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Alyssa Carmona

Dr. Guerriero (Dr. Murphy)


EDA 314-03
03 May 2016
Lesson Plan Adaptation for ADHD:
While there are three main characteristics of children with ADHD inattention,
hyperactivity, and impulsivity the symptoms that may be exhibited will vary, depending on
which characteristic(s) dominate within a particular individual (ADD/ADHD, n.d.). For the
purposes of this lesson plan adaptation, I have chosen to focus on those children who are
predominantly hyperactive. For these children, some possible symptoms include: having
difficulty sitting still (i.e. squirming; fidgeting; not remaining seated when expected to);
excessively running and/or climbing; talking excessively; having difficulty engaging in quiet
activities; frequently changing activities (About ADHD, n.d.; ADD/ADHD, n.d.; ASHA, n.d.).
Resources

About ADHD. (n.d.). Retrieved April 28, 2016, from http://www.chadd.org/Understanding-ADHD/About-ADHD.aspx

ADD/ADHD in children. (n.d.). Retrieved April 28, 2016, from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/add-adhd/attention-deficit-


disorder-adhd-in-children.htm#primary

ASHA. (n.d.). Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Retrieved April 28, 2016, from
http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/ADHD/

Lesson Plan Title: Reviewing Adjectives and Introducing Adverbs


Subject/Grade: Written Language/2nd
1.1 Integration of Learning Outcomes
Students will be able to recall and orally state what they already know about adjectives.
Students will be able to locate, and orally explain how they were able to locate, adjectives
and adverbs within given sentences, and discuss how adjectives and adverbs provide
more detail/description.
Students will be able to identify and orally state the difference between an adjective and
an adverb, as well as the importance of each.
Students will be able to actively participate in small and large group discussions.
Students will be able to modify a piece of their own writing by incorporating the usage of
adjectives and adverbs.
Each of these learning outcomes still apply to this adapted version of the lesson plan,
and, thus, would still be included. Another objective pertaining to verb-adverb
movements, however, could be added. For example: Students will be able to physically
demonstrate various verb-adverb combinations, and will use these demonstrations to
discuss how adverbs add meaning. Such an outcome could be added due to the fact that
the incorporation of this opportunity for movement relates to one of the major focuses
of this lesson: the way in which adverbs add more meaning to the verbs they modify.

1.2 Standards
CC.1.2.2.F: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in grade level
text including multiple-meaning words.
CC.1.2.2.J: Acquire and use grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and
domain-specific words and phrases.
CC.1.4.2.Q: Choose words and phrases for effect.
CC.1.4.2.T: With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and
strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
CC.1.5.2.A: Participate in collaborative conversations with peers and adults in small and
larger groups.
CC.1.5.2.B: Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or
information presented orally or through other media.
The standards used for this adapted lesson plan will remain the same, as they will all
still apply.

1.3 Anticipatory Set


1. Before beginning the lesson, the teacher will write two important terms on a sheet of chart
paper: adjective and adverb. Under each word, corresponding definitions will be written
(describes a noun for adjective; describes a verb for adverb). At the start of the lesson,
the definitions will be covered up (they will be revealed later on in the lesson).
a. The teacher will use two different marker colors to do this. The adjective information
will be written in one color (i.e. blue), and the adverb information will be written in
another (i.e. red). The teacher will use these same marker colors later on in the lesson
when he/she reviews sentences containing these words with the students. The marker
color that the teacher uses for the adjective information (word and definition) on the
chart paper will correspond to the marker color he/she uses to underline the nouns and
circle the adjectives in the sentences. The marker color that the teacher uses for the
adverb information (word and definition) on the chart paper will correspond to the
marker color he/she uses to underline the verbs and circle the adverbs in the
sentences.
2. Good morning, class! Today, we will be reviewing adjectives and learning about adverbs.
The teacher will point to these words, already written on the chart paper.
3. All of you already know about adjectivesSo, who thinks they can tell me what an adjective
is? The teacher will allow for students to respond, seeking the definition (but the teacher
should also welcome any examples that the students may want to provide). Once the desired
definition has been offered (describes a noun), the teacher will uncover the definition on
the chart paper. Very good! An adjective is a word that describes a noun. Great job.
4. Now, lets look at a few sentences to see if we can pick out the adjectives in them. The
teacher will briefly review the corresponding sentences (see first Document Camera sheet)
containing adjectives with the students, guiding and allowing them to do most of the work.
As each sentence is looked at, the teacher should use the first marker color to underline the
noun and circle the adjective. The goal is for students to locate the adjectives, and explain
how they did so (how they knew the selected word was the adjective). This should not take
too much time, and should serve the purpose of activating the students background
knowledge, so that they can apply what they already know to the information ahead.
a. The teacher should take the time to explicitly tell the students that he/she is
underlining the noun (word being described) and circling the adjective (word
describing the noun, or underlined word).
b. The sentences included on the Document Camera sheet can be found below. The
nouns being described are underlined, and the adjectives are in bold.
a. Sally drives a yellow car.
b. Thomas bounces his round ball.
c. Nick reads a long book.
d. Jessica pets the tiny puppy.
e. Sam smells the sweet strawberries.
5. Okay, great job remembering what adjectives are and how they work! Now lets start talking
about something new: adverbs (teacher will point to the word on chart paper).
6. Just the way adjectives describe nouns, adverbs describe verbs. At this point in time, the
teacher will uncover the adverb definition on the chart paper for the students to see. And, I
have a little trick to help you remember the difference between the two! The word verb can
be found in the word adverb (Teacher will circle the verb in adverb on the chart paper
for students to see).
7. Adverbs are similar to adjectives, because they can describe and add meaning to other
words. This is part of what makes them so important! Adjectives and adverbs help us to
really visualize the things we read. Thats why good writers use them when they write, and
good readers pay attention to them when they read.
8. So, now I want all of us to read some sentences to see if we can find the adverbs in them!
Since the idea of adverbs is something thats new for all of you, I am going to walk through
the first two, and I want you to listen to what I say as I try to pick out the adverbs.
During this lessons anticipatory set (and for the entire lessons duration), the teacher
will seat any students with ADHD near him/her. Being that these students may tend to
engage in off-task behavior, this would allow the teacher to address such occurrences
more easily. For instance, rather than having to call more attention to the situation (i.e.
by verbally calling on the student), the teacher would be able to address the situation
more inconspicuously (i.e. by using a nonverbal cue, such as briefly placing a hand on
the students shoulder). In addition to this, another option would be for the teacher to
allow these students to fiddle with a stress ball, or some other small manipulative,
during portions of the lesson (such as this one) that require students to sit still. This,
depending on the exact student, would have the potential to allow the student to stay
focused while still engaging in some type of movement.

1.4 Procedures
1. The Document Camera will again be used to display a variety of sentences, this time
containing adverbs. To begin, the teacher will model the process of how he/she is able to
locate adverbs (via a think-aloud for the first two sentences). The teacher will also talk about
how the adverb adds meaning to the verb/sentence.
2. Okay, so lets take a look at our first sentence. It says, Joe sloppily eats his dinner.
Hmmmokay. So the sentence is telling me about Joe, and it says that hes eating. Thats
what hes doingso the word eats must be the verb, so Im going to underline that
(teacher will underline the verb in the second marker color)and sloppily must be the
adverb, because that word is telling me more information about how Joe is eating. The word
sloppily tells me that hes probably making a mess, and not eating very carefully. So, in
this sentence, sloppily is the adverb that describes the verb eats, so let me circle the
adverb sloppily (teacher will use the second marker color to do so).
3. Now lets look at our second sentence. It says, Joes sister eats her dinner neatly. So, in
this sentence, Im being told about Joes sister and how she eats. Shes doing the same thing
Joe was doingshes eating. So the word eats is the verb in this sentence too, so Im
going to underline that (teacher will use second marker color to do so). But even though I
have the same verb, it looks like I have a different adverb, because this sentence says that
Joes sister eats neatly. I think that the word neatly is the adverb in this sentence, because
its telling me more about how Joes sister eats. The word neatly tells me that she must not
eat like her brother, so she is probably very careful to not make a mess. So, I definitely know
that in this sentence, neatly is the adverb that describes the word eats, so I am going to
circle that (teacher will use the second marker color to do so).
4. In both of these sentences, I had the same verb: eats. But I had different adverbs that added
more meaning to what I was reading. The words sloppily and neatly really helped me to
picture and understand more about how Joe and his sister were eating.
5. So, now that Ive gone over the first two sentences with you, lets look at the next few
together.
6. The teacher will then transfer more responsibility to the students. The teacher will go through
the next few examples with the students, guiding and allowing them to do most of the work.
The students will be asked to identify the adverbs, explain how they were able to do so, and
tell how it adds meaning to the verb/sentence. In addition, each time the students are asked to
respond, the teacher will allow for a turn and talk to take place beforehand.
7. Okay so the first/next/last sentence says, _________ (Teacher will read the displayed
sentence out loud for all students to hear). I want you to turn and talk with your partner
about which word from this sentence you think is the adverb. I also want you to talk about
why you think the word you selected is the adverb, and about how it adds meaning to the
sentence or tells you more about whats going on.
8. Going sentence by sentence, the teacher will give students time to turn and talk with their
partners. He/she will then ask students to share what they talked about (which word they
picked out as the adverb; why they selected the word that they did; how the word gave them
more detail/added meaning to the sentence).
9. As students respond, the teacher should also underline the verb and circle the adverb using
the second marker color. In addition, every two sentences, the teacher will ask students to
think about what they notice (the two sentences have the same verb, but different adverbs;
the same action can be done in different ways). If students struggle, the teacher may ask them
to figure out whats the same and whats different about each of the sentences and/or ask
students how the sentences would be different if there were no adverbs included. In addition,
if students seem to grasp the concept more quickly, the teacher may choose to have students
discuss two sentences at a time.
10. The sentences being used for this portion of the lesson can be found below. The verbs are
underlined, and the adverbs are in bold.
a. Karen dances nervously.
b. Rachel dances happily.
c. Mark quietly plays with his toys.
d. Kate wildly plays with her toys.
e. James sings to his sister loudly.
f. Carl softly sings to his sister.
11. Once all of the sentences containing adverbs have been gone over, the teacher will ask
students to recall how adjectives and adverbs are different. He/ she will then go over
sentences that contain both adjectives and adverbs in order to have students demonstrate their
understanding of the difference between the two.
12. Alright, so now that weve gone over sentences with adjectives and sentences with adverbs,
lets look at some sentences that have an adjective and an adverb! Before we look at the
sentences, who can remind us about the difference between adjectives and adverbs? The
teacher will allow students to respond, seeking for the explanation that adjectives describe
nouns, and adverbs describe verbs. Once this has been recalled, the class will begin looking
at the sentences containing both an adjective and an adverb (one at a time).
13. Okay, so lets look at our first/next/last sentence. It says, _________. I want each of you to
think about which word is the adjective, and which word is the adverb. Once you think
youve figured it out, I want you to put your thumb on your knee.
14. Once most, if not all, of the students have placed their thumb on their knee, the teacher will
ask for students to share their thoughts: Alright, who would like to share what they think the
adjective/adverb is in our sentence? How were you able to figure that out? At this point in
time, the teacher may also choose to ask the rest of the class whether or not they agree, in
order to determine whether or not all students are grasping the difference between adjectives
and adverbs, as opposed to just the students being called on. In addition, he/she will
underline the nouns/verbs and circle the adjectives/adverbs (using the same colors as
previously). This process will be continued until each of the sentences have been discussed.
15. The sentences being used for this portion of the lesson can be found below. The nouns are
underlined and italicized. The adjectives are bold and italicized. The verbs are underlined
(not italicized), and the adverbs are in bold (not italicized).
a. Joe carefully rides his shiny bike.
b. Alex jumps slowly on the giant trampoline.
c. Chris runs quickly on the green grass.
d. Jenn excitedly writes a new book.
16. Independent practice will take place after the completion of this lessons session. Once
closure has been provided, the teacher will tell the students what they are to do on their own
(see below).
17. *Important note: At any point in this lesson, if the teacher calls on a student who does not
correctly identify what he/she has been asked to identify, the teacher will work to guide this
student to gain a better understanding, and potentially identify the correct word. For instance,
when a student does not identify the correct word, the teacher can consider doing the
following:
a. Ask the student What makes you think/say that? in order to gain more insight into
his/her thought process/misconception. (The teacher should ask this question of
students who identify the correct word as well, not just those who dont.)
b. Ask the student to recall the function of an adjective/adverb.
c. Ask the student to refer back to the anchor chart and review the part of speech (either
adjective or adverb) i.e. Well, lets look back at our anchor chart. What is an
adjective/adverb? in order to have the student recall the type of word they are
looking for (if they cannot recall the function of the word on their own).
d. Ask the student to identify the noun/verb in the sentence, in order to decide whether
or not the word they chose makes sense (i.e. For example, when given the sentence
Joe carefully rides his shiny bike., lets say the student identifies the word carefully
as the adjective. Upon asking the student to recall the function of an adjective, the
student will find that an adjective describes a noun. The teacher may then ask the
student to identify the noun in this sentence. Once the student locates the noun (in this
case, bike), the teacher can then ask the student whether or not the word carefully is,
in fact, describing the word bike. Upon realizing that the word carefully does not
describe the word bike, the teacher can then ask the student to identify the word
(adjective) that does describe the word bike.
e. Ask the student to recall what a noun/verb is (person, place, or thing/action word), if
he/she has difficulty identifying the noun/verb in the sentence (if asked to see
above).
f. While the goal here is for the student at hand to gain a better understanding, the
teacher must be mindful about whether or not the student is becoming frustrated. If
this happens, the teacher should not continue prompting the same student over and
over again in front of his/her peers. Rather, in such an instance, the teacher can
choose to ask a fellow classmate to offer help (i.e. [student], would you like to help
[student] out?). Also important to note, though, is the fact that if/when such an
instance occurs, the teacher needs to ensure that the student who was struggling to
identify the correct answer does not feel ashamed/embarrassed. To do this, the teacher
can make it a point to let the student know that it is okay if he/she is not completely
sure of the correct answer. The important thing is that they try, not necessarily that
they always come up with the correct/expected answer.
As during this lessons anticipatory set, any students with ADHD will be seated near the
teacher. In addition, the teacher may also choose to allow these students (depending on
their individual needs) to utilize a stress ball/other small manipulative in order to
enable some sort of movement during portions of the lesson that do not call for any
movement. Furthermore, though, during the procedures portion of this lesson plan, the
teacher will work to incorporate additional movement. In order to do so, the teacher
will have students act out the different verb-adverb combinations that appear in each of
the reviewed sentences. Not only will this effectively incorporate some movement for
those students who have trouble sitting still, but this can also allow the teacher to place
additional emphasis on the way in which adverbs can add meaning to other words. For
instance, while dancing is one action, it means something different to dance nervously
than it does to dance happily. By incorporating this opportunity for movement, the
teacher and students can focus on such differences as they review each of the lessons
sentences.

1.5 Differentiation
This section is not to be completed.

1.6 Closure
1. In order to provide closure, the teacher will briefly hit some key points before asking the
students to engage in the independent practice.
2. Okay, so before we finish up, lets remember: An adjective describes a _________! (Students
will call out noun if they struggle to do so, the teacher can point to the chart paper). And
an adverb describes a _________! (Students will call out verb if they struggle to do so,
the teacher can point to the chart paper).
3. And who can remind us why its important for good writers to use adjectives and adverbs
when they write, and for good readers to look for them when they read? (They can describe
and add meaning to other words. They help us to visualize/picture/understand more about the
things we read.)
If students struggle to provide the desired response, the teacher will prompt the class further
(i.e. by calling their attention to the way in which including adjectives/adverbs can change
whats going on/add detail/etc.). One way in which the teacher could do this would be by
calling students attention back to the first two sentences containing adverbs (Joe sloppily
eats his dinner. and Joes sister eats her dinner neatly.). In doing so, the teacher could ask
the students to consider how these sentences would be different if they did not contain any
adverbs).
4. Once the desired response(s) regarding the importance of adjectives/adverbs have been
offered/addressed, the teacher will continue: Thats right! This is why it is important for us to
include adjectives and adverbs in our own writing! We want to add meaning to the things
that we write, and we want our readers to really be able to picture what it is that we are
saying.
5. Being that this is an introductory lesson on the idea of adverbs, the main idea is to have
students identify them in sentences that have already been written by others. Once the
students have gained such practice, however, the idea is for the teacher to see how well the
students can incorporate the usage of adverbs (and adjectives) to something that they have
written themselves. Thus, it is at this point in time that the teacher will provide students with
directions for the independent practice activity.
6. Boys and girls, now that we have seen some good examples of adjectives and adverbs being
used in sentences, and have practiced identifying them, each of you are going to practice
using them in your own writing. I want each of you to take out your most recent narrative
draft (teacher will have students do so). You are going to take a look at your draft, and read
it over. As you do so, identify any places in which adding adjectives/adverbs would help your
writing to become more detailed, and would give your reader a better idea of what is going
on in your story. Weve already learned about adjectives, and I know that many of you
already try to include them in your written pieces. So, today, I want you to focus on adding in
some adverbs that will help your story to come alive! As you add these words to your draft,
use a yellow highlighter to identify them. You will then go back and reread your draft in
order to see how your usage of such descriptive words has improved your written piece.
7. The teacher will then allow the students to get to work on adding adjectives and adverbs
(mainly adverbs) to their already-written narrative drafts. At this point in time, the teacher
will be available for conferencing. Once the students have been given an opportunity to
modify their drafts, the teacher will view each students draft and corresponding changes.
The results from this will not only help the teacher to plan for future writing instruction, but
will also allow the teacher to see which students need more assistance regarding the purpose
and/or usage of adjectives and adverbs.
Again, during this portion of the lesson, any students with ADHD will be seated near
the teacher, and may also be permitted to fiddle with a stress ball/other small
manipulative. Additionally, being that the students will now be given an opportunity to
work independently, and that conferences will be taking place, the teacher may choose
to conference with these students first, in order to ensure that they are ready to engage
in the task at hand. The teacher may also choose to keep an eye on or check in with
these students more frequently, in order to ensure that they are remaining on-task. This
is due to the fact that any students with ADHD would still need to complete the same
required task as the rest of their peers. However, it should also be noted that the
teacher should not check in with these students unnecessarily, or in a way that
interrupts them. Being that other students are working independently, the goal should
also be for these students to work as independently as possible. Thus, the teacher should
only intervene when absolutely necessary.

1.7 Formative/Summative Assessment of Students


Formative:
o As students recall and orally restate what they already know about adjectives, the
teacher will be sure to observe students (i.e. their facial expressions) and listen
attentively to their responses. This will help the teacher to determine whether or
not the students have an existing firm understanding of adjectives. As a result of
figuring out what students already know, the teacher will be able to apply their
background knowledge to the new content in the days lesson.
o As students are asked to locate, and orally explain how they were able to locate,
adjectives and adverbs within sentences, and discuss how adjectives and adverbs
provide more detail/description, the teacher will formatively assess in a number of
ways. For one, there will be certain instances during which students will be asked
to turn and talk or place a thumb on their knee when ready. As students talk with
their partners, the teacher will be able to listen in order to determine students
understandings. In addition, by asking students to place a thumb on their knee
when ready, the teacher will be able to assess whether or not all students are up to
speed. Being that students will be asked to share via whole group discussions, the
teacher will also be able to closely observe and listen attentively to students as
they participate.
o As students are asked to identify and orally state the difference between an
adjective and an adverb, as well as the importance of each, the teacher will assess
students responses in order to determine their current understandings. This will
be done as the teacher watches students facial expressions, and listens attentively
to their verbal responses. The teacher will also be able to determine whether or
not students have met this objective according to whether or not they are able to
accurately distinguish between the two when given sentences that contain both
adjectives and adverbs. As for the previous objective, the teacher will also be able
to use turn and talk opportunities to assess this objective.
o The teacher will be able to determine whether or not students are able to meet the
objective of participating in both small and large group discussions by watching
to make sure that students are actively engaged. This will be determined
according to whether or not students respond to various teacher-given prompts
(i.e. engaging in turn and talk opportunities; communicating respectfully with
peers; placing thumb on their knee when ready to share; sharing, or offering to
share, responses during whole group discussions).
o The teacher will be able to determine whether or not students were able to meet
the objective of modifying a piece of their own writing by incorporating the usage
of adjectives and adverbs by viewing each students modified narrative. In doing
so, the teacher will make note of how many adjectives/adverbs each student added
to their draft, in addition to whether or not such words were added
appropriately/in the correct manner. The teacher will conference with each
student in order to listen to his/her thoughts about the way in which they feel their
writing has changed due to the addition of such words.
Summative
o There will be no summative assessment for this lesson.
All of this lessons original assessments still pertain, and would still be included. If,
however, the additional learning outcome (Students will be able to physically demonstrate
various verb-adverb combinations, and will use these demonstrations to discuss how
adverbs add meaning.) is incorporated, the teachers assessment would need to account
for it. In this case, the teacher would be able to determine whether or not students were
able to meet this objective by observing students as they engage in the various verb-
adverb movement opportunities. In addition, the teacher would also have to actively
listen and respond to students as they discuss the way in which their movements relate
to the fact that adverbs add more meaning to verbs.

1.8 Materials/Equipment
Chart Paper
Markers (2 colors 1 for nouns and adjectives; 1 for verbs and adverbs)
Sentence sheets for Document Camera
Document Camera
Highlighters (1 per student)
Pencils
Each students narrative draft
If the teacher chooses to permit any student(s) with ADHD to utilize a stress ball/other
small manipulative during portions of this lesson that do not allow for any physical
movement, these materials would need to be added to this section.

1.9 Technology
A document camera will be used throughout the course of this lesson.
There are no technological adaptations needed for this version of the lesson plan.

2.1 Reflection on Planning


When planning this lesson, I decided to begin with reviewing the concept of adjectives.
The reasoning behind this decision was that there is a solid connection between
adjectives and adverbs. As a result, I thought that it would be beneficial for the lesson to
begin by having students call on their prior knowledge of adjectives, and then using this
as a foundation to begin talking about the idea of adverbs. In addition, not only did I
think that beginning the lesson in this way would help me to introduce the idea of adverbs
to the students, but I also thought it would be an effective way to eventually tie in the
difference between adjectives and adverbs.
Also when planning for this lesson, I tried to utilize the idea of the gradual release of
responsibility in several ways. For one, upon introducing the idea of adverbs, I tried to
connect it to students prior knowledge of adjectives. In addition, upon introducing
adverbs, I incorporated an opportunity for the teacher to model picking out/finding the
adverb in a sentence. Once this modeling takes place, the teacher will then engage in a
guided practice activity with the students (working together to have the students pick out
the adverbs). Furthermore, after picking out adjectives and adverbs from given sentences
in isolation, the students will be asked to pick out both adjectives and adverbs in
combination (when given a sentence containing one of each). Thus, the students will
gradually be given tasks that are more difficult (but still scaffolded). Lastly, at the end of
the lesson, the students will be given directions for engaging in an independent practice
activity. Therefore, throughout the entire lesson, the students will be given more and
more responsibility.
When writing the sentences that students would be asked to pick out the adjectives and/or
adverbs from (namely the sentences containing adverbs), I tried to keep a few things in
mind. For one, I made use of strong action verbs and only selected adverbs that end in ly.
Not only did I do this as a result of his suggestion, but I also thought that it would better
help the students to initially grasp the concept of adverbs (i.e. by providing them with
more consistency; by helping them to more easily be able to identify the verbs, and
subsequently the adverbs, in each sentence; because they have probably already
seen/heard many of the ly adverbs that I chose to use). In addition, when writing my
sentences, I tried to vary the placement of the adverbs. I did this in order to indirectly
show students that adverbs can appear almost anywhere in a sentence. They often come
after the verb they modify, but they can also come before an adjective or adverb, at the
beginning or end of the sentence, or before a verb they modify
(http://busyteacher.org/20876-adjectives-and-adverbs-difference-how-to-teach.html).
Although I did not plan to make an explicit comment about this to students, I was sure to
vary my adverb placement, because I did not want them to indirectly and incorrectly
assume that adverbs always have the same placement within a sentence. The reason I did
not choose to plan on explicitly pointing this out to students was because this will only be
their first time hearing about adverbs, and I do not want to overwhelm them.
Creating this adapted version of my original lesson plan was not as difficult as I had
first thought that it would be. Once I reviewed my lesson plan and got some ideas
flowing, it almost seemed as if everything just fell into place. Researching the disability
(ADHD) beforehand was definitely a helpful step to take. Once I had a better
understanding of the needs of students with ADHD (in this case, those who are
predominantly hyperactive), I was able to look more closely at and modify a number of
my original lesson plans aspects. While I was not sure how to initially feel when I first
began adapting this lesson, I now feel that I have been able to make a number of useful
adaptations to the plan that I originally created.

2.2 Reflection on Instruction


Not Applicable.