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O REGON S HORES C ONSERVATION C OALITION

O REGON S HORES
F ALL N EWSLET TER
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 O CTOBER 2007

OREGON SHORES’ OCTOBER ANNUAL MEETING


TO CELEBRATE BEACH BILL’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY
Please join Oregon Shores Conservation Coali- with a welcome from Oregon Shores’ presi- OREGON SHORES
tion in Newport on Saturday, October 13th to dent followed by election of the board of direc-
celebrate the 40th anniversary of Oregon’s tors. BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Beach Bill with a line up of speakers united Allison Asbjornsen, President
There will be a short break to allow partici-
around the theme, “Bold Actions: Past and Future.”
pants to visit informally (please bring a sack Bill Kabeiseman, Vice President
Of course, the “Bold Actions, Past” refers to our lunch) with registration for the afternoon pro- Cathern Tufts, Secretary
beloved Beach Bill which continues to assure gram to begin at 12:30 p.m. outside the doors
Nan Evans
that, “In Oregon, the beaches belong to the people,” of the HMSC auditorium where presentations
and provides the original basis of Oregon will commence at 1:00 p.m. Evelyn McConnaughey
Shores’ mission. Kris Olson
Dave Talbot, who served as director of the
The “Bold Action, Future” refers to two key pro- Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at Steve Schell
jects important to Oregon Shores members and the time the Beach Bill was passed in 1967, will Anne Squier
Coastwatchers: 1) establishing a system of ma- kick off the afternoon by providing a first-hand
rine reserves to protect key habitats in Ore- perspective on the political climate and courage H. Eric Watkins
gon’s nearshore ocean, and 2) passing Measure that it took to take bold action to protect public Catherine Wiley
49 in November to assure that Oregon’s land access to Oregon’s beaches 40 years ago.
use system continues to serve to protect our
Then, state Representative Greg MacPherson,
beautiful Oregon coastline long into the future.
will help us make the bridge from bold actions
The business portion of Oregon Shores’ annual past to the need for continued bold actions in
meeting will begin at 11:00 a.m. in Room the future. Rep. MacPherson served as co-chair I N SIDE T H IS ISSUE :
30/32 of the Hatfield Marine Science Center
(Continued on page 10)
P RESIDENT ’ S 2
M ESSAGE
MEASURE 49 ON NOVEMBER BALLOT
I NTER TIDAL A CTION 3
It is clear to all who love Ore- Oregon Shores’ board has de- A HEAD
gon’s landscape that Measure 37, cided to place the organization in 4,5
L AND U SE U PDATE
which severely altered Oregon’s full support of Measure 49 and
land use laws, is broken and work on the campaign to support T HANKS , D O NO R S ! 6,7
needs to be fixed. The 2007 Leg- its passage.
islature held weeks of hearings on S EA P OETRY 8,11
The coastal counties had fewer
the many problems with Measure
numbers of Measure 37 claims than
37 and ultimately decided to pass S OR TE R EMEMBER ED 9
the Willamette Valley counties,
a new measure on to the voters
where development pressures are
which would restore balance to O CEAN U PDATE 9,10
high. But in five coastal counties
the land use laws. This new
there are more than 500 claims,
measure, which will appear on CALENDAR 12
and Measure 37 claims on the coast include
your ballot in November 2007, is Measure 49.
(Continued on page 8)
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 P AGE 2

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT


Dear beachwalkers, birdwatchers, Our CoastWatch program continues to grow, while planning
for a new, major effort to collaborate with State Parks in pro-
kayakers, surfers, kite flyers, tecting rocky shores.
tidepool explorers, Are you aware that our dedicated staff are accomplishing all
this while being paid only part-time? Those of us on the board
and all others who love our coast — are extremely eager to increase the support we can offer them,
I’ve discovered a new, coast-related pleasure where I least ex- and thereby increase our capacity to meet all the challenges of
pected it. In fact, it is a task I tried to dodge, until I reluctantly coastal conservation.
took it up and discovered its rewards. The task is to send We also need to look ahead to next year, and build up reserves
thank-you letters to everyone who contributes to Oregon that will enable us to take bold action. A very generous recent
Shores, and it turns out that this is wonderful for the spirit! It gift from long-time board member Evelyn McConnaughey
is humbling and encouraging and an all-around honor and helps to point the way. Evelyn, who has served on our board
pleasure. for fully 30 years, placed a capstone on
We all shy away from talking about her lifelong commitment to the
money, and sending similar letters to hun- coast with a $30,000 contribution.
dreds of people at first glance appears to Some of it will go to meet this
be tedious labor, so it is understandable year’s immediate needs, but she
that I didn’t approach the chore with en- stated her intention that the bulk of
thusiasm when I took it on. What I hadn’t the funds go into our reserves, to

Photo: Laurel Hillmann


realized is how it would make me feel to help us address our need for an
be in touch with hundreds of people, all of executive director and for program
whom care enough about the Oregon expansion.
coast and Oregon Shores’ work to make a Evelyn’s gift doesn’t enable us to sit
gift. The more letters I write, the more back comfortably—far from it.
my spirit is lifted, as I feel connected to so Instead, it is a launching pad. It
many people who share our concerns and gives us a great start toward taking
entrust us to act on them. Oregon Shores to a higher level, and
I’m honored to be part of this connection, and intrigued to increases our chances of success. All the more reason for all
imagine the stories behind all these wonderful gestures of sup- those who love the coast—all you beachwalkers, birdwatchers,
port, from the person who sent us $1 to the board member surfers, kayakers, tidepool explorers and all the rest—to help
who recently made a landmark donation of $30,000. Every us seize this opportunity. We need your involvement as volun-
gift bolsters our budget, every gift cheers us on, and every gift teers, and we need your voices in support of our policy stands.
renews the commitment I feel to work hard on the many issues But all those thank-you letters I’ve written have encouraged me
affecting the Oregon coast. I hope that many more of you will not to be shy about money. We do need your financial support
keep me busy writing letters. We have a great deal going on if we are to adequately support our staff, expand our efforts on
right now, and we also need to build up our reserves so that we every front and meet the needs of coastal conservation. Please
will be ready for further evolution as an organization. keep me writing those letters. I will gladly suffer writer’s
We’re doing more than ever before, and sometimes the pace cramp on behalf of the Oregon coast!
seems dizzying. Thanks in part to a grant from the Jubitz Fam- Please read the rest of this newsletter to get a sense of the wide
ily Foundation, our land use director, Cameron La Follette, has range of Oregon Shores’ activities. And then, please consider
launched a new South Coast Rivers Land Use Initiative, which how you can help us build on this shared success.
will expand our efforts in Coos and Curry counties.
Gratefully yours,
Robin Hartmann, our ocean program director, is playing a cen-
tral role in both the campaign to establish marine reserves and
other protected areas in the ocean, and in addressing the poten- Allison Asbjornsen
tial impacts of wave energy development.
P AGE 3 O REGON S HORES

COASTWATCH CONTINUES FOCUS ON PROTECTING ROCKY SHORES


CoastWatch mile adopters keep an eye on the entire range of double benefit of enrich-
shoreline habitats, but for the past year and more, the program ing the educational
has paid special attention to tidepools and other rocky shore experience for the
areas. That emphasis will continue, as we point toward in- students while
creased collaboration with the Oregon Parks and Recreation deterring what is
Department (State Parks) in monitoring and protecting these often very serious
ecosystems, which are vulnerable to everything from overhar- damage to tide-
vesting to invasive species to simply being “loved to death.” pool life.
All of Oregon Shores’ work emphasizes connections between The first special
land and ocean, seeking to build public awareness of the links training event in
among onshore activities, shoreline management and the health support of this
of the nearshore ocean. During much of 2006 and 2007, “coast host” project
CoastWatch worked with Oregon Shores’ Ocean and Land Use has just been sched-
programs through the Oregon Coastal Ocean and Intertidal uled for December
Conservation Project. More than 900 Oregonians have at- 7th and 8th at the Going In
tertida
tended educational programs and training sessions during this Lane Community l!
period, learning more about the way that shoreline communi- College branch in Florence. The two-
ties interact with the neighboring marine waters. In particular, day conference will feature a number of talks and workshops,
hundreds saw our specially commissioned slide talk, primarily emphasizing rocky shorelines. It will be open to all
“Connections: A Tale of Rocky Shores and the Ocean Next CoastWatchers and the general public, and will include much
Door,” by environmental educator Nancy Steinberg. material of interest to all coast-lovers, not just volunteers for
the project. One goal is to lay the groundwork for both the
CoastWatch’s goal for this fall and for the coming year is to
rocky shore survey and “coast host” projects in 2008, but an-
translate this educational effort into more effective monitoring
other is to improve all CoastWatchers’ monitoring skills where
and action to protect rocky intertidal areas. We intend to col-
rocky shores are concerned.
laborate with State Parks in two ways. The first is the rocky
shore visitor use survey. Volunteers from within the Coast- CoastWatch isn’t exclusively focused on rocky shores. A num-
Watch ranks will be posted during low-tide periods at selected ber of training sessions have been devoted to beaches and
tidepool regions which are heavily visited and subject to im- dunes. Often, as with the recent event in Reedsport, our first
pacts both deliberate (harvesting of shellfish and seaweed) or in Douglas County in many years, these sessions have featured
inadvertent (such as handling or trampling). The information geologist Roger Hart’s talk, “Where Has All the Sand Gone?”
will be used by State Parks in planning for rocky shore manage-
Dozens of CoastWatchers have also played an active role in the
ment and designating areas for higher levels of protection. A
beached bird survey, for which we are the Oregon partner of
number of CoastWatchers assisted with a successful pilot pro-
the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST),
ject at three sites this summer, and we hope to expand the ef-
which operates the survey in five states. COASST plans a spe-
fort next year.
cial, intensified survey for the area from Tillamook Bay to
More ambitiously, we hope to work with State Parks to de- Grays’ Harbor in Washington, to glean more detailed data over
velop a new “coast host” project. This will involve recruiting the next two years, which will be used to calibrate the results
and training a pool of special volunteers who will meet the from the regular survey. We are helping COASST to step up
public at high-impact tidepool areas, both providing informa- outreach efforts on the northern coast, as additional volunteers
tion about natural history and discouraging damaging behavior. will be needed for this special project. (CoastWatchers don’t
The goal is to get this project started in 2008 at a few sites necessarily work on their own miles when participating in the
(depending on how many volunteers come forward), and to beached bird survey. Anyone who can get to one of the survey
build up the pool of available hosts and thus the number of sites sites from Tillamook Bay north once or more a month can play
we can help to protect in future years. a useful role in this citizen science effort.)
A particular need is to provide volunteers to meet school CoastWatch continues to grow, with more than a hundred new
groups, which often arrive at the shoreline in large numbers mile adopters joining our ranks during the past year. The web-
and with too little supervision; trained hosts would provide the (Continued on page 11)
P AGE 4 O REGON S HORES

PROTECTING THE TREASURE: SOUTH COAST RIVERS PROJECT


Oregon Shores recently received a match- development in Harbor Hills south of
ing grant from the Jubitz Family Founda- Brookings, the area added to the city’s
tion which will enable us to expand our Urban Growth Boundary in 1998. Hills
efforts to protect the rivers of the south in that area are so steep that develop-
coast. A number of activities will keep our ment there will increase stormwater
Land Use Program busy working to protect and erosion problems for the lily bulb
the waters of this region. farmers on the Harbor Bench below.
Instream gravel mining is generating great Having the Jubitz grant also will allow
controversy on the Chetco River near- us to focus attention on Johnson Creek
Brookings and on the Rogue River a little in Coos County, which flows directly
further north. All gravel mining on the to the sea near Bandon. A 90-foot-high
Chetco has been stopped as of October 2006 due to a cease- dam is proposed on the creek up in the forested hills east of
and-desist order from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers town. The proponents hope to use the water mainly for the city
against Tidewater Sand and Gravel and Freeman Rock, the two of Bandon and for Bandon Dunes’ several new golf courses pro-
main operators in the area. But both companies have been ap- posed near the resort. Johnson Creek is a salmon stream, and
plying to Curry County for renewal of their permits in any owners in the area have been working hard to restore it for
event. Oregon Shores has been participating in the hearings, salmon spawning. The proponents of the dam recently filed
and will continue to do so. with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for a fish
passage waiver to allow them to build the dam without (very
Freeman also proposed increasing its gravel extraction from the
expensive) fish ladders and provide mitigation to fish elsewhere
lower Rogue by 150 percent. However, the Curry County
instead.
planning commission refused to grant this increase, and the
matter is under appeal. If you’re interested in south coast rivers, or have knowledge
and experience about rivers that Oregon Shores is not aware of,
In addition to gravel mining, Oregon Shores is participating in
please contact Cameron La Follette, Oregon Shores’ land use
the hearings for the new Mixed Use Master Plan (MUMP) ordi-
director at thehomecountry@onemain.com or 503-391-0210.
nance proposed by Curry County, which will govern future

SAND LAKE SAFE FROM MEASURE 37 CLAIM


Frank Bastasch, owner of the Sand Lake property in Tillamook overlay zone sunsetted in 1992 because Mr. Bastasch did not
County, filed a Measure 37 claim against the county, hoping to take the necessary actions to extend it. In May 2007, Mr. Bas-
be able to thereby get permission to build the golf course and tasch filed suit in Tillamook County Circuit Court to overturn
resort he has sought for so long. In March 2007, the Tillamook the county decision. The county has filed to dismiss the action.
County Commissioners turned Bastasch’s claim down. He Oregon Shores is watching this case carefully,
had sought for the Coast Resort overlay on and will intervene if necessary, in support of
his property to be reinstated—the exact Tillamook County’s correct dismissal of
opposite of Measure 37 claims in the Measure 37 claim.
general, where landowners seek to
have land use laws rolled back. The

BOTTS MARSH . . . THREATENED AGAIN


Botts Marsh, in the Nehalem Wheeler, which is under consid-
River estuary in northern Tilla- eration. In it he proposes an as-yet
mook County, is seeing activity again. undetermined number of condomini-
The marsh and associated uplands are in the ums, related commercial development and a
urban growth boundary for the City of Wheeler. The owner, dock out into the Nehalem River. The fate of Botts Marsh un-
Vern Scovell, has launched a new set of proposals to develop der this application is not yet clear. Oregon Shores is watching
the area. He filed Measure 37 claims with both the City of this development proposal, and working with local activists to
Wheeler and Tillamook County, which are still being proc- ensure that the Marsh is protected and not developed (as
essed. He also filed a development application with the City of Scovell has proposed in the past) as a marina.
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 P AGE 5

COASTAL LAW PROJECT: KEEPING CITIZENS IN THE LAND USE GAME


The Coastal Law Project (CLP) is a Hank Westbrook. He sought before to
unique coalition among three groups build a large planned-unit develop-
which seeks to help coastal activists par- ment on the property, which was
ticipate effectively in local hearings and blocked by a lawsuit brought by CLP;
provide low-cost legal support when then he filed a Measure 37 claim to
cases need to be taken into the court allow the development; and now he
system. Started by Oregon Shores over has filed another land use application,
three years ago when seeking help with still seeking the same large, inappro-
burgeoning needs on the coast, CLP is priate development.
now a well-established coalition.
• A third issue for CLP is an appli-
The overall running of CLP lies with cation, also by Hank Westbrook, to
Oregon Shores, which works with local build a 170-unit trailer park on a piece
activists and keeps track of upcoming of land fronting the Coquille River,
situations that will need attention. Goal just outside Bandon. It would be a
One Coalition provides expert help in classic case of sprawl: allowing urban
writing testimony for local hearings and uses outside a city’s urban area. There
working with activists to ensure good participation in local are many issues in the case — from water problems to
hearings. Crag Law Center in Portland, and sometimes Goal sewage disposal — but the issue of urban uses on rural
One as well, provide the low-cost, or free, lawyers to take lands is central. Local hearings are completed, and Oregon
cases Oregon Shores is concerned about to the Land Use Board Shores and adjacent residents have taken the matter to the
of Appeals—and sometimes beyond. Land Use Board of Appeals (LUBA) represented by CLP
Currently CLP members are working on several issues: member Goal One Coalition.
Oregon Shores is seeking to raise money to support our work in
• One of these is the proposal to build a Liquefied Natural
the Coastal Law Project. If you are interested in this project and
Gas (LNG) facility on the North Spit of Coos Bay.
would like to contribute, please contact Cameron La Follette,
• Another is continuing vigilance over Indian Point, the Oregon Shores’ land use director at 503-391-0210 or at
180+ acre forested land right on South Slough owned by thehomecountry@onemain.com.

COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT ACT UP FOR REAUTHORIZATION


The federal Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) gives state CZMA participation is only voluntary. Any reauthorization will
programs, like Oregon’s Coastal Management Program, addi- keep Oregon’s laws and requirements in place; CZMA support-
tional force by creating a mutually binding pact with the federal ers are trying, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, to get more
government. Oregon’s program, based on our land use laws, states to do the things Oregon (and California) already do.
has been approved at the federal level, triggering “consistency,”
So what do Oregonians need to do now? It will be important in
meaning that U.S. actions must align with Oregon’s coastal
the fall, after the November election, to inform our congres-
policies. Approval under the CZMA also brings with it federal
sional delegation about the CZMA reauthorization effort. Mem-
funding.
bers of the delegation will be voting on CZMA reauthorization,
The CZMA is up for reauthorization by Congress this year and of course; but we want them to really support a strong new
next. Currently the nationwide Coastal States Organization is law. This is especially true of Oregon Senators Gordon Smith
talking with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- and Ron Wyden.
tion (NOAA) about key points they want approved. Bill drafts
Additionally, the votes of Oregon Representatives David Wu
from both entities should start circulating soon. Everyone hopes
and Darlene Hooley matter greatly in the House, because both
to have a solid bill package by December 2007, with hearings
have coastal territory in their districts, and both have worked
before Congress sometime in the spring of 2008.
with coastal constituents on various matters in the past. You
Supporters want to ramp up the scope and effectiveness of state will be hearing from Oregon Shores about CZMA reauthoriza-
coastal programs. Oregon is lucky—we already have a strong tion as the process gets a little clearer in this winter.
mandatory coastal program—which is a good thing, since
P AGE 6 O REGON S HORES

CONTRIBUTORS FOR 2007 MAKE


OREGON SHORES’ WORK POSSIBLE
More than 200 of you have made possible our
have already underwrit- Land Use, Ocean and
ten Oregon Shores’ suc- CoastWatch programs;
cessful work on many our conferences and
fronts with financial con- workshops; our policy
tributions this year. work at the local, state
Some gifts have been for and federal level; even
$1 or $5, and some have this very newsletter.
reached four or even five Please consider joining
figures; some have been this list before 2007 is
to the general fund and out. If your name is al-
some have been earmarked for special purposes; some ready found below, many thanks from Oregon Shores’
have come in all at once and some have been pledged for board and staff, and from all those who care about the
the future; all are greatly valued. These generous donors Oregon coast.

Headland Group Our Generous Donors Alfred and Kathleen Coombe


($5,000-plus) Elaine Cramer
Robert and Kerstin Adams David and Michie Crane
Evelyn McConnaughey Vic Affolter Brian and Mary Crawford
Kris Olson Jennifer Agnew Cliff Cruickshank
Alaskan Brewing Company Robert Dady and Karen Reyes
Oswald West Society Joe Amicarella William Dalton
($1,000-plus) Steven and Linda Anderson Jean and Patrick DeCato
C. Lloyd Anderson Barbara Dodrill
Anonymous Philip and Joanne Anselone
Jane Beckwith V. Alton Dohner
Bob Bacon and Sue Daniels David and Heather Donielson
Geraldine and Robert Haynes Diane Bailiff
Jerry and Kristayani Jones Carol and Robert Doty
Ewart Baldwin Joy Dresie
Cynthia Lord John and Juanita Batson
Paul and Lory Utz Ann Eaton
R. Peter Bauer Eco Justice Committee,
John Vitas and Pat Towle Joy Bautz
Howard Watkins Benedictine Sisters
Larry and Mary Ann Beggs Carl and Millie Ehrman
Bob Berman and Cindy Lippincott Sven and Paula Eldring
Director’s Circle Dave and Diane Bilderback
($500-plus) Joseph Erceg
Robert Black Charles Evans
Allison Asbjornsen Florence Blitch Nancie Fadeley
and Forrest Dickerson Katherine Brigham Clara Fairfield
Willotta Asbjornsen Dirk and Loretta Brinke Marjorie Feldman and Francis Quinn
Daniel Anderson and Joy Strand William and Marilyn Buskirk Jamie Fereday and Margaret Ryan
Gerry and Nancy Brown Angela Calkins Caryn Fieger
Johanna Cummings Joan Campf Jack Finch
Christine DeMoll and Bill James Anne Caples Carol Fisher
Barbara Hilyer and John Daggett Gert Carey Clifford and Margaret Fisher
Ron Hogeland and Nancy Archer Steven and Adrienne Casey Bob and Linda Fleming
Kalmiopsis Audubon Society Leo and Jean Chiantelli Rene and Janet Fortin
Maria and John Phipps Andy and Lynn Christensen George and Sandra Frick
Craig and Anne Swinford Gerald and Joanne Clark Marie Gargano
Eric and Ann Watkins Leonard and Else Cobb Janice and J.W. Gerdemann
Jane Comerford Stephen Gerould
Sixto Contreras, Jr. Jerry Gibson
Stanton Cook
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 P AGE 7

THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS

Edward Gingras and Jennifer Iams Ian and Yvonne Maitland Kenneth and Ruth Ross
Gayla Gomena James Marshall Ed and Lorraine Rossiter
William and Kimberly Graham Dennis Martin and Corinne Sherton Kenneth Rystrom
Patricia Graves Bob Martyn Erica Rubin and Tom Swanson
David and Evelyn Gray and Donna Harwood-Martyn Bill and Joan Russell
Winthrop Gross David McConnaughey Monica Schreiber
Susan Hay and Michael Becker and Patricia Blanton Judy Schwartz-Sorrel
Tom and Eileen Hallee Christine McElroy Alan and Sylvia Seder
Frank and Rebecca Hatcher John and Vernie McGowan Jean Shank
John Haxton Ruby Miller Bryan and Betty Shaner
J. Richard Heinzkill Donald Miller John Sherman
Howard and Akiko Helwig Gainor Minott Ron and Mary Sherriffs
Bonnie Henderson Derith Mottershaw Steve and Krista Shipsey
and Charles Zennache Beverly Nachel Myrna Sims and Dorothy Diel
Dennis Higgins Gerald Nagel Billy Smith
Robert and Inger Hobron Milt and Shirley Nelson Roderick and Jean Smith
William and Paula Hoehn Wade and Corinne Newbegin Robert and Margaret Smith
Lori Hollingsworth Paul Niblock and Victoria Lambert James R. Smith
Kerry Holman and Laurie Prouty Lori and David Sours
Berne and Merrilee Howard South Coast Unitarian Fellowship
Mike Hryekewicz Betty Sparks
Fred Hummel Shirley Suddeth
George and Shirley Humphreys Laura Svendsgaard and Ron Brean
Tom Hurst and Nancy Steinberg Michael and Yvette St. John
Barbara Isenberg Edwin and Judy Swenson
Dotta Janssens Gary and Esther Tepfer
Merlyn and Elizabeth Javens Marisu Terry
Gordon Joachim and Narda Tolentino Seth and Suzanne Thompson
Wallace Johnson Brent Thompson
Phillip Johnson Cheryl and Ray Thorp
Gary Johnson and Lisa Jaffe Jim Thurber
John M. Johnson Jeanne Norton Debby Todd
Gail Katul Alice Oglesby Lysbeth Toribio
Murray Kaufman Robert and Carolyn Ollikainen Margaret Tweelinckx
Mary Kentula and Donald Armstrong Pauline Olsen Ron and Nancy Usher
Charles and Reida Kimmel Maynard and Betty Olson Lorraine Vanderzander
Daniel Kinsey Don and Elizabeth Oswalt John Vitas and Pat Towle
Gary and Sharon Kish Timothy O’Toole Merle and Suzanne Wallis
P.C. Klahr Walter and Carol Ottoson Joanne Walls
Randall and Helaine Koch Jeff Ouderkirk Joanne Warren
Bill and Carolyn Kolzow Elaine Owens Lavern Weber and Pat Lewis
Paul and Janet Komar Diane Pace Helen Westbrook
Louis and Kathie Kroeck J.B. and M.D. Parks Mitchell Williams
Jim and Myra Lawson Edgar and Phyllis Peara Hanspeter Witschi
Archie and Pauli LeCoque Carrie Phillips Bernard and Carol Wolff
Alexander Linke Michael and Sharon Posner Chester and Patricia Wolter
Pat Linstromberg Shawn Powell and Tina Choi Kip Wright
Byron Lippert Doug Purcell and Lani Warner
Lee and Ann Littlewood John D. Randall Foundations
Bob and Shirley Loeffel Judson Randall Bullitt Foundation
Porter and Corinne Lombard Kendall Ridgway Hydropower Reform Coalition
Richard and Elizabeth Lyons Jim and Carrie Rogers REI Inc.
Neal Maine Patricia Romanov
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 P AGE 8

MEASURE 49 ON BALLOT IN NOVEMBER


(Continued from page 1)

some of the most damaging in the whole state. For example, the
Knox Baird Davis claim seeks an urban-type development on
1,500 acres along the lower Rogue River above Gold Beach. The
Sweet Ranch claim seeks to build a Bandon Dunes-style resort on
the 700+ acre ranch at the mouth of the pristine Sixes River in
north Curry County, right on the coast.
Sea Lion Caves, that icon of coastal tourism north of Florence,
filed a claim seeking unspecified residential development on
some 200 acres they own on the east side of the highway by the
ELAKHA *
Caves. The Scheinberg claim in Lincoln County seeks to build
100 houses on 120 acres of forestland on the north side of Devils The sea is sobbing against high cliff and stone
Lake, just outside the Lincoln City urban growth boundary. And,
in Clatsop County there is the Reith claim to develop housing on The sea flings itself against the running foam:
180 acres along the scenic Lewis and Clark River. O I am alone, ever in the waves alone
These few examples do not include the thousands of acres of Elakha, elakha, will you come never home?
forestland under Measure 37 claims by various timber compa-
nies--including Plum Creek Timber (who initially filed over I have wave of sparkling salt, I have summer tide
30,000 acres of claims but recently said they are withdrawing all And white mists and purple howling gale;
of them), Simpson Lumber, South Coast Lumber and Davidson
Industries--hoping to develop rural housing on the state’s best Schools of fish gleam and weep by my side
coastal timberland. Far in the deep mourns the spouting whale.
Measure 49, if passed, will allow a land owner to build up to O elakha, leap again where the spindrifts burn
three houses on the owner’s land if he or she could have done so
at the time of purchase. These rights will be fully transferable to I am weak, I run spiritless upon the shore,
later sellers, which is not true for development under Measure From warm blue waters will you never turn?
37. Except on groundwater-limited areas and high-value farm or
Hollowed is my heart as shell on the sea floor.
forestland, under Measure 49, a landowner could apply to build
up to ten houses if he or she can prove loss of value due to land O elakha, he plays in the white sun far away
use laws equal to the value of the houses. Large subdivisions, and
But he hears the call of the foaming northern sea,
commercial and industrial development, must follow the regular
land use laws. He rides waters forgotten, stormy and gray
Measure 49 will thus protect Oregon’s farm and forestland, as Into the waves green and cold and lonely;
well as groundwater-limited areas, and prohibit large-scale de- The high black cliff-stone claps his hands
velopment in inappropriate areas of the state.
O cries the sea, come fish, come whale of the deeps,
For more information on Measure 49 and how you can help,
contact Cameron LaFollette at thehomecountry@onemain.com Elakha returns; shine in the moon, O sands
or 503-391-0210 or the Measure 49 campaign at Elakha is playing where the sea-forest sleeps.
www.yeson49.com.

*Elakha: the Chinook word for “sea-otter.”


Cameron La Follette
P AGE 9 O REGON S HORES

GOVERNOR BEGINS 18-MONTH COUNTDOWN


TO MARINE RESERVES
In June, Governor Ted Kulongoski set in motion a plan for bers and the public in participating in the nomination process as
making marine reserves a reality in Oregon which includes a well as in advocating, over the entire 18-month period, for es-
rousing 18-month timeline. “The purpose of the network of tablishment of a network of marine reserves that is based on
reserves is to help protect, sustain or restore the nearshore ma- sound science and that will adequately protect key ecosystems
rine ecosystem, its habitats and species for the heritage values and marine habitats for the future.
they represent to present and future generations.”
Many of Oregon Shores’ members have learned about marine
The strategy relies on the participation and expertise of many reserves over the past couple years, having viewed the made-in-
and outlines explicit roles for Oregon citizens, esteemed marine Oregon film, “Common Ground,” about how marine reserves
scientists, Oregon’s Ocean Policy Advisory Council (OPAC), are an important tool for protecting fully-intact ecosystems and
the Marine Cabinet (made up of state agency with authority for especially for protecting old-growth age structure. We know
managing Oregon’s Territorial Sea out to three miles), the about the need to set aside some areas of the ocean from all
Governor’s natural resources staff and ultimately the State Land extraction so that the “big, old, fat, fertile, female fish,” affec-
Board and Oregon’s Fish and Wildlife Commission. tionately known as “BOFFFFs,” can live in these areas to reach
the ripe, old age of 30 to 50 years, when the are the most pro-
Essentially, the plan consists of four phases. First, from now
ductive and are giving birth to the healthiest young which will
until the end of the year, the OPAC will finalize objectives for
serve to reseed the ocean in areas around the reserves. For
the network of reserves as well as forms and the process to be
those of you who have seen the film and heard this message, it
used during the public nomination period. The OPAC’s Science
will soon be time to put this knowledge to work during the
and Technical Advisory Committee will develop a set of crite-
marine reserves public nomination process.
ria, based on the objectives, to evaluate site nominations, as
well as a Web-based toolkit, including maps and ecological in- The third phase, to occur from July through September of
formation about areas in Oregon’s ocean that can be readily 2008, will involve development of a set of coastwide alterna-
accessed by Oregon citizens to assist them in developing a tives for a network of marine reserves by a team of scientists
nomination proposal. and agency staff, based on the nominations receive from the
public. The OPAC will take those alternatives back out to the
Second, in January 2008, the public nomination process begins
public for input, then advise the Governor.
with an outreach effort, and will continue through April. Ore-
gon citizens and organizations will use a nomination form and Finally, during the fourth phase, October through December
draw upon the Web-based mapping tools developed specifically 2008, the Governor will forward the alternatives to the agen-
for the nomination process, as well as any other information cies for rulemaking and action by the State Land Board and the
they may find useful, and submit the completed forms to a des- Fish and Wildlife Commission.
ignated state agency, whose staff will post all nominations on
For information on how you can participate in the nomination
the OPAC website.
process and advocate for a system of reserves, attend Oregon
To assist in this effort, Oregon Shores will hold a series of Shores October 13th annual meeting (see page one) to hear
meetings this winter and next spring, assisted by funding from directly from Jessica Hamilton, the Governor’s natural re-
the Bullitt Foundation, to provide information about ecologi- sources policy advisory, or contact Robin Hartmann at
cally important areas of Oregon’s ocean and to assist our mem- robin@oregonshores.org or 541-672-3694.

IN MEMORIAM: FORMER BOARD MEMBER CURTIS SORTE


We are sad to report that long-time Oregon Shores board During his time on the board, he played a lead role in preserv-
member Curtis Sorte passed away August 5th. A resident of ing wetlands adjacent to South Beach State Park. He also served
South Beach in Lincoln County until his final months, Curt as a CoastWatch mile adopter from the program’s inception,
served on the board for more than 15 years, stepping down and kept a sharp eye on his adopted mile. For a time, he and
only a year ago. granddaughter Cascade Sorte (a marine biology student) were
the program’s only grandparent/adult grandchild pair.
Curtis enjoyed a long career as a dentist and dental surgeon in
Albany, Oregon, until, in retirement, he and his wife, Mary Curt’s family has requested that memorial contributions be
Jean, moved to what had been their second home on the coast. made to Oregon Shores, for which we are grateful.
P AGE 10 O REGON S HORES

ANNUAL MEETING A CELEBRATION, CALL TO ACTION


(Continued from page 1) will make presentions on the organization’s three program areas
- ocean, land use and CoastWatch— and describe what steps
of the Oregon Legislature’s Land Use Fairness Committee are being taking to help implement bold actions to protect our
where many of the problems with Measure 37 were addressed coast and ocean, as well as ways you can become involved.
and shaped into a solution that will be before voters this No- Cameron LaFollette, director of Oregon Shores’ land use pro-
vember (Measure 49). Additionally, Greg MacPherson’s father, gram, will provide an overview of the serious threats from
Hector MacPherson, was an Oregon legislator at the time of the Measure 37 claims filed along Oregon’s coast and how impor-
Beach Bill enactment and a chief sponsor of Senate Bill 100, tant passage of Measure 49 will be to stopping these threats.
which established Oregon’s land use planning system. Of par-
Robin Hartmann, Oregon Shores’ ocean program director, will
ticular interest, Representative Greg McPherson recently an-
describe efforts to move the marine reserves campaign to a suc-
nounced his candidacy to serve as Oregon’s Attorney General.
cessful outcome and how vital it will be to have CoastWatchers
Jessica Hamilton, who serves as Governor Ted Kulongoski’s and Oregon Shores members play a significant role in voicing
Natural Resource Policy Assistant, will help us bridge from the support for marine reserves to key decision makers over the
Beach Bill to the Governor’s 18-month plan to establish a sys- coming months.
tem of marine reserves, a bold and courageous action, indeed.
Finally, Phillip Johnson, director of Oregon Shores’ Coast-
In addition to serving as the Governor’s representative on Ore-
Watch Program, will highlight the importance of our intertidal
gon’s Ocean Policy Advisory Council (OPAC), Jessica has a
resources and the hands-on work that CoastWatchers can do to
strong background in marine policy and is a long-time Coast-
help others protect and understand these fragile coastal re-
Watch mile adopter.
sources. For information on any part of the annual meeting,
Following this series of keynote speakers, Oregon Shores’ staff contact Robin at robin@oregonshores.org or 541-672-3694.

OREGON SHORES BRINGS ECOLOGICAL FOCUS TO WAVE ENERGY FORMS


Oregon Shores has sought a place at the table, rather than serve nary session on the morning of the 11th is open to observers,
as an outside critic, of wave energy projects proposed for Ore- but the rest of the workshop will be strictly for scientists to
gon, as this technology holds promise for reducing Oregon’s work in small group sessions where they will consider a compre-
reliance on out-of-state, coal-fired power plants for our electri- hensive list of “stressors,” (including components of the wave
cal needs, thus helping address our state’s contribution to global energy parks such as mooring lines, buoys, electro-magnetic
warming. Our goal has been to respond constructively to the fields and acoustic avoidance devices) and “receptors,” (all the
prospect of wave energy development by making absolutely sure natural components of the ocean including whales, sand, phyto-
that potential environmental impacts would be legitimately and plankton, seabirds and salmon smolts). The goal of the work-
thoroughly studied on each project and effects considered cumu- shop is to have the scientists determine what is known, what is
latively. If damaging effects are discovered, adaptive manage- not known (gaps) and what the priorities are for monitoring and
ment should occur, impacts should be mitigated or, if it is deter- studying ecological impacts of wave energy projects.
mined impacts cannot be adequately addressed, projects should
The Oregon Wave Energy Trust (OWET) — Hartmann has
be removed.
been approved as a board member of the newly formed organi-
To this end, Oregon Shores’ Ocean Program Director Robin zation which will have an oversight and planning role for use of
Hartmann is serving on a number of key wave energy forums, the $4.2 million recently approved by the Oregon Legislature
where she has been able to bring focus in recent months on the for wave energy development in Oregon over the current bien-
need to increase Oregon’s commitment to understanding the nium. Having a voice in OWET’s decision-making process will
potential ecological effects of wave energy development and to help assure that Oregon invests state funds in becoming a leader
consider projects, collectively, from a coastwide perspective. not only in the “technology” of wave energy but also in the
Two of these efforts are highlighted below: “ecology” of wave energy park siting along Oregon’s coast. With
Hartmann’s support, the first funding request to OWET was
An Ecological Effects Workshop for Scientists—Over
approved, that of spending $25,000 to match other funds raised
the course of this year, Hartmann has served on a steering com-
for implementing the ecological effects workshop for scientists,
mittee for a workshop to be held in Newport on October 11th
and to assure that at least $750,000 is budgeted for a coastwide
and 12th at the Hatfield Marine Science Center that will be at-
assessment of wave energy development in Oregon.
tended by over 40 scientists from across the national. The ple-
V OLUME 22, N UMBER 2 P AGE 11

COASTWATCH INTERTIDAL FOCUS CONTINUES


(Continued from page 3) For all CoastWatch’s growth and ambitious plans, there are still
many miles for which we lack regular reports. There is always
site, thanks to webmaster Lloyd Maxfield, continues to add a need for new volunteers to help keep watch over any stretch
features. It is now possible not only to file quarterly reports of the coast. If interested in adopting a mile, or if you would
online, but to view reports filed by other CoastWatchers for like to know more about CoastWatch’s rocky shoreline pro-
any mile of the Oregon coast. (The website, currently found at jects, contact Phillip Johnson, the CoastWatch director, at
oregoncoastwatch.org, will merge with the website for Oregon 503-238-4450 or at orshores@teleport.com.
Shores, oregonshores.org, sometime in the coming months).

MAKE A GIFT FOR THE AGES WITH A


BEQUEST TO OREGON SHORES

This year marks the


40th anniversary of
Oregon’s pioneering
Beach Bill, which gives
all of us the right to
wander anywhere on
our shores. And Ore- Prayer to the Sea
gon Shores, which
emerged from the bat-
tle for the Beach Bill O great blue-foaming sea, enter into my bones
and established itself as
the guardian of those I am lost, I am shivering, I cannot speak;
public beaches and the entire coastal region, is closing in on Carry me on your tide over the terrible stones,
its 37th birthday.
Enter this heart, carry away all that you seek.
Those who worked to pass the Beach Bill were looking past
their own time to create a legacy for future generations.
Likewise, Oregon Shores intends to be around for the long O great moon-pulled sea, upon the near shore turn
haul, protecting this legacy and handing it on to new gen-
erations of coastal stewards. Speak your only name, return the shining face;

Please consider extending your care and concern for the Upon pale spindrift I cast my darkness to burn,
Oregon coast with a legacy gift to future generations who May this heart drift away silver and leave no trace.
will cherish this landscape and these resources as we do
today. A bequest to Oregon Shores will help to keep the
organization strong and the voice for coastal conservation O great green-storming sea, be my every shield
steady.
Be my every love, wave-wandering and fierce,
If you would like to consider remembering the coast and
Wash the gaping wound that has not been healed;
Oregon Shores in your will, or making any other form of
legacy gift, contact Allison Asbjornsen, Oregon Shores’ Star above the sea, take this heart to pierce.
president, at whiskeycreek@oregoncoast.com or 503-
Cameron La Follette
842-2808.

Oregon Shores welcomes your poetry submissions. Please contact


Cameron at thehomecountry@onemain.com for more information.
O REGON S HORES Nonprofit
C ONSERVATION C OALITION Organization
U.S. Postage
P.O. BOX 1344 Paid
DEPOE BAY, OREGON 97341 Newport, OR
Permit No. 48

W E ’ RE O N T HE W EB!
W W W . O R E G O N S H O RE S . O R G

CONTACT US: DATES TO REMEMBER:


• OCTOBER 13, HATFIELD MARINE SCIENCE CENTER, NEWPORT
Program STAFF
CAMERON LA FOLLETTE, LAND USE DIRECTOR 11:00 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M.— OREGON SHORES ANNUAL MEETING,
thehomecountry@onemain.com “CELEBRATING THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BEACH BILL: BOLD AC-
TIONS PAST AND FUTURE” AT 11:00 IN RM. 30/32, MEMBERS VOTE ON
PHILLIP JOHNSON, COASTWATCH DIRECTOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS; AT 12:30 NEAR HMSC AUDITORIUM, REGISTRA-
orshores@teleport.com TION; AT 1:00 IN HMSC AUDITORIUM PROGRAM BEGINS.

ROBIN HARTMANN, OCEAN DIRECTOR, • OCTOBER 3, DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARY, ROSEBURG. WAVE ENERGY
NEWSLETTER EDITOR EVENT, (OREGON SHORES IS A PRESENTER) 12:00—4:00
robin@oregonshores.org
• OCTOBER 27, HECETA HEAD CONFERENCE, FLORENCE EVENTS CENTER
(OREGON SHORES REPRESENTED ON WAVE ENERGY PANEL).
Key Volunteers
ALLISON ASBJORNSEN, PRESIDENT • NOVEMBER 6—VOTE FOR MEASURE 49
whiskeycreek@oregoncoast.com
• DECEMBER 7,8 —TWO DAY CONFERENCE ON ROCKY SHORES, OTHERE
BETTE SILVER, REGISTRAR TOPICS, FLORENCE, FRI. START TIME TBA, 4:00 P.M., SAT. 10:OO A.M.—
Bette88@centurytel.net 4:15 P.M., LANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE FLORENCE CENTER, 3149 OAK ST.

LLOYD MAXFIELD, WEBMASTER


techwatcher@oregoncoastwatch.org