and  neglecting  the  effect  of  small  blade  deflections.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            The expressions for the aerodynamic loads on the element of chord c and finite width  δr  are                                        δ Aη = 1 ρ cVr ⎡Cl (α . a cδ Aζ                                        (3.a =                                                                      (3. a = 1 ρ c 2Vr 2Cmδ r − ee . Re)Vη ⎤ δ r   2 ⎣ ⎦ δ Aζ = 1 2 ρ cVr ⎡⎣Cl (α .a – distance from leading edge to elastic centre (m)      3.17)                                                                                             The blade element also experiences a pitching moment given by                 δ qξ .  3. Re)Vζ − Cd (α .5 The Blade‐Element Equations for Thrust and Torque    Referring  to  Fig.16)   The aerodynamic force in the spanwise direction has been neglected.a – increment of aerodynamic pitch moment loading (Nm)                Cm    – aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient about the aerodynamic centre of                             the  aerofoil                 ee.

22 are solved iteratively to find the axial and tangential  induced  velocities.    4(ut ) (UCos Ψ + ua )2 + U 2 Sin 2 Ψ                                                                                                                                                                                            c ⎧ B −1                     B −1 ⎫ ⎪ = ∑ ∑ ⎨ Vr Cl (α .      −4(ua ) (UCos Ψ + ua )2 + U 2 Sin2 Ψ   ⎫⎪ c ⎧ B −1 B −1 = ∑ ∑ ⎨ Vr Cl (α .22)                       ⎩ b =0 b =0 ⎭⎪    In the BEM theory.  The  BEM  equation  for  axial thrust is obtained by equating Eqts. where CT is an  empirical expression such as Eqt.  3.  After  simplifying. Eqts. 3.7  to Eqt.  The  basic assumption is that the force of a blade element is solely responsible for the change of  momentum of the air which pass through the annulus swept by the element.  3.  These  loads  are  then  integrated  along  each  blade  span  to  yield the global rotor loads.  The solution procedure is described in section 3. Re) ⎡⎣Vζ Sinθ − Vη Cosθ ⎤⎦ ⎬ 2π r                                                                                                                                      (3.21)                                                                                                                                                           2π r ⎩ b =0   b =0 ⎭⎪ For (‐ua)> 0.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            3. Re) ⎡⎣Vζ Cosθ + Vη Sinθ ⎤⎦ ⎬  (3.38U.  These  are  then  used  in  the  BET  theory  to  find  the  required  spanwise  aerodynamic  load  distributions. 3.21 and 3.    The  BEM  equation  for  angular  torque  is  obtained  by  equating  Eqt.6.                                30  . It is therefore  assumed  that  there  is  no  radial  interaction  between  the  elements. This yields the  following equation that is used to determine ua.4 The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Equations    The  Blade‐Element‐Momentum  (BEM)  Theory  combines  the  momentum  theory  with  the  blade  element  theory  (BET)  to  determine  the  axial  and  tangential  induced  velocities. 3.20a and simplifying.20b.6 to Eqt. 3. the left hand side of the above equation is replaced by CTU2. Re ) ⎡⎣Vη Cosθ − Vζ Sinθ ⎤⎦ + Vr Cd (α . this yields an equation that is used to find ut. Re ) ⎡⎣Vζ Cosθ + Vη Sinθ ⎤⎦ + Vr Cd (α .4b.

 2D static wind tunnel aerofoil data  (Cl  and  Cd)  were  used  to  compute  the  aerodynamic  loads  on  wind  turbine  blades  with  BEM theory.  However  when  the  turbine  is  yawed.  As  a  result.21  and  3.  However  for  conditions  of  high  angles  of  attack  and/or  yawed  flow.  The BEM theory lacks the physics to mathematically model how the wake characteristics  affect  the  distribution  of  induced  velocity  at  the  rotor  disk.  The  same  phenomenon  was  observed  on  wind  turbine  31  . Due to the complex 3D nature of the flow over rotating wind turbine blades.  However  the  BEM  equations  3. 3.  In  a  yawed  rotor.  The  upwind  side  will  experience  a  lower induced velocity.  Basically. as the wind flows through the yawed turbine.     (a)  Stall‐delay:  Since  the  1940’s.  the  trailing  and  shed  vorticity  shed  from  the  blades  into  the  wake  is  on  average  closer  to  the  downwind  side  of  the  rotor  plane  resulting  in  higher  induced  velocities  in  this  region.  a  time‐dependent  circulation  that  varies  radially  along  the  blades  is  formed.  As  already described in section 1.  the  main  sources  for  inaccuracies  in  the  BEM  theory are two:    (1) the limitations of momentum equations: Eqts.5 Corrections to the Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory        Previous  validation  efforts  have  revealed  that  the  BEM  theory  may  be  considerably  accurate when modelling axial conditions (no rotor yaw) where the local angles of attack at  the  blades  are  small.  the  wake  becomes  skewed.  When  a  rotor  is  yawed. Consequently.  Himmelskamp  [39]  investigated  the  aerodynamic  behaviour of propellers and noted that the lift forces on a rotating blade are larger than  those  on  a  non‐rotating  one.6 and 3.7 are based on the assumption that  each  individual  streamtube  (or  strip)  can  be  analyzed  independently  of  the  rest  of  the  flow.  the  theory  fails  to  predict  accurately  the  blade  load  distributions  that  are  required  for  aeroelastic  tailoring  of  the  blades. a vortical  wake  is  created  downstream  of  the  rotor  similar  to  that  created  by  a  helicopter  rotor  in  forward flight.     (2)  the inaccuracies in the aerofoil data: In the early days. In a wind turbine two  aerodynamic  phenomena  take  place:  (a)  Stall‐delay  phenomena  and  (b)  Unsteady  flow  phenomena. the local induced velocities at the blades will vary  considerably  from  the  azimuthally  (annular)  averaged  values.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            3.  the  use  of  2D  static  aerofoil  data  did  not  yield  a  good  correlation  of  the  calculated aerodynamic loads with those observed in experiments.22  are  only  capable  of  calculating  an  axial  and  tangential  induced  velocity at each streamtube that are azimuthally averaged ( ua and  ut ).2. Such an assumption works well for non‐yawed conditions and when the circulation  at the blades is relatively uniform so that most of the circulation is shed at the blade root  and  tip. the major difference being that the wake expands rather than it contracts. especially at the inboard sections and at the tip/root regions of the blades.  the  aerofoil  characteristics  will  vary  considerably  from  the  2D  static  aerofoil  characteristics.  This  creates  a  radial  interaction  and  exchange  between  flows  through  adjacent  stream  tubes  and  thus  invalidates  this  assumption.

 87. together with a drop in lift.3D)  with  those  of  a  static  non‐rotating wing in 2D flow (Cl. 3.  below  what  would  otherwise  be  the  stall  angle  of  attack  of  a  non‐rotating  aerofoil.  This  results  in  higher  lift. When the angle  of  attack  at  a  blade  section  exceeds  the  aerofoil’s  static  stalling  angle. As long as  this vortex remains on the upper aerofoil surface.5.2D         α   Figure  3. However the  flow  causes  the  vortex  to  be  swept  over  the  chord  towards  the  trailing  edge. is rotating with the blade and therefore it  experiences a centrifugal force causing it to flow radially outwards. 74.  a  shedding of a concentrated vortical disturbance is formed at the leading edge.  This causes the lift and drag coefficients to be different from the corresponding 2D static  values  at  the  same  angle  of  attack.  When  the  time‐dependent  variation  of  the  angle  of  attack is below the stall angle (αs) for static conditions. the flow over the blades remains  attached and the variation of lift will be similar to that shown in Fig. This phenomenon  is often known as stall‐delay and is most predominant in the inboard sections. 103].  In  a  2D  non‐rotating  environment. which is moving  very slowly with respect to the blade surface.  each blade element aerofoil is subjected to an unsteady angle of attack and flow velocity.3D         Cl.  there  is  little  difference  between  the  2D  flow  conditions  and  the  rotating  conditions.        Cl   Cl. the air in the separated region.    (b)  Unsteady  flow:  In  certain  operating  conditions  of  a  wind  turbine  such  as  rotor  yaw. it produces enhanced lift.2D). The flow towards the  tip on the suction side experiences a Coriolis force in the main flow direction. when stall occurs.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            blades in the past years [13. The effect  of stall‐delay on the lift characteristics of a rotating wing is illustrated in Fig. However.  This  produces  a  state  of  full  separation  resulting  in  a  rapid  aft  movement  of  the  centre  of  pressure and an increase in the pitching moment. delaying the onset of stall and resulting in higher lift coefficients.4.  This  reduces  the  displacement  thickness  of  the  boundary  layer. 82.4  –  Comparison  of  the  lift  characteristics  of  a  rotating  wing  (Cl.  the  phenomenon  of  dynamic  stall  is  characterized by a delay in the onset of flow separation to a higher angle of attack than  would  occur  statically. Evidence shows that for attached flow  conditions.  dynamic  stall  occurs. 3. If the angle     32  .  When  flow  separation  does  occur. acting as a  favourable  pressure  gradient. 75. 62.

  These  hysterisis  effects  introduced  by  dynamic  stall  may  have  a  negative effect on the aeroelastic damping behaviour of wind turbine blades.                      33  .6 shows a typical variation of  the  lift  coefficient  with  angle  of  attack  together  with  a  schematic  explaining  the  flow  topologies observed in dynamic stall.    The  delay  in  flow  separation  and  the  lag  in  the  flow  reattachment  process  results  in  a  hysteresis  variation.2D                 αs α         Figure 3.     The phenomenon of dynamic stall is not fully understood and is still undergoing much  research. This inturn  reduces the fatigue lifetime leaving an adverse impact on the economics of the system.  Dynamic  stall  also  occurs  in  a  rotor  environment  where  it  has  a  much  more  three‐dimensional  character  and  depends  on  both the radial and azimuth positions on the blades.  Yet flow re‐attachment can only take place if the angle of attack becomes small enough  again.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                                Cl     Cl. 3. Fig.    of attack is reduced well below the static stall angle. flow re‐attachement may take place. Much of what is known about dynamic stall has been obtained from 2D wind  tunnel  experiments  on  non‐rotating  wings.5 – Typical variation of the unsteady lift coefficient for small angles of attack (α<αs). Unsteady Cl.  There  is  generally  a  significant  lag  in  this  process  until  the  fully  separated  flow  reorganizes itself until it is ready for re‐attachment.

full separation occurs. Unsteady   (1) (4)       Cl. boundary layer reattaches front to rear           Stage 2 . causing extra lift                Figure  3.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                              (3)   Cl   (2) Cl. Steady   (5)           αs α       Stage 1: Aerofoil exceeds α and flow reversal Stage 3-4: Lift stall occurs.    34  . After vortex reaches s   occurs in upper boundary layer trailing edge.6  –  Schematic  showing  the  unsteady  lift  coefficient  and  the  basic  flow  topologies  during  dynamic stall.3: Vortex convects towards trailing   edge. Adapted from Leishman [49].             Stage 2: Formation of vortex at leading edge     Stage 5: When angle of attack decreases again.

 84].23 was derived from the smoke visualization  of  the  fully  roll‐up  strong  tip  vortices  formed  on  helicopter  rotors  in  forward  flight.23)         Author(s) K               Coleman et al.  then  χs  will  also  vary  radially.  However χs is usually taken to be equal to that between 70‐80%R. some of which were examined against  measurements in the JOULE Dynamic Inflow projects [83.23)  where K depends on the yaw angle. These models have been  implemented  in  various  BEM‐based  aeroelastic  models. It estimates the axial induced velocity at the blades using the  equation   ⎛ r ⎞                                                              u a .(1945) tan(χ/2)   White&Blake (1979) 21/2 Sinχ     Pitt&Peters (1981) (15π/32)tan(χ/2)   Howlett (1981) sin2χ   Other models were developed in the past years. 3. This has resulted in the so‐called ‘extended BEM’ theory.1.  An  early  model  for  skewed  wake  effects  has  been  proposed by Glauert [30]. Eqt.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            To  reduce  the  uncertainties  in  the  BEM  theory  due  to  the  limitations  of  the  momentum  equations and due to inaccuracies in the aerofoil data.  A short review of some  of these models is now presented. These models fall under two different classifications:    • Type  I  models:  those  that  correct  the  axial  induction  factor  computed  by  the  BEM  theory for the non‐uniform induction distribution at the rotorplane resulting from the  skewed  wake  of  a  yawed  rotor.1 ‐ Various models for parameter K (Eqt.  One  such  model  is  that  developed  by  the  DTU  [60]  that  is  similar  to  Glauert’s  model  but  introduces  a  radial  variation for the induction. various corrections were included in  the past years. These corrections  took  the  form  of  basic  ‘engineering  models’  that  were  derived  from  experimental  data  or  data from more advanced codes (based on vortex theory or CFD).                                                        Table 3. The model was derived with a curve fitting procedure from  35  .c = ua ⎜ 1 + K * * Sinφ ⎟                                                                                 ⎝ R ⎠                                                                                                                                                          (3.  χs is the wake  skew angle which is calculated from                                                       tan χ USinΨ                                                       (3.24)  = s UCosΨ + ua   Since  in  the  equation  above  ua will  vary  radially.  Various formulas for K were proposed [49] which are given in Table 3. 3.

 3. It is shown that vorticity originating from the blade root as well  as shed vorticity will cause the induction distribution at the rotor disk to have a higher  harmonic  content  than  that  modelled  by  Eqt. For instance for f=1.9 and introducing a correction factor Fsa as follows:      ⎡ ⎛ ut ⎞ ⎤ ⎢ ⎜⎝ f ⎟⎠ ⎥   ⎢ ⎥ ⎡ ut .28)                     ⎝ R ⎠ 36  . 3.23 is that it considers only the induced velocity due to  the tip vorticity alone.25a)  s where  ( R) 3 5 r ⎛r⎞ ⎛r⎞                                        f 2. 96]. The local induced velocity was found to depend on  the radial location.c ⎥                                          (3. c = ua [1 − A1 cos (φ − ϕ1 ) − A2 cos ( 2φ − ϕ 2 )]                  (3.3 and 3. if Glauert’s engineering model is to be used.4.27)  a                                                                                                           ⎢ ⎥ ⎢⎣ ur .25b)  R ⎝R⎠ ⎝R⎠   Other  engineering  models  for  yaw  were  developed  in  the  JOULE  I  and  II  projects. c ⎛ = ua ⎜ 1 + f 2.  This  was  revealed  in  past  inflow  measurements taken on the Delft wind tunnel model [69. skewed wake effects are accounted  for by modifying Eqt.  In the BEM model described in sections 3.  Further details may be found in references [83] and [84]. This consists of a second order  Fourier series having the form:                                       ua .23.c ⎤ ⎢ ⎛ ⎞ ⎢ ⎥                                                                                   F ⎥= u                                                                                                      u uˆc = ⎜ ⎢⎝ f ⎟⎠ S a ⎥ ⎢ a . azimuth angle and the wake skew angle according to:                                         ua . ECN [69] has developed  a new engineering model that accounts for such effects.c ⎥⎦ ⎢ 0 ⎥ ⎢⎣ ⎥⎦ where  Fsa  determines  the  ratio  of  the  local  axial  induced  velocity  at  the  blades  to  the  azimuthally  averaged  value  as  modelled  by  anyone  of  the  engineering  models  described above.     A major shortcoming of Eqt.26)  where amplitudes A1 and A2 and phases  ϕ1 and  ϕ2 have been modelled as a function of  radial position and yaw angle.4 ⎜ ⎟                            (3.tudk r ⎝ ( R ) tan ⎛⎜⎝ χ2 ⎞⎟⎠ sin (φ ) ⎞⎟⎠                      (3. then  Fsa would be equal to  ⎛ r ⎞                                                       Fsa = ⎜1 + K * * Sinφ ⎟                                            (3.tudk r = + 0.4 ⎜ ⎟ + 0.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            an actuator disk vortex ring model.  3.

max = 2.     Engineering Models for Stall‐Delay    An  early  empirical  model  for  modifying  2D  static  aerofoil  data  to  represented  more  accurately  the power  augmentation  at  high angles  of  attack  resulting  from  stall‐delay  has  been  developed  by  Viterna  and  Corrigan  [100]  in  1981. s − Cd . Snel et al.  This  model  was  used  extensively in the past years for wind turbine modelling in stalled flow conditions.29d)  cos α s   µ ≤ 50 : Cd .29c)  cos 2 α s   Cd . [82] presented a method to evaluate the first order effects of the  blade rotation on stall characteristics through a simplified solution of the 3D boundary  layers  equations.max sin 2 α s                                              K d =                                                 (3.29b)    sin α s                                             K l = ( Cl .11 + 0.    • Type  II  models:  those  that  correct  static  2D  aerofoil  data  for  3D  rotating  effects  (stall‐ delay) and unsteady aerodynamic effects (unsteady aerofoil models for both attached  flow and dynamic stall).27.max sin 2 α + K d cos α                                           (3.max sin α s cos α s )                      (3.max is the maximum drag coefficient and µ is the blade aspect ratio.  No  correction  is  done  for  the  tangential and radial components since these are usually very small in magnitude and  thus their influence on aerodynamic loading is insignificant. the correction for skewed wake effects is only being  applied  to  the  axial  component  of  the  induction.    In year 1993.max cos 2 α                                              Cl = sin 2α + K l                                        (3.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            As it can be noted from Eqt.  An  order  of  magnitude  analysis  of  the  different  boundary  layer  equations  was  carried  out  to  enable  the  identification  of  the  most  important  37  .max = 1. s − Cd .29e)  µ > 50 : Cd .  The  equations for this model are as follows:   For  α ≥ αs :   Cd .01    where  Cd .018µ                                                                               (3. 3.29a)  2 sin α                                               Cd = Cd .

6 ( c r ) a − ( c r ) Λ r                                         f l = − 1⎥                                 (3.3 D = Cl .2 D )                                     (3.31b)                                     Cl . especially  at the inboard regions.2 D − Cd .lin is the lift coefficient that would be obtained if the  linear  part  of  the  static  2D  Cl‐α  curve  is  extended  beyond  stall.    A third model was developed by Du and Selig [22].3 D = Cl .  It  was  shown  that  the  local  blade  solidity  (c/r)  is  the  most  influential  parameter affecting stall‐delay.2 D − f d ( Cd .30b)  a and b are empirical constants.31a)                                                Cd . In this work. Cl.3 D = Cd .  It  is  a  well  known fact that 3D rotating effects may alter the 2D Cd  values significantly.2 D for α = 0                     (3.2 D + a ⎜ ⎟ ∆Cl                                           (3.  c/r.  Although  this  model  improved agreement for power prediction when compared with experimental data.  (which  accounts  for  rotor  geometry)  and  the  modified tip speed ratio. The model corrects both the lift and drag coefficients as follows:                                                   Cl .  [62])  and  results  from  a  CFD  model  ULTRAN_V  developed  at  NLR.32b)  2π ⎢ 0.  Λ is given by   ΩR U + ( ΩR ) .31c)    fl  and  fd  are  factors  that  depend  on  the  separation  point  of  the  flow  on  the  aerofoil’s  upper  chamber  as  predicted  by  the  boundary  layer  theoretical  analysis.lin − Cl .1267 b + c r Λ r ⎥ dR ⎣ ( ) ⎦ ⎡ d R ⎤ 1 ⎢1. it  is  limited  due  to  the  fact  that  the  drag  coefficient  remains  uncorrected.  [82]  as  it  also  originates  from  the  3D  incompressible  boundary  layer  equations  for  a  rotating  system.6 ( c r ) a − ( c r ) 2 Λ r                                        f d = − 1⎥                               (3. a simple empirical model to correct 2D lift  coefficient  data  for  stall‐delay  was  developed  with  observation  of  wind  tunnel  data  (Ronsten. fl and fd are given by  2 2 ⎡ dR ⎤ 1 ⎢1.1267 b + c r 2 Λ r ⎥ d R ⎣ ( ) ⎦ 38  . Cd .  The  model is given by   b ⎛c⎞                                                    Cl .lin = 2π (α − α 0 ) . This traces its roots in the work of  Snel  et  al.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            parameters.  These  factors  are  related  to  the  local  solidity.0 = Cd .2 D + fl ( Cl .32a)  2π ⎢ 0. 2 D                                                        (3.30a)  ⎝r⎠ where                                                           ∆Cl = Cl .  A  rigorous  analysis  of  the  integral  boundary  layer  equations is applied.0 )                                    (3.lin − Cl . Λ (which accounts for the effects of rotation).

 The most‐straight forward  model  is  the  Boeing‐Vertol  model  which  is  based  on  correcting  the  static  2D  lift  coefficient in accordance with the following equations    α − α0                                          Cl (α .   39  .34a)  α − α0 − ∆   ∆ is the shift in the angle of attack given by    1 ⎛ c α ⎞ 2                                                  ∆ = γ ⎜ ⎟ sign (α )                                               (3. m                                    h                   C X . and the Beddoes‐Leishman model [47]. α ) = Cl .  Another  engineering model was developed by Chaviaropoulos et al.  A  brief  description  of  the  different  dynamic  stall  models  is  presented  by  Leishman  [49.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            In  the  above  equations.2 D − MIN                                               (3.34b)  ⎝ 2Vr ⎠ where  γ  is  an  empirical  constant.2 D + a ( c r ) cos n ( twist ) ∆C X where X = l .  h  and  n  are  empirical  constants.  b  and  d  are  empirical  correction  factors.3.  Snel  [79]  developed  a  heuristic  model  for  dynamic stall based on the observation of experimental data.33a)  where                                                       ∆Cl = Cl .  section  4.33b)                                                      ∆Cd = Cd .lin − Cl .2.  Examples  of  dynamic  stall  models  include  the  Boeing‐Vertol  model. d . [17] using CFD and corrects  all  aerofoil coefficients  (Cl.33d)    where  a.  the  ONERA model [11]. 2 D                                                        (3.  The  latter  model  is  described  in  detail  in  chapter  4.lin                                                     (3.  73]  on  different rotors suggest these models may not always be sufficiently accurate.2 D − Cd .  terms  a. The model equations are     = C X .2 D − Cm .  Cd  and  Cm)  for  3D  rotating  effects.  50].      Engineering Models for Unsteady Flow Effects    Examples  for  unsteady  aerofoil  models  used  in  attached  flow  conditions  are  Theordorsen’s  model  [93]  and  Leishman’s  indicial  response  method  using  Duhamel’s  superimposition  [49.33c)                                                      ∆Cm = Cm .3 D                                                                                                                                                (3.  The  model  was  derived  based on results obtained from a 3D incompressible flow Navier‐Stokes solver. It also  accounts for the effects of blade twist since this was found to play an important role in  massively separated flow.  pp  336‐340].2 D (α − ∆ )                                (3.  65.  However  validations  studies  [45.

 One whole rotor revolution is divided into a fixed number  of azimuth steps (τtot). This code was used for all computations required  with the BEM theory throughout this project. The total number of blade sections is equal to n.  Consider  the  situation  in  which  the  rotor  is  rotating  at  constant  angular  speed  Ω  in  a  uniform wind front equal to U. Considerable discrepancies between  predicted  and  experimental  results  were  observed  even  at  low  windspeeds  at  which  the  angle  of  attack is small.  The  azimuthal  step.  ∆φ. 3.        3. then the solution has to be solved as a function of time (or rotor azimuth angle φ).     Although  the  inclusion  of  both  Type  I  and  Type  II  engineering  models  improved  BEM  aerodynamic  load  predictions.6.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            Most  unsteady  aerofoil  models  for  attached flow  conditions  have  been  derived  based  on 2D non‐rotating wings and therefore there may be inaccurate when applied for 3D  conditions  on  a  rotating  wind  turbine  blade. 3.8.  This  was noted  during  the  “blind  comparison”  investigation  organized  by  National  Renewable  Energy  Laboratory  (NREL)  way  back  in  the  year  2000  [73.7. it is still unclear  how 3D effects influence stall in an unsteady environment.    Several  dynamic  stall  models  are  semi‐ empirical  and  were  also  derived  from  non‐rotating  2D  wing  experiments. is equal to ∆φ/Ω. as shown in Fig.  Such  radial  flows  influence  the  dynamic stall behavior significantly. as described in reference [48].  τ=0  denotes  when  the  first  blade  is  at  an  azimuth  angle  equal  to  zero  (vertical  pointing  upwards). ∆τ.  An index τ  is used to denote the azimuth angle  of  the  first  blade.    3.1 Time‐based Numerical Solution for the BEM Equations    This section describes the numerical solution of the BEM theory equations described above  as implemented in HAWT_BEM. The cross‐sectional area of the     40  .  Due  to  the  blade  advancing‐and‐retreating  effect  resulting  from  yaw. Although it is a well  known  fact  that  radial  flow  over  the  blades  helps  in  preventing  flow  separation  over  the blades at high angles of attack and thus contributes to stall delay.  Consequently  they  are  also  inaccurate  when  treating  3D  dynamic  stall  on  a  rotating  blade.  is  equal  2π/τtot  while  the  incremental  time step.6 Description of Program HAWT_BEM        HAWT_BEM is a BEM code developed in this project using MathCad© version 11 and is  applicable to both axial and yawed rotors.  each  rotating  blade  is  subjected  to  unsteady  radial  flow  components  that  may  be  much  larger  in  magnitude  than  in  a  non‐yawed  rotor.  78].  better  models  are  still  required.  Each turbine blade is discretized into a fixed number of equally spaced sections as shown in  Fig. Since in a yawed turbine the flow at the blades becomes  unsteady.

  flow  relative  velocity  and  aerodynamic loading) are denoted by the three‐letter index notation (τ. i). The total number  of blades is equal to B and b=0 denotes the first blade.7 ‐ Division of one whole rotor revolution into a fixed amount of azimuthal steps.  3.  An  index  notation  is  used  to  represent  each  parameter at each rotor time step (τ). then the azimuth angle of each blade is given by   2π b                                                              (φ )τ .i respectively. Given that  (φ )τ  is the rotor azimuth  angle at time step τ. and radial location (i).8 – Discretization of blade into a fixed number of equally spaced blade sections.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            τ=0   τ = τtot-1 τ=1       τ = 10 D ro irec τ=2 to tio rr n ot o   ati f on   τ=9 τ=3       τ=8 τ=4       τ=7 τ=5   τ=6          Figure 3. For instance the  angle of attack at particular blade element is denoted by  ( α )τ . The parameters that are  only a function of the radial location and rotor azimuth angle are only denoted by a two‐ letter  suffix  notation  (τ.  Thus  the  azimuthally  averaged  axial  and  tangential  induced  velocities at each annulus are denoted by  ( u a )τ .  41  .     rotorplane  swept  by  the  blades  (from  r=Rr  to  r=Rt)  is  divided  into  n  annular  elements  (as  illustrated  by  the  shaded  area  in  Fig. blade (b).b .  Reynolds  number. The parameters local  to  the  blade  (equal  angle  of  attack.9). b.i .i and  ( ut )τ .  i). b = (φ )τ +   B   rn-1 = Rt   ri+1     ri δr   ri-1   r0 = R r     ξ     Rotor axis                   Figure 3.

  42  .9 – Division of swept area by blades into a fixed number of annuli.      The  solution  starts  by  assuming  initial  values  for  the  azimuthally  averaged  axial  and  tangential  induced  velocities  for  each  time  step  and  radial  location  ( ( u a )τ .b .i  is determined using a Type I  engineering model (refer to section 3.i and  ( ut )τ .ξ )τ .  The  solution  is  started  with  an  impulsive  start  of  the  rotor.27    Step  5:  The  flow  relative  velocity  components.    Step 4: The local induced velocities at each blade element.12 and 3.13. ( Fsa )τ .i ( )τ and  Vξ .i ( and  VA . VA .i ( )τ   .i   and  (Vrel )τ .i ( .  3.b .b .b .  ( f )τ . VA . (Vr )τ .b .5)    Step  3:  The  Prandtl  tip/root  loss  factor.i are found using Eqts.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                              ri   δr                     Rt       Rr                          Figure 3.b .i ).    Step 2: The correction factor for skewed wake effects. Vη ( )τ .b .  ( uˆc )τ .b .b . Vζ .b .  Initially.  3. 3.b .η ( )τ . 3.i are  found  using  Eqts.ζ )τ .i  are found from Eqt.i are  found  using Eqts.10.    Step  6:  The  resultant  flow  relative  velocities.8. 3.  the  rotor  is  at  an  azimuth  angle  of  zero  (τ=0)  and  the  following  sequence  of  steps  is  applied  to  each  blade  element for all the time steps (τtot) in one whole rotor revolution:  Step 1: The absolute velocities.11.i   is  then  calculated  in  accordance with  Eqt.

16  and  3. (α )τ .b.  This  code  is  organized  into  three  separate  modules:  the  Data  Input  Module  in  which  the  parameters  describing  the  rotor  geometry  and  operating  condition  are  inputted.  sweep  angle  and  Reynolds  number.6.i .b .i   together  with  the  pitching  moment coefficient  ( Cm )τ . dynamic stall) using a Type II engineering model (refer  to section 3.  3.b .a integrated  numerically  to  find  the  resulting  3D  aerodynamic  forces  and  moments  at  the  yaw bearing in accordance with the method described in Appendix B.i are found from 2D wind tunnel data which may be corrected  for stall‐delay.  The  3D  aerodynamic  loads  induced by the rotor blades at the yaw bearing and the rotor output power are calculated  using the solution described in Appendix B.    The new values for  ( ua )τ .5.  3.i   and ( Cd )τ .  ( Cl )τ .2 Program Structure    Fig.10  describes  the  structure  of  code  HAWT_BEM.b .i   are  evaluated  using  Eqts.i  are found from Eqts.i  and ( ut )τ .1  to  determine  the  spanwise  distributions  of  the  various  aerodynamic  parameters  at  different  blade  azimuth  positions.        3.)    Step 9: Eqts.    Step  8:  The  lift  and  drag  coefficients.                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                            Step  7:  The  angle  of  attack.i .15 and 3.i  and ( ut )τ .18.b.6. 3. The Data Output Module outputs the local blade  and rotor global results as a function of blade/rotor azimuth angle. 3.  The  Data  Processing  Module  implements  the  numerical  solution  of  the  BEM  equations  described  above  in  section  3.b .b .g.                  43  .b . 3.  η (δ A )τ .  together  with  the  required  aerofoil  data.i   and  (δ q )τ . or unsteady flow (e.17.  α sweep ( )τ .i and  ( Re )τ .b.  These  are  then  ζ ξ .i .21 and 3.    The  aerodynamic  loading  components (δ A )τ .22 are then solved to yield new values for  ( ua )τ .14.i  obtained in Step 9 are used in Step 1 and the whole  sequence of steps is repeated until convergence in these parameters is achieved at all blade  elements  and  rotor  azimuth  positions.

 Vζ .    Re. Vrel.  parameters at different blade azimuth angles :    .Cl. Vη .                                                                        Chapter 3 – The Blade‐Element‐Momentum Theory                                Data Input:     (1) Input Rotor Geometry Details:   Number of Blades (B)   Blade Tip and Root Radii (Rt & Rr)   Blade chord and twist distributions (c & θ)     (2) Input Rotor Operating Conditions:   Rotor Angular Speed (Ω)   Rotor Yaw Angle (Ψ)   Wind Speed (U)     (3) Input Aerofoil Data:   Input of 2D aerofoil data   Selection of Type II models for stall‐delay/unsteady   effects         Data Processing:     Application of numerical solution described in Section 3. Vr.Cm.  44  . αsweep. Cd. dAζ     Calculation of Aerodynamic Loads and Output Power    induced at yaw bearing using numerical solution described    Appendix B         Data Output:   Output of results from module Data Processing at    each blade/rotor azimuth angle (φ)                                                                                              Figure 3.10 – Structure of code HAWT_BEM.1   to determine the spanwise distributions of the following    uˆc α. dAη.6.

2  will  describe  the  experiments  in  detail  together  with  the  data  reduction  procedures  that  were  required  to  obtain  the  required  experimental  data.  unsteady  aerofoil  theory  had  to  be  employed  in  order  to  derive  the  aerodynamic  loads  from  the  inflow  measurements.  Since  the  experimental  set‐up  used  in  this  study  on  the  TUDelft  rotor  was  incapable  of  acquiring  such  distributions  through  blade  pressure  measurements.  (3)  to  use  the  experimental  data  to  validate  the  newly  developed free‐wake vortex model in both axial and yawed conditions (refer to Chapter 5).  The  main  experimental results are also presented. Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model        Turbine    4. Section 4.    As  already  outlined  in  Chapter  2.  The  unsteady  lift  coefficient  could  be  predicted  with  reasonable  accuracy  since  the  inflow  measurements  were  carried  out  in  attached flow conditions only.  A  series  of  experiments  were  carried  in  the  Delft  University  of  Technology  open  tunnel  jet  facility. (2) to assess the limitations of BEM models in yaw  for attached flow conditions where the uncertainty in the aerofoil data is not the issue that  limits BEM models from predicting loads accurately.  The  inflow  measurements  were  limited  to  one  rotor  tip  speed  ratio  and  blade  pitch  setting  only  that  yielded  attached  flow  conditions  over  the  blades.  The  measurements  were  mainly  required  for  three  reasons:  (1)  to  obtain  a  better  understanding  of  the  aerodynamics of wind turbines in yaw.1 Introduction           This chapter describes the aerodynamic analysis carried out on the TUDelft model wind  turbine.  The  smoke  visualization  experiments  were  carried  out  at  different  tip  speed  ratios  and  blade  pitch  settings  that  resulted  in  both  attached  and  stalled  flow  at  the  blades.  The  experiments  were  carried  out  in  both  axial  and  yawed  conditions.  The  experiments  consisted  of  detailed  hot‐film  inflow  measurements  in  the  near  wake  of  the  turbine  and  smoke  visualization  experiments  to  trace  the  tip  vortex  paths  in  the  turbine  wake.  Section  4.3 implements a method for deriving the steady/unsteady bound circulation and  aerodynamic load distributions at the blades by coupling the inflow measurements with an  45  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             4.    B.  to  be  able  to  provide  an  in‐depth  investigation  of  the  limitations  of  the  BEM  theory  it  is  vital  to  have  the  unsteady  aerodynamic  loading  distributions  along  the  blades. This assessment was a first step before  carrying  out  a  more  extensive  assessment  on  the  NREL  rotor  in  both  attached  and  stalled  conditions  (refer  to  Chapter  6).     This chapter is organized in three separate sections:     A.

3. a  dedicated computer program.1 – Wind turbine geometric specifications      Number of blades  2    Airfoil section  NACA0012    Rotor radius R  0.3≤r/R≤0.1 – Wind turbine model at Delft University of Technology. To be able to carry out these computations in an efficient and organized manner.42 m    Blade twist  θ(r/R)=(6+θtip) ‐ 6. see section 3. was developed.67(r/R).  the  angle  of  attack  values  at  the  blades  are  estimated  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  and  used in  the  unsteady  aerofoil  model  to  be  able to determine the lift coefficients. HAWT_LFIM.    C. The latter are then used to estimate the distributions  for  the  bound  circulation  and  aerodynamic  loads  at  the  blades  using  the  blade‐element  theory.6 m    Blade root radius  30% of tip radius    Chord c  0.                                              Table 4.  In  this  procedure.08 m (constant)    Blade length  0.    Rotor Details    The wind tunnel model rotor was a horizontal‐axis wind turbine with the specifications  listed in table 4.1 below.4 deals with the assessment of a typical BEM code (HAWT_BEM.9<r/R≤1                                                                Figure 4. 0.  46  . Section 4.6)  using both the experimental inflow measurements and the aerodynamic load results from  sections 4. 0.2 and 4.9    θ(r/R) =θtip.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           unsteady  aerofoil  model.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           The rotor shaft and its bearings are placed on an extended support leaving 0.  Strain  gauges  are  installed  on  the  rotor  shaft  and  one  of  the  blades  to  be  able  to  measure  the  rotor  axial  thrust  and  blade  root  edgewise  and  flapping  bending  moments.33m above the ground. The rotor is linked to a constant  speed  drive  unit  consisting  of  a  1.  capable of adjusting the blade pitch with accuracies of ±0.5kW  motor/generator.3.10.2 and 4.                 CT               λ  Figure 4. A variable pitch mechanism is installed in the rotor hub.3 ‐ Variation of power coefficient with tip speed ratio and blade tip pitch angle Theta (θtip)  (deg) (Source: Vermeer [97]).2 ‐ Variation of axial thrust coefficient with tip speed ratio and blade tip pitch angle Theta  (θtip) (deg) (Source: Vermeer [97]).  with  the  rotational  speed  that  is  adjustable  from  0  to  16Hz.  The  rotor  hub  height is 2.75 m free space  behind the rotorplane to minimize the interaction of the developed wake with the support  structure  within  a  distance  of  about  one  rotor  radius  from  the  rotorplane.                CP               λ  Figure 4.  47  .  The  aerodynamic  behavior  characteristics  of  the  model  turbine  when  operating in axial conditions are shown in Figs. 4.

  The  turbulence  level  was  equal  to  1.2±0.      48  . The  tunnel  maximum  windspeed  was  equal  to  14.  The  tunnel  had  an  exit  jet  diameter of 2. 4. height 5.5m/s.  The  flow  straightener  was  a  hexagonal  shaped  honeycomb  structure  made  out  of  thin  aluminum sheets.5. The exit jet velocity profile was not uniform throughout.2.    The tunnel was situated in a hall (length 35m.4 – Open jet wind tunnel at Delft University of Technology.2m  at  2m  upstream  of  the  tunnel  jet  exit.  the  speed  at  which  measurements were taken.5m/s. flow straighteners and gauzes.1 Wind Tunnel    The open jet wind tunnel consisted of a flow channel with a circular cross‐section. width 20m.  Both  the  wake  inflow  and  smoke  visualization  experiments  were  carried  out  in  close  collaboration  with  Phd  colleague  Wouter Haans. Fig.33m above the ground.    4.4 is a schematic diagram of the tunnel.        inlet flow straightener   fan centrebody   gauze   wind     gauze   gauze           motor                        Figure 4. as may  be noted in Fig. The fan was driven by a  45kW dc motor in a Ward‐Leonard circuit. A velocity dip was observed at the centre of the exit and this is mainly  due to the centre body containing the motor‐fan drive mechanism.2%  at  Ujet  =5.2 Wind Tunnel Measurements        The  wind  tunnel  measurements  on  the  model  turbine  were  performed  in  the  open  jet  wind  tunnel  of  Delft  University  of  Technology.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4. a large  inlet fan.5m) and the tunnel exit  was approximately 11m from the back wall. The exit jet wind velocity could be adjusted by  controlling  the  rotational  speed  of  the  fan.24m and its central axis was 2. There were three identical gauzes: one just behind the flow straightener  and  two  spaced  by  0. 4.

  The azimuth angle is zero when the first blade is vertical and pointing upwards. This technique makes use of hot‐wires or hot‐films that act as sensors and  are very useful in obtaining the fast response velocity measurements.2 Part I: Inflow Measurements    Experimental Set‐up     The rotor was placed in front of the wind tunnel exit with the hub centre located in the jet  centre and 1 m downstream from the jet exit plane.9 0.96 0.97   -0.1 0.93 0.95 3   0.9 1 3 -0.   The near wake velocities of the rotor model were measured using constant temperature hot‐ film anemometry. 97 -0. Seen from above.95 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               0.93 0. The velocities are non‐dimensionalized with respect to  the maximum velocity recorded.98    Figure 4.               -0.y)= (0. 99 0. The tunnel wind velocity was measured at  the  jet  exit  plane  using  three  inter‐connected  pitot‐static  tubes  that  were  connected  to  an  electronic pressure sensor.5m/s.2.3 0. 0.95 0.3 0.   0. a positive yaw angle implies that the rotor  is  rotated  counter‐clockwise.9   0.2 0. Fig.  The  conventions  for  the  yaw  angle  and  azimuth angle are also shown.93 1 0.99 7 0.2 0.2 0. (x.9 0.4 -0. 4.      4.92 0.95   0. together with ambient pressure and temperature readings.5 – Velocity distribution measured in the empty tunnel at 1 m downstream from the tunnel  jet exit with the pitot readings set to 5.9 0.9   5 -0.2 0 0.1   y [m] 0   95 0.93 -0.   95 0.86 0.4 95 0.94 0. 93 0   0.93 0.6 x [m]       0.0) coincides with the central axis of the tunnel.88 0. The axial  distance is defined with respect to the rotor axis.4 0. 9 0.95 0. Using different probe   49  .93 0.99 0.4 . the rotor azimuth angle increases as the rotor rotates in the clockwise direction. 9   0.5   7 0.5   99 0.6 is a schematic overview of the  rotor  and  its  position  relative  to  the  wind  tunnel.  Standing  in  between  the  tunnel  exit  and  rotor  while  looking  downwind.

  it  is  possible  to  obtain  three‐dimensional  components  of  complex  flows.  In  subsonic  applications  where  the  fluid  temperature  is  low and constant.12m       Front view Top view                             Figure 4.                                                                                                   Figure 4. The hot‐wire or film then responds to changes in  total  temperature  and  mass  flux. j) Ω   ψ Probe position     1m   Traversing   system   U     R=1.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             φ   p φ Hot-wire probe     (i.6 – Schematic overview of test set‐up with frame of reference. The wire or film is usually made out of a quartz fiber and coated  with  platinum.  Current  passed  through  the  sensor  raises  its  temperature  above  the  adiabatic recovery temperature of the gas.  The  sensor  consists  of  a  very  fine  wire  or  film  that  is  attached  between  two supporting needles.7 – The model wind turbine and open jet wind tunnel used. the problem of heat transfer through the support needle (end losses) and  radiation effects can be ignored and the sensor’s response can be taken to be as a function of  50  .    orientations  or  multi‐sensor  probes.

  This  yielded  a  Reynolds  number  equal  to  about  150.  300  and  450). 4.                        Fig (a): Normal probe (TSI 1201‐20)                 Fig (b): Parallel probe (TSI 1210‐20)    Figure  4.  The  two  probes  are  very  similar.  This  was  very  close  to  the  conditions for peak power (see Fig.8  ‐  The  normal  and  parallel  types  of  single  hot‐film  probes  used. 4.8).      Experimental Procedure     The  experiments  were  carried  out  at  a  rotor  speed  and  tunnel  velocity  of  11.  two  different  types  of  single  hot‐film  probes  were  used:  one  with  the  film  normal  to  the  probe  (TSI  1201‐20)  and  one  with  the  film  parallel to the probe (TSI 1211‐20). the hot‐wire or film is maintained  at  constant  temperature.  A  major  disadvantage  of  using  hot‐films  in  rotor  experiments  is  that  it  is  physically  impossible  to  measure  the  inflow  directly  in  the  51  . In a constant temperature system.65Hz  and  5. The experiments were carried out at different yaw  angles  of  the  rotor  (00. In each of the two probes.  yielding  a  tip  speed  ratio  of  8.5m/s.000  at  the  blades.  with the exception for the hot‐film orientation. the hot‐film  consists  of  a  platinum  film  on  a  fused  quartz  substrate.  The  bridge  voltage  is  a  measure  of  the  cooling  of  the  wire  and  therefore  a  measure of velocity.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           the flow velocity only. (refer to Fig.  (Courtesy:  TSI  Instruments).    In  these  wind  tunnel  inflow  measurements.  The  blade  tip  pitch  angle  was  set  to  20.3).  Electronic  circuits  used  in  a  constant  temperature  anemometer  include  a  bridge  circuit  with  a  feedback  system  to  maintain  the  wire  or  film  at  constant  resistance.

6 are integers  that denote the radial and azimuth positions respectively of each measurement point within  the measurement plane.058.  4. the probe was positioned at different i and j positions in each  measuring  plane. the measuring points were located at radial positions 40.  At  each  point. The hot‐film  measurements were taken at the following planes: 3. 60. 6.  These  yielded  traces  of  velocity  against  φ over a whole rotor revolution (i.   Whilst the rotor was rotating.1  and  0.  these  distances  are  equivalent  to  Ya/R  equal  to  0.0cm and 9.   Since it was necessary to measure the three different components of the wake velocities.0cm  upstream  of  rotorplane.              52  .  0.  For  each  measurement  point. the  readings  had  to  be  repeated  for  different  orientations  of  the  hot‐film  probes.  In  dimensionless  form.  τ is an integer representing the azimuth position of the rotor.  70.9.1  upstream  of  the  rotorplane.  80.  For each plane. Note  that the probe azimuth angle (φp) is different from the azimuth angle of the rotor (φ).                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           rotorplane. 50. 00 to 3600). An estimate had to be made by taking wake measurements at different planes  parallel  to  the  rotor  plane  both  upstream  and  downstream  as  shown  in  Fig.  Six  different  hot‐film orientations were required to be able to derive the flow velocity components using  a new method developed by Haans [37].5cm.15  downstream  and  0.e. 4.0cm downstream of  rotorplane  and  6.  the  hot‐film  readings  were  taken  every  20  increments  of  rotor  azimuth  angle.                   Ψ             Measurement planes                    Figure 4.  90  and  100%R  and  at  azimuth  increments  of  150.  Interpolation was then applied to derive the wake velocities in the rotorplane.  54  velocity  traces  were  taken  corresponding  to  54  consecutive  rotor  revolutions  and  the  mean  velocity  trace  was  determined.9 ‐ Hot‐film measurements at different planes parallel to the rotorplane. Terms i and j in Fig.

 the co‐ordinate axes are attached to the hot‐ film and not to the probe. 4. the temperature corrected.10 ‐ Local Cartesian system of co‐ordinates for the normal and parallel probe calibration. The yp‐axis is always aligned with the hot‐film.    The  calibration  procedure  of  each  hot‐film  consisted  of  two  steps:  (a)  a  speed  calibration  and (b) an angular calibration. (b): Parallel probe    Figure 4. (a): Normal probe Fig.    Hot‐film Co‐ordinate System Definitions    In order to be able to measure 3D flow components using hot‐films. E. averaged King’s law  was used [14] given by:                                                          E 2 ( = T f − Ta ) ( A + BU jet n )                                              (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Data Reduction    This section describes the procedures adopted to calibrate the hot‐films and deduce the 3D  components of the measured velocities in the near wake of the rotor.1)    where Tf and Ta are the preset hot‐film and measured flow temperature respectively.  A. For the correlation.  B  and  n  were  derived from measuring E at different wind tunnel speeds and then applying a curve fitting  procedure using the method of least‐squares. Fig.                                            53  . B  and  n  are  calibration  constants  with  A  set  equal  to  ⎡ E ⎣ 2 (T f ) ⎦U − Ta ⎤ jet = 0 . For this speed calibration.10 shows the local co‐ordinate systems (xp‐yp‐zp) used for  the normal and parallel probes.         yp   zp   yp   xp   xp   zp       Fig. In both cases. was correlated with a known windspeed of the  tunnel  jet  (Ujet)  with  the  hot‐film  in  a  normal  position  to  the  flow  (with  the  yp‐zp  plane  aligned with the flow). a suitable system of co‐ ordinates should be defined. Ujet was determined  using a single pitot‐static tube located in the vicinity of the hot‐film.    (a) Speed Calibration ‐ the hot‐film voltage.

  It  was  found  that  the  variation  of  these  angular  calibration  constants  only  varied  minimally  with  the  tunnel  wind  speed. Vp or Wp was  zero. The angular calibration process was repeated frequently in order to minimise the  uncertainty due to hot‐film ageing.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           (b) Angular Calibration – this calibration procedure was required to derive the characteristics  of the hot‐films at different flow directions.  4. 4.12  illustrates  typical  characteristic  curves  derived  for  the  hot‐films  using  the  experimental  measurements  taken  during  the  angular  calibration procedures.  4. Eqt. The basis for this procedure is based on the fact  that  given  that  Veff  is  the  velocity  measured  when  correlating  with  the  hot‐film  voltage  E  when the latter is normal to the flow as for the speed calibration (Eqt. zp). 4. the characteristic  curve  is  asymmetric  since  for  negative  θ  the  prong  of  the  probe  will  disturb  the  flow  approaching  the  hot‐film.  During  the  angular  calibration.001%  of  the  averaged  values)  and  therefore  their  influence  could  be  neglected.25  respectively  for  both  probes. The values of h and k were found to be on the order of  1.  The  method  was  based  on  using  the  experimental  values  for  V  and  assuming different values of h (or k) to estimate Veff in accordance with the corresponding  equation  from  Fig. yp. the hot‐film was oriented in different orientations such that Up. Veff is correlated  to the 3D velocity components in accordance with [14]:                                                         Veff 2 = h 2U p 2 + k 2V p 2 + W p 2                                              (4.  4.11.  To  determine  the  values  for  h  and  k. This minimum error was found to be less  than 5%.10 (xp. with increments of 100. Note that for orientation 1 of the parallel probe.2)    Up. respectively while h and k are the angular calibration constants for the  particular  hot‐film.            54  .  To  determine  h  or  k  for  each  probe  orientation.  a  trial‐and‐error  algorithm  was  used. 4.000 sample readings were taken and  the averaged values were found.  each  hot‐film  was  subjected  to  a  constant axial velocity whilst being rotated in a vertical plane parallel to the axial direction. Vp and Wp are the 3D flow velocity components in the direction of the hot‐film axis of  Fig.  Two  orientations  where  used  both  for  the  normal  and  parallel  probes.2 was applied to each different orientation to yield  the  equations  given  in  Fig.  Veff  was  recorded  for  the  range ‐900<θ<900.  This  simplified  considerably  the  data  reduction  process. For each θ.  Consequently  for  negative  θ.11.1).1  and  0. The corresponding standard deviations were found to be  very  small  (on  the  order  of  0.  (3)  of  Fig.11  is  invalid  for  θ<00.  Eqt.  Fig.   In doing so.  4.  The  assumed  value  of  h  (or  k)  that  yielded  the  minimum  error was taken to be the correct required value.  For  each  θ. 10.11. 4.  These  orientations are shown in Fig. The curves for the estimated values for Veff  using the derived values  of h and k are also shown.  the  error  between  the  estimated  value  of  Veff  and  the  experimental  value  was  found.

Vp ∴Veff = V cos (θ ) + k V sin (θ ) (1) top view ∴Veff 2 = V 2 cos 2 (θ ) + h 2V 2 sin 2 (θ ) (2) V zp ur . 4.                                                                                     Normal Probe: Orientation 1 Normal Probe: Orientation 2 xp Equation: yp Equation: 2 2 2 2 Veff = Wp + k V p Veff 2 = Wp 2 + h 2U p 2 top view 2 2 2 2 2 2 ur yp. Up θ θ side view side view Parallel Probe: Orientation 1 Parallel Probe: Orientation 2 xp Equation: Equation: 2 2 2 2 zp top view top view Veff = Wp + k V p Veff 2 = k 2Vp 2 + h 2U p 2 ur 2 2 2 2 2 2 ur ∴Veff = V sin (θ ) + k V cos (θ ) (3) ∴Veff 2 = k 2V 2 cos 2 (θ ) + h 2V 2 sin 2 (θ ) (4) V yp V yp . Wp xp. V p p where V = Veff where V = Veff but with θ =900 θ =900 zp.11 – Different orientations and corresponding equations used for the angular calibration of the hot‐film probes 55                                                  Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           . V . W V zp p where V = Veff . Up θ θ probe in orientation 1 k is found from orientation 1 side view side view Fig. W where V = Veff θ = 00 p θ = 00 xp.

2564 6.2902 & h = 1.5 6.3 0 6.2978 1 Estimated using k = 0.1 5 Estimated using h = 1.295 m/s 6.165 m/s 2 Experiment Experiment 1 Estimated using k = 0.0554 0 0 -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 θ (deg) θ (deg) Fig.8 3 6. (c) Parallel probe.595 m/s 6. (d) Parallel probe. Orientation 2 6 8 7 5 6 4 5 3 4 Veff (m/s) Veff (m/s) V = 5.12 – Typical characteristic curves for the hot‐film probes as derived from the angular calibration procedures                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           .7 Veff (m/s) Veff (m/s) 6.1125 7 V = 6. Orientation 1 Fig.2 56  Experiment 7.6 2 V = 5.                                                                                     6 7.2 -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 θ (deg) θ (deg) Fig. Orientation 2 Fig. 4.9 4 6. Orientation 1 Fig. (a): Normal probe. (b): Normal probe.4 1 Experiment Estimated using k = 0.214 m/s 3 2 V = 6.

  the  above  system  of  equations  could  strictly  speaking be only applied on the assumption that the wake velocities for a given point and  rotor azimuth angle are constant and do not vary with time. Xa 2 ⎤ ⎢ 2⎥ ⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ = ⎢h                                                 wv 1 k 2 ⎥ ⎢Veff . even behind the rotorplane.2  only  holds  for  an  instantaneous  point  in  time. Eqt. This assumption is only valid  when turbulence levels in the wake was small. Za 2 ⎥⎦   57  . horizontal and  vertical components denoted by wh.Za    are  the  averaged  hot‐film  effective  velocities  measured  during  the  experimental  procedure.Y a 2 = h 2 wh 2 + wv 2 + k 2 wa 2                                            (4. The required  3D  velocity  components  were  solved  by  reorganizing  the  above  equations  in  matrix  form  and applying matrix inversion as follows:    −1 ⎡ wh 2 ⎤ ⎡ k 2 h2 1 ⎤ ⎡Veff . while the third was taken with the parallel probe.4)  ⎢⎣ wa 2 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ h 2 k2 1 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣Veff .Xa. wa and wv.  Two  were taken with the normal probe. In the parallel  probe orientation.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Derivation of 3D near wake velocities from hot‐film measurements    This  section  describes  the  technique  adopted  to  derive  the  3D  near  wake  velocity  components  from  the  hot‐film  effective  velocities  (Veff)  measured  with  different  hot‐film  orientations at the different points in the rotor near wake as discussed in section 4. 4. Since the rotor was operating such that the  flow was attached. the hot‐film was aligned with the Xa axis of the rotor while  in the second normal probe orientation.3)                                                     Veff .    (a)  Traditional  Method:  With  this  method.2.  4. In one  of the normal probe orientations.Ya 2 ⎥                                   (4. Z a 2 = h 2 wh 2 + k 2 wv 2 + wa 2     In  the  equations  above.    The required 3D wake velocity components at a given point were the axial.  Veff.  It  should  be  emphasised  that  Eqt.  respectively.2.  Two  different  methods  were  adopted  to  deduce  these  components:  a  traditional  method  and  a  new  method  being  proposed  by  Wouter  Haans [37].  Since  it  was  impossible  to  measure  the  three  different  effective  velocities  simultaneously.  Veff. such that they were aligned with the global  co‐ordinate  axes  Xa‐Ya‐Za.2 was applied for each  orientation to yield the following three equations:                                                       Veff .  Veff. the hot‐film was aligned with the Za.Ya. the hot‐film was oriented with the Ya axis.  three  hot‐film  orientations  were  required. X a 2 = k 2 wh 2 + h 2 wv 2 + wa 2                                                      Veff . turbulence levels were small.

  w (φ . In this method.5)  ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎢⎣ wa ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0 0 1 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ wa ⎥⎦   The local inflow measured velocity at any point in a particular measuring plane depends on  the geometrical location of the point and the rotor azimuth angle. a  three‐letter  index  notation  was  used  to  denote  a  velocity  component  at  each  point. i  and  j  are  indices  denoting the rotor azimuth angle (φ). r .    (b)  New  Method:  Wouter  Haans  developed  a  more  advanced  approach  that  is  capable  of  finding  the  directions  of  the  wh  and  wv.  For  instance  the  axial  flow  velocity  was  represented  by  ( wa )τ .    The final step in data‐reduction process was to obtain the flow components in local rotor co‐ ordinates (x‐y‐z reference frame) by using the following matrix transformation:     ⎡ wr ⎤ ⎡ sin(φ ) cos(φ ) 0 ⎤ ⎡ wh ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥⎢ ⎥                                            wt = cos(φ ) − sin(φ ) 0 wv                                         (4. Details of the  method are given in [37].12(c)). r R .                      58  . φ )   and  t p ( wr φ . Component wa was found to be significantly larger than the  other components. the radial location (r/R) and the azimuth angle of the  measuring location (φp).i .  The  method  makes  use  of  six  different  probe  orientations of the asymmetric response of the parallel probe to the flow  angle due to the  obstruction of the flow resulting from the probe’s prongs (see Fig. tangential and  radial  velocities  can  thus  be  written  as  ( wa φ .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           A main disadvantage of this method regards the fact that the directions of the flow  velocities remain unknown. r . j where  τ.  the traditional approach was  still used to find the axial flow component wa. φ p R ) . The axial.    For the sake of the data‐processing and calculation using the developed software codes. φ p R ) . and it could be easily assumed that it acts in the downstream direction. 4.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Inflow Results     Derived Wake Velocities    Since  the  measurements  were  carried  out  at  different  yaw  angles  and  different  measurement planes.  This  may  be  observed  in  Figs.16(a)) is characterized by an increase in the  flow  velocity  followed  by  a  rapid  decrease.min)  will  decrease  as  the  distance  of  the  probe  from  the  rotorplane  (i.                                           59  .  4.  The  peak  to  peak  velocity  difference  (wa.15(a).16 and are mainly induced by the bound circulation of the  blades.  as  noted  in  Figs.  then  two  blade  passage  signals  can  be  recognized  over  one  whole  rotor  revolution.max  –  wa.13  (b).  This agrees well with the law of conservation of momentum. 4. The  tangential velocity is normally negative i. The axial velocity pattern (seen in Fig. it is helpful to understand the distinct axial and  tangential velocity patterns measured when each blade passes by the hot‐film probe.15  plot  typical  measured  signals  for  the  flow  velocity  components (wa.  Since  the  rotor  has  two  blades.15(b).  The negative peak tangential  velocity  decreases  as  the  probe  is  moved  away  from  the  rotorplane.  Figs.14(b) and 4.  Ya)  is  increased.  The  tangential velocity pattern is characterized by ‘U‐shaped’ pattern (seen in Fig. the resulting database was quite an extensive one containing at least  24MB  of  data.  4.    To be able to interpret the velocity signals.13(a). 4. 4.  4.  4.e. 4.  φp) as a function of rotor  azimuth angle (φ).  4.13. opposite to the direction of the rotating blade. wt and wr) at Ψ=00 obtained at various points (r/R.14(a)  and  4. Such  patterns are illustrated in Fig.16(b)).e.14  and  4.

(c) Ya = 9cm   DwnStream   -2.5 Ya = 6cm DwnStream   2.0 φ (deg)   Figure  4.0   DwnStream Fig. (b)   Ya = 9cm DwnStream   -3.0     1.0cm   3.5cm DwnStream   2.0   wr (m/s)     0.0 φ (deg)   3.5   wa (m/s)   4.0 Ya = 3. 750).5cm DwnStream   Ya = 6cm -2.0   5.5 UpStream   3.5   5.5   0 60 120 180 240 300 360   φ (deg)   2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             6.4.0   wt (m/s) 0 60 120 180 240 300 360     -1.0 Ya = 6cm DwnStream   Fig.φp) = (0.   60  .0   Ya = 3.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360   Ya = 3.5cm DwnStream   -1.  tangential  and  radial  velocities  derived  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  for  Ψ=00.0 Fig.0   4. (a) Ya = 9cm   DwnStream 1.13  ‐  Axial.0       2.5   6. Blade passage is observed at φ = 750 and 2550. The probe is located at (r/R.0     1.0     0.0 Ya = 6.

0   5.5cm DwnStream   Fig.0 wa (m/s) 3.0 DwnStream   Fig.5 Ya = 6cm 1.7.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 wt (m/s)   -1.0   φ (deg)   Figure  4.φp) = (0.0 DwnStream   1.0     0.5   3.0cm 2.5 5. 750).14  ‐  Axial.5   4.0   0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ (deg)   2. The probe is located at (r/R.0   1.0   φ (deg) 3.0 Ya = 6cm DwnStream Ya = 9cm   DwnStream -4.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360   Ya = 3.0   wr (m/s)   0.0 Ya = 6cm DwnStream Ya = 9cm   DwnStream -2. (b) -3.0     2. (a) 0.0   Ya = 3.5 UpStream   Ya = 3.  61  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             6.5cm 2. (c) -1.0   1.0 Ya = 6.5 6.  tangential  and  radial  velocities  derived  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  for  Ψ=00.0   4.0   -2.5 Ya = 9cm DwnStream 0.5cm DwnStream   Fig. Blade passage is observed at φ = 750 and 2550.

0   Ya = 3.  tangential  and  radial  velocities  derived  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  for  Ψ=00.φp) = (0.0     1.  62  .0 Ya = 3.0   φ (deg)   Figure  4.5 Ya = 6cm 1. (c) Ya = 9cm   DwnStream -1.5   3.5cm   DwnStream 0.9.0 Ya = 6.0 DwnStream   Fig.0     wr (m/s)   1.0   wa (m/s) 3. 750).5 UpStream   2.0 Ya = 6cm   Fig.5 Ya = 9cm   DwnStream 0.0     Ya = 3.5   6.5   5.0 4.5cm DwnStream   1.15  ‐  Axial.0cm   2. (b) DwnStream   Ya = 9cm DwnStream   -3. Blade passage is observed at φ = 750 and 2550.5   4.0       2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             6.0   Ya = 6cm 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 DwnStream   Fig. The probe is located at (r/R. (a) 0.0   φ (deg) 3.0 wt (m/s) 0 60 120 180 240 300 360     -1.5cm DwnStream   -2.0   5.0   0 60 120 180 240 300 360   φ (deg)   2.0       0.

       63  .  4.max   Axial flow       wa. For a more detailed physical explanation of these inflow measurements refer to  the work of Haans [37].                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             Axial direction   Direction of blade motion       ΓΒ   Probe (fixed position)     x   wa         Fig.   Fig. some turbulence may also be observed at  φ positions other than those at  the  blade  passage  positions.16 – Distinct axial and tangential flow velocity patterns induced by blade passage.  This  turbulence  may  also  be  observed  in  the  wa  signals  and  results from the effect of the wake vortex sheet passing by the hot‐film probe.min     x     wt       x     Fig. (b)   Tangential   flow          Figure 4.17  shows  typical  axial  velocity  signals  at  different  yaw  angles  for  a  given  probe  location. Vermeer [98.    In the wt‐signals. (a) wa.  It  is  noted  that  the  flow  velocity  at  this  location  decreases  as  the  yaw  angle  is  increased. 99] and Mast [55].

 this is equal to  wa .  6cm  and  9cm  downstream)  and  were  required  to  be  able  to  estimate  the  flow  velocities  at  the  blades  from  which  the  angle  of  attack  could  then  be  found.φp)  at  a  particular  measurement plane is denoted as (wa.0 2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           6.  4.16(a).j.  the  value  of  wa.  90%R  at  azimuthal  increments of 150). 150.e.  90  or  100%R)  of  the  hot‐film  measurement  point.     The  results  obtained  for  wa.5 4.c  at  a  given  location  (r/R.  80.0 1. 300 and 450  at 3.058) downstream from the rotorplane.max + wa .φp) = (0.  Index  j  denotes  the  azimuthal location of this point (00.  60.0 5.  4.  4.….e.0 Yaw 30 deg 0. These were obtained for each of the four measuring planes (i.c =                                                       (4.3450).  The  mean  values  of  wa.  80.0 4.6)  2 In  the  index  representation.0 wa (m/s) 3. 750).  Blade passage is observed at φ = 750 and 2550).5 Yaw 45 deg 0.min                                                         wa .18(a).5 6.  50.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ (deg)   Figure 4.5 Yaw 0 deg 1.      Determination of axial flow velocity at the blade passage location (wa.5 5.c)    From  the  experimental  axial  flow  velocity  signals  as  shown  in  Figs. at Ya =  6cm  upstream  and  3.17 ‐ Axial velocity variation derived from the hot‐film measurements for  Ψ=00.15(a). 4. Referring  to Fig.  60.  70.  at  r  =  40. For axial  64  .7.c  at  Ψ=00  are  given  in  Fig.5cm.13(a).c)i.  70.14(a)  and  4. The corresponding standard deviations are also presented. The axial flow velocity at the blade passage location (denoted by wa.  50. Recall that index i denotes the radial location (40.5 2. The probe is located at (r/R. 300.c  obtained from the different probe positions (at azimuthal increments of 150) at each radius  are shown in this plot.5 3. it was possible to estimate the axial flow velocities at the blade passage locations for  each  of  the  probe  measuring  locations  (i.c) was estimated  by taking it to be equal to the average of the maximum and minimum velocities.5cm (Ya/R=0.

 4.20 present the values of wa. j jtot ∑ ⎜ K ⎜ ω ⎟⎟ j =1 ⎝ ⎠ ⎛ x 2 ⎞ −⎜ 1 ⎜ 2⋅( 0.  Since  in  yawed  conditions.18(b)  plots  the  variation of wa.5cm downstream  planes:  (w ) − ( wa . But this was not the case due to  various  sources  of  error  which  will  be  discussed  later.c Ya = 3.37 ω is the bandwidth that should be prescribed.c should ideally be constant with  φp.c  versus  φ  were  also  smoothened  to  damp  out  the  ‘jerky’  variations  introduced due to uncertainties in the measurements.c.  ω was set equal to 0.19 and 4. as depicted earlier in Fig.5 cm Ya =−6 cm     + ⋅ ( 0 − ( −6) )         (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           conditions (Ψ=00).c obtained in yawed conditions (Ψ=300 and 450).  There is a velocity  dip for positions near  φ=00 which in fact results in a discontinuous behaviour in the velocity  variation  between  3300‐3600  and  00‐300. 4.37 )2 ⎟⎟                                                    K ( x) = ⋅e ⎝ ⎠   2π ⋅ 0.c at a given point (i. as will be described later on in section 4. In the data smoothing.8.  In  the  index  representation using (i. A major contribution for this non‐ideal trend  is the non‐uniformity in the tunnel exit jet. 4.3.c  at  the  rotorplane (Ya = 0cm) using the mean values for the 6cm upstream and 3.  65  . This  was found to be reasonable.  This  discontinuity  may  be  easily  observed  in  Fig.    Figs.7)  Ya = 0 cm Ya =−6 cm 3.    Linear  interpolation  was  employed  to  estimate  the  spanwise  variations  of  wa. This smoothing method was useful since the data lies along a  band of constant width (equal to 150). wa.  For  yawed  conditions  only.j).c ) a .  4. k ⎝ ω ⎠ (w ) k =1                              =                             (4.c )i . a technique that implements a Gaussian kernel   was  used  to  compute  local  weighted  averages  of  the  input  vector  wa.c ) = ( wa .20.c with the blade azimuth angle over one whole rotor revolution for Ψ=00.18(a).  4.c ) ( wa. In this analysis. the smoothed value of wa.18(b). The smoothed variations are included  in Figs.  the  results  are  plotted  as  a  function  of  the  blade  azimuth  angle  (φ).c i.  the  flow  velocities  at  the  blades  are  unsteady.5 − ( −6)   These interpolated values are included in Fig.8)  ( ) ( p )k ⎞ ( smoothed ) ⎛ p j φ − φ a .  For  instance  Fig.19 and 4. These values are an estimate for the  axial  flow  velocities  at  the  blade  lifting  lines  and  they  were  used  to  estimate  the  angle  of  attack from the measurements. It is  noted that the variation is not constant with φ.  the  variations  of  wa.5. 4.j) was found from    jtot ⎛ (φ p ) j − (φ p )k ⎞ ∑ K ⎜⎜ ⎟⎟ ( wa .

c (m/s) 2.5 6cm UpStream wa.c (m/s) 3.0cm DwnStream 0.0 0.0 RotorPlane (Interp) 1.4 0.5 Std Dev 9.0 3.5 4.5cm DwnStream Std Dev 6.8 0.5 3 wa.3 0.5cm downstream of the rotorplane.0 6cm DwnStream 2.7 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           5.5 Std Dev 6cm UpStream 1.18(a) – Axial flow velocity distribution at blades derived from the hot‐film measurements  using Eqt.4 1.  66  .5 9cm DwnStream 2.9 1 r/R   Figure 4.18(b)  –  Variation  of  the  axial  flow  velocity  at  the  blades  with  azimuth  angle  forΨ=00  at  3.9 0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ (deg)   Figure  4.5 4 3. 4.5 r/R=0.0cm DwnStream 0.6 1 r/R=0.0 4.5 5.5 2 r/R=0.6 forΨ=00.                 5 4.5cm DwnStream 3.8 r/R=0.0 Std Dev 3.5 0.6 0.5 r/R=0.7 0.5 r/R=0.

5).20. The presence of some  fluctuations (such as due to turbulence) invalidates this assumption. 4. 4.  the  data  reduction  technique  assumes that for a given rotor azimuth position.8m/s when  the  pitot  readings  are  set  to  5.  The  interpolated  values  are  included  in  Figs.  Thus  it  is  reasonable  to  assume  that  the  uncertainty  interval  introduced  by  the  non‐uniformity  in  the  tunnel  exit  jet  is  5.     The  rotor  angular  speed  and  the  pitot  readings  at  the  tunnel  exit  could  be  adjusted  very  accurately at the required setting (720 rpm and 5.  The  positioning  accuracy  was  estimated  to  be  around ±1cm.18(b)). it was found that the tunnel exit velocity varies from 5.  In  these  figures. it was     67  . The interpolated  values were an estimate for the unsteady axial flow velocities at the lifting line of the blades  in  yawed  conditions. 4. linear interpolation was used to estimate the variations  of wa. Yet it is not excluded that the wake  circulation  from  the  skewed  wake  (tip  and  in  particular  root  circulation)  resulting  from  rotor  yaw  as  well  as  the  influences  of  the  centrebody  structure  of  the  test‐rig  could  have  yielded  abrupt  changes  of  wa.c with φ at the rotorplane for different radial locations using Eqt. In this analysis. 4.5.2 to 5.1.    (4) The  traversing  system  experienced  some  inaccuracies  in  positioning  the  hot‐film  probe  at  the  required  locations. as was already noted at Ψ=00 (see Fig.    (3) Errors in the data reduction technique described earlier (see page 54) mainly due to  errors  in  the  angular  calibration  constants. (see Fig.19  and  4.  4.7.  Also.    Sources of error    The main sources of error in the inflow measurements are the following:    (1) The non‐uniformity in tunnel exit jet: as already explained earlier in section 4.c  with  φ .2.5m/s.3m/s.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Using these smoothed distributions.  These  abrupt  changes  could  also  contribute  to  the  discontinuous behavior in the velocity variation between 3300‐3600 and 00‐300.  Fig. the discontinuous behavior in the velocity variation between 3300‐3600 and 00‐300 is  observed. Therefore the errors in  the  experimental  data  due  to  possible  fluctuations  in  these  parameters  were  negligible. This discontinuity is mainly due to  the non‐uniformity in the tunnel exit jet.  Haans [37] has carried out an in‐depth uncertainty analysis for these measurements at  Ψ=00  estimating the uncertainty to due to individual sources of error.    (2) The hot‐film probes in measuring the effective velocities (Veff) mainly due to errors  in the speed calibration constants. the velocity at any point does not  change  with  time  and  thus  the  different  hot‐film  measurements  using  different  probe orientations need not be carried out simultaneously.5±0.5m/s respectively).

  This is of  the same order as that obtained by Haans [37]. the  magnitude  of  the  axial  flow  velocity  component  at  the  measurements  planes  is  less  dependent  on  the  windspeed  U  than  at  no  rotor  yaw.  The  measurements were carried out at radial locations 50.    68  .  For  each  radial  location  and  measurement  plane.c  should  be  independent  of  φ at  Ψ=00.18(a).                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           concluded that the overall uncertainty in wa at the vicinity of blade passage is on the order  of 10%.  50. 70 and 80%R and were limited to  one  measurement  plane  only  (at  6cm  downstream  of  the  rotorplane). As already described in the  previous  section.  wa. However.  This  is  because  of  the  fact  that  the  same  apparatus  and  rotor  speed and blade pitch settings were used and also because the hot‐film speed and angular  calibration  constants  were  very  close  to  those  for  axial  conditions.  These  distributions  were  compared  with  those  from  the  new  measurements.  60.      Alternatively.  it  was  possible  to  use  a  simple  method  to  derive  an  estimate  for  this  uncertainty by considering the results of wa.   The  above  simple  method  for  estimating  the  uncertainty  in  the  hot‐film  measurements  could  not  be  applied  for  yawed  conditions  for  the  simple  reason  that  wa.c obtained at  Ψ=00. 450 and 600.  The  measurements  were  performed for the same wind speed and tip speed ratio and at  Ψ = 00.c.c could be obtained for this plane using the procedure described on page  64.  80  and  90%R  and  the  four  measurement  planes and it was found to be in the range of 6 – 10% of the mean values of wa.c.21.  Using  this  data. The agreement is reasonably good and this adds  to  confidence  in  the  measurements. when the rotor is yawed.  But a more elaborate uncertainty analysis would be necessary to confirm this. 4. it was justified to assume the same uncertainty level of 6‐10%  for  Ψ=300  and  450  as  well.  Assuming  the  velocity  distribution  of  each  sample  follows  a  normal  distribution.c  was  obtained  at  azimuth  increments  of  150  yielding  a  sample  size  of  24  readings.  the  uncertainty  contribution  due  to  the  tunnel  exit‐jet  non‐uniformity  should  be  less.  It  is  possible that this could result in a lower overall uncertainty level in yaw than for no yaw.  It  also  follows  that  in  yaw.3m/s)  is  considerably  high  (on  the  order  of  ±5%  of  5.  The  mean  and  standard  deviations  were  computed  and  the  results  were  plotted  earlier  in  Fig.  The same level of agreement was also obtained for Ψ= 00 and 450.  in  the  ideal  situation.    Comparison with previous data by Vermeer     In year 1998.5m/s)  and  should  contribute  a  considerable proportion of the 6 – 10% uncertainty in wa.  the  distributions of wa.45%  confidence  could  be  taken  as  ±2σ  where  σ  is  the  standard  deviation.  An  important  point  to  note regards the fact that the uncertainty in U due to the non‐uniformity in the tunnel exit  jet  (±0. 300.  wa. Yet.c  is  no  longer  independent on  φ.  The  maximum  discrepancy  is  seen  at  blade  azimuth  angles 00<φ<900. 60. Vermeer [96] carried out similar inflow measurements using the same wind  tunnel  and  rotor  with  hot‐wire  probes  (see  also  Schepers  [69]).  70.  4.  This  uncertainty  interval  was  computed  over  radial  locations  40.  the  uncertainty  interval  at  95.  The  comparison at  Ψ=300 is shown in Fig.

5 6cm UpStream wa.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.        69  .0 3.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2. (a) r/R = 0.0 3.5cm DwnStream 3.4    4.5 6cm UpStream wa.0 3.0 3.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                              Fig.5    Fig. (b) r/R = 0.19  –  Variation  of  axial  flow  velocity  at  blades  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  different  radial  locations at Ψ=300.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                               Fig.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.5 4.5 4.  4.5cm DwnStream 3.

19 – contd. (d) r/R = 0.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3. (c) r/R = 0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.          70  .5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.7                                        Fig.6    4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.5 6cm UpStream wa.5 4.0 3.0 3. from previous page (Ψ=300).0 3.5cm DwnStream 3.5cm DwnStream 3. 4.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                             Fig.5 6cm UpStream wa.5 4.0 3.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                             Fig.

9                                        Fig.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                               Fig.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.5cm DwnStream 3.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                             Fig.5cm DwnStream 3.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.8    4. from previous page (Ψ=300). (f) r/R = 0.5 4.0 3.0 3.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2. 4.0 3.          71  .5 6cm UpStream wa.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.0 3.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 2.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 2. (e) r/R = 0.5 6cm UpStream wa.5 4.19 – contd.

5 3.4    4.0 3.  4.20  –  Variation  of  axial  flow  velocity  at  blades  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  different  radial  locations at Ψ=450.0 6cm UpStream wa.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1.0 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 9cm DwnStream 1.5 4.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                              Fig.0 3. (a) r/R = 0.c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1.        72  . (b) r/R = 0.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                                 Fig.5 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5cm DwnStream 2.5cm DwnStream 3.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 2.0 6cm UpStream wa.0 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 1.5    Fig.5 3.c (m/s) 2.5 3.

 (c) r/R = 0.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                              Fig.c (m/s) 2.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.0 6cm UpStream wa.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.5 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.6    4.0 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 1.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                               Fig.5 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3. (d) r/R = 0.0 3.0 6cm UpStream wa.c (m/s) 2.0 3.0 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 1.5 3.5 3.7                                        Fig.5cm DwnStream 3.20 – contd.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1.5cm DwnStream 3.          73  . 4.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1. from previous page (Ψ=450).

c (m/s) 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                              Fig.c (m/s) 2.5 3. (e) r/R = 0.0 6cm UpStream wa.5 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1. 4.5 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.5 3.5 4.0 3.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm_DwnStream 2.5 3.0 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 9cm DwnStream 1.8    4. from previous page (Ψ=450).20 – contd.          74  .0 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ ( deg )                                                              Fig.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 2.5cm DwnStream 2.9                                        Fig. (f) r/R = 0.5 9cm DwnStream_Smooth RotorPlane (Interp) 1.0 6cm_DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 1.0 3.5cm DwnStream 3.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.0 6cm UpStream wa.

6 3.8  2.4 present data 2.6 Fig.8   3.c (m/s) 3  2.5 Fig.c (m/s)   3.8  3.4   3. (b) r/R = 0.21 – Comparison of distributions of wa.2   2.8   Figure 4.2 3   3 2. (c) r/R = 0.2 3.2   3 wa.6 3.8   4 3.4 2.7    3.2   2 2 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 0 60 120 180 240 300 360   φ (deg) φ (deg)   Fig.4 present data   2.1).6   2.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                  4.4 3.8 2.6 3.2 3. (d) r/R = 0.6  3.6 Vermeer Vermeer present data 2.8 2.4 3.c with  φ with those from Vermeer [96] at  Ψ=300 and  6cm downstream of the rotorplane (Ya/R=0. see also Schepers [69].2 wa.8 2.4 present data  2.6 Vermeer  2.4  3.c (m/s) wa. (a) r/R = 0.                                      75  .2 2 2   0 60 120 180 240 300 360 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 φ (deg) φ (deg)   Fig.2 2.6 Vermeer 2.8 3.c (m/s) wa.

  During the experiments the wind tunnel hall lights where switched off to create a complete  dark  environment.  The  jet  was  injected into the tunnel jet stream through a nozzle that was located well upstream from the  rotor.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4. A digital camera.  A  reference  grid consisting of equally‐spaced wires was constructed.22 – Schematic diagram of experimental set‐up used for smoke visualization. In this way it was possible to capture the smoke  flow patterns in a horizontal plane passing through the rotor hub and observe the position  of the wake tip vortices relative to the blade tip.  76  .22). The nozzle position with respect to the blade tip (at 900 or 2700 azimuth positions) had  to be adjusted at different yaw angles of the rotor for optimal visualization of the tip vortex. 4.  A  smoke  jet  was  created  using  a  generator  that  uses  oil  to  produce  smoke.  The rotor position with respect to the tunnel exit was kept the same as for the  wake inflow measurements (i.      Side view Top view 7   6   6       2 1 2 1     5     7 5 3       3   4 4             1: Model rotor 2: Wind tunnel 3: Video camera 4: Smoke generator 5: Smoke jet 6: Wire grid 7: Stroboscope             Figure 4. with its lens focused on  this  plane.3 Part II: Smoke Visualization Measurements          The following sections describe the wind tunnel smoke visualization experiments to track  the tip vortex paths of the wake in axial and yawed conditions. with the rotor hub 1 m downstream from the tunnel exit). This was installed in a horizontal  plane on top of the rotor such that the wires were parallel and perpendicular to the wind  tunnel axis (refer to Fig.e.2.22 illustrates the schematic diagram of the apparatus used in the smoke visualization  experiments.  A  stroboscope  was  synchronized  with  the  rotor  to  flash  when  the  azimuth angle  of the first blade was 900.    Experimental Set‐up    Fig. 4.  was  used  to  record  multiple  images  of  these  smoke  flow  patterns.

    (2) at  Ψ = ‐450 and +450. rotor and grid were measured for each rotor setting. Furthermore. These settings were selected so that the rotor would operate in both attached  and  stalled  flow  conditions  over  the  blades.  The  smoke  was  injected  on  both  sides. the wind tunnel exit jet velocity Ujet was maintained constant  at  5.  For each rotor setting.  For  each  of  these  yaw  angles.  θtip  =  20  were  repeated. ‐150.      Tip vortex pitch p ys (Downwind Side)   Tip vortex path   Rotor blade tip    Tip vortex core (Downwind Side)   xs     Midpoint of line joining Wind  vortex cores   velocity   Axis of skewed    wake O     −χs Yaw axis −Ψ   Rotor axis   Rotor blade tip    (Upwind Side) Lines joining vortex cores    having same age   xs       Tip vortex pitch p Tip vortex path ys (Upwind Side)                                          Figure 4. ‐300.  77  .  were the tip vortex core locations at 900 and 2700 were compared. 8 and 10 and  θtip =  00.5m/s. 20  and 40.  The  tip  vortex  measurements  for  λ = 8. two smoke injections were carried out on every side.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Experimental procedure                 Throughout the experiments. ‐450 and +450.  the  tip  vortex  core  positions  were  recorded  at  nine  combinations of the following tip speed ratios and tip pitch angles:  λ = 6.  at  azimuth angles equal to 900 and 2700 (refer to Fig.  were the tip vortex core locations at 900 and 2700 were compared  for the corresponding upwind and downwind sides.  The  measurement  campaign  employed  ensured  repeatability  and  randomization  of  data. These distances were required  for the parallax correction which will be described later on. two symmetry checks were accomplished:   (1) at Ψ = 00. each yielding at  least  75  photos.  The  smoke  visualizations  were  performed  at  different  yaw  angles.  tip  speed  ratios and blade tip pitch angles: Five different rotor yaw angles: 00.23).23 – Definitions used in the wake geometry.  The vertical distances between the  camera. 4.  θtip  =  00  and  λ = 6.

 respectively) and therefore their effect was ignored.  These  coordinates  are  attached  to  the  blade  tip  and  lie  in  the  horizontal  plane  passing  through  the  rotor  hub  centre  (see  Fig. For each yaw angle.  Wake  expansion could be determined from the path followed by the tip vortices.  distance d is given by  H −h                                                                 d = ⋅L                                                              (4.  The tip vortices are clearly identifiable by the swirling smoke pattern.  Applying  similar  triangles.  For  yawed  conditions.  ys). the location of each vortex centre relative to the blade tips could  be  found.  wake  expansion is larger on the downwind side than on the upwind side and this leads to wake  skew.9)  H Other  factors  were  thought  to  influence  parallax  effects.  the  axial  thrust  was  measured  at  each  of  the  nine  combinations  of  λ and  θtip. Figure 4.     The  presence  of  wake  expansion  is  evident  from  the  photos.  4. The blade tip can be identified on the  photos.  The  xs‐axis  lies  along  the  undisturbed  flow  direction.       Data Processing  The Photos     Figure 4. Here.1 m x 0. with the centre of the  vortex indicated by the centre of the smoke‐free area. Knowing the size of these squares. together with the grid in the background. the distances of each vortex core relative to the blade  tips were measured against the length of grid’s squares.     Using the above method. L is the measurement taken  from  the  photo  while  d  is  the  corrected  (actual)  distance.  These  measurements are described in further detail in reference [36]. tip vortex pitch and wake  skew angle were derived from the  known tip  vortex  positions.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           In a separate measurement campaign. the photos appear to be instantaneous pictures of  the unsteady helical tip vortex structure in a horizontal plane that cross‐sects the rotor hub.  The  position  of  each  vortex  core  was  expressed  using  local  coordinates  (xs. the axial thrust force on the rotor was measured for  yaw angles going from change this Ψ = ‐450 and +450 with steps of 150.80 m.25 is a schematic used for  parallax correction.1 m.  4.28 m and 2.  Fig. while the ys‐axis is perpendicular to the undisturbed flow. the positions of the tip vortex cores could be established after application of  camera parallax correction to the photo measurements. Due to the stroboscopic  light source and the camera orientation. respectively.23).  0. h and H are the perpendicular distances between grid and smoke  visualisation plane and between grid and camera. Using photo editing software.  such  as  lens  and  camera  sensor  misalignment.23  illustrates  how  these  parameters  have  been  found. However these were considered to be negligible since the values of h and H  were large (about 1.24 displays typical photos derived from the visualisations.     Wake expansion.  78  .

          L       Measuring Grid   h   d   H     Smoke visualisation plane             Camera                           Figure 4.(c): Ψ = −300.24 – Typical smoke visualisation photos showing tip vortex cores and the blade.(d): Ψ = −450. Downwind side Fig.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               Blade tip         Tip vortex core       Fig. Upwind side                       Fig.25 – Schematic diagram used for parallax correction. λ = 8 θtip = 20. Upwind side Figure 4. λ = 8 θtip = 20.  79  .(a): Ψ = 00. Note that  the flow is from left to right. λ = 8 θ tip= 20.(b): Ψ = −150. λ = 8 θ tip= 20 Fig.

 An upwind and downwind p  has been defined. the contribution of parallax bias uncertainties to the total uncertainty  has  been  ignored.  It  is  estimated  that  the  random  uncertainty  in  average  tip  vortex  location  translates  in  an  uncertainty interval of ±1. As stated.    For each measurement of both the tip vortex locations and CT.  Details  of  this  correction  are  explained  in  reference  [36].  respectively.  This  could be done.  The  wake  skew  angle  could  then  be  taken  as  the  angle  between  the  rotor  axis  and  the  axis  of  the  skewed wake. only the first pitch is quoted.23). The axis of the skewed wake was determined by constructing a best‐fit straight line  originating  at  the  yaw  axis  and  passing  through  these  midpoints  (see  Fig.5  cm  and  ±0. since a two‐bladed model has been used. θtip)  was  equal  to  0.  For  each  visualisation  measurement.10)       T 1 ρ AU 2 2 where A is the rotor swept area equal to πR2.     An  analysis  into  the  uncertainties  of  the  estimated  vortex  centre  locations  has  been  performed.5  cm. for the tip vortices shed on the upwind and downwind side of the rotor  plane.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           The tip vortex pitch p was determined by measuring the distance along the xs‐axis between  two successive vortex cores originating from the same blade.  Enclosed  within  the  contribution  from  averaging  is  the  effect  of  the  vertical  drift  of  the  smoke. The maximum interval of random uncertainty in the average tip vortex location  has  been  estimated  at  ±1.  six  photos  have  been  used  for  averaging.  The  corrected  values  for  the  thrust  were  azimuthally  averaged  and  non‐ dimensionalized using the standard equation:                                                                   C = T                                                          (4. The thrust measurements had to be corrected  due  to  considerable  structural  interference.  The  maximum  standard  deviation  over  the  9  different  settings  of  (λ. λ was taken to be equal to the  average  over  36  rotor  revolutions.  respectively. The midpoint of each line was then  found.  Averaging  of  the  measured  vortex  centre  locations  is  the  main  contributor  to  the  random  uncertainty.  It  is  estimated  namely.  Since  in  this  study.12.  that  its  effect  on  the  error  in  the  vortex  centre  location  is  substantially  smaller  than  1.5  cm  in  the  xs‐  and  ys‐direction.    The wake skew angle χs was found as follows: a straight line was drawn joining the vortex  cores  on  the  upwind  side  to  the  ones  having  the  same  age  on  the  downwind  side.       Axial Force    A  measurement  campaign  solely  dedicated  to  the  measurement  of  axial  thrust  (T)  on  the  rotor at all different settings was carried out.  CT  was  also  taken  to  be  equal  to  the  average  over  36  80  .  out  of  the  measurement  plane.  the  flow  visualisation  was  limited  to  a  small  distance downstream of the rotor plane (less than 2R).  4.5˚ in χs.

  Figs.  The  tip  vortex  trajectory  determines  the  wake  boundary  and  hence  the  wake  expansion. 4.076  at  Ψ  =150  and  (λ. For this axial flow  condition. The maximum standard deviation over the 9 different settings of (λ.  Ideally. there is a component of the free stream  velocity (equal to USin(Ψ)) that acts in a direction parallel to the rotorplane (refer to Fig.     Tip vortex locations    Fig.  Probably.1.20).  The  maximum  difference  is  0.    Recall  that  ys  and  xs  are  the  distances  relative  to  the  blade  tip  in  a  direction  perpendicular and parallel to the undisturbed windspeed (see Fig 4.  at a given (λ.018.  the  symmetry  is  better. (a) shows the effect of changing  θtip.27 illustrates the tip vortex locations obtained from the smoke visualization photos at  Ψ=00.26. while maintaining  θtip constant at 20. θtip).28(a) and (b) displays the tip vortex locations at  Ψ= ‐300  at both the upwind and  downwind side.5. However.23).                   81  . The differences in CT are largest for  Ψ= ±150. 4. it  can be observed that there is a consistent lack of symmetry with the CT values for negative  yaw  being  slightly  lower  than  the  corresponding  values  at  positive  yaw. Fig. In both cases. 4. CT was measured over the range of yaw angles ‐450 to 450 at increments  of 150. This is due to the fact that in a yawed rotor. the variation of CT with Ψ should be symmetrical about Ψ=00. only the trajectory on one side is plotted since the wake expansion appeared to  be symmetrical. while maintaining  λ constant at 8. 3. (b) shows the effect of changing λ. The CT values (averaged over one whole revolution) are shown in Fig.  the wake expansion on the downwind side is significantly larger than that on the upwind  side.  Fig.  Referring to Fig. θtip)  was equal to 0. It may be noted that the wake expansion is highly sensitive to both λ and  θtip. At  Ψ= ±300 and  Ψ  =±450. but is  shifted slightly to the right.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           rotor revolutions. θtip)  =  (10.  the  reason for the asymmetry is the non‐uniformity in velocity distribution of the tunnel exit jet.  Chapter 3). the velocity dip region is not located centrally at the tunnel axis.       Results and Discussion    Axial thrust coefficients    As already earlier. 4.

10.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           1.6.θθtip==000 λλ==10.2 λ λ= =10.6.θθtip==22 0 λ λ= =8.θθtip==00 0 λ λ= =6.8.26 – Variation of axial thrust coefficient with yaw angle at all combinations of λ and θtip.27 – Tip vortex locations at Ψ = 00  at different combinations of λ and θτip.θθtip==4 4 0 0 -45 -30 -15 0 15 30 45 Ψ ( deg)    Figure 4. 10. 10.8.6.θθtip==440 12 λλ==10.6.6.θθtip==440 λλ==8.8.8.θθtip==44 0 λ λ= =8. 10. 10.6 λ λ= =6.θθtip==00 0 0.θθtip==44 0 λ λ= =10.    18 λλ==6.θθtip==2 2 0 λ λ= =10.θθtip==44 0 10 ys (cm) 8 6 4 2 0 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 x s (cm)                  Figure 4.2 1 0.8.θθtip==000 16 λλ==6.θθtip==0 0 0 0.θθtip==22 0 CT 0.θθtip==000 14 λλ==8.  82  .8 λ λ= =6.4 λ λ= =8.

  The results for  Ψ=00 are given in Fig.   The  linearity  found  in  Fig.                 83  . 4.28. but it may be observed that  θtip also has a  considerable influence over p.  χs was derived from the tip vortex locations using the procedure described earlier  in page 80. 4.  It  is  used  in  several  engineering  models  of  BEM  codes  as  already  outlined  in  chapter 3 (section 3. For the subject rotor.  the  wake  skew  angle  is  usually  modelled  to  be  a  function  of  the  axial  induction  factor  (or  velocity)  (for  example  see  Eqt. This is  due  to  the  fact  that  the  wake  expansion  is  larger  on  the  downwind  side  than  that  on  the  upwind side. the relation of |χs| with CT   is quite linear. 4. From knowledge of the rotational speed and p.  Chapter  3).    In  BEM  engineering  models  for  yaw.  Consequently.  Higher  λ’s yield higher values for p.      To  investigate  the  influence  of  the  rotor  axial  thrust  on  the  wake  skew  angle.32.  |χs|  was  plotted  against  CT  for  the  different  yaw  angles.  As shown in Fig. 4. p is the pitch along the xs‐axis. 4.    Fig.32  and  also  the  fact  that  generally  smoke  visualization  measurements  are  much  cheaper  to  perform  than  inflow  measurements  suggest  that  it  could be simpler to develop engineering models that relate |χs| with CT  than |χs| with a1. θtip).  the  tip  vortex core velocities on the upwind and downwind side are different and this reflects the  asymmetry of the wake as a result of rotor yaw.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Tip vortex pitch    From the tip vortex locations as shown in Figs.27 and 4. Higher thrust values result in larger wake  skew angles. In this plot the pitches on both the right and left  hand side are included.23.29. χs may be as much as 80 larger than Ψ. it is possible  to  obtain  an  estimate  the  transport  velocity  of  the  vortex  cores. Note that the differences in p between the left and right hand sides  are small.5). it was possible to extract the  tip vortex pitch (p) at different (λ. In Fig. the variation of χs with Ψ is plotted for the different rotor  settings.  4.    It  was  observed  that  this  velocity is generally not much smaller than the free‐stream velocity (on the order of 70‐95%  of U). It is observed that |χ|>|Ψ| at all tip speed ratios and blade pitch settings.  3.  4.  p  is  larger  on  the  upwind  side  than  on  the  downwind  side.  It  is  noted  that  for  each  yaw  angle.24.  see  Fig.31.      Wake skew angle    A  parameter  often  used  in  modelling  the  skewed  wakes  of  yaw  rotors  is  the  wake  skew  angle  χs.30 shows the tip vortex pitch variations at Ψ=‐300 for both the upwind and downwind  sides.

Theta 0 Downwind Dwnwind 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 x s (cm)                    Figure (a) – Effect of changing θtip while maintaining λ constant at 8. Dwnwind 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 x s (cm)                         Figure (b) – Effect of changing λ  while maintaining θtip constant at 20.=Upwind Lambda 8. Upwind λ = 6. Lambda = 10. Upwind Upwind λ = 6.28  –  Tip  vortex  locations  at  Ψ = −300   at  upwind  and  downwind  side  for  different  combinations of λ and θtip.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           18 16 14 12 10 ys (cm) 8 Theta =00. Dwnwind 2 λ = 8. Lambda Downwind = 10. Upwind θtip=0 Upwind 6 θ =2=02. Theta 0 Downwind Dwnwind θtip=4= 4.=Downwind Lambda 8. Dwnwind λ = 10. Theta Upwind Upwind 4 θtip=0=00.  84  . Theta tip Upwind Upwind θtip=4=04. Upwind 4 λ = 10. Upwind λ = 8.=Downwind Lambda 6.    Figure  4. Theta Downwind Dwnwind 2 θtip=2= 2.  14 12 10 8 ys (cm) 6 Lambda = 6.

Downwind Downwind 25 θtip=2 Theta 0 = 2.Upwind Upwind θtip=2 Theta = 02.Upwind Upwind θtip=0 Theta = 00.Downwind Downwind θtip=4 Theta 0 = 4. Right Right θtip=2 Theta =02.Upwind Upwind 30 θtip=4 Theta = 04.Downwind Downwind 20 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 λ   Figure 4.  85  . Right Right θtip=0 Theta =00. Left 20 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 λ        Figure  4. Left Left θtip=4 Theta 0 Left = 4.    55 50 45 40 p (cm) 35 θtip=0 Theta = 00. Left Left 25 θtip=2 Theta =02.29  –  Variation  of  tip  vortex  pitch  with  tip  speed  ratio  at Ψ = 00   at  right  &  left  side  for  different θtip. Right Right 30 θtip=4 Theta =04.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           60 55 50 45 p (cm) 40 35 θtip=0 Theta =00.30 – Variation of tip vortex pitch with tip speed ratio at  Ψ = −300  at upwind & downwind  side for different θtip.

8 0.2 CT   Figure 4.−45 Ψ 450 0 0.6 0.3 0. 8. 8. θθtip = =00 0 λλ= =10.1 1. θtip = =2 2 0 15 λλ==8.−30 Ψ 300 5 Ψ==. 6.0 1.  86  .1 0. θθtip==4 40 λλ==10.4 0. θθtip = =44 0 0 0 15 30 45 60 | Ψ | (deg )   Figure 4. 10. θtip = =0 0 0 λλ==8.31 – Variation of wake skew angle with rotor yaw angle for different combinations of  λ and  θtip.    55 50 45 40 35 |χs| (deg) 30 25 20 15 Ψ==. θθtip==2 2 0 λλ==10.7 0. 6. 8. 10.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           60 45 |χs| (deg) λλ==6.5 0. θtip = =4 4 0 λλ==8.−15 Ψ 150 10 Ψ==.32 – Variation of wake skew angle with rotor axial thrust coefficient for the different yaw  angles. θtip = =0 0 0 30 λλ==6.2 0. 10.9 1. θtip = =2 2 0 λλ==6. 6.

2 D = 1 cVr Cl .2.    Fig. it was vital to have the unsteady aerodynamic  loading  distributions  along  the  blades  apart  from  the  near  wake  inflow  measurements. 60.  one  of  the  objectives  of  the  experiments  on  the  TUDelft wind turbine was to provide experimental data to be able to carry out an in‐depth  investigation of the limitations of the BEM theory for yawed conditions.c)  at  the  blade  lifting  lines  were estimated by interpolating linearly the measured values at the 3. even at a yaw angle of 450.  The  2D  unsteady  lift  coefficient  (Cl. 70.18(a).    In  section  4.  4.c + ( r Ω) 2                                                      (4. 50.2. In order to reach these objectives. even though the angle of attack was determined directly from the measurements. the bound circulation was unrealistically  high. Tangential flow velocities were ignored since these were found to be very small  compared  to  absolute  velocities  of  the  blades.  it  was  explained  how  the  axial  flow  velocities  (wa.3.2.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.11)  ⎝ ⎠ (w ) 2                                                            Vr = a .  The  unsteady  lift  coefficient  could  be  predicted  with  reasonable  accuracy  since the inflow experimental data available was for turbine operating conditions at which  the flow behaviour over the blades remained attached.33  illustrates  the  sequence  of  steps  used  in  deriving  the  aerodynamic  loads  distributions  on  the  blades  from  the  inflow  measurements  taken  in  the  wind  tunnel  experiments  for  operating  conditions  with  λ=8. c ⎞                                                            α = tan ⎟ −θ −1 ⎜ rΩ                                                            (4.2D)  was  calculated using the unsteady aerofoil model described later on section 4. A second objective  was to use the experimental data to validate a newly developed free‐wake vortex code (see  Chapter 5). 80.20).19  and  4.  4.1 Methodology    As  already  outlined  earlier  in  section  4.2 D                                                       (4.  θtip=20  and  yaw  angles  00.  4.  90%R using the following blade‐element‐theory equations:  ⎛ wa .3 Estimating the Aerodynamic Loads at the Blades from Wind                      Tunnel Inflow Measurements     4.13)   2 It was found that at the 40%R and 90%R locations. This  87  .1.3.  The  former  were  then  used  to  find the local angle of attack and relative flow velocity at radial locations 40.12)    The above equations were applied for the different azimuth angles along the whole blade  revolution.  300  and  450.5cm downstream and  6cm  upstream  planes  (refer  to  Figs.  Since  the  experimental  set‐up  used  in  this  study  was  incapable  of  measuring  such  distributions.  unsteady  aerofoil  theory  that  accounts  for  shed  vorticity  effects  in  the  wake  had  to  be  employed  in  order  to  derive  the  aerodynamic  loads  from  the  inflow  measurements.  This was used  to  determine  the  bound  circulation  at  the  blades  with  the  Kutta‐Joukowski  theorem  in  accordance with:                                                              Γ B .

3 D                                                                  Cl .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           was because a 2D unsteady aerofoil model was being used to determine the lift coefficients. the  axial  thrust  derived  from  the  inflow  measurements  were  checked  against  their  corresponding  measured  values.3 describes the software tools developed for this work.14)  cVr The  drag  coefficient  was  obtained  from  2D  wind  tunnel  static  data  for  the  NACA0012  aerofoil at low Reynolds number.    B.  a  lift  coefficient corrected for tip/root loss was used.    The  global  aerodynamic  loads  and  the  output  power  of  the  turbine  were  computed  by  numerically  integrating  the  loading  distributions  at  each time  step in  accordance  with the  numerical method described in Appendix B. This was justified since the angles of attack  were very small and thus the drag was very small compared with the lift. Section 4.  This  is  acceptable  since  for  attached  flow  conditions the influence of drag on the vortex wake structure is minimal.3 D =                                                            (4.  For  these  calculations.    88  .33  and  (2)  HAWT_PVC  which  is  the  prescribed  wake  vortex model used to assess tunnel blockage effects. Section  4. This code was also found very  useful in deriving a tip/root loss correction for Ψ=00. No tip/root loss  correction was applied to the drag coefficient.2D such that the bound circulation  decreases  gradually  to  zero  at  the  blade  tip  and  root.  4.16  were  applied  to  determine  the  chordwise  and  normal  aerodynamic  load  distributions  along  the  blades  between  40%R  and  90%R.3. Section 4.3D.  the  blade‐element  theory  equations  3. To check the validity of these calculations.2 describes the unsteady aerofoil model.  Thus a tip/root loss correction had to be employed to  ΓB.  the  inflow  measurements  were  assessed  for  possible  uncertainties  due  to  tunnel  blockage.3.    D.  For  each  blade  azimuth  angle. Section 4. These include:  (1) HAWT_LFIM which is basically a blade‐element‐theory code implementing the  sequence  of  steps  in  Fig. This was derived using the corrected bound  circulation together with the Kutta‐Joukowski theorem:  2Γ B .4  presents  the  methods  used  to  assess  whether  the  hot‐film  measurements were influenced by tunnel blockage effects.     C.  The  corrected  bound  circulation  distribution  is  being  denoted  by  ΓB.3.    This Chapter is organized into five separate sections as follows:     A.  Finally. No correction was applied to the static drag coefficient for  unsteady  effects  in  the  aerodynamic  loads.  This  assessment  was  carried  out  using  a  newly developed prescribed wake vortex code (named HAWT_PVC).3.5 presents a simplified analytical approach for quantifying errors in the  derived blade loading resulting from errors in the inflow measurements.

 4.20      Compare rotor thrust derived from   Calculate global loads and  inflow measurements with those   output power using numerical measured directly using strain  method of Appendix B   gauges       Assess for tunnel blockage  using prescribed vortex code     Figure 4.18(a).            Input experimental data for wa. 4.12)       Find Cl.  Section 4.3D  (Eqt.6 presents the results including the distributions for the angle of attack  (α). 4.3. 3.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           E.2D using unsteady aerofoil model (section 4.2D from static wind tunnel 2D data       Find ΓB.c at rotorplane (Figs.13)       Correct ΓB. flow velocities relative to the blades (Vr) and aerodynamic loading (dT.2D for tip/root loss to find ΓB.3D       Find Cl.20)       Find α and Vr (Eqts.14)        Calculate dAη.           89  . 4.3. 4.11 and 4. dAζ. dQ).3D from ΓB.2D (Eqt.33 – Sequence of steps used in deriving the rotor aerodynamic loads from the inflow  measurements.19 and 4. dT and dQ using BET Eqts.16 and 3.2)   Find Cd.

  the  circulatory  lift  coefficient.  then  the  system  response  u(t)  to  the  forcing  can  be  mathematically  expressed in terms of Duhamel’s integral as    t dF                                                   u (t ) = F (0)φ (t ) + ∫ φ (t − σ ) dσ                                    (4. If the  indicial  response  function  is  known.  Given  that  the  indicial  response  function  F  of  the  system  is  known. . Non‐Circulatory Lift Coefficient    For  an  almost  rigid  blade  (experiencing  minimal  flapping).  at  which  the  angles  of  attack  are  small. In this approach.17)  s l ⎜ ⎝ ∫0 dt ⎟ ⎠ 90  .      A.15)  V ⎝2 ⎠ where a is equal to ‐1/2 for a pitch axis at the quarter chord location. Consider a general system in response to a time‐ dependent  forcing  function  F(t..3.  t>0).  The  method  was  adapted  from  Leishman  [49. Circulatory Lift Coefficient    An indicial response method may be used to evaluate the circulatory lift coefficient. The method is only applicable  for  attached  flow  conditions.    B.  the  non‐circulatory  lift  coefficient is found from [49]:    πb ⎛ .  The former is the lift that  arises from the acceleration effects of the flow while the latter is due to the circulation about  the aerofoil.  Clc  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.  pgs  333‐340]  to  evaluate  the  unsteady  lift  coefficient  as  a  function of time.  then  the  unsteady  loads  due  to  arbitrary  changes  in  angle  of  attack  can  be  obtained  through  the  superimposition  of  the  indicial  aerodynamic  responses by applying Duhamel’s integral. ⎞                                                          C lnc (t ) = ⎜V α − ab α ⎟                                                  (4. b is equal to half the  chord length.in  response  to  an  unsteady angle of attack can be expressed as    ⎛ ⎞                                       C c (t ) = 2π ⎜ α (0)φ ( s ) + dα (σ ) φ ( s − σ ) dσ ⎟                               (4. the instantaneous lift coefficient is considered to be the  sum of two components.2 A Theoretical Method for Finding the Unsteady Lift Coefficient in                  Attached Flow for a Rotating Blade in Yaw        This section describes a theoretical approach for deriving the unsteady lift coefficients at  the blades of a yawed rotor from the inflow measurements.16)  0 dt   By  analogy  with  the  equation  above. the non‐circulatory and circulatory lift.

15  and  4.  Therefore.  Although  the  Wagner  function  is  known  exactly.335.  Eqt.  A  pictorial  representation  of  this  phenomenon is given in Fig.20)  nc                                                 C l V ⎝ 2 dt ⎠                   V(t) Vs1 Vs2     ΓB   ΓS   Vs1 ≠Vs2 Figure  4. In yawed flow.  A  major  difficulty  in  solving  Duhamel’s  intergral  in  Eqt.3  respectively. s is the reduced  time given by   t 2 c ∫0                                                                      s = Vdt                                                              (4.  0.     Leishman  [49]  modifies  Eqts.  0. 4.  4. Jones is written in the form of an exponential decay function as follows:                                                              φ ( s ) = 1 − A1e − b1s − A2 e − b2 s                                                 (4.    C.  the  function  is  usually  approximated  by  a  simply  exponential  or  algebraic  approximation.18)  which represents the relative distance travelled by the aerofoil through the flow in terms of  aerofoil semi‐chords during time interval t.165.  A2.  4. the blade element of the wind turbine  blades  will  encounter  a  time‐varying  incident  velocity.  its  evaluation  is  not  in  a  convenient  analytic  form.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             where  φ  is  the  indicial  response  function  derived  by  Wagner  [102]  for  the  lift  on  a  thin  aerofoil undergoing a step change in angle of attack in incompressible flow.19)    where  A1.17  deals  with  the  Wagner  function  φ. Time‐Varying Incident Velocity    Eqts.34.15  and  4.T.17  to  account  for  the  time  variation  in  incident  velocity as follows:  πb ⎛ d (Vα ) .  the  shed  wake  vorticity  leaves  the  aerofoil  at  a  non‐uniform  velocity.0455  and  0.  91  .34  ‐  time‐dependent  free‐stream  velocity  causes  shed  vorticity  to  be  convected  at  a  non‐ uniform speed (Vs).  4..  attributed to R.17  includes the time‐history effects of the shed wake on the lift. V.17  only  consider  the  situation  in  which  the  local  free‐stream  velocity  relative to the aerofoil.  b1  and  b2  are  taken  as  0. ⎞ (t ) = ⎜ − ab α ⎟                                                   (4.  Consequently. is constant.  4.  One  approximation  to  the  Wagner  function.

    From Eqt.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             Cl ⎡ s d (V α ) ⎤                                        Cl ( s ) = V ( s ) ⎢V ( s0 )α ( s0 )φ ( s ) + ∫ ds σ φ − σ σ ⎥               (4.21)  c α ( ) ( s ) d ⎢⎣ s0 ⎥⎦ = Clα α e ( s )                  Clα is the lift‐curve slope equal to 2π/radian for incompressible flow.17  recursively.  4.  pg  337]  presents  a  solution  for  solving  Eqt.22.        1 ⎡ d (V α ) ⎤ s α e (s) = ⎢V ( s0 )α ( s0 ) (1 − A1e 1 − A2 e 2 ) + ∫ (σ ) (1 − A1e− b1 ( s −σ ) − A2 e− b2 ( s −σ ) ) dσ ⎥   −b s −b s V ( s ) ⎢⎣ s0 ds ⎥⎦                    V ( s0 )α ( s0 ) V ( s0 ) α ( s0 ) A1 e V ( s0 ) α ( s0 ) A2 e −b 1 s −b 2 s = − − V (s) V (s) V (s)   1 s d (V α ) A1 s d (V α ) A2 s d (V α ) + ∫ (σ ) d σ − ∫ (σ )e − b1 ( s −σ ) dσ − ∫ (σ )e − b2 ( s −σ ) dσ V (s) s 0 ds V (s) s 0 ds V (s) s 0 ds Terms  V(so)α(so)A1e‐b1s  /V(s)  and  V(so)α(so)A2e‐b2s  /V(s)  containing  the  initial  values  of  V  and  α are short term transients and can be neglected.19 in 4.      D.21 to be able to cater for an unsteady  flow velocity.22)  V ( s ) ⎢⎣ s0 ds ⎥⎦   Substituting Eqt. 4. 4. 4. Consequently. the Duhamel integral may  be expressed as  1                                                   α ( s ) = e [V (s)α ( s) − X (s) − Y ( s)]                                  (4.23)            V (s)                                                                                 where X(s)  and Y(s) are equal to  92  .  αe(s) can be viewed as  an effective angle of attack in that it contains all the time‐history information related to the  unsteady condition.21.  This  section  presents this solution however modified to solve Eqt. the effective angle of attack may be expressed as    1 ⎡ d (V α ) ⎤ s                                     α ( s ) = e ⎢V ( s0 )α ( s0 )φ ( s ) + ∫ (σ )φ ( s − σ )dσ ⎥                   (4. Recursive Solution for the Circulatory Lift using the Duhamel’s Integral    Leishman  [49.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           s d (Vα )                                                  X ( s ) = A1 ∫ ds (σ )e − b 1 ( s − σ ) dσ                                 (4.25)    where   d (V α ) s +∆s                                        I = A1 e − b ( s +∆s ) 1 ∫ (σ ) e b σ d σ   1 s ds To evaluate I.  For the next time step s + ∆s. a simplified estimate for d(Vα)/ds is used by applying a backward difference  approximation at time s + ∆s:    d (V α ) V ( s + ∆s )α ( s + ∆s ) − V ( s )α ( s )                                        =   ds ∆s   Thus  s +∆s ⎡ V ( s + ∆s )α ( s + ∆s ) − V ( s )α ( s ) ⎤                             I = A1 e − b ( s +∆s ) 1 ⎢⎣ ∆s ⎥⎦ ∫ eb σ d σ   1 s   ⎡ V ( s + ∆s )α ( s + ∆s ) − V ( s )α ( s ) ⎤ ⎡1 − e ⎤ − b1 ∆s                                 = A1 ⎢⎣ ⎥⎦ ⎢ b ⎥                                (4.24b)  s0 ds   Assume a continuous system with time step  ∆s which may not be constant and that s0 =0.26)  ∆s ⎣ 1 ⎦   Expand term e‐b1s in the form of a power series    93  .  s +∆s d (V α )                                       X ( s + ∆s ) = A1 ∫ (σ ) e − b ( s +∆s −σ ) d σ   1 0 ds                                       s d (V α ) s +∆s d (V α )                 = A1 e − b1 ( ∆s ) ∫ (σ ) e − b1 ( s −σ ) d σ + A1 ∫ (σ ) e− b ( s +∆s −σ ) dσ   1 0 ds s ds d (V α ) s +∆s                           X ( s + ∆s ) = X (s) e − b1 ∆s + A1 e − b1 ( s +∆s ) ∫ (σ ) e b σ d σ   1 s ds                                       = X (s)e − b1∆s + I                                                                                   (4.24a)                            s0 d (Vα ) s                                                  Y ( s ) = A2 ∫ (σ )e −b2 ( s −σ ) dσ                                       (4.

  We now consider a wind turbine in a fixed yaw angle. 4.25. the recursive solution for the indicial Eqt.22 consists of the following three  one‐step formulas:  1                                        α ( s ) = e [V ( s)α ( s ) − X ( s) − Y ( s )]                                               (4. as shown in Fig. 3. we will end up with the following simple relation for integral I    [ ]                                           I = A1 V ( s + ∆s )α ( s + ∆s ) − V ( s )α ( s )                                   (4.30b)  1                             Y ( s ) = Y ( s − ∆s ) e − b ∆s + A2 [V ( s )α ( s ) − V ( s − ∆s )α ( s − ∆s ) ]           (4. respectively) as a function of time for a rotor in steady  yawed  conditions. τ denotes the number of the  time step. The number of azimuthal positions is equal to  τtot.  a  new  approach  is  presented  for  solving  the  non‐circulatory  and  circulatory  lift coefficients (Eqts.24b using a similar method.30c)  2     E.28)    Putting Eqt. 4.  The  main  advantage  of  this  approach  is  that  the  solution  is  based  on  matrix inversion and thus is computationally efficient. we end up with a recursive equation given by    ( )                          X ( s + ∆s ) = X s e 1 + A1 [V ( s + ∆s )α ( s + ∆s ) − V ( s )α ( s ) ]        − b ∆s or  ( )                          X ( s ) = X s − ∆s e 1 + A1 [V ( s )α ( s ) − V ( s − ∆s )α ( s − ∆s ) ]            (4.26  and  neglecting  terms  b12∆s2  and  higher    since  b1∆s is very small..20 and 4.  the  unsteady  wake may be assumed to be periodic. Numerical Solutions Algorithms for Conditions of Steady Yaw    In  this  work.  Under  such  operating  conditions. The time elapse during one time step is given by                                                                       ∆τ = 2π                                                              (4. rotating at constant angular speed  Ω  in  a  steady  and  uniform  wind  flow  field.7  (section 3.29)  − b ∆s   A recursive solution may be derived for Y(s) in Eqt.21. 4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           − b1 s b12 ∆s 2 b13 ∆s 3                                        e = 1 − b1∆s + + + . 4..  4.28 in Eqt. 4.                                             (4.6). Consider one whole revolution of the rotor blade that  is divided into a given number of equally‐spaced azimuthal positions.27)   2! 3!   Substituting  the  above  equation  in  Eqt.31)     Ω * τ tot   94  .30a)  V (s)                           X ( s ) = X ( s − ∆s ) e − b ∆s + A1 [V ( s )α ( s ) − V ( s − ∆s )α ( s − ∆s ) ]        (4.    In summary.

20 may be solved as follows:    It is first necessary to establish a method for evaluating dα/dt.  four  previous  data points are required and the equation takes the form of  ∆τ                                        ατ = ατ −1 + [55α&τ −1 − 59α&τ − 2 + 37α&τ −3 − 9α&τ − 4 ]                   (4.  at  each  rotor  time  step). 4. this would be  dα α τ +1 − α τ                                                                 =                                                         (4.32)   dt τ ∆τ   The  global  error  in  this  method  is  only  in  the  order  O(τ2). d(Vα)/dt and d2α/dt2 at each  blade  azimuth  angle.33)  24   Since  we  have  a  periodic  wake  then  ατtot = α0  and  the  above  equation  may  be  written  at  each blade time step to form a system of τtot equations which may be written in matrix form  as       ⎡ ∆α 0 ⎤ ⎡ 55 0 0 0 0 −9 37 −59 ⎤ ⎡ α& 0 ⎤   ⎢ ∆α ⎥ ⎢ −59 55 0 0 0 0 −9 37 ⎥ ⎢ α&1 ⎥   ⎢ 1 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥   ⎢ ∆ α 2 ⎥ ⎢ 37 − 59 55 0 0 0 0 − 9 ⎥ ⎢ α& 2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ∆α 3 ⎥ = ⎢ −9 37 −59 55 0 ⎥ ∗ ⎢ α3 ⎥ 0 0 0 &                                                                                                                                                                               ⎢ o ⎥ ⎢ o o o o o o o ⎥ ⎢ o ⎥                                                                                                                                                        (4.e.34a)  o   ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥   ⎢ ∆α τ ⎥ ⎢ 0 0 −9 37 −59 55 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ α&τ ⎥   ⎢ o ⎥ ⎢ o o o o o o o o ⎥ ⎢ o ⎥   ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥   ⎢ ⎣ ∆ α τ tot −1 ⎥ ⎦ ⎢ ⎣ 0 0 0 0 − 9 37 − 59 55 ⎥ ⎦ ⎢ ⎣ α&τ tot −1 ⎥⎦   [ ] [ ]                  or                                  ∆α = A * α&                                                                    (4. For dα/dt.  A  simple  way  of  doing  so  is  to  apply  a  forward  difference  approximation at each time step.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Numerical Solution for the Non‐Circulatory Lift Coefficient    Given  that  V  and  α  are  known  at  each  blade  azimuth  angle.  a  more  accurate  method  was  used  based  on  the  Adam‐Bashforth  multi‐step  numerical  integration  technique.  In  this  work.34c)  ∆τ 95  .  In  the  case  of  a  fourth‐order  Adam‐Bashforth  method.  This  technique  makes  use  of  data  at  previous  time  steps  inorder  to  predict    a  solution  at  the  next.34b)    24              where                            ∆α τ = (α τ − α τ −1 )                                                            (4.  (i.  Eqt.

36(a) is applied for each time  step in order to give τtot equations which can be written in matrix form as    96  .  (i.  After  these  time  derivatives  are  evaluated at each time step. 4. the values for a small incremental change in s becomes    ∆τ                                                                 ∆sτ = [Vτ + Vτ −1 ]                                                     (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           The  vector  [∆α]. 4. 4.36b)  where                                                     pτ = e −b1∆sτ                           qτ = e −b2 ∆sτ                              (4.. The rate of change of  α with time is then found by find the inverse  of matrix A and using                                                                [α& ] = A * [ ∆α ]                                                         (4. can  be  easily  evaluated  from  knowledge  of  α  at each blade time step.39)  c   The value of X at each time step τ is solved as follows: Eqt.36a)                                                                                                                                                   Yτ − qτ Yτ −1 = Qτ                                                           (4.  Eqts.∆ατtot−1 ]Τ. An identical approach is adopted  to  find  d(Vα)/dt  and  d2α/dt2  using  the  same  matrix  A.21 may be solved recursively as follows:    Applying Eqts.30a.18. they are substituted in Eqt.e.20 to yield the non‐circulatory lift  coefficient at all blade time steps.34d)  −1   The global error in this method is only in the order O(τ5)..                                                               α e = τ 1 [Vτ α τ − X τ − Yτ ]                                              (4. 4.c for each time step τ.37)                                                                       Pτ = A1 (Vτ ατ − Vτ −1ατ −1 )                                               (4.b. [∆α0 ∆ατ ∆ατ+1 . 4.35)        Vτ                                                             X τ − pτ X τ −1 = Pτ                                                         (4.38a)                                                             Qτ = A2 (Vτ ατ − Vτ −1ατ −1 )                                               (4.                                             Numerical Solution for the Circulatory Lift Coefficient    Given  that  V  and α  are  known  at  each  blade  azimuth  angle.38b)    Using Eqt.  at  each  rotor  time  step).

  at  each  time  step  are  then  evaluated  using  matrix  inversion such that    r r                                                                  ⎡ X ⎤ = G −1 * ⎡ P ⎤                                                        (4.39. 4. 4.  Once  the  values  of  X  and  Y  at  each  time  step  are  obtained. q and Q  using Eqts.  4. P. ⎥⎥ ⎢ ⎢⎣ 0 0 0 0 0 0 − pτ tot −1 1 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ X τ tot −1 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ Pτ tot −1 ⎦⎥                     or  r r                                                                   G ∗ ⎡ X ⎤ = ⎡ P ⎤                                                            (4.           Summary of Numerical Solution to Estimate the Unsteady Lift Coefficient from the Inflow  Measurements    From  inflow  measurements.Xτtot‐1]T  .  [X0  Xτ−1 Xτ . The latter is then  added to the non‐circulatory lift coefficient (computed using Eqt. and thus find the circulatory lift coefficient. ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ∗⎢ ⎥ =⎢ 0 0 0 − pτ .. 4.  the  values  of  α and  Vr  at  each  time  step  may  be  evaluated  (Parameter Vr in a rotating blade is equal to V).40)  ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦   r The  values  of X . ⎥ ⎢ .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           ⎡ 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 − p0 ⎤ ⎡ X 0 ⎤ ⎡ P0 ⎤                                   ⎢⎢ − p1 1 0 0 0 0 0 ⎥ 0 ⎥ ⎢⎢ X1 ⎥⎥ ⎢⎢ P1 ⎥⎥   ⎢ 0 − p2 1 0 0 0 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ X 2 ⎥ ⎢ P2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 0 0 − pτ −1 .20) to give the total lift  coefficient as a function of time. 1 0 ⎥⎥ ⎢⎢ .37.  Eqt. 1 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ Xτ ⎥ ⎢ Pτ ⎥ ⎢ 0 0 0 0 0 .41)  ⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦   r The values of  Y are calculated in a similar fashion however replacing p and P with q and Q  respectively.. ⎥⎥ ⎢⎢ . 0 0 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ .38 and 4.35  is  employed  to  obtain  the  equivalent  circulatory  angle  of  attack  to  be  used  to  find  the  circulatory lift coefficient. 0 0 0 X P ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ τ −1 ⎥ ⎢ τ −1 ⎥ ⎢ 0 0 0 0 .                        97  . These can then be used to find p.

20. d(Vα)/dt and d2α/dt2 at  (1) Find ∆s at each blade time step   each blade time step   (2)     Find p and q at each blade time step (2)    Apply Eqt.  4.35 to find αe (5)     Find Clc from  Cl = 2πα e c           Add non‐circulatory and circulatory components of lift coefficient:   Cl = Cl nc + Cl c                       Figure 4.  The  Data  Processing  Module  implements  the  various  blade‐element  theory  equations and the unsteady aerofoil theory to be able to estimate the aerodynamic loading  98  . Fig.  4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               Divide one whole blade revolution into equally spaced time steps as in Fig.7       Input ατ and Vτ from HAWT_LFIM         Compute Non‐circulatory Lift Coefficient Compute Circulatory Lift Coefficient     Procedure: Procedure:   (1) Find dα/dt.36 describes  the  structure  of  this  code.  This  code  is  organized  into  three  separate  modules: in  the  Data  Input  Module  in  which  the  experimental  parameters  describing  the  rotor  geometry  and  operating condition are inputted.33. 4.  This  code  was  written  using  MathCad©  version 11 and is applicable for both non‐yawed and yawed conditions.35 – Summary of method used to determine the unsteady lift coefficient.3. 3.3 Developed Software Tools     A.20 to find Clnc   (3)     Solve for X and Y     (4)     Apply Eqt.19  and  4.c) of Figs. Description of Program HAWT_LFIM    Program  HAWT_LFIM  (LFIM  meaning  Loads  from  Inflow  Measurements)  was  specifically  developed  to  derive  the  aerodynamic  loads  at  the  rotor  blades  from  the  inflow  measurements  using  the  procedure  of  Fig.18(a).        4. together with the axial flow velocities (wa. 4. 4. 4.

c) estimated from hot‐film measurements           Data Processing:   Calculation of the following:     (1) α and Vr from Eqts.2D from Eqt.12   (2) Cl.  99  .13 and ΓB. The latter are integrated numerically to be able to find the rotor  global aerodynamic loads and output power. dAζ.3D from ΓB.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           distributions at the blades. dT and dQ (Eqts. 4. 4. 4.2D from unsteady aerofoil model (section 4. 4. The Data Output Module outputs the results as  a function of rotor azimuth angle.3.14)   (5) dAη. 3.11.36 – Structure of code HAWT_LFIM.        Data Input:     (1) Input Rotor Geometry Details:   Number of Blades (B)   Blade Tip and Root Radii (Rt & Rr) Blade chord and twist distributions (c & θ)       (2) Input Rotor Operating Conditions: Rotor Angular Speed (Ω)   Rotor Yaw Angle (Ψ)   Wind Speed (U)     (3) Input Experimental Data:   Axial Inflow Velocities at blade lifting lines    (wa.16.3D (Eqt.20)   (6) global loads & output power         Data Output:                                                 Output of results from module Data Processing at                                        each blade azimuth angle (φ)                                                                    Figure 4. 3.3D using tip/root loss correction   (4) Cl.2)   (3) ΓB.

3. the prescribed wake vortex model was mainly  developed to be able to estimate quantitatively the influence of wind tunnel blockage.37:  Structure of computer code HAWT_PVC. Fig. Rt.  The inputs to the  model are the blade geometry and the rotor operating parameters together with the known  bound circulation distributions at the blades.  100  . Description of Program HAWT_PVC    As already described earlier in section 4. This  code was also helpful in applying a tip/root loss correction at Ψ=00. named HAWT_PVC (PVC meaning Prescribed Vortex Code)  is  also  written  using  MathCad©  version  11  and  is  applicable  for  both  non‐yawed  and  yawed conditions. p. The code.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           B.1.          Data Input:     (1) Input Rotor Geometry Details: Number of Blades (B)   Blade Tip and Root Radii (Rt & Rr)   Blade chord and twist distributions (c & θ)     (2) Input Rotor Operating Conditions:   Rotor Angular Speed (Ω) Rotor Yaw Angle (Ψ)   Wind Speed (U)     (3) Input Aerodynamic Parameters:   Bound Circulation at Blades (ΓB) Wake Geometry Details (χs.w1 &Rt.w2)           Data Processing:   (1) Model Wake Geometry     (2) Biot‐Savart Computations         Data Output:   Induced Velocities at Plane Parallel to   Rotorplane                                                                                         Figure 4. 4.37 describes the structure of this vortex model. The main function of the  code  is  to  estimate  the  induced  velocities  in  the  rotor  wake  using  a  known  bound  circulation distribution.

b.  Each  vortex  sheet  consists  of  helices located at different radial locations.b.    Blade and Wake Model    Fig. i O φ   Y   Ψ k-1.b.  since  for  the  operating  conditions  of  the  TUDelft  rotor  being considered in this study. Za   k+1.  the  trailing  circulation  distribution  is  derived  and  used  in  conjunction  with  the  Biot‐Savart  law  (refer  to  Appendix  C)  to  calculate  the  3D  induced velocity distributions at any required plane parallel to the rotorplane.b.i     wake   nodes X   Rotor Axis Xa     ΓB     Blade Lifting Line   Blade Tip                     Figure 4.  4.  From  the  known  bound  circulation  distributions.i-1 k.38).       Z. The modelling of  shed  circulation  was  not  included.Za]k. the helices are skewed.2.38: Modelling of blades and wake in prescribed‐wake vortex model.3)  are  also  inputted  and  used  by  the  code  to  model  the  prescribed  wake  geometry.  4.     The  wake  consists  of  helical  vortex  sheets.  The  wake  parameters  derived  from  the  smoke  visualization  experiments  (refer  to  section  4.38  gives details  for  the adopted  model  for  the  rotor blades  and  wake.  The  lifting  line  consists  of  a  fixed  number  (n)  of  piecewise  constant spanwise segments. Each helix is segmented into straight‐line vortex  filaments  to  represent  trailing  circulation  in  the  wake  (refer  to  Fig.i   (ΓT )k.  one  per  blade.  then  this  circulation  is  prescribed  to  the  code  as  a  function  of  blade  azimuth  angle.i+1   Ya [Xa.    101  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Since  in  a  yawed  rotor  the  bound  circulation  at  the  blades  becomes  time‐dependent. depending on the inputted value of χs. b.b. each of equal length.  For  yawed  conditions. this circulation component was found to be very small.  Each  blade  is  modelled  using  a  lifting‐line  with  a  single  lumped  vortex  located  along  the  quarter‐chord  point  of  the  blade  sections.Ya.i     Wind direction k.

 To determine the 3D Cartesian co‐ ordinates of each wake node.    Figs. k denotes the node number on the helix. both of these are skewed with respect to the rotor  axis and their central axis is the wake skew axis.   As  shown  in  Fig. Rt.  i  is  equal  to  0  for  all  wake nodes that lie on the helix that is originating from the blade root.29 and 4. a slight  variation was observed between the tip vortex pitch values on the upwind and downwind  sides (some results are plotted in Figs.  a1  and  a2  are  determined  by  applying  the  following  three  boundary  conditions: (i) at Ya=0 (i. Rt. w (Ya ) = a0Ya 2 + a1Ya + a2                                              (4. In the wake model.3). (ii) at Ya = pw/2.7.99Rt. The outer wake boundary is defined  using  the  prescribed terms  Rt.e. where b and i denote the blade  number  and  the  radial  location  from  which  the  helix  is  originating. Thus the number of filaments used for each revolution in each helix is also equal  to  τtot.w1 and (iii) at  102  .42)    Wake Geometry    Each wake node is denoted by indices k.  The  total  number  of  vortex  filaments  used  to  represent  a  single helix is denoted by ktot and this is equal to nwRev*τtot.w1  and  Rt. the following mathematical model is used:    Each rotor revolution is divided into a fixed number (τtot) of equally‐spaced azimuth steps  as in Fig. These define the expansion of the wake in the near  field of the rotor. the  radii of the outer and inner wake boundaries are denoted by Rt. 4.2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           The trailing filament nodes are interconnected by nodes. where k=0 is for the starting node that lies on  the  respective  blade  lifting  line. a quadratic fit is applied for the variation of Rt. The azimuthal step of the wake helices is maintained equal to that of the rotor  (i.30).38).  b=0  denotes  the  first  blade. the average value of the two values  for p is used in the model.23  pitch  p  is  taken  along an  axis parallel to the free wind direction. a pitch pw acting along the Ya axis  is used and this is given by                                                                   pw = p cos(Ψ )                                                         (4.w=Rt. Thus the helical trailing vortices have the  wake skew axis as their central axis and not the Ya axis. The wake extends downstream depending on the prescribed number of revolutions  (nwRev) and the value of the pitch p. At any distance Ya from the rotorplane. i (see Fig. i is equal to n‐1 for  the  wake  nodes  that  lie  on  the  helix  originating  from  the  blade  tip. It is assumed that the cross‐section of the wake in a plane parallel to the  rotorplane is annular. 3.w respectively. b.  4. (b) and (c) describe the geometry used to define the wake outer (tip) and inner  (root) boundaries.e.w=0. 4. For yawed conditions.    For the outer wake boundary. 4.39(a). Since in the smoke visualization experiments. 4.w2  that  are  derived from  the  smoke  visualization  of  tip vortex cores (refer to section 4.w and Rr. at the rotorplane).w with Ya for  Ya<pw such that                                                     Rt . It is assumed that the vortex sheet pitch is equal to that of the tip  vortex  at  all  radial locations in  the  wake.39(c). 2π/τtot).43)   where  constants  a0. as shown in Fig.

  For  the  inner  wake  boundary  no  wake  expansion is taken into consideration.46)  Rr . w (Ya ) = a0 Ya 2 + a1Ya + a2 if Ya ≤ pw                                             = Rt .99 Rt ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ( ) ( ) ⎢ ⎥ 2                                         a1 = ⎢ w 1⎥ * ⎢ Rt .e.w  for  the  wake  nodes  lying  on  the  outer  edge  of  the  vortex sheets (i=n‐1).  i=n‐1)  will  experience  an  expansion  in  accordance  with  Eqt.w  for  the  wake  nodes  lying  on  the  inner  edge  of  the  vortex  sheets (i=0). it is being assumed that the  outboard edge vortex sheet is released from the blade at 0.w  is  set  constant  and  equal  to  Rt. as follows:  −1 ⎡ 0 0 1⎤ ⎡ a0 ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎡0.  4. w (Ya ) = Rr ∀ Ya   The co‐ordinates of each wake node in polar co‐ordinates is denoted by [(rw)k. w 2 ⎦   Using matrix inversion. 4.99Rt. This boundary takes the form of a skewed cylinder  having a constant radius equal to the rotor blade root radius Rr.    To summarize.99Rt).  (Ys)k]  where the central axis is aligned with the wake skew axis Ys (refer to Fig.44)  2                                           ⎢ w p pw ⎢ 2 2 ⎥ ⎢ p 2 ⎢a ⎥ ⎢ R ⎥ ⎣ w pw 1⎥⎦ ⎣ 2 ⎦ ⎣ t . i. w1 ⎥                          (4.  the  outermost  helix  (from  the  blade.  4.i. the wake nodes that lie on the helix originating from the blade tip  (at  r=0.  Rt.w2 (refer to Fig. the wake nodes that lie on the helix originating from the blade root (at r=Rr).w2.99 Rt ⎤ ( ) ( ) ⎢ ⎥ 1⎥ * ⎢⎢ a1 ⎥⎥ = ⎢ Rt . w1 ⎥                          (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Ya = pw.45)  p pw ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 2 2 ⎥ ⎢⎣ a2 ⎥⎦ ⎢ ⎢ R ⎥ ⎣ pw 2 pw 1⎥⎦ ⎣ t .46  while  the  innermost  helix  (from  the  blade  root. w 2 ⎦   For  Ya>pw. a1 and a2 may be evaluated. In boundary condition (i). i.39(a). (φw) k.w=Rt.43  leads  to  three  equations  that  may be written in matrix form as     ⎡ 0 0 1⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎡ a0 ⎤ ⎡ 0.  i=0)  does  not  expand.  rw  is  equal  to  Rr.     Applying  the  above  three  boundary  conditions  to  Eqt.b.b. 4. the wake boundaries are defined by the following equations:    Rt . w 2 if Ya > pw                       (4. rw denotes  the  radial  distance  and  is  equal  to  Rt.  For  Ya≤  pw. Rt.    103  . constants a0.e.39(a)).

w (Y a ) X Xa Outer wake boundary Fig.w (Ya) Xa Fig.w Ys (Y a )= Rr X Inner wake boundary Wake skew axis Rr.39 – Schematic diagrams describing how prescribed vortex wake was modelled                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           . (c): Cross‐section through prescribed wake at given Ya Fig. (b): Geometry for inner wake boundary of prescribed wake Figure 4.w1 R t.w 2 R t.                                                                                     Tip vortex core 104  Outer wake boundary pw Ya Rt χs Wake skew axis Ψ Y Ys R t. (a): Geometry for outer wake boundary of prescribed wake Za Outer wake boundary Inner wake boundary Ya φw a) Inner wake boundary (Y t.w R Rr χs Wake skew axis Ψ Y Xa R r.

i = ( Rr .b ) ⎣⎢ ⎦⎥     Finally.b .b. w ) k . w ( Ya ) ⎞                                 rw (Ya ) = Rr .k.b ) ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥                              ⎢ ( Ya ) k ⎥ = ⎢ (Ya )k ⎥                 (4. 4.  the  wake  node  co‐ordinates  are  transformed  into  the  global  fixed  X‐Y‐Z  frame  of  reference using the following transformation:    105  .i ⎤ ⎡( Ya ) k ⋅ tan ( χ s ) + (rw ) k . (Ya)k.i ⋅ cos ( (φw )k . w ) k . w k .b .b = (φ )τ + − k ⋅ ∆φ                                            (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           The  rest  of  the  helices  (i=1.b .b .50)  B   where  τ  is the index denoting the azimuth angle of the first blade and  ∆φ is the azimuthal  step (2π/τtot). (Za)b. then the  axial distance along the Ya axis may be written in index form (Ya)k as   k ⋅ pw                                                                (Ya )k =                                                              (4.2.i] using the following transformation equations:    ⎡( X a )k .b .48)  τ tot and Eqt.b ..i ⎟ ( ri − Rr )             (4.b . w (Ya ) + ⎜ ⎟ ( r − Rr )                    (4.i as    ⎛ ( R ) − ( Rr .b . w ( Ya ) − Rr .i ⎦ ( rw ) k .47 in index form is expressed by (rw)k.i ⎞                                ( rw ) k .47)  ⎝ Rt − Rr ⎠   Since after one whole helical revolution. The distance of each wake node along the wake skew axis may be written in  index notation (Ys)k as  k ⋅ pw                                                          (Ys )k =                                                       (4.52)           ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ( Za ) ⎥ ⎣ k .i + ⎜ t .k.i.51)  τ tot cos ( χ s )   The  position  of  each  wake  node  on  the  vortex  sheets  is  expressed  in  3D  Cartesian  co‐ ordinates [(Xa)b.i ⋅ sin ( (φw )k .n‐2)  are  allowed  to  expand  in  accordance  with  the  following  linear interpolating formula  ⎛ Rt .49)  ⎝ Rt − Rr ⎠   The angle φw at each wake node is determined from    2π b                                                    (φw )k . each helix will advance by one pitch (pw).

b .    Numerical Solution    Initially. Each point in this plane is denoted by co‐ordinates (XP. The  azimuthal  spacing  of  the  points  is  equal  to  ∆φ.40.54(b) is used so that each filament is assigned a circulation calculated using the bound  circulation when the blades are at the same azimuth angle as that of the filament.b.i ⎦⎥ ⎣ 0 0     Wake Trailing Circulation Distribution    ΓT  represents  the  trailing  circulation  in  the  wake  due  to  a  spanwise  variation  in  bound  circulation.e.  The  solution  starts  with  an  impulsive  start  of  the  rotor  with  the  first  blade  initially  at  an  azimuth  angle  of  00.b .b .i ⎤ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ Y ⎥                               ⎢ ( Y ) k . ZP)  and  indices  (ip.  while  the  number  of  radial  locations  at  a  fixed azimuth is equal to n.  The  axial  distance  of  the  plane  parallel  to  the  rotorplane  at  which  the  induced  velocities  are  to  be  computed  (Yap)  is  inputted.  i.  respectively  and  τp=0  for  an  azimuth angle of 00. For non‐yawed conditions however.i = (Γ B )τ .i ⎥⎦ ⎣⎢ ( Z )k . 4.b .b .b .b.  depending  on  its  azimuth  position  of  the  filament.i)  and  (k+1.  When  the  turbine  is  operating  in  steady  conditions  with  its  axis  parallel  to  the  windspeed  direction. Each trailing vortex filament in the wake is denoted by (ΓT)k.  106  .i                             (4.  refer  to  Fig.b.  each helix of the wake  vortex sheet will have a uniform  circulation.  Consequently.53)  ⎢ ⎥ a k ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 1 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ ( Z a )k .54a)  where  2π b                                                             (φw )b . the bound circulation becomes a function  of the blade azimuth angle (φ). 4.b .  a  spanwise  variation  of  bound  circulation  is  prescribed  to  each  blade  of  the  modelled rotor as a function of rotor azimuth angle.i and is connected  to  nodes  (k. the circulation at each helix is varied from filament to  filament.i ⎥ = − sin ( Ψ ) cos ( Ψ ) 0 ⎢ ( ) ⎥                  (4.38.b.i −1 − (Γ B )τ . The total number of helical revolutions  for the prescribed wake (nwRev) is inputted and a whole rotor revolution is subdived into  τtot  equally  spaced  azimuth  steps.b .i ⎤ ⎡ cos ( Ψ ) sin ( Ψ ) 0 ⎤ −1 ⎡( X a ) k .  4.54b)  B   Eqt. A number of calculations points on the plane are noted as shown in Fig.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           ⎡( X )k .i).  The  assignment  of  the  circulation  at  each  trailing  filament  is  carried  out  in  accordance  with  the  following  relation:                                                               (ΓT ) k .  (φw)k.  the  bound  circulation  at  the  blades  is constant. Thus.τp)  where  ip=0  and  ip=n‐1  for  r=Rr  and  r=Rt. YP. k = φτ +                                                     (4.

i                                    b=0 i =0 k =0 b=0 i =0 B −1 n −1 ktot B −1 n −1 ( uZ )ip .τp)   (ip‐1.2 and 4.τ .i b=0 i =0 k =0 b =0 i =0 B −1 n −1 ktot B −1 n −1    ( uY )ip .b.   (3) the Biot‐Savart equations (Appendix C.τp)     (0. the following steps are carried out  (1) the geometry  of the wake vortex sheet due to each blade is modelled using Eqts..τp+1)                          Figure 4.40 ‐  Notation used for calculations points within plane distant Yap from rotorplane.b.τ . A simple numerical cut‐off method is used to de‐singularise   107  .  (2) the trailing circulation at each wake filament is found using Eqts.b. 4.τ p )   (ip. as follows:                  B −1 n −1 ktot B −1 n −1 ( u X )ip .k .τ .32) are applied to calculate the  3D  induced  velocity  components  at  each  calculation  point  (ip.b.    For each rotor time step τ.k .τp) (ip.b. (b).55)    where  GXB.τp)  due  to  all  bound  vortices at the blades and trailing vortex filaments in the wake.b.b.53.  The  discretization  equations  for  these  coefficients  are  presented in Tables 4.24.  GYB  and  GZB  are  the  geometric  influence  coefficients  due  to  the  bound  circulation  vortices  while  GXT.i * GXTip .τ p .3.i * GZTip .τ p .τ p .b.τ p = ∑∑ ( Γ B )τ .τ p .i * GZBip .i * GYTip .τ p = ∑∑ ( Γ B )τ . C.τ p = ∑∑ ( Γ B )τ .b.b.i b =0 i =0 k =0 b=0 i =0                                                                                                                                                          (4.i * GYBip .i +∑∑∑ ( ΓT )k .τp−1) (ip+1.i * GXBip .τ p .54(a).τp) π/ τ   to t (ip.τ p .  GYT  and  GZT  are  the  geometric  influence  coefficients  for  the  trailing  circulation  vortices.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               ∆φ   =2 (n‐1.46‐4.k . Eqts.i +∑∑∑ ( ΓT )k .b.  4.b.i +∑∑∑ ( ΓT )k .

b .i + ( r2 )ip .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .2: Discretization equations for influence coefficients for bound circulation                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           .τ .τ p ( B )τ .i +1 ( B )τ .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .τ p ( B )τ .i +1 ( B )τ .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .τ p .b .b .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .τ .i +1 ( B )τ .b .τ .b .b .τ p .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i +1 ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( L )τ .b .b .b .i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .b .b .τ .b .b .τ p .τ .τ p .τ p ( B )τ .b .i = ⎡ ⎡( X ) − X ⎤ +⎡ Y − Y ⎤ +⎡ Z − Z ⎤ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ B τ .τ .τ p .b .i +1 ( B )τ .τ p .i ⎦ ⎦ GXBip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎣⎢ ⎣ ⎦ ⎦⎥ ⎡ r + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎡ X − X ⎤−⎡ X − X ⎤⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎤ ⎣( 1 )ip .τ .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎥⎦ ⎡ r + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤⎡ Y − Y ⎤−⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎡ X − X ⎤⎤ ⎣( 1 )ip .τ .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .b .τ p .i +1 ( B )τ .τ p .                                                                                     108  ⎡( r1 ) + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎡ Z − Z ⎤−⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎤ ⎣ ip .b .τ p .τ p ( B )τ .τ p.τ p ( B )τ .τ .b .b .i = ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤ +⎡ Y − Y ⎤ +⎡ Z − Z ⎤ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣( P )ip .τ .i + ( r2 )ip .τ .b .τ .i ⎦ ⎥⎦ Table 4.b .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .b .i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .b .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .b .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .i = ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤ +⎡ Y − Y ⎤ +⎡ Z − Z ⎤ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣( P )ip .i + ( r2 )ip .τ p .i +1 ( B )τ .b .τ .τ p ( B )τ .τ .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .τ .τ .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L )τ .τ .τ p .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .b .i +1 ( B )τ .τ p ( B )τ .τ .i ⎦ ⎦ GZBip .b .b .b .τ p ( B )τ .b .b .i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .b .τ .τ p .τ p .i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L )τ .i ⎦ ⎦ GYBip .τ p .τ p .b .b .i +1 ( B )τ .b .b .b .b .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .i ( 2 )ip .b.b .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .τ p .τ p .τ .i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L )τ .b .b .b .τ p ( B )τ .τ p .b .b .i ( 2 )ip .b .i ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .τ .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .b .b .b .τ p ( B )τ .b .i +1 ( B )τ .i ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( r2 )ip .τ p ( B )τ .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .i +1 ⎦ ⎣( B )τ .τ p .τ p .b .τ p .b .b .τ p ( B )τ .b .b .τ .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( r1 )ip.τ .τ p .b .b.i ( 2 )ip .

i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L )k .b .b .b.b .b .i − (Y )k .i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L )k .τ p .i ⎦ ⎦ GZTip .b .τ p .i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .τ p .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .b .i − ( Z )k .i ( 2 )ip .τ p .i + ( r2 )ip .i ( )k .k .i ( )k .b.k .b .k .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.b .b .b.τ p .b .i − ( X )k .k .τ p .b .b .k .b .τ p .i ( )k .k .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎥⎦ ⎡( r1 ) + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤⎡ Y − Y ⎤−⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎡ X − X ⎤⎤ ⎣ ip .b .                                                                                     ⎡( r1 ) + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎡ Z − Z ⎤−⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎡ Y − Y ⎤⎤ ⎣ ip .k .τ p .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .τ p .b .τ p.i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .τ p .b .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .i ⎤⎦ + ⎡⎣( Z )k +1.b .b .b .b .k .b .b .i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.τ p .b .τ p ( )k .b .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .i ⎤ − ⎡⎣( L ) k .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .k .b .b .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.i = 2 2 2π ⋅ ( r1 )ip .τ p ( )k +1.i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .τ p ( )k +1.τ p ( )k .b .b .i ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( L ) k .i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.b .3: Discretization equations for influence coefficients for trailing circulation 109                                                  Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           .τ p .b .τ p ( ) k +1.k .b .τ p .i = ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤ +⎡ Y − Y ⎤ +⎡ Z − Z ⎤ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣( P )ip .b .i = ⎡ ⎡( X ) k +1.τ p ( )k .b .τ p .τ p .i ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( r2 )ip.τ p .i + ( r2 )ip .i ( 2 )ip .b.τ p .b .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .τ p ( )k +1.b.i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.b .b .τ p .τ p .k .i ⎦ ⎦ GXTip .i ⋅ ( r2 )ip .i ⎦ ⎣ ⎣( P )ip .b .b .k .k .i ( )k .b .k .b .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎥⎦ 2 2 2 ( r1 )ip .b .b .i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎥⎦ ⎡( r1 ) + r ⎤ ⋅ ⎡⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎡ X − X ⎤−⎡ X − X ⎤⎡ Z − Z ⎤⎤ ⎣ ip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .k .b .i = ⎡⎡ X − X ⎤ +⎡ Y − Y ⎤ +⎡ Z − Z ⎤ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣( P )ip .b . k .τ p ( )k +1.k .k .i ⎦ ⎣( )k +1.b .τ p ( )k +1.k .i + ( r2 )ip .i ⎦ ⎣( P )ip .k .i ⎦ ⎦ GYTip .τ p .k .i ⎤⎦ + ⎡⎣(Y )k +1.i ⎤⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎣ ⎣ ⎥⎦ Table 4.τ p .τ p .b .b .b .τ p ( )k +1.b .k .τ p ( )k +1.b .k .i ⋅ ⎡ ⎡( r1 )ip .b .i ( )k .b.i ( 2 )ip .τ p ( ) k +1.i ( )k .

 4.  This  yields  a  3D  induction  distribution  at  the  calculation  plane  at  all  azimuth  steps  of  one  whole  rotor  revolution. 4.3.τ p ip .τtot‐1).57.  Outside  the  wind  turbine  wake.41(a).  the  flow  velocity  may  be  considered  to  be  uniform  and  equal  to  the  free‐wind  speed.  This  is  because  in  a  wind  tunnel.τ p ⎥ = ⎢ 0 1 0 ⋅ ⎥ ⎢ − sin ( Ψ ) cos ( Ψ ) 0 ⋅ ⎢ ( uY )ip . then the wake is allowed  to  expand  freely.19 and 4. It will be shown later on in this section that  a small difference in the value of U may yield to large errors in the derived axial induced  velocities.  as  illustrated  in  Fig.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           the Biot‐Savart equations. the induction components (uX. the exit‐jet velocity measured at three points using the pitot‐static probes may be  slightly different from the true‐free wind speed.τ p ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢( u y )ip .    The  above  three  steps  are  repeated  for  all  rotor  time  steps  (τ  =  0.57)    A major difficulty in finding the axial induced velocities was in establishing the true free‐ wind speed accurately (U) to be able to use it in Eqt.τ p ) ⎥ ⎦ ⎣ ⎢ 0 0 1 ⎥ ⎦ ⎢⎣ ( uZ )ip .55 above.. uY.  The  flow  characteristics  across  a  wind  turbine  in  a  wind  tunnel  may  therefore  be  considerably  different than those that would be experienced if the same turbine is operating in an open  air  environment. it was  required  to  derive  the  axial  induced  velocity  components  at  the  rotorplane  by  applying  equation                                                                 ua = wa − U cos(Ψ )                                                   (4.  These  are  finally  transformed  into  the  moving  x‐y‐z  frame of reference using the following transformation:    ⎡( u x ) ⎤ ⎡ cos ( (φ ) ) 0 − sin ( (φ ) ) ⎤ cos ( Ψ ) sin ( Ψ ) 0 ⎡( u X ) ⎤ ⎢ ip .2.  the  flow  field  is  limited  to  a  restricted  flow channel.56)  where ux.τ p ⎥ ⎢ ⎡ ⎤ ip . Such differences give rise to wind blockage effects.τ p ⎥⎦                                                                                                                                                                                       (4. 4. see section 4. Due to the influences of tunnel  blockage.τ p ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢⎣ ( u z )ip .τ p ip .4 Assessment of Wind Tunnel Blockage Effects    From the inflow measurements (refer to Figs.τ p ) 0 cos ( ( φ ) ip .18(a).  4. uy and uz are the tangential.  uZ)  are  in  the  X‐Y‐Z  reference  frame. A major pre‐requisite in  wind tunnel testing is to achieve a flow environment that is as close as possible to that of an  110  . axial and radial induction components respectively.2).τ p ⎥⎦ ⎣ sin ( ( φ ) ip .20.        4.     When a wind turbine is operating in a real open air environment. Note that in Eqts. 4.

 the flow field is limited by the size of the jet. For the closed test‐section. the  jet  is  not  constrained  by  walls  and  thus  the  turbine  wake  is  allowed  to  expand  more  freely than in closed test section (see Fig. two main blockage phenomena take place in an open‐jet wind tunnel:    (1) Blockage due to Wake Boundary    If  we  consider  a  closed‐section  wind  tunnel  (see  Fig. BF was equal  to 0. The flow velocity at section q is denoted by wa’.  it  follows  that  the  velocity  bypassing  the  rotor  wb  (outside  the  slipstream)  would be greater than U. BF is taken to be equal to Arotor/Ajet. 4.  For this study on the TUDelft rotor.  But  since  the  same  volume  of  air  that  passes  any  section  upstream  of  the  turbine  must  pass  any  section  behind  it.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           open  air  environment. the larger tunnel blockage effects tend  to be.  4. For an open‐jet  tunnel.    In an open‐jet wind tunnel. A simple first‐order relation for wb may be derived from basic actuator  disk theory for a turbine in axial conditions in an inviscid and incompressible flow:    Consider  two  sections  p  and  q  in  the  fluid  stream  such  that  p  is  located  far  upstream  from the rotor where the tunnel speed is equal to U while q is located at a downstream  distance from the rotor (see Fig.  Precautions  should  therefore  be  taken  to  ensure  that  blockage  influences  are  minimal. since the  turbine  wake  is  less  restricted  from  expanding  (see  Figs. The amount of blockage  will depend on the wind tunnel configuration used. The larger this ratio.  4. this wb  would be equal to U (Fig.42).   Alternatively.41(a)). blockage effects are less than that in a closed section. However. 4. In an open‐jet wind tunnel (similar to  the one used in this study). tunnel blockage depends on the ratio of the cross‐sectional area of the  rotor to that of the test‐section.  wake  expansion  is  constrained by the tunnel walls.  Let  the  diameter  of  the  rotor  wake  at  section q be D’. then some wake boundary blockage will  still be present. Also. the static pressure of the air bypassing the turbine  would  therefore  be  less  than  that  of  the  undisturbed  stream  having  velocity  U.  4.  it  can  also  be  argued  that  the  thrust  developed  would  be  equal  to  that  produced  when  the  turbine  is  operating  in  an  open‐air  environment  at  a  higher  windspeed. Let Dj be the diameter of the tunnel tube while Dj’  be  the  diameter  of  the  tunnel  jet  at  section  q. This ratio is often referred to the blockage factor (denoted here by BF).  This  influences the turbine so that it develops a thrust larger than would be developed in an  unrestricted flow of the same speed with the same rotor angular speed and blade pitch.29.42   111  .  Physically.41(b)  and  (c)).  then  the  measured  results  should  be  corrected.41(c)). When the rotor is operating in a wind turbine state. the  flow  velocity  wa  would  be  less  than  the  free‐stream  velocity  U.  for  a  given  tunnel configuration. Referring to Fig. In an open air environment.  tunnel blockage is related to the momentum reduction in the wake. However if wb at any point in the jet  flow bypassing the turbine is not equal to U. 4.41(b)).     Basically.  If  not.

41: Wake developments in open air and in two different wind tunnel types (open and closed  test‐section).  112  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             By‐pass Velocity wb=U       U   Wake Flow Velocity wa<U           By‐pass Velocity wb=U   Fig (a) – Open air environment       By‐pass Velocity wb>U Tunnel wall       U Wake Flow Velocity wa<U           By‐pass Velocity wb>U     Fig (b) – Wind tunnel with closed test‐section       By‐pass Velocity wb   Jet boundary       U Wake Flow Velocity wa<U           By‐pass Velocity wb     Fig (c) – Wind tunnel with open test‐section     Figure 4.

58)  ∴ wb = '2 D 1− D j '2 Let a1’ be the magnitude of the axial induction factor at section q   wa ' − U               where                                       a1 ' =   U   Dividing both sides of Eqt.60)  1 + a1'   Since for the normal operating state of a wind turbine a1’<0.                     and applying the volume continuity equation between sections p and q.58 by U and substituting for a1’ yields  D '2 1− Dj 2 (1 + a ) 1 ' wb                                                          =                                                     (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               wb       D’ U            Dj wa’ Dj’       wb     p q     Figure 4. wb/U=1). Also from simple  axial momentum considerations.59 that for the wind turbine wake to reach the ideal wake  boundary condition as that for an open air environment (i.e.42 – Nomenclature for simple analysis of wind turbine in an open‐jet wind tunnel. a1’ will increase negatively downstream until it reaches a   113  . then Dj’>Dj. 4. 4.  D j 2U = D '2 wa '+ ( D j '2 − D '2 ) wb D '2 U− 2 wa '                                                Dj                                      (4. the jet diameter at any  distance from the rotorplane should expand in accordance with  Dj                                                              D j ' =                                                          (4.59)  U D '2 1− D j '2 It can be easily shown from Eqt.

 the rotor will cause the tunnel exit velocity distribution to become  non‐uniform.  In  fact.   In yawed conditions. A higher  operating thrust will make the pitot‐readings more susceptible to this type of blockage. 4.3 0.4 2.       (2) Blockage due to proximity of Rotor to Tunnel Exit Jet    When a wind turbine is placed in the jet of the wind tunnel. This severity of this type of  blockage depends on the blockage factor (BF).44. the distance of the rotor from the tunnel  exit.9 . 4. This implies that the tunnel jet  diameter should increase gradually downstream in accordance with Eqt.a 1'                                    Figure 4.45(a) and (b). The rotor geometry and operating  condition will determine the thrust exerted by the rotor on the fluid stream.6 1. In addition.  In  reality  such  a  condition  would  be  very  difficult  to  obtain  and  consequently  some  wake  blockage  will  always be present.  The  non‐uniformity  becomes  more  complex  when  the  rotor  is  yawed.7 0.43 plots  the  required  wake  expansion  with  the  local  axial  induction  factor.  the  retardation  of  the  flow  starts  way  upstream  from the rotor.    value that is double that at the rotorplane in the far wake.4 1.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           2.2 0. the rotor geometry and the operating condition.2 1 0 0. this effect could be more severe for two reasons: first because the    114  . Yet.60.43 – Required open‐jet expansion at different local axial induction factors as predicted by  Eqt.6 0. 4.1 0. the above analysis reveals that by having an open‐jet tunnel instead  of a tunnel with a closed test‐section (where Dj’ has to be maintained constant and equal to  Dj).5 0. its presence will be also felt  upstream  of  the  rotorplane. For yaw.8 Dj'/Dj 1.4 0. the latter will not measure the true free‐stream  velocity.8 0. the required jet expansion  would be more complex (due to wake skew) and even more difficult to have. 4.  This effect is illustrated pictorially in Figs. 4. as shown in Fig.60 to have the ideal situation where no wake blockage is present.2 2 1. wake boundary blockage would be less significant. Thus if the rotor is placed close to the tunnel exit  where the pitot readings (Ujet) are taken. Fig.

  than  over  the  rest  of  the  rotorplane. This  distribution was predicted using an acceleration potential code by van Bussel [15].46  where  a  predicted distribution of the local blade axial thrust (in dimensionless form) is shown  as a function of blade azimuth angle for the TUDelft rotor at a yaw angle of 300. In this case the combined action will help  in reducing uncertainty.            115  .  4.  This  may  be  observed  in  Fig.  doing  so  will  cause the inflow at the rotor  to have a higher turbulence level.44 – Discrepancy between Ujet and U due to proximity of rotor to pitot‐tubes.42.  the  skewed  wake  causes  an  uneven  induction  at  the  tunnel  exit. both blockage types will  increase uncertainty levels. the turbulence level generally increases. it may happen that the proximity of the rotor to the  jet may also help to speed up the flow at the pitot. This may cause the local flow at the pitot to become higher than U.  In  fact  it  is  possible that the combined action of the two may reduce the uncertainty in taking Ujet  equal  to  U. This is due to the fact  that as the tunnel jet expands downstream.  blockage due to wake boundary may cause wb to be higher than U if the jet expansion  remains small.  The  skewed  wake  induction  at  the  blades  causes  the local axial thrust at the blades to be higher between azimuth angles 1800 and 3600.    One  physical  explanation  would  be  the  following:  Referring  to  Fig.  Secondly.    upwind  blade  will  be  closer  to  the  tunnel  exit. However.  As a result. On  the other hand. tunnel blockage due to rotor proximity to the tunnel exit may cause the  local flow at the pitot to become less than U.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             Flow     Error Rotor disk       U Ujet       Axial distance                   Figure 4.     Ideally. the influences of tunnel blockage due to wake boundary and that due to the  proximity  of  the  rotor  to  the  exit  jet  cannot  be  considered  in  isolation. the rotor should be placed well downstream of the tunnel exit such that it will  not  influence  the  jet  velocity  distribution  at  the  tunnel  exit. In  this study the rotor was placed 1m downstream of the tunnel exit.  However.      In effect.  4.

46 – Variation of the local axial thrust coefficient with blade azimuth angle for Ψ=300 for the  TUDelft rotor as predicted by an acceleration potential method.      00             2700 900           1800   Figure 4. (Source: van Bussel [15]).                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                   ua U   wa           Pitot readings   Fig (a) – Axial Conditions     Ujet         U ua wa             Pitot readings Ujet     Fig (b) – Yawed Conditions                    Figure 4.  116  .45 –Influence of rotor on tunnel exit jet velocity distribution.

 Using a  simple  actuator  disk  model.  If  the  tunnel  blockage  causes  the  local  velocity  at  the  pitot probes to be less than the true free windspeed.63)  kc wa .  Fig.61(c) in Eqt.47  plots  the  variation  of  error  εkc  with  kc  in  accordance  with  Eqt. It can be easily observed from Fig.  The  error  in  the  axial  induced  velocity  will  be  larger  at  lower  values  of  kc. Then                                                            ua = wa . On the other hand if tunnel  blockage  causes  a  speed‐up  in  the  flow  local  to  the  probes. 4.  then  kc>1.  Note  that for kc=1.exp − U cos(Ψ )                                              (4. then kc<1.47 that a small deviation  of  exit  jet  velocity  from  the  true  free‐wind  speed  could  possibly  yield  a  large  error  in  the  117  . it  may  be  shown  mathematically  that  very  large  errors  in  the  derived axial induced velocity may result  when the latter is calculated on the assumption  that the free‐wind speed (U) is equal to that measured by the pitot‐static tubes at the tunnel  exit (Ujet):    Let  kc  be  equal  to  the  ratio  of  the  exit  jet  velocity  to  the  true  free  stream  velocity  (i. The true free‐stream velocity at any point in the cross‐section of the tunnel  tube may differ from that measured using the pitot‐static tubes at the tunnel exit jet.  larger  yaw  angles  and  at  higher  measured  values  of  wa. 4.62 yields             U jet cos(Ψ )(1 − kc )100                                                    ε kc =                                            (4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Quantification of Error in the Computed Axial Induced Velocity due to Error in Ujet    As  already  outlined  before.62)  ua * Substituting Eqt.61c)  kc The percentage error introduced by finding the axial induced velocity using Ujet instead of  U will then be equal to:  ua − ua *                                                             ε kc = • 100                                                       (4.5  m/s  and  for  different  yaw  angles  and  axial  flow  velocities  (wa).e.exp − U jet cos(Ψ )                                           (4.exp < U jet cos( Ψ ) where  kc>0. the error is equal to zero since for this condition the exit jet velocity is equal to  the true free‐stream velocity. 4.exp be equal to the measured axial flow velocity at the rotor disk.exp − cos(Ψ )                                         (4. Let ua* be the axial induced velocity derived using the true  free‐stream velocity (U). Let ua be  the axial induced velocity at the rotor disk derived using the assumption that Ujet is equal  the true free‐stream velocity (U).  4.  kc=Ujet/U).61a)                                                            ua * = wa .63  for  Ujet=5.61b)  U jet                                                            = wa .  4.exp − U jet cos(Ψ )   Since  for  a  wind  turbine  the  axial  flow  velocity  decreases  continuously  downstream  then  kc wa .  tunnel  blockage  makes  it  difficult  to  determine  the  true  free‐ stream velocity. Let wa.

. If additionally tunnel  blockage  is  present  such  that  it  contributes  to  a  kc  value  of  0.5.  then  the  total  effective  kc  value  would  be  equal  to  0.  4.  The  procedures  are  illustrated  in  Fig.  Both  procedures  make  use  of  the  prescribed  118  .       Procedures for Assessing Influences due to Tunnel Blockage     Two  separate  computational  procedures  were  adopted  to  assess  the  extent  to  which  the  inflow  measurements  on  the  TUDelft  rotor  could  have  been  affected  by  tunnel  blockage.6 0.47 – Variation of  εkc with kc for different yaw angles and measured inflow velocities (wa. the non‐uniformity in velocity distribution of the  tunnel exit jet (shown in Fig.48.2 Ψ=30 Yaw 30 0deg. .8 0. that a kc value  of 0.93 can be easily presented due to tunnel exit jet non‐uniformity.  4.  A  very  important  note  to  make is that. w wa=3 =3m/s a m/s Ψ=45 Yaw 0. the tunnel speed was set  such that the pitot‐readings measured this wind speed.  it  is  seen  that  the  later  value  yields a percentage error in ua of around 20‐25%. w =3m/s 45 deg. w wa=2 =2m/s a m/s Ψ=45 Yaw 45 0deg. a 10% deviation of Ujet (i.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           estimation of the axial induced velocity.9)  from  the  true  free‐stream  velocity  may  easily  result  in  a  30%  error  in  ua.5. 4. w wa=2 a=2m/sm/s 0.exp).5m/s since during all measurements. . w wa=2 =2m/s a m/s -50 Ψ=00 0deg.  kc=0.1 1.7 0.884.95. Yaw .95  =  0.93X0. w wa=3 a=3m/sm/s Ψ=30 Yaw 30 0deg.  For instance at yaw 450.  The results are calculated for Ujet =5.  This  provides evidence that special care should be taken when assuming Ujet to be equal to the  free‐stream  velocity  and  that  it  is  crucial  to  know  the  free‐stream  velocity  accurately  if  accurate  prediction  of  the  induced  velocity  is  to  be  estimated. which is considerable. wa=3 m/s a -100 kc Figure 4. 4. page 49) also cause the true‐free windspeed to be different  from that measured by the probes.  From  Fig.e.9 1 1. apart from tunnel blockage. It could be easily observed from Fig.47. Yaw .5 0.        100 50 εkc (%) 0 Ψ=00 0deg.

65            ( ke r .05? R Yes Yes ( ε a r R . 4.64  R   ( )     ε a r R . φ ' ) Ya =3.48 ‐  Two procedures used to assess the inflow measurements for influences due to tunnel  blockage. 4.5 cm ( ) using HAWT_PVC ke r . 4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           vortex  model  HAWT_PVC  on  the  assumption  that  this  model  is  reasonably  accurate  for  modelling the wake inflow distributions for both axial and yawed conditions.exit R from experimental  inflow data and    using HAWT_PVC assuming Ujet = U using Eqt.φ ' r   at tunnel exit.c r R .φ Find                       using Eqt. Re‐call that in  this code a bound circulation (which may vary with blade azimuth angle) is prescribed to  calculate the induced velocity distribution at a given plane. φ Calculate induced velocity                            ( ) R Ya =3.φ Prescribe                       to HAWT_PVC   R         Procedure 1 Procedure 2 ( )     Calculate induced velocity  ua .φ ) Is                       <10%?     No No           Tunnel Blockage Minimal Measurement Data Valid and Usable       Tunnel Blockage Significant   Measurement Data Invalid and Unusable   Figure 4.61(a)         ( Calculate induced velocity  ua . c r .  119  .5 cm . φ   Find                       using Eqt. ua . φ ) Is                       <0.    ( )   ΓB r .

    120  .exit ' ( r R .  In  both  assessment  procedures.  Note  that  in  this  assessment  method.5cm downstream plane are derived from  the experimental measurements using the assumption that the pitot Ujet is equal to the free‐ stream  velocity  (using  Eqt.  These  are  then  compared  with  that  computed  by  HAWT_PVC  for  the  same  plane. then it may be argued that  the computed induced velocities are equivalent to those which would have been obtained  should the rotor was operating in an open air environment (i. the pitot reading). φ ) .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Since in this code. Considering that the values for w  are accurate. φ )                                               (4. φ ) . it follows that the  a.  the  bound  circulation  derived  directly  from  the  inflow  measurements using HAWT_LFIM is prescribed to vortex code HAWT_PVC.65)     Ya = 3.c r . φ . the modelled vorticity is only due to the rotor. this  should  be  zero. the error in the equation above should mainly be in using Eqt.e.33 and HAWT_PVC are  reasonably accurate.    In Procedure 2.c r . 4. no blockage) with the same  bound circulation at the blades.exp main source of error in  εa is due to the Ujet (i. c ' r . In Procedure 1. c r .  error  εa  is  based  on  the  induced  velocities at 3.  ( ) ua . 4. it was decided to limit ke to 0.5cm downstream and not those at the rotorplane to reduce the uncertainties  due to the linear interpolation that was required to estimate wa.  the  vortex  code  computes  the  tunnel  exit  axial  velocity  distribution. φ ) ( ) R = R Ya =3.c at the rotorplane (Eqt. This would lead to a higher wake circulation whose induction is felt more  at the tunnel exit.5cm plane and the relative error is found using      ( ua .5 cm ε a r R . φ ) ( − ua .  4. 4. 4. c ( r R .e. In this study. If it was higher.exit ' r .  Also  tunnel  non‐uniformity  may  cause  the  velocity  at  some  locations  in  the  jet  exit  to  be  higher than Ujet.5 cm   Assuming that the results for  ΓB derived in accordance with Fig.61(a)  to find  ua .64)                                                    ke ( r R ) .44).5 cm                                                                                                                                                                                               a   ' ( ua . then the  measurement  data  would  be  invalid  and  unusable  or  a  correction  to  the  data  would  be  required.61(a)).φ = U jet R In ideal conditions (no‐blockage).7).  The  ratio of this velocity to that measured using the pitot probes is evaluated using    ( ua . But this would not be  the case if blockage due to rotor proximity to the tunnel exit is present (refer to Fig.  The  two  induced  velocities  are  compared  R along the different points in the 3. the axial induced velocities at the 3. this ratio should be equal to zero.  ua .φ = Y 3. φ R )                                                                                                                                                          (4. In ideal conditions.05.

 the main objective  was  to  investigate  an  approach  for  deriving  the  aerodynamic  loading  distributions  at  the  blades  from  hot‐film  inflow  measurements  in  attached  flow  conditions.  ⎛ ⎛ wa .67)  ⎝ ⎝ rΩ ⎠ ⎠ Relation  tan −1 (w a .c 2 + r 2 Ω 2 ⎜ tan −1 ⎜ ) ⎟ − θ ⎟                            (4.c ⎞ 1 ⎛ wa .  it  was  therefore  very  important  to  investigate  the  uncertainty  in  the  derived  blade  loading  resulting from errors in wa.c ⎞               ϕ = tan ⎜ −1 ⎟ = r Ω − 3 ⎜ r Ω ⎟ + 5 ⎜ r Ω ⎟ − 7 ⎜ r Ω ⎟ + .20)  and  substituting Eqts..70a)  dr 121  ..  It  was  also  necessary  to  investigate  how  this  uncertainty  is  influenced  by  other  parameters  such as the blade radial location and pitch angle.  4.3.68)  ⎝ rΩ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠   Since  for  the  TUDelft  turbine.c r Ω ) is equal to the local inflow angle (ϕ) and this can be expanded in  series form as follows  3 5 7 ⎛ wa .5 Quantification of Errors in Deriving Blade Loading due to Errors            in Inflow Measurements    As already outlined before. 4. Neglecting the effects of  unsteady flow over the blades.  In  this  analysis. 4.11 and 4.c ⎞ wa . in this work related to the TUDelft turbine.c ⎞ 1 ⎛ wa .  wa.    Consider a blade element at a given blade azimuth position and yaw angle.19  and  4. Assume that the  local angle of attack is small and does not exceed the stall angle. Thus Eqt.c  as  the  axial  flow  velocity  at  the  blade  lifting  line  obtained  from  the  measurements  using  linear  interpolation  (see  Eqt.69)  ⎝ r Ω ⎠⎝ 2 2 ⎠ Neglecting  the  drag  on  the  blades  (this  assumption  is  reasonable  for  1<α<12  deg  for  the  NACA0012  aerofoil).66.18(a).  then  we  can  neglect  terms  (w rΩ ) and higher.  4.c ⎛ w2 ⎞ ⎛ w ⎞                                           f L ≈ ρπ cr 2 Ω 2 ⎜ 1 + ⎟ ⎜ r Ω − θ ⎟                                       (4.7  and  Figs.c 1 ⎛ wa .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.c which is directly obtained from the hot‐film measurements. the lift coefficient may be approximated to Cl=2πα. The local  lift loading in N/m may then be expressed as  dL                                                              fL = = ρπα cV 2                                                      (4.67 becomes  3 a .66)  dr   Taking  wa.           (4.  the  axial  thrust  (N/m)  and  torque  (Nm/m)  loading  at  a  given  radial  location on the blades as equal to  dT                                                        fT = = f L cos (ϕ )                                                      (4.. 4.  4.c ⎞ ⎞                                         ( f L = ρπ c wa .12 in Eqt.c<<rΩ  at  all  radial  locations.

c ⎞ sin (ϕ ) = − ⎜ ⎟ + 5! ⎜ r Ω ⎟ − .c 2θ ⎞                                              fT ≈ ρπ cr Ω ⎜ − θ − 2 2 ⎟                                       (4. the percentage error εT is given by  ∂fT ε w                                                          ε T ≈ a .c ⎞ 1 ⎛ wa .c 100                                            (4.70 and neglecting terms  a . 2! ⎝ r Ω ⎠ ⎝ ⎠                                                                  (4.c ⎞ cos (ϕ ) = 1 − ⎜ ⎟ + 4! ⎜ r Ω ⎟ − .76)  a .73)  2 ⎝ rΩ ⎠   The  percentage  error  in  fT  due  to  an  error  in  measured  wa..c wa .c 1 ⎛ wa .77)  ⎛ wa .c wa ..75. for small values in δwa.c Alternatively..c                                               ε T ≈                                                    (4.72 and 4.c  at  a  given  radial  location  on  a  blade could be simply found from   fT wa . it follows that     ⎛ 1 wa .c                                                              ε w = 100                                                            (4.74)  fT wa .c − fT                                                     ε T = wa .cθ ⎞ ⎜ r Ω − 2 2 ⎟ ε w wa .c δ wa .c +δ wa .c given by  a . 4.c wa .c wa .75)  ∂wa . 4.c                                                          (4. Terms cos(ϕ) and sin(ϕ) may also be expanded in series form  as  2 4 1 ⎛ wa .c From Eqts.71)  3 5 wa .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           dQ                                                        fQ = = r × f L sin (ϕ )                                               (4. the axial  3 Substituting Eqts.71 in Eqts.c ⎝ r Ω ⎠ a .c 2θ ⎞ ⎜ −θ − 2 2 ⎟ ⎝ rΩ 2r Ω ⎠ 122  .c ⎞ 1 ⎛ wa .c only. rΩ 3! ⎝ r Ω ⎠ ⎝ ⎠ (w rΩ ) and higher. 4.c ⎞                                               f Q ≈ ρπ cr Ωwa .70b)  dr   where  ϕ is the inflow angle.c fT where  ε w  is the percentage error in wa..72)  2 2 ⎝ rΩ 2r Ω ⎠ ⎛ wa .c ⎜ − θ ⎟                                                   (4.c thrust and torque loading can then be approximated to  ⎛ wa .

  is  equal  to  zero.c. It can be easily  noted  that  a  small  variation  in  wa.c/rΩ becomes close to  θ.c    may  be  large. but that due to  the aerofoil data may be large (especially when dealing with highly stalled flows). This implies that when using the inflow measurements to find the  axial  thrust  loading.c while keeping rΩ constant.  the  percentage  error  in  the  thrust  loading.c . the uncertainty in the aerofoil data is small. Eqt.  The  results  are  shown  for  two  values  of  wa. a small error in wa.77.  But  the  results  from  the  two  equations very found to be nearly equal. For other pitch angles however.  ε T  becomes very large. this is the condition when the  a .c . at a given value of  εw a .  the  error  in  the  loading  remains  approximately  equal  to  that  in  wa.  On  the  contrary.     Therefore  one  can  conclude  that  despite  the  fact  that  for  attached  flow  conditions  (low  angles of attack at the blades).  is  dependent on parameters wa.c local angle of attack is small and thus the thrust loading (fT) approaches zero. 4.c different values of  θ and wa.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           For  the  condition  in  which  the  local  blade  pitch  angle.    Fig.  ε T . In Figs.c the  exact  equation  4. In fact.c . 4.  It is noted that.c  (equal  to  2  and  3m/s)  which are on the order of magnitude of those derived in the wind tunnel.c  may yield a significantly larger error in the derived loading.49(a) shows that variation of  ε T  with  ε w at  a .c and  speed  (Ω)  equal  to  those  of  the  TUDelft  rotor  in  the  hot‐wire  measurements  (i.e.49(a) and (b).c  has  a  significant  effect  on  ε T   and  may  cause  it  to  be  much larger than  εw . 4.  This only holds when the local pitch angle is zero. 4.     A more important observation concerns the fact that in many situations.74  and  the  approximate  equation  4. r and  θ.77  shows  that  for  constant  speed  Ω. even when  ε w is small.  it  can  be  concluded that εT ≈ εwa.c is small.  Fig.  θ.              123  . the results for  ε T  were computed both with  a.49(b) shows the spanwise variation of  ε T  for  ε w =8% and a pitch angle variation (θ)  a . the uncertainty   in  the  derived  loading  due  to  measurement  errors  in  wa. This is a very  important  issue  that  needs  serious  consideration  when  deriving  blade  loads  from  inflow  measurements.  when dealing with high angles of attack.  Ω=720rpm  and  θtip=20).c. the uncertainty due to wa. error  ε T  is very much dependent on the values of θ and wa. When wa.

wac=2m/s) =2m/s) 60 εT Exact. wac=2m/s) =2m/s) εT Approx. w =3m/s) a. w =2m/s) a.c Ω=720rpm.5. 0 =2m/s) εT (%) 50 εT Exact.9 1 r/R           Figure  4.6 0.49(b)  –  Spanwise  variation  of  the  error  due  to  axial  thrust  loading  for ε w =8%.c. wa.  a . (q=4deg. 0. (θ=0wac=3m/s eT_Exact. (θ=00. eT (θ=40.c 60 εT Approx. 0. (q=0deg.7 0.    90 εT Exact.c 70 εT Exact.      124  . eT (θ=2 . (q=2deg. wac=3) =3m/s) 40 εT Approx.c 50 εT (%)  40 30 20 10 0 0.8 0. wa. wa. 0.c 70 εT Approx.  r/R=0.49(a)  –  Variation  of  error  due  to  axial  thrust  loading  against  the  error  in  wa.cwac=2m/s) eT Approx. =3m/s) wac=3m/s) 30 20 10 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 εwa.c Approx. w wac=2m/s) Exact. (θ=2 . wa.  Ω=720rpm. w =2m/s) a.3 0. eT (θ=00.c (%)                     Figure  4.c 0 Exact.4 0. eT (θ=40.c 80 εT Approx. Spanwise variation of θ is equal to that of the TUDelft rotor with θtip=20. (θ=0wac=2m/s eT_Exact. (q=4deg.c Exact.c Approx. (θ=0wac=2m/s eT_Approx. (q=0deg. 0. (θ=0wac=3m/s eT_Approx. wa.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           80 εT eT Exact. =2m/s) a. (q=2deg.5 0. w =3m/s) a.

    In  a  yawed  rotor  conditions.80. From Eqt.c ⎞ ⎜ rΩ − θ ⎟ ε w ⎝ ⎠ a .  the  values of wa. Thus the error is doubled.c ⎞ ⎜ rΩ − θ ⎟ ⎝ ⎠ It can be easily observed from the equation above that  ε Q  is always larger than  ε w which  a .79.c                                                          (4.c Alternatively.50(a) and (b) are plots similar to Figs. the error in torque loading due to  ε w is therefore higher  a .c . it can be shown that as wa.c ε Q  becomes much larger than  ε w a .c at a given radial location and blade could simply be found from   fQ − fQ wa . it can be concluded that ε Q ≈ 2ε wa .    To  summarise. The results from the two equations differ marginally.c only.c fQ   From Eqts.c at a fixed windspeed and rotor speed are smaller than for non‐yawed   125  .78  and  the  approximate equation 4.c).80. 4. the resulting error in  the  torque  loading  is  larger  than  that  for  axial  thrust. 4. especially  at larger values of ε w . Figs. For a given inflow measurement error. 4. then  a .  θ.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Applying a similar approach to the torque loading fQ. the percentage error in fQ due to an  error in measured wa.  from  the  above  analysis  it  can  be  concluded  that  when  deriving  the  axial  thrust  and  torque  loading  distributions  from  measured  inflow  values  (wa. is equal  to zero.c                                                         ε Q ≈                                                     (4.49(a) and (b) but ε Q  is shown  instead.  For a given radial  location and operating condition.  In  these  figures.  This  result  indicates  more  difficulties  in  maintaining  accuracy  when  deriving  the  rotor  torque  and  power  coefficients  from  the  inflow  measurements. 4.79)  ∂wa . it follows that   ⎛ 2 wa . the percentage error εT is given by  ∂fQ ε w                                                          ε Q ≈ a .c concludes that the error in the derived torque loading would always be larger than that in  the inflow measurements.78)  fQ wa .  It  can  be  observed  that  the  values  of  ε Q   are  larger  than  those  of ε T .73 and 4.  the  results  for  ε Q   are  computed  both  with  the  exact  equation  4.c .c 100                                              (4. for small values in δwa.  the  uncertainties  in  these  derived  distributions  due  to  errors  in  the  inflow  measurements  is  largest at low angles of attack.c than  that  in  the  axial  thrust  loading.c wa .c +δ wa .c/rΩ approaches  θ. For the condition in which the local blade pitch angle.80)  ⎛ wa .c                                                  ε Q = wa .

eQ (θ=4 . w wac=2m/s) Exact.  a .c Approx. eQ (θ=20. (θ=40. wa. (θ=0 0. wa.c   (%)    Figure  4.4 0. (θ=0 0.c Ω=720rpm. (q=4deg. =3m/s) wac=3m/s) 50 Q 40 30 20 10 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 ε wa. Q Exact. Spanwise variation of θ is equal to that of the TUDelft rotor with θtip=20.8 0.6 0. wa. wac=3) =3m/s) εQ Approx.c ε  (%) eQ Approx.50(b)  –  Spanwise  variation  of  the  error  due  to  axial  thrust  loading  for ε w =8%. (q=4deg. (θ=00.50(a)  –  Variation  of  error  due  to  torque  loading  against  the  error  in  wa. Q Exact. (θ=00.  Ω=720rpm. wac=2m/s) =2m/s) 60 εQ Exact. (θ=0 0. (q=0deg. (q=0deg. wa.5 0.  126  . w =2m/s) wac=2m/s a. eQ (θ=20. w =3m/s) wac=3m/s a. =2m/s) a.                    120 εeQ_Exact. (q=2deg.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                           100 90 εQ eQ Exact. w =3m/s) wac=3m/s a. (θ=0 .c.c Exact.c ε eQQ Approx. Q Approx.c εQ (%) 60   40 20 0 0. (q=2deg.c=2m/s) wac=2m/s 0 100 εeQ_Approx.c Approx. wac=2m/s) =2m/s) 70 εQ Approx.9 1 r/R                Figure  4. Q Approx.3 0.c 80 εeQ_Approx.c εeQ_Exact. wa.7 0.5.  r/R=0.c 0 Exact. wac=2m/s) =2m/s) 80 εQ Exact. wa.

 one might  ask why the hot‐film measurements carried out in this study were not accomplished with a  lower rotor tip speed ratio (instead of λ=8) or at a smaller tip pitch angle (instead of  θtip=20)  so as to increase the local angles of attack at the blades and hence reduce the uncertainties  in the derived loading due to the measurement errors.  This  results  in  a  smaller  angle  of  attack  at  some  blade  azimuth  positions  and  hence  the  uncertainties  in  the  derived  loading  due  to  errors  in  the  inflow  measurements  would be larger.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           conditions.                                                              127  . Secondly. it is very difficult to model  the aerofoil data accurately in stalled conditions. Following this analysis. it is more difficult to derive the loading distributions for  inflow measurements when treating yawed conditions. The reasons for not doing so are two:  first of all larger angles of attack could easily result in stall in some radial locations on the  blades. especially when the rotor is yawed. This would generate high turbulence levels in the near wake with would otherwise  increase the error in inflow measurements themselves. For this reason.

  70.2  (page  67).2)  in  accordance  with  the  procedure  described  in  section  4.26m/s and ±0. Also the possible presence of significant tunnel blockage could only add to  the uncertainty in the data.e.  In  the  calculations  using  HAWT_LFIM.1.20)  were  used  in  conjunction  with  the  unsteady  aerofoil  model  (described  in  section  4. This is equivalent to about ±8% of the azimuthally  averaged  value  of  wa.  The  calculations  were  performed  for  three  128  .2.  However.  In  section  4.3.     A. they were found to be negligible.  (see  Figs.    Uncertainty Analysis in Yawed Conditions    For yawed conditions.c  at  the  rotorplane  estimated  directly  from  the  hot‐film  measurements  by  linear  interpolation. The standard deviation was taken as a measure of the uncertainty due to  measurement errors.  The  parameters  were  computed  for  different  azimuth  positions  (at  150  increments) over one whole revolution of the rotor. The wind tunnel inflow values for  wa.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4. 50. 60. Tunnel blockage effects were however assessed and.3. respectively.5 has shown that the uncertainty in the derived blade  loading  is  very  sensitive  to  the  uncertainty  in  the  inflow  measurements  used. Uncertainty Analysis    The first‐order analysis of section 4.  4. in the range of 6‐10%.    For the calculations with HAWT_LFIM.6 Results and Discussion    This  section  presents  the  results  for  aerodynamic  flow  parameters  and  blade  loads  that  were derived for the TUDelft rotor using HAWT_LFIM.g.c was  assumed at  Ψ=300 and 450.  it  was  necessary  to  introduce  a  more  elaborate  uncertainty  analysis  to  be  able  to  quantify  the  resulting  errors  in  each  derived  parameter  (e.  the  sources  of  error  in  the  hot‐film  measurements  were  outlined  and  the  uncertainty  in  these  measurements  was  estimated  to  be  in  the  order of  6‐10%  for  Ψ=00.2. the uncertainty analysis is much more difficult to accomplish than in  axial  conditions  because  the  parameters  are  known  to  be  a  function  of  φ.c.  the  derived  angle  of  attack  or  aerodynamic  thrust  loading)  due  to  errors  in  the  measured data.21m/s in wa. an uncertainty analysis was carried out by deriving the parameters at  the different blade azimuth angles over one whole revolution (at 150 increments) taking into  account  the  deviations  in  wa. as it will be  explained later on.  as  already remarked in section 4. an uncertainty of ±0. it is reasonable to assume that the uncertainty  in wa.  The  mean  value  and  standard  deviation  of  each  parameter  across the whole revolution were then estimated for the different radial locations (40.18(a). i. 80 and 90%R).  4.    Uncertainty Analysis in Axial Conditions    For axial conditions.c  at  each  radial  location.3.19  and  4.3.c for yawed conditions would be equal to that in Ψ=00.2 (page 68).

7 0. Ψ=00).  the  standard deviation was found to be negligible due to the fact that for this study rΩ>>U at all  radial locations.51 – Distribution of angle of attack (U=5.  This  provides  evidence  that  the  flow  over  the  blades  is  fully  attached.     The angle of attack values of Fig.8 0.  4.1 Derivation of spanwise distributions of angle of attack.26m/s and 0. The mean values obtained over one whole revolution are  plotted together with error bars denoting the corresponding ±one standard deviation from  the mean.000). 4.51  illustrates  the  angle  of  attack  (α)  distribution  obtained  for  axial  conditions  using  Eqt. 50. 60. the angle of attack was almost constant with blade    9 8 7 6 5 α (deg) 4 3 2 1 0 0.  4.      B.  129  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           different sets of wa.c value increased by 0.21m/s at  Ψ=300 and 450  .19 and 4.e. 80 and 90%R.    B.c shown in Figs. 4. 4.2. The mean angle of attack  is  small  at  each  radial  location  and  is  much  smaller  that  the  stalling  angle  for  the  NACA  0012  aerofoil  (which  is  equal  to  110  at  a  Reynolds  number  of  150.  (2) same as (1) but with each wa.5 0.11 computed at radial locations 40.4 0.  respectively.  The  corresponding  flow  relative  velocity  (Vr)  distribution  computed  using  Eqt.5m/s.12  is  shown  in  Fig.  (3)  same  as  (1)  but  with  each  wa. HAWT_LFIM Results for Axial Conditions    This section presents the results that were obtained for the blade aerodynamic parameters  in axial conditions (i.9 1 r/R                   Figure 4.    For  Vr. respectively. For axial conditions. Ω=700rpm.51 were used in the unsteady aerofoil model presented  in section 4.3 0.6 0.20.  4. 70. flow relative velocity and  bound circulation    Fig.26m/s  and  0.c at the rotorplane: (1) with the values of wa.c  value  decreased  by  0.21m/s  at  Ψ=300 and 450 .52. θtip=20).3.

 Ω=700rpm.c estimated  at  the  rotorplane  using  linear  interpolation  of  those  at  Ya=‐6cm  and  at  Ya=3.  70.6 0.53  –  Distribution  of  bound  circulation  distribution  estimated  using  2D  lift  coefficient  (U=5.4 2 0.5 0.5 cm 0.7 0.  the  same  calculations  were  also  performed  using  the  measured  wa.53 where  they are referred by curve ‘Ya=0 cm’. θtip=20).7 0.  To  investigate  the  sensitivity  of  ΓB.2D  due  to  changes  in  wa.    0.5m/s.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           azimuth angle.  50.c  values  at  Ya=3.6 0.1 0 0. the slight fluctuations mainly being due to the non‐uniformity in the tunnel  exit  jet.13.5m/s. these results were calculated using the values for wa.9 1 r/R   Figure  4.5cm.3 0.5cm’. Considerable differences     45 40 35 30 25 Vr (m/s) 20 15 10 5 0 0.  The  lift  coefficient  could  be  approximated  to  the  incompressible  equation  for  attached  flow:  Cl=2πα.2 Ya=3. These results are plotted in Fig.5 0. 4. 4.  The  resulting  ΓB.c.5cm. 130  .6 0.52 – Distribution of flow velocity relative to moving blades (U=5.     As already outlined before.53 where they are referred to by ‘Ya=3.  60.5 ΓΒ.2D  values  are  also  included in Fig.2D (m /s) 0. Ω=700rpm. θtip=20). 4.4 0.9 1 r/R  Figure 4.7 0.8 0.3 Ya=0 cm 0.4 0.3 0.8 0.  The  bound  circulations  at  40.  80  and  90%R  were  then  found from the Kutta‐Joukowski law Eqt.

 as it will be explained later on in section B.c.2D resulting from  the use of wa. The calculations were carried out for three  131  .18(a) in Eqt.2.c) at Ya=3.3).  4.c  in Figs.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           were  found. 70.c values at Ya=3. 4.  [40]  when  deriving  lift  and  drag  coefficients  from  detailed  CFD  computations  and  by  Tangler  [90]  when deriving aerofoil data from pressure measurements on a rotating turbine blade using  a vortex model. a trial‐and‐error approach was used in conjunction with the prescribed‐wake  vortex  model  HAWT_PVC  described  in  section  4.  This  phenomenon  has  been  observed  by  Johansen  et  al.  the  axial  induced  velocity at the blades (ua.c).    B.19(a)).  In  this  method. This was justified since. 80  and  90%R.  especially  towards  the  outboard  sections. This is because these two locations are very close to  the blade tip and root and the highly 3D nature of the flow here will cause the lift coefficient  to  be  less  than  2πα . The same was observed in this project when analyzing the NREL Phase VI  rotor (refer to Chapter 6. For the operating condition being tested.w2  and  p  were  obtained  from  the  smoke  visualization experiments (refer to section 4.  Parameters  Rt.e. The vortex model parameters were  set  as  shown  in  table  4. but due to the angle of attack that is sensitive to changes in  wa. two different methods were used:      In  method  1.  The  derived  bound  circulation  at  locations  40%  and  90%R  was  found  to  be  rather  unrealistically  high  (see  Fig. 50.5cm instead of those estimated for Ya=0cm is not mainly due to  changes in Vr (since rΩ>>wa. 60.  The  bound  circulation  at  30%  and  100%R  was  set  to  zero.5cm was initially found by assuming that the free‐stream  velocity was equal to the ideal free‐windspeed of 5.2 Extrapolated Bound Circulation Distribution Corrected for Tip and Root Loss    A major difficulty encountered was to derive an extrapolated bound circulation distribution  across the whole blade span (from 30% to 100%R) from the point values at 40.c  at  Ya=3. 6.4.  even  though  the  angle  of  attack  was  derived  directly from the inflow measurements.  Rt. Fig.  Then.3.5 m/s (i.  a  large  number  of  different  spanwise  distributions  for  bound  circulations  were  assumed  and  each  was  prescribed  to  HAWT_PVC  to  calculate  the  spanwise  distributions  ua.  Using  a  trial‐and‐error algorithm embedded in the code.     To  derive  an  extrapolated  bound  circulation  distribution  that  accounts  for  tip/root  loss  (ΓB.3. the prescribed vortex model HAWT_PVC  determined the bound circulation that yielded an induced velocity variation that is closest  to that derived directly from measurements at Ya=3.     In method 2.  blockage  effects  for  axial  conditions  were  found  to  be  small.  This  indicates  the  importance  of  estimating  the  inflow  at  the  rotorplane  using  both  upstream  and  downstream  measurements. using results for wa.3.5cm.  the  estimated  values  of  the  bound  circulation  at  40%  and  90%R  were  discarded  and  a  cubic  variation  of  bound  circulation  was  prescribed  between  30%  and  40%R  and  between  80%  and  100%R.3D).  4.57).5cm.53). the change in  ΓB.  A  spline  interpolation  was  then  applied  to  obtain  a  continuous  bound  circulation  distribution across the whole blade using the technique described in Appendix D.w1.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           different  values  of  n:  n=15.3D   obtained  using  the  two  methods.w1  0.37  ReleaseTip  0.3D  obtained  for  the  three  different  values  of  n  are  shown.55 that the results  from methods 1 and  2  agree  very  well.  4.99  ReleaseRoot  0.6398  Rt.4: Parameters used for determining the bound circulation using HAWT_PVC for Ψ=00.  4.668  p  0.w2  0. (n = 21). The induced velocities at Ya=0.             Table 4.305  δ 0.035cm for such distributions using  HAWT_PVC  are  shown  in  Fig. It is observed in Fig.  For  method  2.  These  agree  very  well  with  those  obtained  for  the  measurements using Eqt.    nwRev  10  τtot  36  ∆φ 100  Rt.  In  fact.  4.  the  distributions  for  ΓB. Fig.  132  .  The  modelled  helical  wake  geometry  used  for  the  vortex  model  is  depicted  in  Fig.54 – Wake geometry for determining bound circulation distribution at blades using  prescribed vortex model (HAWT_PVC) in method 2.57.5mm                                    Figure 4.  thus  providing  confidence  in  the  derived  bound  circulation  along  the  blades.  21  and  31.  no  knowledge  of  aerofoil  data  for  the  lift  coefficient is used.56.  It  should  be  noted  that  in  method  2.  the  difference  between  the  resulting  distributions is negligible. 4. 4.54.55  shows  the  derived  distributions  for  ΓB.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.6 0.6 0. 4. n = 21 Method 2.55 – Derived bound circulation distributions using methods 1 and 2.0 -1.5cm computed using method 2  with that derived from experimental measurements (‘Exp’) using Eqt.5 ΓB.4 0. n = 21 Method 2.0 Method 2.3 0.8 0.6 0.57.7 0.8 0.9 1 -0.7 0.5 0.5 0.1 Method 2.56 – Comparison of induced velocities at blades at Ya = 3.c (m/s) -1.5 Exp -2.4 0.      0.5 r/R Figure 4.3 0.7 0. n = 31 0 0. n = 31 -2. n = 15 0.9 1 r/R             Figure 4.2 Method 1 Method 2.3D (m /s) 2 0. n = 15 Method 2.5 ua.5 0.0 0.3 0. The error bars in plot  ‘Exp’ denote the ±one standard deviations due to the uncertainty in the hot‐film measurements.        133  .4 0.

 the axial induced  velocities  at  Y=3. Thus it may be argued that blockage effects are small.029 at r/R= 0.  This  provides  evidence  that  tunnel  blockage  due  to  rotor  proximity to the tunnel exit can be neglected.58(a)  and  (b). the mean bound circulation derived using method 1 (refer to section B. These values for ke are  very  small  and  are  only  on  the  order  of  magnitude  of  the  standard  deviations  caused  by  tunnel  jet  non‐uniformity. HAWT_PVC calculated the axial induced velocities in line with the blades but  at  the  tunnel  exit  (i.c’ at Y=3.5  m/s  (i.    It  can  be  observed  that  the  induced  velocity  at  the  tunnel  exit  is  very small. 4.48).3 Assessment of the Effects of Tunnel Blockage in Axial Conditions    To assess for blockage the two procedures described in section 4. Note that since  we  are  dealing  with  axial  conditions.2) was  prescribed to vortex model HAWT_PVC together with the parameters of table 4. 4.  HAWT_PVC then calculated the induced velocity ua.  4.  the  calculations  were  carried  out  at  only  one  rotor  azimuth  angle  (at φ=00).3. one should keep  in  mind  that  in  the  blockage  assessment.     In procedure 1.  In both cases.e. The highest value for ke being predicted by HAWT_PVC is only 0. 4.  4.  using  results  for  wa. The results are shown  in  Figs.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           B.3  (i.65.e. Fig.  Actually  these  are  the  same  values  as  those  of  Fig.56  (referred  by  ‘Exp’).  it  is  being  assumed  that  the  vortex  model  HAWT_PVC is suitably accurate in calculating the induction for a given bound circulation.4.c  at  Y=‐1m)  and  the  factor  ke  were  evaluated  at  all  radial  locations (using Eqt.57).48 were applied.    134  . The results are presented in Figs. 4.9% of Ujet).5cm  were  initially  found  by  assuming  that  the  free‐stream  velocity  was  equal  to  the  ideal  free‐windspeed  of  5.  4.  The  induced  velocities  derived  using  the  two  different  methods  agree  very  well  and  this  implies  that  it  is  justified  to  assume  that  Ujet  =  U  when  applying  Eqt.64).e. Fig.c  of  Fig.5cm resulting from the bound  circulation  estimated  using  method  1.4.  The  two  induced  velocities  were  compared  and  the  percentage discrepancy (εa) was found in accordance with Eqt.57.3. 4. ke decreases continuously to 0.57(a) and (b).4. 2.     To assess for tunnel blockage using procedure 2 (see section 4.  finding  ua.  4. However.18  in  Eqt. 4.022 at the blade tip.

7 0.02 ke 0.3 0.4 0.005 0 0.9 1 -0.16 -0.3 0.02 -0.9 1 r/R                 Figure 4.015 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0.        135  .14 -0.5 0.18 r/R Figure 4.     0.57(a) – Spanwise variation of ua.025 0.04 ua.6 0.c (m/s) (at Y = -1m) -0.5 0.035 0.08 -0.8 0.57(b) – Spanwise variation of ke calculated using HAWT_PVC (n=21).6 0.7 0.01 0.4 0.06 -0.8 0.1 -0.12 -0.c calculated at the tunnel exit using HAWT_PVC (n=21).03 0.

c (m/s) (at Y=3. 4.9 1 -5 -10 -15 r/R             Figure 4.58(b) – Spanwise variation of percentage discrepancy calculated using Eqt.7 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.4 0. n = 21 HAWT_PVC.    15 10 5 εa (%) 0 0.7 0.5 Exp -2.5cm) -0.3 0.6 0.8 0.0 HAWT_PVC.9 1 ua.8 0.5 0.58(a)  –  Comparison  of  axial  induced  velocities  at  3.5 0. n = 31 -2.4 0.5cm  downstream  of  rotorplane  calculated using measurements and assuming Ujet=U with those calculated from HAWT_PVC.5 0.5 r/R   Figure  4.0 -1.             136  .3 0. n = 15 HAWT_PVC.6 0.5 -1.0 0.65.

5m/s).  137  .  4.c and a1) were then be found by dividing  the  interpolated  induced  velocities  at  the  rotorplane  by  5.57.    It  can  be  observed  from  Figs.c and ua at the different measuring planes are shown in Figs.  the  azimuthally averaged axial flow velocity at a given radial location and rotor azimuth angle  could be found from:  j = jtot 1 ( wa .  4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           B. 6 and  9cm)  could  be  found  using  the  measured  values  of  wa.aver )i .61  that  the  standard  deviations  in  a1  are  smaller  than  those  in  a1.60(a)  and  (b).  This  is  a  result  of  the  fact  that  averaging  tends  to  damp  out  any  fluctuations in velocity that tend to occur locally.18(a)  and  Eqt. 3.j))  and  rotor  azimuth  angle  (denoted  by  index  τ)  (refer  to  section  4.81)    The azimuthally averaged axial induced velocities could then be found from                                                                    ua = wa .82)    The results for ua.  4.5.2.  then  U  can  be  taken  to  be  equal  to  Ujet  (5.  The  bars  indicated  the  +/‐one  standard  deviations  in  the  data  across  one whole revolution.c at each measuring plane (Ya=‐6. j (4.  page  58).5m/s.  The  results  are  shown  in  Figs.c.e. The axial induction distributions for ua.aver − U                                                          (4.4 Axial Induction Factor Distributions    Since  the  blockage  effects  were  found  to  be  small.i .τ = jtot ∑ ( w )τ j =0 a .  The  azimuthally  averaged  induced  velocities  (i. 4.  4.60  and  4.2.c  in  Fig.  the  average  axial  induced  velocity  over  an  annulus)  at  each  radial  location  for  a  given  rotor  azimuth  angle  could  be  computed  as  follows: By  knowing  the  axial  flow  velocity  wa  at each  probe  position  (denoted  by  indices  (i.59(a) and  (b). The axial induction factors at the rotorplane (a1.

1 9cm DwnStream -2.2 -1.59 (a) – Spanwise variation of axial induced velocity at blade lifting line.3 0.3 0.7 r/R                 Figure 4.4 0.0 0.8 6cm DwnStream -2.0 0.4 RotorPlane (Interpolated) -2.3 0.7 0.7 0.7 r/R                Figure 4.9 1 -0.59 (b) – Spanwise variation of azimuthally averaged axial induced velocity at rotorplane.9 ua (m/s) -1.5 6cm UpStream 3.5cm DwnStream -1.6 0.6 0.  0.4 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.c (m/s) -1.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.9 ua.9 1 -0.3 -0.6 -0.2 -1.5 6cm UpStream 3.3 0.8 6cm DwnStream -2.    138  .5cm DwnStream -1.5 0.4 RotorPlane (Interpolated) -2.3 -0.1 9cm DwnStream -2.6 -0.

25 -0.10 -0.35 r/R                    Figure 4.15 a1 -0.30 -0.5 0.8 0.  139  .  0.20 -0.c -0.9 1 -0.9 1 -0.3 0.15 a1.7 0.35 r/R       Figure 4.05 -0.3 0.60 – Spanwise variation of axial induction factor at blade lifting line.00 0.6 0.4 0.00 0.20 -0.6 0.25 -0.5 0.30 -0.10 -0.8 0.05 -0.7 0.61 – Spanwise variation of azimuthally averaged axial induction factor at rotorplane.4 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.

6 0. 4.62 and  4.  In  Figs. 60. 4.  the  error  bars  denote  the  ±one  standard  deviations  resulting  from  the  uncertainties  in  the  inflow  measurements.5 Cl. The drag coefficient was found from the 2D data for the NACA  0012  aerofoil. 70. Re‐call from  section  4. 4. page 131).  however  using  Eqts.5 Blade Load Distributions    Using the distribution for ΓB. The results are shown in Figs.  3.c) were equal to 7.8 0.2  (page  68)  that  the  uncertainty  in  wa.  The  drag  coefficient  was  not  corrected  for  tip/root  loss. 50.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           B.3D) was calculated from Eqt.6%. 80 and 90%R.4 0. 60. since the drag coefficient was very small. the lift  coefficient corrected for tip/root loss (Cl.3 0.16  and the lift/drag coefficients of Figs.2 0.62 and 4. 50.  The  results  are  displayed  in  Figs.  140  .  4.  It  was  found  that  the  maximum  errors  in  dT3D  and  dQ3D  due  to  the  uncertainties in the inflow measurements (wa.2.3D 0.  Each rotor blade was discretized into 22  equally‐spaced elements.20  (refer  to  Figs.  The  blade  thrust  and  torque  loading  distributions  (dT3D  and  dQ3D)  were  estimated  using  a  similar  method.3. The loading values at the blade tip and root were set to zero and a  spline interpolation (as in Appendix D) was applied to estimate the loading values at each  of  the  22  blade  sections.7 0. 3.c  was  found  to  be  in  the  range  6‐10%  at  Ψ=00.64  and  4.5  that  ε Q > ε T .5 0. 70.  4.1 0 0.    0. However the error in dQ3D is higher  than  that  for  dT3D  and  this  consolidates  what  was  found  earlier  in  section  4.62  –  4.8 0.67).9 1 r/R                                 Figure 4.62 – Distribution of lift coefficient (corrected for tip/root loss).14 at radial locations  40.3D calculated using method 1 (see section B.4% and 13.7 0.3 0.65.63.4 0. It can therefore be concluded that the error in dT3D remained in the same order of that  of the inflow measurements from which it was derived.66  and  4.2. 80 and 90%R were found using the blade‐element theory equations Eqts. Using HAWT_LFIM.67.  4. the blade chordwise and normal loading values (dAη and dAζ) at  40.  The  error  incurred  was small.63.6 0.

4 0.025 0.9 1 r/R              Figure 4.7 0.2 0 0.015 CD.8 0.7 0.01 0.64 – Distribution of chordwise aerodynamic loading.4 0.2 1 dAη (N/m) 0.6 0.4 1.3 0.9 1 r/R                                    Figure 4.5 0.005 0 0.3 0.4 0.6 1.2D 0.02 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.63 – Distribution of drag coefficient (not corrected for tip/root loss).    1.6 0.8 0.5 0.6 0.  141  .8 0.

8 0.3 0.    142  .6 0.3 0.65 – Distribution of normal aerodynamic loading.8 0.5 0.      30 25 20 dT3D (N/m) 15 10 5 0 0.5 0.6 0.66 – Distribution of axial thrust aerodynamic loading.9 1 r/R               Figure 4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           30 25 20 dAζ (N/m) 15 10 5 0 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.9 1 r/R    Figure 4.7 0.

  4.  refer  to  section  B.67 – Distribution of torque aerodynamic loading.2)  may  underestimate the thrust loading a tip and root region. thus resulting in a lower value for  CT. The percentage discrepancy is mainly due  to  various  sources  of  error  associated  with  the  hot‐film  measurements.      Measured using  Derived from Inflow  Percentage  Strain Gauges  Measurements  Discrepancy  CP  0.26).7 0.2.8 dQ3D (Nm/m) 0. 4. The tip/root correction applied using  the  cubic  extrapolation  and  using  HAWT_PVC  (methods  1  and  2.6 0.    B.  Another  source  of  error is the uncertainty in the tip/loss correction used.5 0.5: Comparison of axial thrust and power coefficients derived by HAWT_LFIM using hot‐film  near wake measurements with those measured using strain gauge techniques.25  143  .67  ‐16.4 0.    Table 4.  One  should  also  remark  that  the  lifting  line  model  used  in  HAWT_LFIM  and  HAWT_PVC is a 2D flow model and is rather limited in representing the 3D effects at the  rectangular blade tip and root regions.  4.64 and 4.6 Comparison of Rotor Power and Axial Thrust Coefficients    HAWT_LFIM integrated the loading distributions of Figs.3  and  4.  The  comparison is  shown  in  table  4.5.2 1 0.37  15.9 1 r/R                                        Figure 4. Ideally the two readings should be the same.2 0 0.3 0.6 0.625  CT  0.4 0.32  0.8 0.8  0. These were compared with those measured during the wind tunnel experiments by  means  of  strain  gauges  (refer  to  Figs.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           1.65 using the procedure  of Appendix B to determine the axial thrust and power coefficients for the rotor for λ=8 and  θtip=20.

c.11 for yaw angles 300 and 450.    144  .2.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           C.  at  these  yawed  conditions the flow over the blades is fully attached. As in axial conditions.c  at  Ψ=300  and  450.  The  highest  rates  of  change  of  angle  of  attack  are  observed  at  the  inboard  blade  sections  and  consequently higher local unsteady aerodynamic effects are experienced here.12. 4.19  and  4.    From the angle of attack variations of Figs.  A discontinuity  in  the  variation  of  α  with  φ  is  observed  between  3300<φ<3600  and  00<φ<300  at  almost  all  radial  locations. 4. The uncertainty in α resulting from the  assumed errors in wa.71.c is in the range of ±0.  page  67  (see  Figs.4 to ±0. bound circulation and  aerodynamic  loading).  C. These errors are approximately equivalent to ±8% of the azimuthally averaged  values of wa.  flow  relative  velocity  and  bound circulation  Figs.  This  results  from  the  discontinuity  observed  in  the  inflow  measurements  which  was  already  mentioned  earlier  in  section  4.  4.40 at r/R = 0.80 at r/R = 0.c. This is slightly less than the 2D  stalling angle for the NACA0012  aerofoil  which  is  about  110  at  a  Reynolds  number  of  150.4 and  Ψ =300. The variations are periodic and  the  inboard  blade  sections  experience  the  highest  variations  of  both  the  mean  and  cyclic  components of the angle of attack.20).  Consequently  this  discontinuity  has  resulted  in  a  discontinuity  of  the  other  parameters  derived from the inflow measurements (e. The maximum angle of attack is about 100 and occurs at  φ=00.72  and  4. 4.  4.26m/s  and  ±0.1  Derivation  of  spanwise  distributions  of  angle  of  attack. 4.70  and  4. It could also be the case that the influences from the centrebody structure  contribute to such a behaviour.2. the uncertainty in this parameter  due to errors in the measured flow velocities (wa.  Thus.000.  as  will  be  noted  later  on.c) is very small because rΩ >>wa. it was possible to calculate the rate  of  change  of  the  local  angle  of  attack  ( α& )  with  time  as  a  function  of  φ  using  the  inverse  Adam‐Bashfort method described in section 4.  The  error  bars  in  the  plotted  results  denote  the  uncertainty  bounds  resulting  from  the  estimated  errors  of  ±0.  Since in yaw the parameters are  unsteady.21m/s  in  wa.69 show the variations of the local angle of attack (α) with blade azimuth  angle (φ) derived using Eqt.  α& is  negative  for  00<φ<1800  and  positive  for  1800<φ<3600. r/R=0.    Figs.  4. The results are plotted in Figs.  As  already  described.g.  respectively. lift and drag coefficients.9.69.2 (page 95). the results are plotted as a function of blade or rotor azimuth angle (φ) over one  whole  revolution.68 and 4.  In  general.3. HAWT_LFIM Results for Yawed Conditions  This section presents the results that were obtained for the blade aerodynamic parameters  in yawed conditions (Ψ=300 and 450) using HAWT_LFIM.68 and 4.73  show  the  variations  of  the  local  flow  relative  velocities  (Vr)  with  blade  azimuth angle (φ) using Eqt.  this  behaviour  between 3300<φ<3600 and 00<φ<300  is mainly due to the non‐uniformity in the tunnel exit jet  and possibly also from influences from the complex circulation in skewed flow caused by  the yawed rotor.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

  12 5

  10 r/R = 0.4
r/R = 0.7
4
 
8
  3

α (deg)

α (deg)
  6
2
  4
  1
2
 
  0 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )

 
 
8 5
 
7 r/R = 0.5
  4
6
 
5
3
 

α (deg)
α (deg)

4
  2
3
  r/R = 0.8
2
1
 
1
  0
0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
  6 5

  5 r/R = 0.6

4
 
4
  3
α (deg)

α (deg)

  3
  2 2
r/R = 0.9
 
1
1
 
  0 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )

 
                         Figure 4.68 ‐ Variation of angle of attack with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=300.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

145 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

  9 4

8
  r/R = 0.4
3.5
r/R = 0.7
7
  3
6
2.5
  5
α (deg)

α (deg)
2
  4
1.5
  3
1
  2
0.5
  1

  0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
 
7 3.5
 
6 r/R = 0.5
3
 
 5 2.5

 
α (deg)

4 2

α (deg)
 3 1.5

 2 1
r/R = 0.8
 1 0.5
 
0 0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
 4.5 3.5

  4 r/R = 0.6
3
3.5
 
3 2.5
 
α (deg)

2.5 2
α (deg)

  2
1.5
 1.5 r/R = 0.9
1
  1
 0.5 0.5

0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  φ ( deg )
φ ( deg )
 
                         Figure 4.69 ‐ Variation of angle of attack with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=450. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

146 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

  200 200

  150 150
r/R = 0.7
  100 100

  50 50

αdot deg/s
(deg/s)

(deg/s)
αdotdeg/s
  0 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  -50 -50

  -100 -100

  -150 r/R = 0.4
-150

  -200 -200
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
  200 200

  150 150
  100 100
r/R = 0.8

  50
50
αdot deg/s
(deg/s)

(deg/s)
 

αdotdeg/s
0 0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
-50 -50
 
-100 -100
  r/R = 0.5
-150 -150
 
-200 -200
  φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
200 200
 
150 150 r/R = 0.9
 
100 100
 
  50 50
(deg/s)

(deg/s)
αdotdeg/s
αdotdeg/s

  0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  -50 -50

  -100 -100
r/R = 0.6
  -150 -150

  -200 -200
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
    Figure 4.70 ‐ Variation of time rate of change of angle of attack with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=300. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

147 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

  200
200
  150

  100 100

  50

(deg/s)

(deg/s)
αdotdeg/s

αdotdeg/s
  0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  -100 -50
  r/R = 0.4 -100
r/R = 0.7
  -200
-150
 
-300 -200
  φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )

 
 
200 200
 
150 150
 
100
  100

  50 50
(deg/s)

(deg/s)
αdotdeg/s

αdotdeg/s
  0 0
0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  -50 -50

  -100 r/R = 0.5 -100
r/R = 0.8
  -150 -150

  -200 -200
φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
 
  200 200

  150 150
  100 100
  50
50
(deg/s)

 
(deg/s)
αdotdeg/s

αdotdeg/s

0 0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
-50 -50
 
-100 r/R = 0.6 -100 r/R = 0.9
 
-150 -150
 
-200
  -200 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )
 
    Figure 4.71 ‐ Variation of time rate of change of angle of attack with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=450. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

148 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

  45
 
40
 
  35
 
  30
 
  25
Vr (m/s)

 
  20
 
15
  r/R = 0.4

  r/R = 0.5
10
r/R = 0.6
 
r/R = 0.7
  5
r/R = 0.8
 
r/R = 0.9
  0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  φ ( deg )
         Figure 4.72 ‐ Variation of flow relative velocity with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=300. 
 
 
  50
 
45
 
  40
 
  35
 
30
 
Vr (m/s)

  25
 
20
 
  15 r/R = 0.4
  r/R = 0.5

  10 r/R = 0.6
r/R = 0.7
 
5 r/R = 0.8
 
r/R = 0.9
  0
  0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360
  φ ( deg )
         Figure 4.73 ‐ Variation of flow relative velocity with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=450. 

149 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

Figs.  4.74  and  4.75  plot  the  resulting  spanwise  bound  circulation  distributions  (ΓB,2D)  for 
different  blade  azimuth  angles  (00,  900,  1800  and  2700)  as  derived  in  accordance  with  the 
Kutta‐Joukowski  law  (Eqt.  4.13).  The  error  bars  for  this  parameter  due  to  the  estimated 
errors in wa,c are not included in these plots for the sake of clarity. But the error in  ΓB,2D was 
found  to  be  on  the  order  of  ±0.071  and  ±0.055m2/s  at  yaw  angles  300  and  450  respectively. 
Unlike axial conditions, the bound circulation is a function of the blade azimuth angle and 
is therefore unsteady. Comparing Figs. 4.53, 4.74 and 4.75, it may be noted that the bound 
circulation  level  decreases  as  the  yaw  angle  is  increased,  but  the  unsteadiness  actually 
increases.  
 
 
 
0.7
 
    
0.6
 
 
  0.5
 
ΓB,2D (m /s)

  0.4
2

 
 
0.3
 
 
0.2
φφ == 000
 
  φφ == 90
900
  0.1 φφ == 180
1800
 
φφ == 270
270
0
  0
  0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
  r/R
 
                 Figure 4.74 ‐ Variation of bound circulation with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=300. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

150 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

 
0.5
 
  0.45
 
0.4
 
  0.35
 
  0.3
ΓB,2D (m /s)
2

 
0.25
 
  0.2
 
 
0.15 φφ == 000
  0.1 φφ == 90
900
 
0.05
φφ == 180
1800
 
  φφ == 270
2700
0
  0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
  r/R
 
                 Figure 4.75 ‐ Variation of bound circulation with blade azimuth angle at Ψ=450. 
 
 
C.2 Extrapolated Bound Circulation Distributions Corrected for Tip and Root Loss 
 
The  section  describes  how  the  extrapolated  distributions  for  the  unsteady  bound 
circulations for the whole blade span were derived from the point values at 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 
and  90%R.  Recall  that  in  axial  conditions  the  bound  circulation  values  at  40%  and  90%R 
were found to be unrealistically high (refer to section B.1, Fig. 4.53), even though the angle 
of attack was being derived from the inflow measurements. This presented a difficulty for 
deriving  a  bound  circulation distribution  across  the  whole  blade  span.  The  same  problem 
was  also  expected  to  occur  at  yaw  angles  300  and  450,  for  the  simple  reason  that  the 
unsteady  aerofoil  model  employed  to  derive  the  lift  coefficient  was  a  2D  model  and  does 
not  cater  for  blade  tip/root  3D  effects.  In  axial  conditions,  the  prescribed  vortex  model 
HAWT_PVC  could  easily  be  employed  to  derive  the  extrapolated  bound  circulation 
distributions  corrected  for  tip/root  loss  using  a  trial‐and‐error  approach  (This  approach  is 
referred  to  as  method  2  in  section  B.2).  This  was  possible  because  this  vortex  model  was 
found to be very accurate when treating axial conditions. However, when it came to yawed 
conditions, it was found that the predicted results by HAWT_PVC for ua,c did not agree very 
well  with  the  corresponding  experimental  results.  Consequently  the  trial‐and‐error 
approach  was  very  difficult  to  apply  at  both  300  and  450  yaw.  The  following  alternate 
method  was  applied  to  obtain  the  unsteady  extrapolated  bound  circulation  distributions 

151 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

that account for tip/root loss effects (ΓB,3D): the estimated values of the bound circulation at 
40% and 90%R were discarded (as they were expected to be high). The bound circulation at 
the  blade  root  and  tip  (30%  and  100%R)  was  set  to  zero.  A  spline  interpolation  was  then 
employed to obtain a continuous bound circulation across the whole blade span using the 
method described in Appendix D. The results for such distributions at 300 and 450 yaw are 
shown in Figs. 4.76 and 4.77. In these plots, the distributions of the 2D uncorrected values 
(ΓB,2D) of Figs. 4.74 and 4.75 are also included for the purpose of comparison.  The difference 
between  the  ΓB,2D  and  ΓB,3D  distributions  is  at  the  regions  between  30%R  and  50%R  and 
between  80%R  and  100%R,  where  the  tip/root  loss  correction  is  applied  together  with  the 
extrapolation. Figs. 4.78 and 4.79 show the same results for  ΓB,3D but plotted as a function of 
the blade azimuth angle. 
 
To derive an accurate tip/root loss correction for yawed conditions were no blade pressure 
measurements could be performed is not an easy task and requires a thorough modelling of 
3D flows at the blade tips such as CFD. This was beyond the scope of the project. The fact of 
not carrying out this in‐depth analysis and instead applying the simple spline extrapolation 
method  described  above  introduces  some  level  of  uncertainty  in  the  unsteady  bound 
circulation  values  at  the  blade  tip  and  root  regions.  It  should  be  kept  in  mind  that  these 
derived bound circulations were required to validate the free‐wake vortex model using the 
procedure  described  in  Figs.  2.4  and  5.10.  A  high  uncertainty  due  to  the  tip/root  loss 
correction could have been detrimental to this validation exercise. Therefore, it was vital to 
assess  the  significance  of  this  uncertainty.  To  do  so,  the  vortex  model  HAWT_PVC  was 
used.  The  uncorrected  bound  circulation  distributions  (ΓB,2D)  of  Fig.  4.74  and  4.75  were 
extrapolated using the same method described above but the circulation values at 40% and 
90%R  were  not  discarded  (i.e.  no  tip/root  loss  correction  was  applied).    The  two  different 
extrapolated circulations,  ΓB,2D  and  ΓB,3D, were then prescribed to HAWT_PVC to calculate 
the axial induced velocities at the blades (ua,c  at Ya=0). The latter were compared, as shown 
in  Figs.  4.80  and  4.81.  Table  4.6  gives  the  parameters  used  in  HAWT_PVC.  In  this  table, 
parameters  Rt,w1,  Rt,w2,  p,  and  χs  were  obtained  from  the  smoke  visualization  experiments 
(refer to section 4.2.3). The calculations were performed at different values of n (n = 11, 21 
and  31)  to  show  that  the  numerical  errors  due  to  blade  discretization  are  negligible.  Figs. 
4.82  and  4.83  illustrate  the  prescribed  skewed  wakes  modelled  by  HAWT_PVC.  The 
descrepancy  between  the  induced  velocities  resulting  from  the  two  different  circulations, 
ΓB,2D    and  ΓB,3D,  gives  a  first  order  indication  of  how  significantly  this  uncertainty  in  the 
tip/root  correction  would  influence  the  spanwise  induced  velocity  distribution  along  the 
blades.  Figs.  4.80  and  4.81  show  that  this  uncertainty  mainly  influences  only  induced 
velocities  at  the  blade  tip  and  root  region.  The  region  between  50%  and  80%R  experience 
only a minor influence. 
 
 
 

152 

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                          

0.7

0.6

ΓB,2D and ΓB,3D (m /s)
2 0.5

0.4 ΓB,2D, φ f==000
GB,2D
ΓB,2D, φ f==90
GB,2D 900

0.3 ΓB,2D, φ f==180
GB,2D 1800

ΓB,2D, φ=
GB,2D f =270
2700

0.2 ΓB,3D, φ f==00
GB,3D 0

ΓB,3D, φ f==90
GB,3D 900

0.1
ΓB,3D, φ f==180
GB,3D 1800

ΓB,3D, φ=
GB,3D f =270
2700
0
0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
r/R
Figure 4.76 ‐ Comparison of extrapolated bound circulation distributions corrected for tip/root loss 
(ΓB,3D) with uncorrected distributions (ΓB,2D) at Ψ=300.  
 
0.7

0.6

0.5
ΓB,2D and ΓB,3D (m /s)

ΓB,2D, φ f==000
GB,2D
2

0.4 ΓB,2D, φ f==90
GB,2D 90
0

ΓB,2D, φ f==180
GB,2D 180
0

0.3
ΓB,2D, φ=f =
GB,2D 270
270 0

0.2 ΓB,3D, φ f==00
GB,3D 0

ΓB,3D, φ f==90
GB,3D 0
90
0.1 ΓB,3D, φ f==180
GB,3D 1800

ΓB,3D, φ=f =
GB,3D 270 0
270
0
0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
r/R
 
Figure 4.77 ‐ Comparison of extrapolated bound circulation distributions corrected for tip/root loss 
(ΓB,3D) with uncorrected distributions (ΓB,2D) at Ψ=450.  

153 

5 0.5 0.6   0.3 2 2 0.9   0.05 0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.3 0.3 ΓΒ.1 r/R = 0.4   2 2 0.3 ΓΒ.25   0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.78 ‐ Variation of the extrapolated bound circulation (corrected for tip/root loss) with blade  azimuth angle at Ψ=300.7 0.15   r/R = 0.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.4 0.45 0.4 0.45   0.1   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.4   0.3D (m /s) 0.1 r/R = 0.7   0.1 r/R = 0.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.35 0.2   0.3   0.6 0.35   0.5 0.1 r/R = 0.15 0.5   0.5   0.2 r/R = 0.3   0.2 0.                  154  .4 0.2 0.25 0.3D (m /s) 2 2 0.6 0.5   0.6   0.6 0.2   0.05   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )   Figure 4.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.5   0.2   0.4 ΓΒ.8   0.1 0.3D (m /s)   0.4   0.

5   0.35 0.3   0.1 r/R = 0.35 0.9   r/R = 0.2   0.05 0.45 0.05 r/R = 0.2 2 2 0.35 0.1 0.15 0.15 r/R = 0.1 0.4 0.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.7   0.3 0.4 0.                155  .4   0.25 ΓΒ.05   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.1 r/R = 0.2 0.3   0.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.3D (m /s)   0.35   0.1 0.3D (m /s)   0.05   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )   Figure 4.4 0.4 0.79 ‐ Variation of the extrapolated bound circulation (corrected for tip/root loss) with blade  azimuth angle at Ψ=450.25 2 2 0.3D (m /s) ΓΒ.3 0.35 0.15 0.2 0.5 0.05   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.4   0.45   0.45 r/R = 0.6 0.15 0.25   0.25 2 2 0.2   0.15   0.35   0.45 0.25   0.1 0.2   0.3 0.05 0.25 ΓΒ.3D (m /s) 0.5   0.8   0.4 0.15   0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             0.3 ΓΒ.

6 -0.8 r/R -1. (a): φ = 00 Fig.4 0.2D n = 31 B.2D B.2D n = 21Γ n = 21 GB.8 -0.3D Γ n = 21 B.3D n = 31 Γ n = 11 GB.2D Γ n = 21 GB.3D B.2D n = 21 Γ GB.9 1   -0.c -0.4 ua.3D n = 31Γ n = 31   0.3D n = 31   0.2 GB.3D B.4 -1.6 -2 -2.2D n = 11B.3D B.8   r/R r/R   Fig.3D B.2D Γ n = 31 n = 31 GB.3D n = 11 GB.2D n = 31 ΓB.8 0.2D n = 31 Γ Γ Γ Γ Γ Γ   0.2D B.3D 0.4 0.2D Γ n = 11 GB.6 0.2D 11 Γ GB.2D n = 11 GB.2 -1.2   -1.4   0 ua.3D n = 31 n = 31 GB.3 0.4 0.2D B.6 B.6 -1.8   -1 -0.5 ua.5 0.7 0.3D B.6 B.2D B.2D n = 31Γ n = 31 Γ n = 11 GB.3D B.80 ‐ Spanwise distributions of axial induced velocity at blades as predicted by HAWT_PVC      Γ n = 11 GB.81 ‐ Spanwise distributions of axial induced velocity at blades as predicted by HAWT_PVC  156  .2 -1.2D n = 11 GB.3D n = 21 n = 21 GB.2D B.8 0.7 0.4 0   -0.2D n = 11 B.6 -0.2D Γ n = 11 n = 11 GB.9 1   -0.c ua. (d): φ = 2700  Figure 4.4 -0.2 -0.2D Γ n = 21 n = 21 GB.3 0. (d): φ = 2700  Figure 4.2D Γ n = 21 Γ n = 31 GB.4 0.3D 0.3D n = 31 n = 31   0 0.8 0.2D B.9 1   -0.5 0.9 1   -0.6 -0.2 -1.2D n = 31 B.3 0. (a): φ = 00 Fig.2D n = 11 n = 11 GB.6 0.2D GB.3D n = 11 GB.3D Γ n = 21 n = 21 GB.7 0.2D B.3D n = 11 GB.7 0.3D n = 11 0.3D n = 21 n = 21 GB.6 0.5 -1.3D n = 11 1 n = 11GB.9 1 0.8 0.4 B.2 0.4 -1.2D Γ n = 11 GB.8 0.8   -1 -1   -1.4 0.4 0.6 -0.2 0   -0.2 0.4   -1.4 ua.7 0.2 0.9 1   -0.2D Γ n = 11 GB.2D Γ n = 31 GB.3D n = 11 GB.3D n = 21 GB.c ua.c ua.3D   0.5 0.2Dn == 21 21 ΓGB.3D B.6 0.3D B.3D B.6 0.6 n = 11 GB. (c): φ = 180 0 Fig.3 0.5 0.2 0.8   -1 -1   -1.5 0.4   0.4 0 0.6 0.2 0.3D B.2D n = 21 B.4 0.4 0.5   -1.8 0.3D n = 11 B.2   -0.4 0.2D B.2 GB.7 0.6 -1.3D B.2 0.3D B.3D Γ n = 31 B.3 0.3 0.2D B.3D Γ n = 31 B.5 0.8 r/R r/R   Fig.4 -0.2D n = 21 B.3D n = 21Γ n = 21 GB.2D n = 11 B.4 -1.4   -1.2D Γ n = 21 GB.8 0.2D n = 21 B.5 0.3D n = 11 B.9 1 0.3D Γ n = 31 n = 31 GB.6 -0.3D n = 31 n = 31 GB.2Dnn == 21 21 ΓGB.2D n = 21 Γ n = 31 GB.c -0.4 0 -0.2D 11 Γ GB.2D n = 11 B.2 -1   -0.6 r/R   Fig.3D n = 31 n = 31   0 0.3D Γ n = 11 B.c ua.2D B.2D n = 31Γ n = 31 Γ Γ Γ Γ Γ Γ   0.8 0.c -0. (b): φ = 900   Γ GB.7 0.2 -1 -1.2 0. (c): φ = 180 0 Fig.8   -1.6 0.7 0.5 -0. (b): φ = 900     Γ n = 11 GB.4   -0.2   -1.3D n = 11 GB.c -0.9 1 0 -0.8 -0.6 0.3D B.3D n = 21 Γ n = 21 GB.2D B.6 0.6 -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           ΓB.3 0.3D B.3D B.3D n = 11 GB.3D n = 21 n = 21 GB.3D n = 21 n = 21 GB.2D n = 31 B.4   r/R r/R Fig.2D n = 31 GB.5 0.2 0.3 0.2D n = 31 B.

99  0.w1  0.5mm                                                                Figure 4.32  0. n=21.82 ‐ Prescribed helical wake as modelled by HAWT_PVC at Ψ=300.61  0.99  ReleaseRoot  0.5mm  0.      Ψ = 300  Ψ = 450  nwRev  10  10  τtot  36  36  ∆φ 100  100  Rt.62  0.61  p  0.305  χs  350  480  δ 0.60  Rt.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                     Table 4.w2  0.305  0.28  ReleaseTip  0.          157  .6: Parameters used for the computations using HAWT_PVC for Ψ = 300 and 450.

  The  parameters  used  for  HAWT_PVC  were the same as in table 4.  To  obtain  a  conservative  estimate.78 and 4.  the  upper  limit  of  the  circulation  distributions was used for the calculations.  4.  Procedure  1  described  in  Fig.                158  .  respectively).79 were prescribed to HAWT_PVC  to  calculate  the  induced  velocities  at  the  wind  tunnel  exit  (ua  tunnel  exit)  over  a  circular  region  having  a  diameter  equal  to  that  of  the  rotor.84.  The  equivalent  values  for  ke  computed  from  Eqt.64  are  0.48  was  applied.13  and  ‐0. Since yawed conditions were being considered.83 ‐ Prescribed helical wake as modelled by HAWT_PVC at Ψ=450. The induced velocity was computed in a direction parallel to  the  tunnel  jet. respectively. It can be noted that the peak induced velocities are very small at both 300 and  450  yaw  (‐0. Thus it may be concluded  that in yawed conditions the tunnel blockage effects were also minimal.  This  is  much  less  than  the  pitot‐reading  at  the  tunnel  exit  (5. 4.4 Assessment of the Effects of Tunnel Blockage in Yawed Conditions    To  assess  for  tunnel  blockage  effects.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                                                                            Figure 4.016. The results are plotted  in Fig.      C.09m/s.6.05. n=21.  4.024  and  0.  The  bound circulation distributions shown in Figs.5m/s). This was less than the acceptable limit of 0.  the computed induced velocity across the tunnel exit jet was uneven. 4.

4 r/R = 0. The results are shown in Figs.12 r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.6 -0.      The corresponding azimuthally averaged induction distributions could be found using the  same method  as for  Ψ=00 (i.87  and  4.2 -0.3   r/R = 0. 3.c in Figs.08 r/R = 0. 4.       C.  A  cyclic  variation in ua is observed at the blade root and tip regions and is a consequence of the root  and tip vortices in the wake.7 r/R = 0.c  and  a1)  were  found  by  dividing  the  interpolated induced velocities at the rotorplane by 5.5   r/R = 0.9 r/R = 0.5m/s.20 (taking the smoothened values) and Eqt. These smoothed  distributions  are  also  included  in  Figs.90.84  –  Induced  velocities  computed  using  HAWT_PVC  at  tunnel  exit  across  area  equal  to  that of rotor (n=21).16 r/R = 0. 4. This variation has a frequency of twice the rotor angular speed  for the simple reason that the rotor has two blades.0 φ (deg) φ (deg)                                 Ψ=300                                                                           Ψ=450  Figure  4.7.  It  may  be  easily  observed  that  for  yawed  conditions.9 r/R = 1.89 and 4.5 Axial Induction Factor Distributions    Since wind tunnel blockage effects were found to be small. 4.e.12 r/R = 0.16 r/R = 0.8 -0.8.    The  axial  induction  factors  at  the  rotorplane  (a1.c  at  each  measuring  plane  (Ya=‐6.88.5.0   -0. using Eqts.8   r/R = 0. 4.  The distributions  for  ua  were smoothed using the Gaussian kernel technique described in Eqt.6   -0.08 r/R = 0.c at 300 and 450 yaw are  shown in Figs.04 -0. The results for ua.             159  .5 r/R = 0.  Linear interpolation was then used to  estimate  ua  at  the  rotorplane using  an  equation  similar  to Eqt.  4.88.85 and 4.3 -0. then it was justified to take U to  be  equal  to  Ujet  (5.87 and 4.7 r/R = 0.2 r/R = 1.  4.19 and  4. 4.4 -0.86.  The  axial  induction  distributions  for  ua. 6 and 9cm) could be found using the experimental values of wa.04   ua at tunnel exit (m/s) ua at tunnel exit (m/s)   -0.5m/s).  ua  is  not  always  constant  with  the  rotor  azimuth  angle  (φ). The results for  ua at the different  measuring planes are shown in Figs.  4. 4.57.81 and 4.82).

5 yaw30     -1 ua.5 RotorPlane (Interp)   φ (deg) Figure  4.c (m/s)     -1.5   φ (deg)   0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.5 -2 3.5cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp) -2.5cm DwnStream   -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   -2.4 -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   -2.5     6cm UpStream r/R = 0.5 RotorPlane (Interp)   φ (deg)   0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.c (m/s)   -1.5     -1   ua.5cm DwnStream   r/R = 0.  160  .5   6cm UpStream   3.5     -1   ua.6 3.c (m/s)   -1.85  –  Variation  of  axial  induced  velocity  at  blades  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  different  radial locations at Ψ=300.5   6cm UpStream     r/R = 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.

9 3.5   9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp) -3   φ (deg)                                                          Figure 4.5     -2   6cm UpStream   r/R = 0.c (m/s)     -1.5cm DwnStream   -2. from previous page.5 6cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp)   -3 φ (deg)     0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.5cm DwnStream r/R = 0.5       -1 ua.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.8 3.5   6cm UpStream   3.5     -1   ua.5 φ (deg)     0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.5     -2 6cm UpStream   r/R = 0.c (m/s) -1.7 -2   6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream RotorPlane (Interp)   -2.85 – contd.c (m/s)   -1.  161  .5     -1   ua.5cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream -2.

5cm DwnStream   -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream RotorPlane   (Interp) -2.5 (Interp)   φ (deg)   0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.5     r/R = 0.4 -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream RotorPlane   -2.5cm DwnStream -2   6cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp)   -2.5   φ (deg) Figure  4.5     -1   ua.5 φ (deg)       0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.  162  .c (m/s)   -1.5cm DwnStream   r/R = 0.6 6cm UpStream 3.5   6cm UpStream   r/R = 0.c (m/s)   -1.5     -1   ua.c (m/s)     -1.5 3.5     6cm UpStream 3.5     -1 ua.86  –  Variation  of  axial  induced  velocity  at  blades  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  different  radial locations at Ψ=450.

5       -1 ua.c (m/s)     -1.8 3.5   r/R = 0.5   6cm UpStream   r/R = 0.c (m/s)     -1.  163  .c (m/s)     -1.5   6cm UpStream   r/R = 0.7 3. from previous page.5       -1 ua.5     -1   ua.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.86 – contd.5   φ (deg)     0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.5 φ (deg)                                                          Figure 4.5cm DwnStream -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp) -2.5cm DwnStream -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp)   -2.9 6cm UpStream   3.5 φ (deg)     0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.5cm DwnStream -2 6cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream   RotorPlane (Interp)   -2.

5 6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   -1.5cm DwnStream_Smooth -1.2   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream   -1.2 6cm UpStream 6cm UpStream_Smooth   3.6 9cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream_Smooth Rotorplane (Interp)   -1.5cm DwnStream   -1.6   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.8 φ (deg)       -0.8   9cm DwnStream_Smooth   -2 Rotorplane (Interp)   φ (deg) Figure 4.  164  .2   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream 6cm UpStream_Smooth   -1.8     -1   -1.6 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.4 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.6 -1.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           -0.5cm DwnStream   3.6   6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.4 3.6 6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   9cm DwnStream -1.8   9cm DwnStream_Smooth Rotorplane (Interp)   -2 φ (deg)     -0.5cm DwnStream   3.87 – Variation of azimuthally averaged axial induced velocity with blade azimuth angle at  different radial locations at Ψ=300.8     -1   -1.8     -1   ua (m/s)   -1.4 9cm DwnStream -1.4 3.6 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.

5cm DwnStream   -1.6 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.9 6cm DwnStream   -1.4 6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           -0.6 3.8   -1     -1.5cm DwnStream   3.8     -1   -1.5cm DwnStream -1.4 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.6   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.2   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream   -1.6 3.8 6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   9cm DwnStream -2   9cm DwnStream_Smooth Rotorplane (Interp)   -2.8 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 9cm DwnStream   -2 9cm DwnStream_Smooth   -2.6 6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.2 φ (deg)       -0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   -1.2 Rotorplane (Interp)   φ (deg)                                                    Figure 4.4 6cm UpStream_Smooth   3.8   9cm DwnStream_Smooth Rotorplane (Interp)   -2 φ (deg)     -0. from previous page.2 ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream   -1.2   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream -1.6   -0.8 -1.7 9cm DwnStream -1.87 – contd.  165  .5cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.8   -1     -1.4   6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.

2   6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.88 – Variation of azimuthally averaged axial induced velocity with blade azimuth angle at  different radial locations at Ψ=450.4 9cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream_Smooth   Rotorplane (Interp) -1.8 φ (deg)       -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           -0.8     -1     ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream -1.2 3.4 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.4 -1.6 6cm DwnStream_Smooth 9cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream_Smooth Rotorplane (Interp)   -1.6 Rotorplane (Interp)   φ (deg) Figure 4.4 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360     -0.8     ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream -1   6cm UpStream_Smooth   3.8     ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream -1   6cm UpStream_Smooth 3.6   -0.4   6cm DwnStream   r/R = 0.5   6cm DwnStream_Smooth -1.5cm DwnStream   3.6 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.5cm DwnStream   -1.5cm DwnStream -1.6   6cm DwnStream_Smooth -1.  166  .6   φ (deg)     -0.6   -0.4 9cm DwnStream   9cm DwnStream_Smooth   -1.2 3.5cm DwnStream_Smooth -1.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   6cm DwnStream r/R = 0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   6cm DwnStream r/R = 0.

8   -1   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream   -1.5cm DwnStream_Smooth   r/R = 0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth -1.4 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.6   -0.5cm DwnStream -1.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           -0.8     -1 ua (m/s)   6cm UpStream 6cm UpStream_Smooth   -1.2 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.6   -0.6 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth   Rotorplane (Interp)   -1.8 φ (deg)                                                  Figure 4.6 9cm DwnStream_Smooth   Rotorplane (Interp)   -1.  167  .4     -0.2   r/R = 0.6 6cm DwnStream 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   -1.4   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360   -0.4 6cm DwnStream_Smooth   9cm DwnStream -1.8 -1.6     -0.8   ua (m/s) 6cm UpStream   -1 6cm UpStream_Smooth   3.8 9cm DwnStream 9cm DwnStream_Smooth   Rotorplane (Interp) -2   φ (deg)     -0.5cm DwnStream   3. from previous page.4 6cm DwnStream   6cm DwnStream_Smooth r/R = 0.5cm DwnStream_Smooth 6cm DwnStream   -1.9 3.2 3.7   -1.88 – contd.4   3.5cm DwnStream -1.8 φ (deg)     -0.2 6cm UpStream_Smooth   3.

18   -0.14     -0.32   φ (deg)     -0.3   φ (deg)   Figure 4.6   r/R = 0.12 0 60 120 180 240 300 360   -0.7   r/R = 0.22     a1 (m/s)   -0.5   -0.8   r/R = 0.28 r/R = 0.4   r/R = 0.22     -0.2       -0.2   a1.3 r/R = 0.c (m/s)   -0.28   r/R = 0.18   0 60 120 180 240 300 360     -0.24       -0.16     -0.6 -0.5         r/R = 0.89 – Variation of the axial induction factor (at blade lifting line and azimuthally averaged)  with blade/rotor azimuth angle at Ψ=300.7   -0.9 -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             -0.9   -0.8   r/R = 0.26 r/R = 0.4   r/R = 0.26 r/R = 0.  168  .24   -0.

c (m/s)                        -0.9 -0.24 r/R = 0.12       -0.8 r/R = 0.14         -0.08     -0.4   -0.32   φ (deg)       -0.5   r/R = 0.5   -0.28 r/R = 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           -0.9   -0.16   a1 (m/s)     -0.2     r/R = 0.  169  .7   r/R = 0.12   0 60 120 180 240 300 360     -0.90 – Variation of the axial induction factor (at blade lifting line and azimuthally averaged)  with blade/rotor azimuth angle at Ψ=450.4   r/R = 0.6   r/R = 0.04   0 60 120 180 240 300 360     -0.2 r/R = 0.18     r/R = 0.8   r/R = 0.16 a1.7   r/R = 0.22   φ (deg)   Figure 4.6   -0.

78  and  4.  4.e.26m/s  at  300  yaw  and  ±0. an attempt was made to assess  the capability of the prescribed vortex model HAWT_PVC in treating yawed conditions at  both  300  and  450  yaw.c) at 3.21m/s  at  450  yaw.79.  4. Note that comparison of the  values at 3. HAWT_FWC (which accounts for both roll‐up and shed circulation  in  the  wake).  it  was  discovered  that  there  are  other  reasons  for  not  obtaining  a  good  correlation with the experimental measurements.  for  the  same  blade  positions  180<φ<3600. the tip vortex path was being obstructed by the  centrebody  on  the  upwind  side  of  the  rotor.  4.91 and 4.  the  correlation  of the  vortex  model  predictions  with  the  experimental  results  was  not  as  good  as  that  achieved  in  axial  conditions  (Fig.  the  correlation  with  the  experimental  values  is  relatively  good.  One  reason  for  this  is  the  fact  that  wake  roll‐up  is  not  modelled  in  HAWT_PVC.  taking  the  uncertainty  limits  into account.79. These represent the uncertainty in the vortex model  predictions for ua.  in  the  validation  work  of  the  newly  developed  free‐wake vortex model. 4. These where then compared with those obtained experimentally (of Figs.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           C.  But it was discovered that it is very likely  that the flow interference caused by the centrebody of the tunnel turbine should be blamed.  the  parameters  of  table  4. page 262. The smoke  visualization photos revealed that in yaw.5).6  were  used  together  with  the  unsteady  bound  circulation  distributions  of  Figs.7).91  and  4.92.56).5cm downstream is being made instead of that at the rotorplane so as to avoid  any ambiguity resulting from the additional uncertainties in the linear interpolation (using  Eqt.78 and 4.  4.  The  vortex  model results also include errors bars. Re‐ call  from  section  C.92  shows  that  for  blade  positions  0<φ<1800.  i.            170  . The comparison is shown in Figs. Such uncertainties were displayed earlier in Figs.6 Comparison of Experimental Axial Induced Velocities with those from HAWT_PVC    Once the axial induced velocities were derived (section C.c  are  displayed.  Looking  closely  at  Figs. 4.  4.  However.85 and 4.86).  This interference was not modelled in HAWT_PVC.  the  error  bars  in  the  experimental  values  of  ua.1  that  the  prescribed  bound  circulations  were  derived  from  the  inflow  measurements  and  therefore  these  circulations  are  also  subject  to  the  uncertainties  in  the  inflow measurements.    Despite  the  fact  that  in  HAWT_PVC  the  wake  was  modelled  using  experimental  data  collected  from  the  smoke  visualization  measurements.  Another reason is that shed circulation is also not included in the wake model  embedded  in  this  vortex  code. Further details of this investigation are  given later on in Chapter 5. The levels of shed circulation were found  to be very small compared to trailing circulation.  4.5cm downstream  of the rotorplane.92.c resulting from the uncertainties in the prescribed bound circulations.  To  do  so. The large disagreement only occurs for blade positions 180<φ<3600.  In  Figs.  These  distributions  were  prescribed to the model to compute the axial induced velocities (ua.  These  are  equal  to  ±0.91  and  4.

c (m/s) ua.5   -1.5 HAWT_PVC.5   -2 -2  -2.8   0. r/R = 0.5   -1 -1   -1.5 φ (deg) φ ( deg )     1 1   Exp.5 0.5 ua. r/R = 0.5   -1 -1   -1.5 -2.9   0 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360  -0.5 -2. r/R = 0.5 HAWT_PVC.5   -1 -1    -1.c (m/s) -0.91  ‐  Comparison  of  axial  induced  velocity  distributions  computed  by  HAWT_PVC  with  those obtained from the hot‐film measurements at Ψ=300 at Ya=3.5 HAWT_PVC.5 -1.7   0 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360  -0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           1 1   Exp.c (m/s) -0.                171  .7   0. r/R = 0.5 Exp.5 HAWT_PVC.5 HAWT_PVC.c (m/s) ua.5 φ (deg) φ (deg)     Figure  4.5 -1.5 φ (deg) φ ( deg )     1 1   Exp. r/R = 0.6 0.5   -2 -2  -2.5 ua.4 0.5 -2.c (m/s) ua.c (m/s) -0.8   0 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360  -0.5cm downstream.6 Exp. r/R = 0. r/R = 0. r/R = 0.5     -2 -2  -2.4 Exp.5 HAWT_PVC. r/R = 0.9   0. r/R = 0. r/R = 0.5 ua. r/R = 0.

9   0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0   -0.5 HAWT_PVC.5 -1   -1   -1.5   -2   -2.5   -1.5 -2 φ (deg) φ (deg)     Figure  4. r/R = 0.c (m/s) ua.5 Exp.c (m/s)   -0.5 HAWT_PVC. r/R = 0. r/R = 0.5 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 ua.5 -2 φ (deg) φ ( deg )     1 1   Exp.5   -0.c (m/s) -0.5   -2 -1.5 -2 φ (deg) φ (deg)       1 1 Exp. r/R = 0.4 Exp.                172  .6 Exp.5cm downstream.5   -2.5 HAWT_PVC.5 -1   -1 -1. r/R = 0.7   0.8   0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0   -0. r/R = 0.c (m/s) ua.5   -2   -2.c (m/s)   -0. r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             1 1 Exp.7   0 0   0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 ua. r/R = 0.4 0. r/R = 0.5 HAWT_PVC.5 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 ua.5 HAWT_PVC.92  ‐  Comparison  of  axial  induced  velocity  distributions  computed  by  HAWT_PVC  with  those obtained from the hot‐film measurements at Ψ=450 at Ya=3.5 HAWT_PVC.c (m/s) ua.5 -1.5 -1   -1   -1.5 0.8   0. r/R = 0. r/R = 0.9   0.6 0. r/R = 0.

 80%R tend to be not affected by the tip/root loss  correction  and  therefore  Cl.  These  error  intervals  are  large.7 Blade Load Distributions    As for axial conditions.3.5.  For the sake of clarity.  173  .21m/s deviation in wa.  The  loops  are  modelled  by  the  unsteady  aerofoil  model  and  if  static  aerofoil  data was used in the computations. 50.e.0N/m at r/R=0.8N/m at r/R=0. hysterisis loops are formed.4 to ±2.9.  Figs.  Due  to  the  unsteadiness  at  each  radial  location  (i. 60. i.96 show the results obtained for the axial thrust loading as a function of the  blade azimuth angle (φ).  The  error  incurred  was  small  since  at  low  angles of attack. even though the overall values of Cl and  α are smaller.93 and 4. the percentage error in  the derived axial thrust loading ( ε T ) is very sensitive to the error in the inflow at the blade  lifting lines obtained from the inflow measurements.  each  aerofoil  section  experiences time‐dependent variations of Vr and α).  to  derive  the  unsteady  aerodynamic  loads  from  hot‐film  measurements  in  the  near  wake.3.  4.e. the error bars are not displayed  in  these  plots. This explains the  limitation  for  this  analysis.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           C. At  Ψ=450.  the  error  intervals  were  found  to  be  much  larger.c ).  Re‐call  that  the  calculations  with  HAWT_PVC  (section  C.95 and 4.94  show  the  variations  of  the  unsteady  lift  coefficient  (Cl.c  range from ±1.14  at  radial locations 40.  Since the  angles  of  attack  are  small  and  the  flow  over  the  blades  is  attached. These results were computed using the same method as for axial  conditions. the Cd are very small compared with Cl (<5% of the Cl).c range from  ±1. ( εwa.3D)  in  accordance  with  Eqt. As the level of unsteadiness increases with yaw angle. 4.3. 4.  For  the  torque  loading. 60. the  loops are in general wider at  Ψ=450 than at  Ψ=300. 70.  the  error  in  the  derived  torque  loading  ( ε Q )  resulting  from  the  error  in  the  inflow  measurements is usually larger than that in the axial thrust loading ( ε T ).  then  no  dynamic  stall  takes  place.3D  is  equal  to  Cl. the values of  ΓB.26m/s deviation in wa.  This consolidates what was proved analytically in section 4.9.69.4 to ±2. 80 and 90%R and at different blade azimuth angles over one  whole  revolution  of  the  rotor.  The  accuracy  of  the  results  could  only  be  improved  by  being able to measure the flow velocities more accurately.  The  drag  coefficient was determined from the 2D static data for the NACA 0012 aerofoil and was not  corrected  for  tip/root  loss  and  unsteadiness.  i.  This also consolidates what was shown in section 4.68  and  4.  4.79 were used to determine the  unsteady  lift  coefficient  corrected  for  tip/root  loss  (Cl.e.2D  as  estimated  by  the  unsteady  aerofoil  model  described  in  section  4. no loops would be observed.2  and  the  angle  of  attack  values  of  Figs.  considerably larger than those of the inflow measurements from which they were derived. 4.  This is approximately equivalent to  the  percentage  error  ε T being  in  the  range  of  ±16  ‐  35%. It can also be confirmed that the  sensitivity  increases  at  larger  yaw  angles. but a simple straight line  along which Cl and  α will vary. the error intervals by assuming a ±0.  sometimes  exceeding  100%  of  the  azimuthally  averaged  thrust  loading at some radial locations.2N/m at r/R=0.78 and 4.0N/m at r/R=0.3D)  with  angle  of  attack  at  different  radial locations at 300 and 450 yaw. i.e. the error intervals by assuming a ±0. Figs. This is approximately equivalent to an error  ε T  in  the range of ±14‐25%. 70. At Ψ=300.3D of Figs.5.2)  have shown that radial locations 50.

8 0.24 0.5 0.22 0.7 0.45 0.1 0.5 2 2.8   0.                174  .38   0.2 r/R = 0.2   0 0.6 0.25   0.5 4     0.4   0.22   0 0.45   0.4   0.5 2 2.1 1.7   0.5 α ( deg ) 3 3.5 4 α ( deg )   Figure 4.5 3 3.26 0.9 0.7 0.3 0.3 0.5 2 2.34   0.3D Cl.5 2 2.5 5 0.36 0.28   0.18   0.5   α ( deg ) α ( deg )     0.12   0.1 0.35 Cl.4 0.14   0.2   Cl.3D   0.15 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   α ( deg ) 1.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1.1   α ( deg ) 1.3D 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.15 0.93 – Variation of unsteady lift coefficient with angle of attack at various radial locations at  Ψ=300.55 0.24 r/R = 0.2 r/R = 0.3   0.2   0.3 0.3D Cl.3D   0.5 3 3.3D 0.5 4 4.4 r/R = 0.5 r/R = 0.3 Cl.16   0.35   0.32   0.5 3 3.6 r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             0.25 0.28   0.26   0.5 Cl.

2   0.5 3 3.1 0.3   0.1   0.5 3 3.22   0.1   r/R = 0.16 0.3 0.15   0.4 r/R = 0.3D Cl.8 0.2 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             0.5 4 1 1.2 Cl.5 0.45 0.1   0 0.7   0.25 0.2   0.3   0.35   0.5 1 1.2 0.1 r/R = 0.6 0.4 0.18 Cl.94 – Variation of unsteady lift coefficient with angle of attack at various radial locations at  Ψ=450.4   0.15   0.                175  .3D   0.1 r/R = 0.14 0.3D Cl.5 3 3.5 α ( deg ) α ( deg )   Figure 4.3D   0.5 2 α ( deg ) 2.5 0.4 Cl.5 3   α ( deg ) α ( deg )     0.6 0.12 0.05   0 0   0 1 2 3 4 5 α ( deg ) 6 7 8 9 0.05   0 0.3D 0.35 0.3 0.25 Cl.3   0.15   0.6 0.5 2 2.24   0.7 0.5 2 2.5 2 2.9   r/R = 0.5 r/R = 0.2 0.3D   0.4   0.35   0.05   0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1.25 0.5 1 1.5     0.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           10 20   9 18   8 16   7 14 dT3D (N/m) dT3D (N/m)   6 12   5 10 4 8   3 6 r/R = 0.5 5   2   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     18 25   16   14 20   12 dT3D (N/m) dT3D (N/m) 15   10   8 10 6   r/R = 0.8   4 r/R = 0.6 5   2   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     Figure 4.9 4 r/R = 0.4 r/R = 0.95 – Variation of unsteady axial thrust loading with blade azimuth angle at various radial  locations at Ψ=300.              176  .7   2 4   1 2   0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     16 25   14 20   12   10 dT3D (N/m) dT3D (N/m) 15   8   6 10 r/R = 0.

8 r/R = 0.7   2 r/R = 0.5 4 2   2   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     14 20   12 18   16 10 14   dT3D (N/m) 12 dT3D (N/m) 8   10   6 8   4 6 r/R = 0.96 – Variation of unsteady axial thrust loading with blade azimuth angle at various radial  locations at Ψ=450.9 r/R = 0.              177  .                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           16   8 14   7 12   6 10   5 dT3D (N/m) dT3D (N/m) 8   4 6   3 4 r/R = 0.6 4   2 2   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150φ (180 deg ) 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg )     Figure 4.4 2   1 0   0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     12 20   10 18 16   14 8   dT3D (N/m) 12 dT3D (N/m)   6 10   4 8 6   r/R = 0.

8   0.1   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.5 0.7   0.7 0.1 0.7   0.2   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     Figure  4.5 r/R = 0.8   0.5 0.6 0.4 0.2   0.1 -0.7 r/R = 0.1   0 -0.6 dQ3D (Nm/m) dQ3D (Nm/m)   0.15 0.1 0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.2 r/R = 0.1 0.3   0.4 0.4 0.9   0.3   0.2 r/R = 0.3 0.8 r/R = 0.35 0.5 0.4   0.3 0.8 0.8 1 0.6   0.05 0.1 0.              178  .5 dQ3D (Nm/m) dQ3D (Nm/m) 0.4 0.9 0.4   0.2 0.2 0.3 r/R = 0.6   0.7   0.5 dQ3D (Nm/m) dQ3D (Nm/m) 0.45 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.2   0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0.97  –  Variation  of  unsteady  torque  loading  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  various  radial  locations at Ψ=300.9   0.3   0.6   0.8   0.5   0.7 0.25 0.9   0.6 0.4   0.

4   dQ3D (N/m) dQ3D (N/m) 0.05 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.2 0.9   r/R = 0.6   0.4 0.4 r/R = 0.5 0.05 -0.3   dQ3D (N/m) dQ3D (N/m) 0.4 0.2 dQ3D (N/m) dQ3D (N/m) 0.2 0.2   -0.2   0.2   -0.6 r/R = 0.6 0.3   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.2   0.1 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   0 -0.5   r/R = 0.2   0.              179  .7   0.1   0.1 -0.1 0   0.1   0.1 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.25 r/R = 0.6 0.1 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   -0.1 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   0 -0.15 0.35 0.5 0.2   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.3   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     0.1 -0.5 0.3 0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     Figure  4.8 0.1   0.4   0.3   0.6 0.7   0.5 r/R = 0.4 0.98  –  Variation  of  unsteady  torque  loading  with  blade  azimuth  angle  at  various  radial  locations at Ψ=450.3 0.3 0.2 -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             0.1   0 -0.6 0.5   0.3   0.

 80 and 90%R were computed using the 2D values of Cl and  Cd (i. HAWT_LFIM  computed the CT values with no tip/root loss correction.  The  mean  percentage  discrepancy  is  found  to  be  quite  high  (about  ‐32%)  which  is  considerably  larger  than  that  obtained  for  Ψ=00  (about  ‐16%. 4.  Apart  from  the  errors  in  wa.4%    In  table  4. 50. 60.  180  .514  0. Fig.5).472±0.3.  Even  the  range  in  the  uncertainity  resulting  from  the  uncertainty  in  wa.c. Such distributions were  integrated to yield CT.e.95  and 4.96. The comparison for CT is given in table 4.  refer  to  table  4.2.      To be able to assess the sensitivity of CT to the applied tip/root loss correction.7 below.2).7: Comparison of axial thrust coefficients derived by HAWT_LFIM using hot‐film near wake  measurements with those measured using strain gauge techniques.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           C. Yet the uncertainty resulting from  errors in wa. Another important point is  that  the  uncertainty  in  the  tip/root  loss correction  is  not  expected  to influence  the  loading  distributions over the middle blade sections (between 50% and 80%R). The axial thrust loading (dT) values  at radial locations 40.  The  uncertainty intervals in CT due to the assumed errors in wa.9±12. as shown in  table 4.5±12.8. 4. These were compared with those measured using strain gauges in the wind tunnel  experiments (refer section 4.c  is  very large  (about  12%)  and  this shows  that  the  CT  values  derived  using  HAWT_PVC  are  very  sensitive  to  the  errors  in  wa.8 below.  the  percentage  discrepancies  relative  to  the  measured  values  are  given. the spanwise distributions  were then extrapolated by applying the boundary condition that at 30 and 100%R dT is zero  and applying a spline interpolation (using method of Appendix D). no tip/root loss correction).  Note that the azimuthal averaged value of CT is being compared.7.063  ‐32.347±0.c arising from the hot‐film measurements is larger.  another  source  of  uncertainty  is  due  to  the  tip/root  loss  correction  used  (described in section C.8 Comparison of Axial Thrust Coefficients    The  axial  thrust  coefficient  at  each  yaw  angle  for  λ=8  and  θtip=20  was  computed  by  HAWT_LFIM by integrating numerically the axial thrust loading distributions of Figs. 70.09  ‐31. These results were compared with the measured values.26).693  0.    Table 4.7%  CT (Ψ=450)  0.  it  is  noted  that  the  mean  percentage  discrepancy  is  lower  than  that  with  no  tip/loss  correction  (‐20%  instead  of  ‐32%)  indicating  that  the  uncertainty  in  this  correction  has a considerable influence on the derived values for CT. (Tip/root loss correction applied)      Measured using  Derived from Inflow  Percentage  Strain Gauges  Measurements  Discrepancy  CT (Ψ=300)               0.c. For each blade azimuth angle.c are also included together with  the  corresponding  uncertainties  in  the  percentage  discrepancy.    In  table  4.

  (Tip/root  loss  correction  not  applied)      Measured using  Derived from Inflow  Percentage  Strain Gauges  Measurements  Discrepancy  CT (Ψ=300)         0.55±0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                             Table 4.693  0.6±14.6%                                                              181  .1  ‐20.8: Comparison of axial thrust coefficients derived by HAWT_LFIM using hot‐film near wake  measurements  with  those  measured  using  strain  gauge  techniques.0%  CT (Ψ=450)  0.514  0.2±13.07  ‐20.41±0.

 and  for  which  the  flow  behaviour  over  the  blades  is  known  to  be  fully  attached  (i.  θtip=20 and  Ψ=0. These two so‐ called  BEM  parameters  were  computed  at  different  radial  positions. Re) ⎡⎣Vζ Cosθ + Vη Sinθ ⎤⎦ ⎬ 2 r ⎩ b =0                                                                                                                                                           b =0 ⎭⎪                                                                                                                                                        (4. Re ) ⎡⎣Vη Cosθ − Vζ Sinθ ⎤⎦ + Vr CD (α . 3.    (i) Approach A is an original approach that made use of inflow measurements to check the  BEM Eqt. 30 and 450).    This  assessment  was  only  restricted  to  the  operating  conditions  at  which  the  inflow  measurements on the TUDelft rotor were carried out (λ=8. The inflow measurements  and the unsteady aerofoil model described in section 4.  A  large  discrepancy  implied  a  deficiency  of  the  BEM  theory  to  simulate  such  conditions  for  the  model  wind  turbine. Two separate approaches were used: Approach A and Approach B.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.  It  was  found  that  the  uncertainty  in  such  loads  was  found  to  be  considerably  large.  The  uncertainty  in  the  tip/root  correction  also  presented  difficulties.  Actually. one should bear in  mind  the  fact  that.  especially  when  the  rotor  was  yawed.e.  This  uncertainty was a major stumbling block to perform an accurate quantitative assessment of  the  actual  deficiencies  of  the  BEM  theory.  rotor  azimuth  angles  and  yaw  angles. This  study  demonstrated  the  importance  of  knowing  the  experimental  blade  aerodynamic  loading distributions (apart from the inflow measurements) to be able to carry out a more  detailed assessment of the limitations of BEM‐based models.83a)                                  FA 2 = −4(ua ) (UCosΨ + ua ) + U Sin Ψ                                                                      2 2 2                                                                                                                                                        (4.83b)    The  capability  of  the  BEM  theory  to  simulate  yawed  conditions  depends  on  the  discrepancies between the values of FA1 and the corresponding values of FA2.  this  approach  investigated  the  validity of the momentum equation for axial thrust (Eqt.  but  this  tended  to  influence  only  radial  locations  r/R<50%  and  r/R>80%.4 Investigating the Limitations of the BEM Theory for             Axial/Yawed Wind Turbines        This  section  describes  the  work  in  which  the  hot‐film  inflow  measurements  and  the  derived aerodynamic loading distributions on the blades were used to assess the limitations  of the BEM theory when modelling wind turbines in both axial and yawed conditions.    182  .3. 3.2 were used to calculate separately  the blade‐element theory and momentum parts denoted by FA1 and FA2 where    c ⎧ B −1 B −1 ⎪⎫   FA1 = π ∑ ∑ ⎨ Vr CL (α . However.  no  blade  stall).21 when modelling both axial and yawed conditions.3).6a).  for  the  TUDelft  rotor.  the  blade  loads  were  derived  from  the  inflow  measurements  (as  documented  in  section  4.

  the  blades  were  descretized  using  22  elements. The  mean  values  obtained  over  one  whole  rotor  revolution  are  plotted  and  the  error  bars  represent ± one standard deviations in the data over one whole revolution.e.  i.18(a). 4.       4.100 and 4.  3.88) were used to compute FA2.99 compares parameters FA1 with FA2 for  Ψ=00.      (ii)  In  Approach  B.62.  2D  NACA0012 static aerofoil data for the drag coefficient was used but this was not corrected  for tip/root loss.2 for the lift coefficient (Cl.  4.1 Results from Approach A    Axial Conditions    Fig. 4.  4.  The  error  bars  represent  the  uncertainties  in  both  FA1  and  FA2  due  the  ±8%  uncertainty in the hot‐film measurements for wa.6a)  when modelling yawed conditions.100  and  4.3.  The lift and drag coefficients were modelled  using  the  same  method  as  for  the  calculations  with  HAWT_LFIM.3). the linearly interpolated values of wa. This BEM model implements both the tip and root tip  losses using the Prandtl equations (Eqts.6.28) and Coleman’s equation (given in table 3. 4. The two parameters are very close to  each  other.101  unless  the  errors  in  the  inflow  measurements  are  kept  very  small.c within the  rotorplane  (Figs.  3.  the  results  are  being  plotted  as  a  function  of  rotor  azimuth  angle  (φ).  This causes  ambiguity  in  comparing  FA1  and  FA2.  The  azimuthally‐ averaged axial induced velocities obtained from the inflow measurements (Fig.93  and  4. Since unsteady conditions are  considered  due  to  rotor  yaw.  4. parameters  FA1  and  FA2  are  also  very  sensitive  to  the  errors  in  the  hot‐film  measurements. refer to section 3.  Yet.  In  the  modelling. like the derived aerodynamic loads.94). The lift coefficient values corrected for tip/root loss at  r/R=40%  and  90%  (Cl.10).20)  were  used  to  compute  FA1.  4.  Yawed Conditions    Figs. 3.  the  aerodynamic  parameters  predicted  by  the  developed  BEM  code  HAWT_BEM were compared with those derived directly from the experimental data (using  the computer code HAWT_LFIM as described in the previous section 4. Actually this limitation yields an incorrect prediction for the 183  .  a  considerable discrepancy  which  increases  with  yaw  angle  may  still  be  observed  between  these  two  parameters.21)  in  axial  conditions.  demonstrating  the  limitation  of  the  momentum  equation  (Eqt. It is easily noted that these error bars are  considerably wide and this indicates that. 4. Skewed wake effects in yawed rotor conditions were modelled by using Glauert’s  model (Eqt.  as  may  be  easily  observed  in  Figs.87  and 4.3D)  were  used  for  computing  FA1  (see  Figs. For a description  of HAWT_BEM.4.2D) and 2D NACA0012 static aerofoil  data  for  the  drag  coefficient.1) for the K factor.  4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           For this case study with the TUDelft rotor.101 compare FA1 and FA2 at  Ψ=300 and 450.  using  the  unsteady  aerofoil model of section 4. 3.59(b).  proving  the  reliability  of  the BEM  equation  (Eqt.19  and  4.

6a is used.84)  ka is a function of several parameters.  An  engineering  model  for  this  parameter  may  be  derived  from  experiments  that  include  both  unsteady  inflow  measurements  (to  obtain  the  inflow  at  the  rotorplane)  and  unsteady  aerodynamic  load  measurements.    azimuthally averaged axial induced velocity (ua) in BEM codes when Eqt. operating conditions. Re) ⎡⎣Vζ Cosθ + Vη Sinθ ⎤⎦ ⎬ 2 π r ⎩ b =0 b=0 ⎭                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                (4. radial  location (r/R) and rotor azimuth position (φ).7 0.  page  35)  only  correct  the  ratio  of  local  blade  element  induced  velocity  to  the  annular  average  induced  velocity.4 0.    In  state‐of‐art  BEM‐based  design  codes.99 – Comparison of BEM parameters FA1 and FA2 at Ψ=00.  The  fact  that  Figs.101  indicate  a  considerable  discrepancy  between  FA1  and  FA2  shows  that  correcting only this ratio may be insufficient.84 should result in better  estimates  for  ua  and  thus  improve  BEM  predictions. 4. 3. Re ) ⎡⎣Vη Cosθ − Vζ Sinθ ⎤⎦ + ∑ Vrel CD (α . including rotor geometry. FA1 and FA2 may then be found from the measurements to estimate ka using   184  .9 1 r/R                             Figure 4.8 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           30 25 20 FA1 or FA2 15 10 FA1 mean 5 FA2 mean 0 0.3 0.  No  correction  is  applied  to  the  annular  averaged  induced  velocity.100  and  4.  4. The inclusion of parameter ka as in  Eqt.  the  implemented  correction  models  for  skewed  wake  effects  in  yaw  (Type  I  engineering  models  described  in  Chapter  3. even when treating attached flow conditions  (low angles of attack).5 0. The  discrepancy  between  FA1  and  FA2  should  be  corrected  if  BEM  predictions  in  yaw  are  to  be  improved.6 0.  One  way  of  doing  so  is  to  include  another  correction  parameter  ka  to  the  BEM  equation such that    ka × 4(ua ) (UCosΨ − ua ) 2 + U 2 Sin 2 Ψ =   c ⎧ B −1 B −1 ⎫   ⎨∑ Vrel CL (α .

9   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150φ (180 deg ) 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg )                             Figure 4.7   5   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )   30 35     25 30   20 25 FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2   20 15   15   10 FA1 r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               30 35   25 30   25 20   FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2 20   15 15   10 FA1 r/R = 0.5   5 FA2 r/R = 0.100 – Comparison of BEM parameters FA1 and FA2 at Ψ=300.8 5   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     30 35   25 30   25   20 FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2 20   15   15 10   FA1 r/R = 0.8 FA2 r/R = 0.7 5 FA2 r/R = 0.5 10 FA1 r/R = 0.6   5 5 FA2 r/R = 0.                185  .4   10 FA1 r/R = 0.4 FA2 r/R = 0.9 FA2 r/R = 0.6 10 FA1 r/R = 0.

4 5 FA2 r/R = 0.8 FA1 r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                               25 30   25 20   20   15 FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2   15 10   10   5 FA1 r/R = 0.9   5 FA2 r/R = 0.9 5 FA2 r/R = 0.7 FA1 r/R = 0.101 – Comparison of BEM parameters FA1 and FA2 at Ψ=450.6 FA1 r/R = 0.6   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                             Figure 4.8   0 0   0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )     25 25     20 20   FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2 15 15     10 10   FA1 r/R = 0.7   FA2 r/R = 0.5 5 FA2 r/R = 0.4   0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360   φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )   25 30     20 25   20 FA1 and FA2 FA1 and FA2   15 15   10 10   FA1 r/R = 0.5   5 FA2 r/R = 0.                186  .

  an  averaged  value  for  ka  was  obtained  by  averaging  both  azimuthally  and  radially.  an  engineering  model  may  be  derived  with  the  help  of  more  advanced  aerodynamic models such as vortex models and CFD.  The  uncertainties  in  ka  due  to  the  errors  in  the  inflow  measurements  are also included.6a) when increasing the rotor yaw angle. FA1 and FA2 are nearly equal (see Fig.i (ka )τ .  One  can  still  observe  that  larger yaw angles cause the value of ka to decrease and this reflects the increased deficiency  of the momentum equation (Eqt.6 0.       1.85.      187  .                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           the formula  (FA1 )τ .i = (FA2 )τ .102.8 ka 0.    In this study on the TUDelft rotor.  4.e.  At  each  yaw  angle.102  –  Variation  of  ka  with  yaw  angle  for  the  TUDelft  rotor  with λ  and  θtip  maintained  constant at 8 and 20.99)  and  thus  ka  is  very  close  to  unity  in  accordance  with  Eqt. respectively.4 0.i (4. 4. At Ψ=00. Eqt. an attempt was made to derive reasonable values for ka  at Ψ=300 and 450 from the results for FA1 and FA2 plotted in Figs.85 was applied and ka was found to  be  relatively  constant  with  the  rotor  azimuth  angle  (φ). 4.100 and 4. 4.101 (i.  The  values  are  plotted  in  Fig.2 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 Ψ (deg)  Figure  4.  It is noted that these uncertainties are very large and thus make it very  difficult to establish realistic values for ka.  4.2 1 0. 3.85)  Alternatively. from the  results derived from the inflow measurements).

    Figs. 4. a1.103 is due to the intrinsic deficiency of the Prandtl tip/root loss model itself. 4.  α.e.  the  mean  values  are  plotted  (mean  over  one  whole  rotor  revolution).c/U) and the azimuthally averaged values (annular averaged.6.27  (taking parameter Fsa equal to unity since we are dealing with axial flow). in this study with the TUDelft  rotor. This model  corrects  for  the  decreased  aerodynamic  loading  at  the  blade  tip  and  root  regions  by  artificially  increasing  a1. but this is only due to the simple  188  . In the BEM model for  Ψ=00.  3.c  =  a1/f  where  f  is  the  Prandtl  tip/root  loss  factor  in  accordance  with  Eqts.106.  4.105.1 and Fig.4.2 Results from Approach B    The results from BEM code HAWT_BEM are now compared with those obtained from the  hot‐film inflow measurements and unsteady aerofoil model using HAWT_LFIM.c  here  to  reduce  the  local  angle  of  attack  and  thus  also  reduce  the  local  2D  lift  and  drag  coefficients.  3. 4.  This  is  physically  not  accurate  since  it  results  in  an  incorrect prediction for the axial induction factor at the blade tip and root. It is important to  emphasize the fact that in many state‐of‐art BEM design codes. This indicates that  the  discrepancy  in  Fig.  respectively. i.108 compare the distributions of Vr. and the error bars represent the corresponding ± one standard deviations.    Figs. However recall the fact that. Excellent agreement  was obtained in Vr at all radial locations along the blades.  4.3.     Axial Conditions    This section presents the comparison for  Ψ=00.104  compare  the  distributions  of  the  axial  induction  factor  at  the  blade  lifting line (a1.  see  Fig. 2D aerofoil data is still used  at the blade tip and root regions.c=‐ua.  an  unrealistically  high  bound  circulation  resulted  at  the  blade  tip  and  root  region  when  using  an  angle  of  attack  derived  directly  from  the  near  wake  inflow  measurements  and applying a 2D lift coefficient (refer to section 4.  However  the  correlation  for  a1.  4.104.  see  Fig. B. rather than artificially increasing the induction  locally to reduce the angle of attack.107 and 4.c is computed from a1 using the equation  a1. a better tip/root loss correction model should modify  the 2D aerofoil data to 3D values in a way to reduce the loading at the tip and root. 4.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.53).10  and  3.  4. The correlation for a1 is very good even at the sections close to the blade root  and  tip  (40  and  90%R).  It  may  therefore  be  concluded  that  the  discrepancy  in  Fig.  using  Eqts.e. Thus.10  with  the  inflow  angle  (ϕ)  obtained  from  the  inflow  measurements).  The  results from HAWT_BEM are denoted in the graphs by ‘BEM’. a1=ua/U). see Fig. This suggests that  for BEM codes to predict more accurately the induction at the blade tip and root while at  the same time modelling the loading distribution at the tip and root correctly.  Also  good  agreement  is  achieved  between  the  distribution  of  f  predicted  by  the  BEM  model  and  that  derived  from  the  inflow  measurements  (i.c  is  not  good  and  the  discrepancy between the experimental and BEM results increases towards the blade tip and  root. and Cl. In the case of the results from HAWT_LFIM  (denoted  in  graphs  by  ‘Exp’).103  and  4. modified 3D  aerofoil data should be used instead.103.103  is  due  to  f.  4.

104 – Comparison of a1 at Ψ=00.103 – Comparison of a1.  Again  this  results  from  the  inadequacy  of  the  Prandtl  tip/root  loss  correction.4 0.6 0.3 -0.3 -0.4 0.4 -0.9 1 -0.5 0.8 0.1 Exp BEM -0.109  and  4.c -0.3 0.35 r/R                                         Figure 4. Still it is observed that there is a notable disagreement at the blade tip and  root  in  both α  and  Cl.  4.7 0.25 -0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           reason  that  rΩ>>U  and  therefore  the  error  in  the  computed  induction  has  negligible  influence on Vr.1 -0.15 -0.2 -0.05 Exp BEM -0.110  compare  the  axial  thrust  and  torque  loading  distributions.9 1 -0. the predictions by HAWT_BEM correlated very well with those derived from the  0 0.8 0.c at Ψ=00.2 a1.  189  .    It  can  be  concluded  from  this  analysis  that  for  axial  conditions  in  attached  flow  over  the  blades.  Fig.  It  is  noted  that  this  correction  over‐predicts  the  lift  coefficient  at  the  tips.05 -0.6 0.45 r/R                                                  Figure 4.3 0.15 a1 -0.25 -0.7 0.35 -0.5 0.  This  over‐ prediction of the lift coefficient at the tips results in a high tip loading.    0 0.

5 0.106 – Comparison of Vr at Ψ=00.9 1 r/R                                                  Figure 4.7 0.2 0 0.  the  less  influential this deficiency will be.8 0.4 Exp BEM 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.  190  .9 1 r/R                    Figure 4.  However  this  cannot  be  stated  for  the  tip/root  regions  due  to  the  deficiency  of  the  Prandtl  correction.8 0.6 0.4 0.  The  higher  the  blade  aspect  ratio.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           experiments  at  the  middle  blade  sections.105 – Comparison of Prandtl tip loss factor at Ψ=00.    1.5 0.7 0.      50 45 40 35 30 Vr (m/s) 25 20 15 10 Exp BEM 5 0 0.8 f 0.3 0.  The  significance  of  this  deficiency  depends  on  the  aspect  ratio  of  the  blades.6 0.2 1 0.

3 0.1 0 0.7 0.4 0.9 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           9 8 Exp BEM 7 6 α (deg) 5 4 3 2 1 0 0.6 0.107 – Comparison of α at Ψ=00.                                            191  .7 0.6 0.8 Exp BEM 0.8 0.5 0.9 1 r/R                                                   Figure 4.4 0.5 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.      0.9 1 r/R                                                   Figure 4.3 0.8 0.7 0.5 Cl 0.2 0.108 – Comparison of Cl at Ψ=00.

109 – Comparison of dT at Ψ=00.      1.7 0.2 Exp BEM 1 0.2 0 0.                  192  .6 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.8 dQ (N/m) 0.9 1 r/R                                  Figure 4.110 – Comparison of dQ at Ψ=00.8 0.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           30 Exp BEM 25 20 dT (N/m) 15 10 5 0 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.9 1 r/R                                                   Figure 4.6 0.7 0.

111 and 4.  This  was already shown in an earlier study documented in [67]. it was found that the high negative  induction  measured  at  the  inboard  blade  sections  for  blade  positions  180<φ<3600  was  not  only due to the presence of considerable root vorticity but also because of influences of flow  obstruction form the centrebody of the turbine model.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           Yawed Conditions    This section presents the comparison for Ψ=300 and 450.  As already outlined in section 3. 3. This model yields a sinusoidal variation  of a1.  4. Remember  that  in  the  BEM  calculations.e. However on the subject rotor.  Figs.  Figs. These differences are largest towards the inboard regions of the blades  and  are  mainly  due  to  root  vorticity  which  in  reality  causes  the  induction  at  the  inboard  blade sections to be higher at blade positions 180<φ<3600. it was very difficult to model such influences in HAWT_BEM.23) with the Coleman model for the factor K.c at  Ψ=300 and 450.  The  error  bars  in  these  plots  denote  the  uncertainty  resulting  from  the  assumed  errors  in  the  inflow  measurements  (i. dT and dQ from HAWT_BEM with  those  derived  from  the  measurements  using  HAWT_LFIM.c  and  a1  yield  incorrect  predictions  for  the  angles  of  attack.112 compare the results for a1. 4.c with  φ with the axial induction reaching the maximum and minimum negative values  at 900 and 2700 respectively.4.111  and  4.113 and 4.114 compare the results for a1. Cl.  3. The results from HAWT_LFIM are denoted in graphs  by  ‘Exp’.26m/s  at  Ψ=300  and  ±0. It is observed that the BEM code tends to  under  predict  the  value  of  a1  at  almost  all  radial  locations  both  at  Ψ=300  and  450.1.122  compare the results for the unsteady parameters  α.  4.6a  when  treating  yawed  conditions.  Glauert’s  model  only  accounts  for  the  tip  vorticity  in  skewed  flows  and  excludes  the  presence of root vorticity. 4.112  clearly  demonstrates  large  differences  between  Glauert’s  predictions  and  the  experimental results.  This  issue  was  brought  forward  earlier  in  this  section when comparing the Ψ=00.  Better  predictions  for  a1  could  have  been  achieved  but  modifying  the  momentum  equation  for  thrust  as  Eqt.  The  disagreement  with  the  experimental  values  is  not  only  a  consequence  of  the  deficiency  of  Glauert’s  equation  but  also  due  to  the  limitation  of  the  axial  momentum  Eqt. 4.  The  issue  that  the  deficiency  in  this  equation  brings  about  an  inaccurate prediction for ua (and hence also in a1) has already been brought forward earlier  in  section  4.21m/s  at  Ψ=450).  4.    An  incorrect  prediction  for  the  induction  factors  obviously  results  also  from  the  inappropriate  Prandtl  tip/root  correction. respectively.  aerofoil  coefficients  and  also  for  the  blade  loading  distributions. A qualitative comparison with the measurements in Figs.115  –  Figs.  Unfortunately  the  large  uncertainties in the results derived from the measurements (resulting from uncertainties in  193  .    Incorrect  predictions  for  a1.    Figs.5. The results are plotted as a function  of the blade/rotor azimuth angle (φ).  skewed  wake  effects  were  modelled  using  Glauert’s  model  (Eqt.84  with  a  suitable  engineering  model  for  ka.  ±0.  The  results from HAWT_BEM are denoted by ‘BEM’. Due to the complex geometry of this  centrebody structure.

e.  However  it  is  clear  that.  For  such  conditions.84).  the  inclusion  of  model  for  parameter  ka in  Eqt.  the  aerofoil  data  used  in  the  calculations  is  known  to  be  reasonably accurate.  their reliability will be improved when modelling yawed conditions.  better  models  for  parameter Fsa in Eqt.  where  stall‐delay  and  dynamic  stall  take  place).  194  . Yet we should keep in  mind the fact that in this study on the TUDelft rotor. When dealing with turbine operating conditions in which the angles of  attack  are  large  (i.  given  that  BEM  codes  incorporate  accurate  engineering  models  for  skewed  wake  effects  (i. 3.27) together with engineering models to correct for the deficiency of  the  momentum  equation  in yaw  (i.e.  the  reliability  of  the  aerofoil data used in BEM codes also becomes an important issue.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           the hot‐film measurements) make it very difficult to quantify the discrepancies between the  results  of  HAWT_BEM  and  HAWT_LFIM.  4. we are limiting ourselves to attached  flow conditions only for which the time‐dependent angles of attack at the blades are known  to  be  small.e.

25 -0.9 BEM r/R = 0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.25 -0.8 BEM r/R = 0.3 -0.5 Exp r/R = 0. 195  .c at Ψ=300.2 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.05 Exp r/R = 0.7 -0.2 -0.15 -0.3 -0.4 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                 Figure 4.25 -0.3 -0.15 a1.05 -0.9 -0.4 BEM r/R = 0.25 -0.4 Exp r/R = 0.1 -0.15 a1.c (deg) a1.1 -0.c (deg) -0.2 -0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.2 -0.8 -0.15 -0.7 BEM r/R = 0.35 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.35 -0.1 -0.111 – Comparison of a1.35 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.2 -0.25 -0.35 -0.3 -0.25 -0.c (deg) a1.6 Exp r/R = 0.15 -0.1 -0.6 BEM r/R = 0.c (deg) -0.c (deg) -0.4 -0.05 -0.c (deg) a1.05 -0.3 -0.1 -0.35 -0.15 a1.4 -0.1 -0.35 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.5 BEM r/R = 0.

15 a1.35 -0.c a1.3 -0.15 -0.c a1.15 a1.3 -0.8 BEM r/R = 0.c -0.112 – Comparison of a1.05 Exp r/R = 0.4 -0.1 -0.1 a1.4 BEM r/R = 0.05 Exp r/R = 0.7 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.9 -0.15 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.5 -0.25 -0.1 -0.25 -0.15 a1.5 BEM r/R = 0.c at Ψ=450.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.c -0.25 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.25 -0.c -0.2 -0.1 -0.25 -0. 196  .1 -0.15 -0.3 -0.2 -0.6 -0.6 BEM r/R = 0.2 -0.2 -0.9 BEM r/R = 0.35 -0.2 -0.1 -0.7 BEM r/R = 0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.c -0.8 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                                                                       Figure 4.25 -0.2 -0.

15 -0.4 Exp r/R = 0. 197  .3 -0.35 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                  Figure 4.9 BEM r/R = 0.1 -0.25 -0.6 Exp r/R = 0.05 Exp r/R = 0.2 -0.15 a1 a1 -0.3 -0.35 -0.9 -0.15 a1 a1 -0.05 -0.25 -0.35 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.8 BEM r/R = 0.3 -0.5 BEM r/R = 0.2 -0.1 -0.15 a1 a1 -0.2 -0.25 -0.8 -0.1 -0.2 -0.113 – Comparison of a1 at Ψ=300.05 Exp r/R = 0.35 -0.1 -0.7 -0.2 -0.25 -0.1 -0.3 -0.05 -0.6 BEM r/R = 0.3 -0.1 -0.3 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.2 -0.5 Exp r/R = 0.05 -0.4 BEM r/R = 0.15 -0.35 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.25 -0.7 BEM r/R = 0.25 -0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.15 -0.

2 -0.6 -0.15 -0.7 -0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.2 -0.114 – Comparison of a1 at Ψ=450.2 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.1 -0.25 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                  Figure 4.4 Exp r/R = 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.15 -0.2 -0.5 Exp r/R = 0.2 -0.15 -0.05 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.1 a1 a1 -0.05 -0.25 -0.15 -0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.15 a1 a1 -0.1 -0.9 BEM r/R = 0.1 -0.25 -0.25 -0.25 -0.1 -0.6 BEM r/R = 0.2 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0. 198  .15 a1 a1 -0.8 BEM r/R = 0.8 -0.1 -0.25 -0.9 -0.05 Exp r/R = 0.

115 – Comparison of α at Ψ=300.6 5 4 4 3 α (deg) α (deg) 3 2 2 1 1 Exp r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           12 5 Exp r/R = 0. 199  .6 BEM r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.8 4 6 5 3 α (deg) α (deg) 4 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 6 5 Exp r/R = 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.9 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                  Figure 4.5 BEM r/R = 0.5 Exp r/R = 0.4 4 8 3 α (deg) α (deg) 6 2 4 2 1 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 8 5 7 Exp r/R = 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.7 10 Exp r/R = 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.

5 0.5 2 1 1 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.5 1 1 Exp r/R = 0.5 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 7 4 Exp r/R = 0.5 6 3 α (deg) α (deg) 5 2.5 2 1 1 0.7 8 4 7 3.5 4 α (deg) α (deg) 2 3 1.5 6 3.5 Exp r/R = 0. 200  .5 4 2 3 1.8 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 5.9 0.116 – Comparison of α at Ψ=450.5 2.5 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                Figure 4.4 BEM r/R = 0.5 3 5 2.5 α (deg) 3 α (deg) 2 2.8 BEM r/R = 0.5 2 1.5 1.6 3.5 Exp r/R = 0.4 Exp r/R = 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.5 4 3 3.5 BEM r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           9 4.5 4 5 Exp r/R = 0.5 4.

117 – Comparison of Cl  at Ψ=300.2 Exp r/R = 0.3 0.35 0.35 0.4 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.5 Cl 0.45 0. 201  .05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.4 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.8 0.15 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.4 0.45 0.25 Cl Cl 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.25 Cl 0.4 0.6 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.3 0.05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.1 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.6 0.05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                Figure 4.9 BEM r/R = 0.35 0.8 0.9 0.3 0.3 Cl 0.2 0.5 0.7 0.9 0.4 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.5 0.5 0.7 0.2 0.8 0.2 0.6 0.3 Cl 0.15 0.25 0.15 0.4 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.

25 Cl 0.15 0.1 0.35 0.25 0.45 0.6 0.35 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                 Figure 4.3 0.9 0.05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.7 0.4 Cl Cl 0.2 Cl 0.2 0.25 0.6 0.4 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.4 Exp r/R = 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.05 Exp r/R = 0.6 0.118 – Comparison of Cl  at Ψ=450.3 0.05 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.1 0.45 Exp r/R = 0.15 0.5 0. 202  .7 0.3 0.8 0.1 0.5 0.35 0.2 0.5 Cl 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.1 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.3 0.8 0.2 0.15 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.1 Exp r/R = 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.2 0.35 0.15 0.4 Exp r/R = 0.25 Cl 0.7 Exp r/R = 0.

5 5 Exp r/R = 0.8 2 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 18 30 16 25 14 12 20 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 10 15 8 6 10 4 Exp r/R = 0. 203  .6 5 Exp r/R = 0.4 4 Exp r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.7 2 2 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 16 25 14 20 12 10 15 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 8 6 10 4 Exp r/R = 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.9 2 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                Figure 4.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           12 20 18 10 16 14 8 12 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 6 10 8 4 6 Exp r/R = 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.119 – Comparison of dT at Ψ=300.6 BEM r/R = 0.

5 Exp r/R = 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.7 1 2 Exp r/R = 0.6 Exp r/R = 0.9 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                 Figure 4.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           9 16 8 14 7 12 6 10 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 5 8 4 6 3 4 2 Exp r/R = 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.4 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 12 20 18 10 16 14 8 12 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 6 10 8 4 6 4 2 Exp r/R = 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.120 – Comparison of dT at Ψ=450. 204  .8 2 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 14 25 12 20 10 15 dT (N/m) dT (N/m) 8 6 10 4 5 2 Exp r/R = 0.

2 0.8 1 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.2 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.7 BEM r/R = 0.6 0.6 dQ (Nm/m) dQ (Nm/m) 0.4 0.2 0.5 0.4 0. 205  .8 Exp r/R = 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.4 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.4 0.3 0.6 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.1 Exp r/R = 0.2 0.8 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.7 0.6 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.9 1 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.7 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.2 0.6 0.2 0.9 0.6 dQ (Nm/m) dQ (Nm/m) 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.6 0.3 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.2 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                Figure 4.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.4 0.5 dQ (Nm/m) dQ (Nm/m) 0.7 0.3 0.4 0.8 0.1 Exp r/R = 0.9 0.3 0.2 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.8 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.121 – Comparison of dQ at Ψ=300.7 0.

1 0.05 -0.2 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.3 dQ (N/m) dQ (N/m) 0.5 0.2 0.2 0.1 -0.1 0.122 – Comparison of dQ at Ψ=450.35 0.15 0.4 0.1 -0.4 0.3 dQ (N/m) dQ (N/m) 0.1 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0.6 Exp r/R = 0.2 0.1 0 -0.2 0.5 0.4 BEM r/R = 0.3 dQ (N/m) 0. 206  .6 0.9 BEM r/R = 0.05 -0.2 -0.4 0.5 0.1 0.6 0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.2 0.1 -0.7 Exp r/R = 0.1 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.2 -0.5 Exp r/R = 0.6 Exp r/R = 0.9 0.5 BEM r/R = 0.7 0.7 Exp r/R = 0.4 0.6 0.                                                 Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 BEM r/R = 0.3 0.5 Exp r/R = 0.1 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg )                                                  Figure 4.2 0.6 BEM r/R = 0.3 0.2 -0.3 φ ( deg ) φ ( deg ) 0.3 dQ (N/m) 0.8 0.25 0.1 0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 360 -0.7 BEM r/R = 0.4 0.4 0.

 a small percentage error in the inflow measurements  may result into a significantly larger error in loading.  In other words.5 Conclusions         Wind  tunnel  measurements  were  taken  on  the  TUDelft model  turbine  carried  out  in an  open‐jet  facility  with  close  collaboration  with  Wouter  Haans.    When  treating  axial  conditions.  respectively.  This could be shown  through  a  simple  analytical  analysis  and  was  actually  proved  when  applying  an  uncertainty analysis with the hot‐film measurements taken on the TUDelft rotor. The  percentage error of these measurements was estimated to be in the range 6‐10% and  this was mainly due to the non‐uniformity in the tunnel exit jet of the wind tunnel.  The  maximum  errors  in  the  axial  thrust  loading  at  Ψ=300  and  Ψ=450  were  found  to  be  25%  and  35%.  linear  interpolation  was  used  to  estimate  such  velocities  from  the  measurements  taken  upstream  and  downstream  of  the  rotor.  In  yawed  conditions  the  error  was  larger.  A  methodology  was  applied for deriving the unsteady aerodynamic loading distributions at the blades from the  hot‐film  measurements  using  an  unsteady  aerofoil  model.  The  corresponding  errors  in  the  torque  loading  were  found  to  exceed  100%  and  this  mainly  occurred  when this loading was close to zero.  developed  by  Leishman  [49].  Two main conclusions can be  made: (a) the uncertainty in the derived loading distributions resulting from inflow  measurement  errors increases with yaw angle and (b) the uncertainty in the torque  loading is normally larger than that for the axial thrust loading.  positioning errors of the traversing system.  Two  different  measurement  campaigns  were  carried  out:  (1)  detailed hot‐film measurements in the near wake of the rotor.            It  is  important  to  point  out  again  the  fact  that  due  to  physical  restrictions. this methodology  was found to be quite challenging to apply due to the following drawbacks:    (1) The  derived  aerodynamic  loads  are  very  sensitive  to  the  errors  in  the  hot‐film  measurements.  Despite  the  fact  that  the  analysis  was  only  restricted  to  attached  flow  conditions  at  the  blades (for which the unsteady aerofoil model is considerably accurate).     207  .  This  introduced  an  additional  uncertainty  in  the  derived  loading  which  was  not  included  in  the  calculations.  it  is  impossible to measure the inflow velocities directly at the rotorplane with hot‐films.  which  is  considered  to  be  reasonable.  a  Phd  collegue  carrying  out  research  in  the  same  field. This uncertainty could not be determined as it was not possible to take  the measurements at the rotorplane with the equipment available. errors in calibrating the hot‐film probes  and  errors  in  the  data‐reduction  of  the  velocity  components. the error in the derived aerodynamic loading resulting from errors in the  hot‐film  data  did  not  exceed  20%.  (2)  smoke  visualization  measurements  to  track  the  tip‐vortex  paths  of  the  rotor  wake  together  with  measurements  of  the  rotor  axial  thrust. at various planes parallel to  the  rotorplane.  In  this  study.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           4.

  even  though  the  angle  of  attack  was  estimated  directly  from  the  inflow measurements.   ‐ It should be considered to use Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) instead of hot‐film  anemometry since the former has the capability to measure the inflow directly at the  rotorplane.     Recommendations for future work    This  work  on  the  TUDelft  rotor  has  revealed  the  various  difficulties  associated  with  deriving the steady/unsteady aerodynamic load distributions on a wind turbine blade from  detailed  hot‐film  measurements  in  the  near  wake  in  axial/yawed  conditions. Luckily.      Investigation of the limitations of BEM Codes    The results derived from the inflow measurements on the TUDelft rotor were used to carry  out a detailed investigation of a typical BEM code (HAWT_BEM) when modelling axial and  208  .  In  certain  cases. The importance of the tip/root correction depends on  the  aspect  ratio  of  the  blade  and  also  on  the  blade  geometry. PIV is very efficient since measurements at different points may be taken  simultaneously and very quickly. these influences were found to be very small. It is advisable to  use  higher  windspeeds  for  the  same  tip  speed  ratio  to  avoid  having  small  flow  velocities at the blades that could yield large percentage errors.  ‐ The  hot‐film  measurement  equipment  should  be  automated  as  much  as  possible. blade pressure measurements are not possible and alternatively the loads have to be  derived  from  the  near  wake  measurements. a prescribed‐wake vortex model was developed to determine whether tunnel  blockage influences were significant.                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           (2) A  tip/root  correction  is  required.  For  blades  having  a  small aspect ratio and a rectangular tip and root as that of the TUDelft rotor.  ‐ The  uncertainty  in  the  measurements  should  be  kept  very  low  (<3%  is  being  recommended) so that errors in the derived loading are minimized. This was due to the fact that the unsteady aerofoil model used  is  a  2D  model  and  thus  does  not  cater  for  the  highly  3D  flow  phenomena  taking  place at the blade tip and root.  It  was  found  that  the  bound  circulation  derived  using the employed unsteady aerofoil model was unrealistically high at the blade tip  and  root  regions. then 3D  effects are more prominent and this correction could not be ignored.      In this study.  The  detailed  hot‐film  measurements  in  this  study  have  proved  to  be  very  time  consuming  and  the  following  recommendations  from  lessons learnt are being made for future work:     ‐ The  rotor  should  have  a  high  aspect  ratio to  minimize  the uncertainty  in  the  tip/root  loss correction.  In  this  way  it  would  be  possible  to  take  more  repetitive  measurements  for  the  same  period of time available for the wind tunnel testing.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                           yawed turbines.                                                                          209  . but these will be discussed in Chapter 7. together with other  conclusions  drawn  from  a  similar  investigation  on  the  NREL  Phase  VI  rotor  described  in  Chapter 6.  it  was  still  possible  to  have  a  better  understanding  of  the  limitations  of  BEM‐ based  design  codes  and  obtain  further  intuition  of  how  these  may  be  improved.  Various  conclusions could be drawn. Despite that attached flow conditions were only being treated and also the  fact that the results derived from the inflow measurements had a high level of uncertainty  in  general.

                                                Chapter 4 – Aerodynamic Analysis of the TUDelft Model Turbine                                 210  .

 Circulation around the blades is modelled with a lifting line or  lifting  surface  representation.  Circulation in the wake is modelled by a series of vortex filaments that may take the form of  lines (Afjeh et al.  named  HAWT_FWC  (FWC  meaning  Free‐ Wake Code).  [46].  As  already  outlined  in  Chapter  2.  These  methods  are  based  on  the  principle  that. are the so‐called free‐wake  vortex  methods.  The  induced  velocity  at  different  points  in  the  wake  is  computed using the Biot‐Savart law. Bareiß et al. This novel method will be presented in detailed in Chapter 6. Unlike other free‐wake models.4) with a local velocity that is the  vectorial  sum  of  the  free  stream  velocity  and  that  induced  by  all  vorticity  sources  in  the  wake and from the blades. Voutsinas et al.  for  flows  that  may  be  assumed to be incompressible and inviscid. Leishman et al.    In  this  project. Section 5.  a  new  free‐wake  vortex  model. vorticity formed at the blades is convected into  the wake as trailing and shed vorticity (as shown in Fig.  From  this  prescription.    211  . it does not directly rely on  the availability of aerofoil data to iteratively determine the blade loading. It  was  specifically  designed  to  model  HAWT  rotor  wakes  from  knowledge  of  the  aerodynamic loads at the blades. [1].2 describes the numerical model implemented in the free‐wake code  HAWT_FWC.                                                                  Chapter 5 –Development of a Free‐Wake Vortex Model                              5. Section 5. [51]. together with the program structure. [101]). Development of A Free‐wake Vortex Model      5. Garrel  [26]) or particles (Lee et al.    This chapter is organized in two sections:    A.    B. These methods are typically unsteady in nature: vorticity in the  wake  is  allowed  to  diffuse  freely  and  the  evolution  of  the  wake  is  calculated  in  time. [6]. 1. was developed.  the  main  reason  for  developing  this  code  was  to  use  it  in  the  novel  approach  being proposed for deriving the angle of attack distributions in HAWTs from blade pressure  measurements.  the  code  generates  a  wake  and  then  calculates  the  3D  induced  velocities  at  different  points  in  the  flow  field  of  the  rotor.1 Introduction        A  special  class  of  rotor  aerodynamic  models  that  are  less  computationally  demanding  than CFD techniques but are more reliable than BEM methods.3 describes the verification and validation work carried out on  HAWT_FWC using the experimental data obtained for the TUDelft rotor. The input to this  code  is  a  prescribed  spanwise  distribution  of  bound  circulation  that  may  be  time‐ dependent. The model is applicable to both axial and yawed conditions.

2 Free‐wake Numerical Model    5.2.  blade  chord  and  twist  is  approximately represented by the straight‐line segments between i and i=i+1.  212  . An important requirement of  this  piecewise  constant  representation  is  that  the  spanwise  segments  be  small  enough  so  that  any  variation  in  the  prescribed  bound  circulation. The number of segments is equal  to n while i is an index representing each particular segment.         Prescribed bound    circulation distribution             ξ ΓΒn-4 ΓΒn-3 ΓΒn-2 ΓB2 ΓB1 ΓB0          . .1.   Rotor axis                                          Figure 5. .1 Blade Model    In this model. .1 – Discretization of Blade and Bound Circulation Distribution.  The  arrangement of the segmentation is illustrated in Fig. . 5. .           rn‐1 = Rt   ri+1   ri   ri‐1   δr   r0 = Rr     ξ     Rotor axis     i=0 i=1 i=2 i=3 i = n-3 i = n-2 i = n-1 . each rotor blade is represented by a lifting line consisting