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Chemical Resistance

of Thermoplastics
PLASTICS DESIGN LIBRARY (PDL)
PDL HANDBOOK SERIES
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Chemical Resistance
of Thermoplastics

Edited by
William Andrew Woishnis and Sina Ebnesajjad
William Andrew is an imprint of Elsevier
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Notice
Knowledge and best practice in this field are constantly changing. As new research and experience
broaden our understanding, changes in research methods, professional practices, or medical treatment may
become necessary.

Practitioners and researchers must always rely on their own experience and knowledge in evaluating and
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12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Dedication

I dedicate Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics to the memory of my husband, William Andrew Woishnis. He launched
the first version of Chemical Resistance in 1989, creating the Plastics Design Library and initiating one of the first elec-
tronic publishing platforms for scientific technical information. Considering himself an accidental publisher, he founded
William Andrew Publishing and co-founded Knovel Corporation, which put forth hundreds of titles by and for scientists
and engineers around the globe. He had an unabated commitment to his colleagues, authors, editors and the quality of his
work. My perfect partner in business and life, dedication to family topped his list. He clearly relished our son Aidan
and the life, love and laughter they shared. Williams time on earth proved too short, but his contribution great. Sometimes
passionate, sometimes a peacemaker, often affirming, intensely contemplative, William was the kind of person whom, just
by being around him, you found yourself a better person. Deeply, deeply personal and thoughtful, Williams dazzling grace,
brilliance and wit remain an important part of all who knew him.

Jeri Wachter
Material Index

ABS .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 2687


Acetal....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1704
Acetal, Copolymer (POM Copolymer) .................................................................................................................................... 1652
Acetal, Homopolymer (POM Homopolymer) ......................................................................................................................... 1788
Acrylic ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 0001
Acrylonitrile Methyl Acrylate (AMA) ...................................................................................................................................... 0107
Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate (ASA) ....................................................................................................................................... 0139
Aromatic Polyester Estercarbonate (AEC) .............................................................................................................................. 2430
Bisphenol A Polycarbonate (Bisphenol A PC)......................................................................................................................... 2431
Cellulose Acetate .................................................................................................................................................................... 0168
Cellulose Acetate Butyrate (CAB) ........................................................................................................................................... 0179
Cellulose Propionate ............................................................................................................................................................... 0194
Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (EVOH)............................................................................................................................. 3301
Fluorinated Polyethylene (FPE) ............................................................................................................................................. 1625
Ionomer................................................................................................................................................................................... 0198
Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) .............................................................................................................................. 0233
Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) ........................................................................................................................................... 0387
Methyl Methacrylate Terpolymer .......................................................................................................................................... 0079
MMA Butadiene Styrene (MBS) ............................................................................................................................................. 0080
Nylon 11 (PA 11)..................................................................................................................................................................... 1797
Nylon 12 (PA 12)..................................................................................................................................................................... 1813
Nylon 46 (PA 46)..................................................................................................................................................................... 1875
Nylon 6 (PA 6)......................................................................................................................................................................... 1898
Nylon 610 (PA 610)................................................................................................................................................................. 2009
Nylon 612 (PA 612)................................................................................................................................................................. 2029
Nylon 66 (PA 66)..................................................................................................................................................................... 2052
Nylon, amorphous (PA, amorphous) ...................................................................................................................................... 2332
Polyamide................................................................................................................................................................................ 2418
Polyamide, Nylon .................................................................................................................................................................... 2380
Polyamide, Nylon 6, Copolymer ............................................................................................................................................. 2420
Polyamide, Nylon 6, Modified ................................................................................................................................................ 2422
Polyamide, Nylon MXD6 (PA MXD6) ...................................................................................................................................... 2426
Polyamide, Nylon, Copolymer ................................................................................................................................................ 2427
Polyamide, Nylon, Modified ................................................................................................................................................... 2428
Polycaprolactones ................................................................................................................................................................... 2357
Polycarbonate ......................................................................................................................................................................... 2434
Polycarbonate Copolymer (PC Copolymer) ............................................................................................................................ 2556
Polycycloolefin......................................................................................................................................................................... 1626
Polyester, PET .......................................................................................................................................................................... 2558
Polyester (PCT) ........................................................................................................................................................................ 2649
Polyester (PCTG) ..................................................................................................................................................................... 2650
Polyester (PETG)...................................................................................................................................................................... 2655
Polyethylene............................................................................................................................................................................ 1628
Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)....................................................................................................................................................... 2641
Polyethylene, Copolymer ........................................................................................................................................................ 1636
Polyethylene, HDPE................................................................................................................................................................. 0582
Polyethylene, MDPE................................................................................................................................................................ 1296
Polyethylene, Starch Modified LDPE ...................................................................................................................................... 1637
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) ......................................................................................................................................... 0081
Polymethylpentene (PMP) ...................................................................................................................................................... 1637
Polypropylene ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1318
Polypropylene Copolymer....................................................................................................................................................... 1614
Polypropylene Homopolymer ................................................................................................................................................. 1618
xii Material Index

Polypropylene, Expandable..................................................................................................................................................... 1623


Polystyrene (PS) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 3009
Polystyrene, Impact (IPS) ........................................................................................................................................................ 3102
Polyurethane ........................................................................................................................................................................... 2661
Polyvinyl Alcohol Copolymer .................................................................................................................................................. 3314
Polyvinyl Butyral...................................................................................................................................................................... 3315
Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) ......................................................................................................................................................... 3177
Rigid Thermoplastic Urethane (RTPU).................................................................................................................................... 2666
Styrene Acrylonitrile Copolymer (SAN) .................................................................................................................................. 2878
Styrene Butadiene Copolymer................................................................................................................................................ 2997
Styrene Maleic Anhydride Copolymer (SMA)......................................................................................................................... 3004
Styrenic Resin.......................................................................................................................................................................... 3101
Preface

Basic plastics technologies have matured over recent decades, for the most part resulting in a decrease in the number of
experts in the field. Yet applications of plastics and elastomers have proliferated in every area of technology including micro-
electronics, energy, transportation, medicine, drug delivery, and military and civilian apparel. Increasingly, professionals in
various fields with varying levels of expertise in plastics technology have to evaluate and select materials where a plastic
component may be a minor or major part of a larger system.
This Chemical Resistance reference has been available in several editions since its first publication by William Andrew
Inc. in the 1990s. The data in the current volume comes from the CD-ROM edition published in 2008, and not previously
available in print.
Chemical resistance data for high consumption volume commercial thermoplastic families (Commodity Thermoplastics)
are presented in the two volumes of Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics. A supplementary volume covering Specialty
Thermoplastics is in preparation.
The data chapters of this work comprise data about exposure test conditions and test results, capturing the impact of a
wide range of exposure media on commodity thermoplastics. In addition, a rating number is provided for each test, summaris-
ing the impact according to a system devised by William Andrew Publishing called the PDL Rating.
Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics also includes introductory chapters which will enhance the usefulness of the informa-
tion to a broader audience. The first of these chapters introduces polymer chemistry, physics and engineering at a fairly elemen-
tary level that is easy to read and accessible to technically informed readers without a background in plastics. The chapter begins
by providing definitions and a history of polymers. It continues with the classification of different types of polymers, including
thermoplastics, thermosets and elastomers. Also covered are properties, structures, and examples of commercial polymers as well
as processing and polymerization techniques. The chapter ends with a discussion of applications and common trademarks of
plastics.
The second introductory chapter discusses the effect of different classes of chemicals on polymers. Definitions of different
types of interactions and methods to measure them are given, and the reasons for different interactions of chemicals with plas-
tics and elastomers are discussed. The general hierarchy of the chemical resistance of different classes of polymers and com-
mercial plastics is reviewed, along with the common methods used to enhance chemical resistance properties. Finally,
examples of some applications that require chemical resistance are given, along with materials that would be suitable for these
applications.
The data presented in Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics are also provided online for owners of the book.
The online version offers enhanced navigation and search features and includes some additional data about the materials
covered in the book as well as a few additional materials. To access the data online please register using the following link:
http://chemres-pdl.com
Sina Ebnesajjad
December 2011
In Preparation
Chemical Resistance of Specialty Thermoplastics

This additional volume will comprise the following chapters covering Specialty Thermoplastics:

] Ethylene Chlorotrifluoroethylene Copolymers (ECTFE)


] Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene Copolymers (ETFE)
] Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene Copolymers (FEP)
] Fluoropolymer, CTFE
] Fluoropolymer, Perfluoroalkoxy Polymers
] Fluoropolymer
] Polyvinylidene Fluoride and Polyvinyl Fluoride
] Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylenes (UHMWPE)
] Polyethylene, Crosslinked (XPE)
] Polyethersulfones (PES)
] Polyphenylene Ethers
] Polyketone, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK)
] Polysulfides
] Polysulfone
] Other Polyarylenes
] Polyester, PBT
] Polyimides
] Polymer Alloys
] Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chlorides (CPVC)
] Vinylidene Chloride Polymers (PVDC)
How To Use This Book

Data Table Section


In this section, detailed chemical resistance information on rigid thermoplastic materials is provided. Each of the fifty three
chapters in this section contains data tables, each table representing a single generic material. Within each table, records are
arranged alphabetically by exposure medium. When complete chemical resistance data for a single material is desired, the
Data Table section is the best reference. Each row in this section represents one specific chemical tested on the material under
the specified test conditions.
The information provided varies from table to table since different information is relevant and/or available for each
material. The following grid outlines all of the different fields which can be found in the data tables.

FIELD HEADING DESCRIPTION


Exposure medium reagent or other medium to which the thermoplastic was exposed
Exp. medium note additional Information about the exposure medium and conditions of exposure
Conc. (%) concentration of the given exposure medium, often expressed as a percentage
Temp. (C) exposure temperature in degrees C
Time (days) exposure time in days
PDL # PDL Rating; based on a scale of 0 to 9 (with 9 as the highest resistance); details of how the rating is calculated are
given later in this section
% Change
Length % change from length before exposure
Vol. % change from volume before exposure
Weight % change from weight before exposure
% Retained
Elong. % of original elongation retained
Tensile strength % of original tensile strength retained
Impact strength % of original impact strength retained
Resistance note additional Information about the resistance of the thermoplastic to the exposure medium (i.e. observed changes, safety
notes, etc.)
Test note additional information about the test
Material note details of the specific material tested, this includes, if available, supplier, trade name, grade, filler, specimen details
(although supplier names in particular may have changed since the data was compiled).

Material Index
All materials are listed alphabetically in this index. The user can easily find a specific material and the location of the table
within the book.

Alphabetical List of Exposure Media


In the Alphabetical List of Exposure Media, all exposure media which appear in the Data Table section are listed alphabeti-
cally together with a list of the thermoplastics on which they have been tested. Using the PDL Resistance Rating provided,
the user can quickly determine which thermoplastics may or may not be suitable for use with a given exposure medium.
With the material names and the material index the user can refer to the Data Table section for more detailed information.
If in the Data Tables more than one PDL Rating is listed for a given exposure medium/material combination, the range of
PDL Ratings is provided in the List of Exposure Media.
Synonyms of exposure media are included in List of Exposure Media, with a cross-reference to the exposure medium
name used in this book.
xvi How to Use this Book

PDL Resistance Rating


The PDL Resistance Rating is determined using a weighted value scale developed by PDL and reviewed by experts. Each of
the ratings is calculated from the test results for a material after exposure to a specific exposure medium in the conditions
specified.
The PDL Rating gives a general indication of a materials resistance to a specific exposure medium and helps the user to
readily identify the materials most likely to be resistant to a specific exposure medium.
After assigning the weighted value to each field for which information is available, the PDL Resistance Rating is determined
by adding together all weighted values and dividing this number by the number of values added together. All numbers to the
right of the decimal are truncated to give the final result. If the result is equal to 10, a resistance rating of 9 is assigned. Each
reported field is given equal importance in assigning the resistance rating since, depending on the end use, different factors
play a role in the suitability for use of a material in a specific environment.
Supplier resistance ratings are also taken into account in the calculation of the PDL Resistance Rating. Weighted values
assigned depend on the scale used by the supplier.
The following tables give the values and guidelines used in assigning the PDL Resistance Rating. The guidelines are some-
times subject to an educated judgment. Every effort is made to maintain consistency and accuracy.

Weighted Weight Diameter; Volume Mechanical**


Visual/Observed*** Change
Value Change* Length* Change Change* Property Retained
10 0]0.25 0]0.1 0]2.5 .597 no change
9 .0.25]0.5 .0.1]0.2 .2.5]5.0 94],97
8 .0.5]0.75 .0.2]0.3 .5.0]10.0 90],94
7 .0.75]1.0 .0.3]0.4 .10.0]20.0 85],90 slightly discolored slightly bleached
6 .1.0]1.5 .0.4]0.5 .20.0]30.0 80],85 discolored yellows slightly flexible
5 .1.5]2.0 .0.5]0.75 .30.0]40.0 75],80 possible stress crack agent flexible possible oxidizing
agent slightly crazed
4 .2.0]3.0 .0.75]1.0 .40.0]50.0 70],75 dostorted, warped softemed slight swelling blistered
known stress crack agent
3 .3.0]4.0 .1.0]1.5 .50.0]70.0 60],70 cracking, crazing brittle plasticizer oxidizer softened
swelling surface hardened
2 .4.0]6.0 .1.5]2.0 .60.9]90.0 50],60 severe distortion oxidizer and plasticizer deteriorated
1 .6.0 .2.0 .90.0 .0],50 decomposed
0 solvent dissolved disintegrated
*All values are given as percentage change from original.
**Percentage mechanical properties retained include tensile strength, elongation, modulus, flexural strength and impact strength. If the % retention is
greater than 100%, a value of 200 minus the % property retained is used in the calculations.
***Due to the variety of information of this type reported, this information can be used only as a guideline.

CAS Registry Numbers


Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a division of American Chemical Society, began the CAS Chemical Registry in 1965.
The CAS Chemical Registry is a computer-based system that automatically identifies structural diagrams and assigns to each
a unique CAS Registry Number. This number, which has no chemical significance, is then used within a larger processing
system to link the molecular structure with its CA index name and other data. Registry numbers, even in the absence of
names, therefore provide an efficient means of substance identification in technical publications and scientific communica-
tions. Many publications and information sources have adopted CAS Registry Numbers to identify chemical substances.
In the CAS Registry Numbers appendices (chemical sort and numeric sort) CAS Registry Numbers are listed for many of the
materials, as well as the exposure media, covered in Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics.
Abbreviations

AASC ............... Methyl Methacrylate Butyl Acrylate CTMP .................... Chemi-Thermo Mechanical Pulp ft .......................................................................foot
Copolymer cu-cm ............................................cubic centimeter FVMQ............................... Methylvinylfluorosilicone
ABS ........................ Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene cu-foot .................................................... cubic foot g...................................................................... gram
acc. ........................................................ acceptable cyan. ........................................................... cyanide gal. .................................................................gallon
acet............................................................ Acetone DAIP...................................... Diallyl Metaphthalate Gary .................................... AlphaGary Corporation
AEC .................................. Aromatic Estercarbonate DAP................................................Diallyl Phthalate Goodyear .......Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company
alc. .............................................................. Alcohol DDT.......................Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane h ......................................................................hour
alc.-contg. ...................................alcohol-containing deg.............................................................. degrees HAF ......................................High Abrasion Furnace
aliph........................................................... aliphatic deriv............................................................ derived halog. hydrocarb............ Halogenated Hydrocarbon
alk................................................................... alkali dg................................................................degrees HALS .................... Hindered Amine Light Stabilizers
AlkylDimeth. Benzylam. Chlor. Alkyldimethylbenzyl dim. ........................................................ dimension HDPE.............................. High Density Polyethylene
Ammonium Chloride
DIN........................ Deutsches Institut fr Normung HDT........................... Heat Deflection Temperature
am......................................................... Ammonium
DMA ............................................... Dimethylamine HEF................................................High Energy Fuel
AMA........................... Acrylonitrile Methyl Acrylate
DMF .................................. N,N-Dimethylformamide HEMPA..................Hexamethylphosphoric Triamide
amend.................................................. amendment
DMSO ........................................Dimethyl Sulfoxide hexachlorocyclopent......... Hexachlorocyclopentane
Ammon. Carbonate .............Ammonium Carbonate
DNP............................................. Dinonyl Phthalate HMWLDPE ......High Molecular Weight Low Density
ANSI............ American National Standards Institute Polyethylene
DOP.............................................. Dioctyl Phthalate
aq............................................................... aqueous hr .....................................................................hour
Dow .................................. Dow Chemical Company
Aramid .....................................Aromatic Polyamide hrs.................................................................. hours
DSM .................................DSM Engineering Plastics
Aristech.................................. Aristech Acrylics, LLC HTF ..................................... High Temperature Fuel
DTBP ......................................di-tert-Butyl Peroxide
arom. ........................................................ aromatic Huls............................... Chemische Werke Hls AG
ea.....................................................................each
ASA ........................... Acrylate Styrene Acrylonitrile hyd. chloride sat........ Hydrogen Chloride saturated
Eastman ......................Eastman Chemical Company
ASTM ...........American Society of Testing Materials hyd.............................................................. hydride
ECTFE ................... Ethylene Chlorotrifluoroethylene
atm. ..................................................... atmosphere ICI Adv. Mat........................ ICI Advanced Materials
EDTA .....................Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid
auto. trans. fluids .......Automotive Transport Fluids ICI................................Imperial Chemical Industries
EMA .................................Ethylene Methyl Acrylate
BBP ...................................... Butyl Benzyl Phthalate in.......................................................................inch
EMS...............EMS-GRIVORY Performance Polymers
BR .......................................................Butyl Rubber Inc....................................................... Incorporated
Emser................................................. Emser Werke
CAB ................................Cellulose Acetate Butyrate ind............................................................ individual
EPDM ............. Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer
cad. .......................................................... Cadmium Ind. .......................................................... Industrial
EPM ......................... Ethylene Propylene Monomer
CDM.................................... Color Difference Meter Indspec ...................INDSPEC Chemical Corporation
ESCR........Environmental Stress Cracking Resistance
chlor........................................................... Chloride inhib........................................................... inhibitor
ETFE ...........................Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene
CIE lab......... Commission Internationale dEclairage IPS............................................. Impact Polystyrene
ethyl.ox............................................Ethylene Oxide
cm.......................................................... centimeter IRHD.......... International Rubber Hardness Degrees
EtO...................................................Ethylene Oxide
Co. ........................................................... Company irrad. ........................................................irradiance
EVA ...................................... Ethylene Vinyl Acetate
Colorite .............................. Colorite Europe Limited ISO .................International Standards Organization
Eval ............................... EVAL Company of America
com....................................................... commercial ISO/NPG.....................Isophthalic/Neopenthylglycol
EVOH ................................... Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol
compat................................................ compatibility l......................................................................... litre
expos. ....................................................... exposure
compds. ................................................ compounds Labs. ....................................................Laboratories
F.R................................................. Flame Retardant
compn.................................................. composition lb................................................................... pound
Fed. Spec. ............................. Federal Specifications
conc. ................................................. concentration LCP....................................... Liquid Crystal Polymer
fed. .............................................................. federal
concd. ................................................ concentrated LDPE................................ Low Density Polyethylene
FEF .......................................Fast Extrusion Furnace
concs................................................ concentrations liq................................................................... liquid
FEP......................... Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene
cond......................................................... condition liqs. ............................................................... liquids
fermentn. mix........................fermentation mixture
cont..............................................................contain LLDPE ................... Linear Low Density Polyethylene
FFKM..... Tetrafluoroethylene Perfluoromethyl Vinyl
contg....................................................... containing Ether Copolymer long.......................................................longitudinal
Continental .............................. Continental Acrylics Fiberite .................................................. ICI Fiberite LPG ....................................Liquified Petroleum Gas
COPA....... Polyetheramide Thermoplastic Elastomer FKM ........ Vinylidene Fluoride Hexafluoropropylene Ltd................................................................Limited
Corp. .................................................... Corporation FMQ........................................ Methylfluorosilicone m ...................................................................meter
CPVC ........................ Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride foliat. talc .............................................foliated talc mag. chloride..........................Magnesium Chloride
CSM ............ Chlorosulfonated Polyethylene Rubber FPE................................... Fluorinated Polyethylene manuf. ............................................. manufacturing
CTFE ....................................Chlorotrifluoroethylene fpm ................................................ foot per minute manufd. ............................................ manufactured
xviii Abbreviations
materi. ....................................................... material PEK.................................................Polyetherketone SAE....................... Society of Automotive Engineers
max..........................................................maximum PEKK ................................... Polyetherketoneketone SAE Tech. Paper.........................SAE Techical Paper
MBS ......... Methyl Methacrylate Butadiene Styrene Pelseal .............................Pelseal Technologies, LLC SAF.....................................Super Abrasion Furnace
MBT ....................................Mercaptobenzothiazole PES................................................ Polyethersulfone SAN ......................................... Styrene Acrylonitrile
MBTS ............................ Dibenzothiazole Disulphide PET............................... Polyethylene Terephthalate sat.............................................................. saturate
MDI..............Methylene Di-p-Phenylene Isocyanate PETG ........................Polycyclohexylenedimethylene satd.......................................................... saturated
MDPE ....................... Medium Density Polyethylene EthyleneTerephthalate SBC........................... Styrene-Butadiene Copolymer
med. .......................................................... medium PFA ................................................. Perfluoroalkoxy SBR ................................ Styrene Butadiene Rubber
MEK ........................................ Methyl Ethyl Ketone Phillips ............ Chevron Phillips Chemical Company SEBS ................. Styrene-Ethylene/Butylene-Styrene
MFA ..............Tetrafluoroethylene Perfluoromethyl photog. .............................................. photographic sec ..............................................................seconds
Vinyl Ether phr .............................................. per hundred resin SEP...............................Styrene Ethylene/Propylene
mg.............................................................milligram phthalic ahhyd...........................Phthalic Ahhydride sep. ............................................................separate
MIBK .................................. Methyl Isobutyl Ketone plast.........................................................plasticizer SEPS ................Styrene-Ethylene/Propylene-Styrene
min .............................................................minutes PMI .......................................... Polymethacrylimide silv. cy. .............................................. Silver Cyanide
misc. ................................................. miscellaneous PMMA.............................. Polymethyl Methacrylate SMA ................................Styrene Maleic Anhydride
Mitsui ................................Mitsui Chemicals Group PMP .......................................... Polymethylpentene sod. cy............................................ Sodium Cyanide
mix.............................................................. mixture PMPPIC ........ Polymethylene Polyphenyl Isocyanate sod. fluosilic.............................. Sodium Fluosilicate
mL.............................................................. millilitre PMQ....................................... Methylphenylsilicone sod. sulfate ..................................... Sodium Sulfate
mm ......................................................... millimeter Polycast ..........................................PolyCast Acrylic sod. ..............................................................sodium
MMA...................................... Methyl Methacrylate POM............................................Polyoxymethylene sol. ..............................................................solution
moist......................................................... moisture pot. carb. ............................... Potassium Carbonate soln. ............................................................solution
mol. wgt. ..................................... molecular weight pot. cy........................................Potassium Cyanide solns. ........................................................ solutions
MPDA ...............................Metaphenylene Diamine pot. ferrocyan.................... Potassium Ferrocyanide Solvay .................... Solvay Advanced Polymers, LLC
MQ................................................... Methylsilicone pot. gold cyan................... Potassium Gold Cyanide SPE ANTEC ...... Society of Plastics Engineers Annual
NASA..................... National Aeronautics and Space potas....................................................... Potassium Technical Conference
Administration PP .....................................................Polypropylene sq-ft ...................................................... square foot
NBR................................................... Nitrile Rubber PPA ............................................... Polyphthalamide sq-in...................................................... square inch
Nippon Gohsei Nippon Synthetic Chemical Industry PPE.......................................... Polyphenylene Ether sq-m................................................... square meter
Company Limited
ppm .............................................. parts per million SR.......................................................Silicone Resin
Nippon Zeon ...............................ZEON Corporation
PPO........................................ Polyphenylene Oxide SRF.................................. Semi-Reinforcing Furnace
nm ......................................................... nanometer
PPS........................................Polyphenylene Sulfide sub. .......................................................... sublimate
no. .............................................................. number
P-PVC ......................... Plasticized Polyvinyl Chloride TBP ............................................ Tributyl Phosphate
non-metal. ...........................................non-metallic
prem. ........................................................ premium TBT............................................ Tetrabutyl Titanate
NR................................................... Natural Rubber
Pro. ...................................................... Proceedings TCA ...........................................Trichloroacetic Acid
OBDPO........................... Octabromodiphenyl Oxide
prod. ...................................................... production TDI ......................................... Toluene Diisocyanate
Occidental..........Occidental Petroleum Corporation
prop. glycol................................... Propylene Glycol tech........................................................... technical
oct.................................................................octane
PS.......................................................... Polystyrene TEL .................................................. Tetraethyl Lead
org. ........................................................... organical
pt .................................................................... point temp. ...................................................temperature
ox....................................................................oxide
PTT.........................Polytrimethylene Terephthalate tetrachlorocyclopent.........Tetrachlorocyclopentane
oz ...................................................................ounce
PUR.................................................... Polyurethane TFE ........................................... Tetrafluoroethylene
PA ........................................................... Polyamide
PVA .............................................. Polyvinyl Acetate TFE/P ...................... Tetrafluoroethylene Propylene
PAI ................................................. Polyamideimide
PVC ............................................. Polyvinyl Chloride The Purdue Frederick Co. ......The Purdue Frederick
PARA................................................. Polyarylamide Company
PVDC...................................Polyvinylidene Chloride
PASU............................................... Polyarylsulfone TMTD .......................Tetramethyl Thiuram Disulfide
PVDF ................................... Polyvinylidene Fluoride
PBI ............................................. Polybenzimidazole TNT .................................................. Trinitrotoluene
PVF ............................................. Polyvinyl Fluoride
PBT .............................. Polybutylene Terephthalate TPAU............ Polyester Polyurethane Thermoplastic
PVMQ .............................Methylphenylvinylsilicone
PC ..................................................... Polycarbonate Elastomer
qt ............................................................... quantity
PCBs................................ Polychlorinated Biphenyls TPE................................... Thermoplastic Elastomer
Quadrant EPP ............ Quadrant Engineering Plastic
PCL............................................... Polycaprolactone Products TPEU ........... Polyether Polyurethane Thermoplastic
PCT....Polycyclohexylenedimethylene Terephthalate Elastomer
R.H. .............................................. relative humidity
PCTG .............................................. Glycol Modified trans. ...................................................... transverse
reg. .............................................................. regular
PolycyclohexylenedimethyleneTerephthalate tsp.............................................................teaspoon
res..............................................................resistant
PE........................................................ Polyethylene turpen.................................................... Turpentine
RIM PUR . Reaction Injection Molding Polyurethane
PEEK...................................... Polyetheretherketone U.S. .................................................... United States
RTPU .........................Rigid Thermoplastic Urethane
PEG .......................................... Polyethylene Glycol UHMWPEUltrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene
SABIC ................ Saudi Basic Industries Corporation
PEI....................................................Polyetherimide UL .................................. Underwriters Laboratories
Abbreviations xix
unsatd.................................................. unsaturated VDMA .............Verband Deutscher Maschinen- und wat. ...............................................................Water
UP ........................................ Unsaturated Polyester Anlagenbau weatherom. ....................................weatherometer
Urylon........................ Urylon Plastics Incorporation VMQ ......................................... Methylvinylsilicone wt. ................................................................weight
USP .............................United States Pharmacopeia vol................................................................volume XPE................................... Crosslinked Polyethylene
UV...........................................................Ultraviolet vulcan. ...................................................Vulcanizate yr ..................................................................... year
VDF ........................................... Vinylidene Fluoride w/ .................................................................... with yrs................................................................... years
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

1.1 Plastics and Polymers


The most common feature of plastics and elastomers is that both have polymeric structures. The word polymer is derived from
the Greek terms poly, which means many, and mer parts, meaning many parts. Polymers are large molecules comprised of
many repeat units, called monomers, which are chemically bonded together and thus form long chains. Since the turn-of-the-
twentieth-century and, in particular, after World War II, many synthetic polymers have been developed to satisfy the needs of a
diverse range of products, including paints, coatings, fibers, films, elastomers, and structural plastics. The term plastic is typically
reserved for polymeric materials that can be molded or formed into solid or elastic parts. Over 65,900 different grades of plastic
offered by over 500 suppliers are listed, as of 2010. [Source: The Plastics Webs, www.ides.com, 2010].

1.1.1 Polymerization
Polymerization is the process of chemically bonding monomer building blocks to form large molecules. Commercial polymer
molecules may contain thousands of repeat units. Polymerization transpires by one of several methods. The two most common
methods are addition and condensation polymerization.
In addition polymerization, the polymer molecule grows by the addition of one new monomer at-a-time via a chain
reaction. The addition reaction occurs through the opening of double or triple bonds in the monomer. Each new monomer
unit creates an active site for the next attachment. The net reaction is shown in Figure 1.1. Many plastics are formed in this
manner. Some of the plastics created by addition polymerization include polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylics,
polystyrene, polytetrafluoroethylene and polyoxymethylene (acetal).
Another common reaction mechanism is condensation polymerization. The reaction between monomer units and the grow-
ing polymer chain end groups releases a small molecule, which is often water, as shown in Figure 1.2. This reversible reaction
reaches equilibrium and halts, unless this small molecule by-product is removed. Polyesters (which have the by-product
methanol) and polyamides (water is the by-product) are among the plastics made by this process.
Understanding the polymerization process used to make a particular plastic gives insight into the nature of the plastic. For
example, plastics made via condensation polymerization, in which water is released, can degrade when exposed to water at
high temperatures. Polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can degrade by a process called hydrolysis when
exposed to acidic, basic, or even some neutral environments, severing the polymer chains.

1.1.2 Copolymers
A copolymer is a polymer formed when two (or more) monomers are linked in the same polymer chain, as opposed to a
homopolymer where only one monomer is used. If three monomers are used, it is called a terpolymer.

Figure 1.1 Addition Polymerization.

Figure 1.2 Condensation Polymerization.


xxii Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Monomers are sometimes symmetric; such as ethylene CH2QCH2, which has the same structure on the two sides of an
imaginary axis. In ethylene the axis is perpendicular to the double bond at the midpoint. The arrangement of the monomers in
a copolymer can be head-to-tail, head-to-head, or tail-to-tail. Since a copolymer consists of at least two types of repeating
unit, copolymers can be classified based on how these units are arranged along the chain. These classifications include:
 Alternating copolymer
 Random copolymer (statistical copolymer)
 Block copolymer
 Graft copolymer
When the two monomers (A and B) are arranged in an alternating fashion, the polymer is called, of course, an alternating
copolymer:

A and B are different monomers which do not have to be present in any particular ratios such as one to one. In a random
copolymer, the two monomers may follow in any order:

In a block copolymer, each type of monomer is grouped together, and all of the others are grouped together. A block
copolymer can be thought of as two homopolymer chains joined together:

A polymer that consists of large grouped blocks of each of the monomers is also considered a block copolymer:

When chains of a polymer made of monomer B are grafted onto a polymer chain of monomer A, it is called a branched
(or graft) copolymer:
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxiii

Figure 1.3 Linear, Branched and Cross-linked Polymers.

High-impact polystyrene, or HIPS, is an example of graft copolymer. Its a polystyrene backbone with chains of polybuta-
diene grafted onto the backbone. The polystyrene imparts the material strength, but the rubbery polybutadiene chains give it
resilience to make it less brittle.

1.1.3 Linear, Branched and Crosslinked Polymers


Some polymers are linear, consisting of a long chain of connected monomers. Polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, nylon 66 and
polymethyl methacrylate are some linear commercial examples that can found in this book. Branched polymers can be
visualized as a linear polymer with side chains of the same polymer attached to the main polymer chain. While the branches
may in turn be branched, they do not connect to another polymer chain. The ends of the branches are not connected to another
chain. In a cross-linked polymer, (also called network polymer), different chains are connected. Essentially, the branches are
connected to different polymer chains on the ends. These three polymer structures are shown in Figure 1.3.

1.1.4 Molecular Weight


A polymers molecular weight is the sum of the atomic weights of individual atoms that comprise a molecule. It indicates the
average length of the bulk resins polymer chains. Not all polymer molecules of a particular grade have the exact same
molecular weight. There is a range or distribution of molecular weights. The average molecular weight can be determined by
several means, but this subject is beyond the scope of this book. Low molecular weight polyethylene chains have backbones
as small as 1,000 carbon atoms long. Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene chains can have 500,000 carbon atoms along
their length. Many plastics are available in a variety of chain lengths, or different molecular weight grades. These resins can
also be classified indirectly by a viscosity value, rather than molecular weight. Within a resin family, such as polycarbonate,
higher molecular weight grades have higher melt viscosities. For example, in the viscosity test for polycarbonate, the melt
flow rate ranges from approximately 4 g/10 min for the highest molecular weight, standard grades to more than 60 g/10 min
for lowest molecular weight, high flow, and specialty grades.
Selecting the correct molecular weight for your injection molding application generally involves a balance between filling
ease and material performance. If your application has thin-walled sections, a lower molecular weight/ lower viscosity grade
offers better flow. For normal wall thicknesses, these resins also offer faster mold cycle times and fewer molded-in stresses.
The stiffer-flowing, high molecular weight resins offer the ultimate material performance, being tougher and more resistant to
chemical and environmental attack.

1.1.5 Thermosets vs. Thermoplastics


A plastic falls into one of two broad categories depending on its response to heat: thermoplastics or thermosets.
Thermoplastics soften and melt when heated and harden when cooled. Because of this behavior, these resins can be injection
molded, extruded, or formed via other molding techniques. This behavior also allows production scrap runners and trimming,
to be reground and reused.
Unlike thermoplastics, thermosets react chemically to form cross-links, as described earlier, that limit chain movement.
This network of polymer chains tends to degrade, rather than soften, when exposed to excessive heat. Until recently, thermo-
sets could not be remelted and reused after initial curing. Recent advances in recycling have provided new methods for
remelting and reusing thermoset materials.
xxiv Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Figure 1.4 Many Plastics Have Crystalline and Amorphous Regions.

1.1.6 Crystalline vs. Amorphous


Thermoplastics are further classified by their crystallinity, or the degree of order within the polymers overall structure. As a crys-
talline resin cools from the melt, polymer chains fold or align into highly ordered crystalline structures, as shown in Figure 1.4.
Some plastics can be completely amorphous or crystalline. Often plastics specifications report the percentage that is crys-
talline, such as 73% crystallinity. Generally, polymer chains with bulky side groups cannot form crystalline regions. The
degree of crystallinity depends upon both the polymer and the processing technique. Some polymers, such as polyethylene,
crystallize quickly and reach high levels of crystallinity. Others, such as PET polyester, require slow cooling to crystallize. If
cooled quickly, PET polyester remains amorphous in the final product.
Crystalline and amorphous plastics have several characteristic differences. Amorphous polymers do not have a sharp melt-
ing point, but do have a glass transition temperature, Tg. A glass transition temperature is the temperature at which a polymer
changes from hard and brittle to soft and pliable. The force to generate flow in amorphous materials diminishes slowly as the
temperature rises above the glass transition temperature. In crystalline resins, the force requirements diminish quickly as the
material is heated above its crystalline melt temperature. Because of these easier flow characteristics, crystalline resins have
an advantage in filling thin-walled sections of a mold. Crystalline resins generally have superior chemical resistance, greater
stability at elevated temperatures, and better creep resistance. Amorphous plastics typically have better impact strength, less
mold shrinkage, and less final part warping than crystalline materials. End-use requirements usually dictate whether an amor-
phous or crystalline resin is preferred.

1.1.7 Blends
Polymers can often be blended. Occasionally, blended polymers have properties that exceed those of either of the constituents.
For instance, blends of polycarbonate resin and PET polyester, originally created to improve the chemical resistance of poly-
carbonate, actually have fatigue resistance and low temperature impact resistance which is superior to either of the individual
polymers.
Sometimes a material is needed that possesses some of the properties of one polymer, and some of the properties of
another. Instead of returning to the lab and trying to synthesize a brand new polymer with all the properties wanted, two poly-
mers can be melted together to form a blend, which will hopefully have some of the properties of both.
Two polymers that do actually mix well are polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide. A few other examples of polymer pairs
that will blend are:
 Polyethylene terephthalate with polybutylene terephthalate
 Polymethyl methacrylate with polyvinylidene fluoride
Phase-separated mixtures are obtained when one tries to mix most polymers. Strangely enough, the phase-separated materi-
als often turn out to be rather useful. They are called immiscible blends.
Polystyrene and polybutadiene are immiscible. When polystyrene is mixed with a small amount of polybutadiene, the two
polymers do not blend. The polybutadiene separates from the polystyrene into little spherical blobs. If this mixture is viewed
under a high power microscope something that looks like the picture in Figure 1.5 would be seen.
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxv

Figure 1.5 Immiscible Blend of Polystyrene and Polybutadiene.

Multiphase polymer blends are of major economic importance in the polymer industry. The most common examples involve
the impact modification of a thermoplastic by the microdispersion of a rubber into a brittle polymer matrix. Most commercial
blends consist of two polymers combined with small amounts of a third, compatibilizing polymer ] typically a block or graft
copolymer.
Multiphase polymer blends can be easier to process than a single polymer with similar properties. The possible blends
from a given set of polymers offer many more physical properties than do the individual polymers. This approach has shown
some success but becomes cumbersome when more than a few components are involved.
Blending two or more polymers offers yet another method of tailoring resins to a specific application. Because blends are
only physical mixtures, the resulting polymer usually has physical and mechanical properties that lie somewhere between the
values of its constituent materials. For instance, an automotive bumper made from a blend of polycarbonate resin and thermo-
plastic polyurethane elastomer gains rigidity from the polycarbonate resin and retains most of the flexibility and paintability
of the polyurethane elastomer. For business machine housings, a blend of polycarbonate and ABS resins offers the enhanced
performance of polycarbonate flame retardancy and UV stability at a lower cost.

1.1.8 Elastomers
Elastomers are a class of polymeric materials that can be repeatedly stretched to over twice their original length, with little or
no permanent deformation. Elastomers can be made of either thermoplastic or thermoset materials and generally are tested
and categorized differently than rigid materials. They are commonly selected according to their hardness and energy absorp-
tion characteristics, properties rarely considered in rigid thermoplastics. Elastomers are found in numerous applications, such
as automotive bumpers and industrial hoses.

1.1.9 Additives
Additives encompass a wide range of substances that aid processing or add value to the final product. Found in virtually all
plastics, most additives are incorporated into a resin family by the supplier as part of a proprietary package. For example, you
can choose standard polycarbonate resin grades with additives for improved internal mold release, UV stabilization, and flame
retardancy; or nylon grades with additives to improve impact performance.
Additives often determine the success or failure of a resin or system in a particular application. Many common additives
are discussed in the following sections. Most additives are added in very small amounts.

1.1.9.1 Fillers and Reinforcement


Reinforcing fillers can be added in large amounts. Some plastics may contain as much as 60% reinforcing fillers. Often,
fibrous materials, such as glass or carbon fibers, are added to resins to create reinforced grades with enhanced properties. For
example, adding 30% short glass fibers by weight to nylon 6 improves creep resistance, and increases stiffness by 300%.
These glass-reinforced plastics usually suffer some loss of impact strength and ultimate elongation, and are more prone to
warping because of the relatively large difference in mold shrinkage between the flow and cross-flow directions.
Plastics with non-fibrous fillers, such as glass spheres or mineral powders, generally exhibit higher stiffness characteristics
than unfilled resins, but not as high as fiber reinforced grades. Resins with particulate fillers are less likely to warp and show
xxvi Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

a decrease in mold shrinkage. Particulate fillers typically reduce shrinkage by a percentage roughly equal to the volume per-
centage of filler in the polymer, an advantage in tight tolerance molding.
1.1.9.2 Combustion Modifiers, Fire, Flame Retardants and Smoke Suppressants
Combustion modifiers are added to polymers to help retard the resulting parts from burning. Generally required for electrical
and medical housing applications, combustion modifiers and their amounts vary with the inherent flammability of the base
polymer. Polymers designed for these applications often are rated using an Underwriters Laboratories rating system. Use these
ratings for comparison purposes only, as they may not accurately represent the hazard present under actual fire conditions.
1.1.9.3 Release Agents, Lubricants, Slip and Antiblocking Agents
External release agents are lubricants, liquids or powders, which coat a mold cavity to facilitate part removal. Internal release
agents can accomplish the same purpose. The identity of the release agent is rarely disclosed, but they are frequently fine
fluoropolymer powders, called micropowders, silicone resins or waxes.
1.1.9.4 Catalysts
Catalysts, substances that initiate or change the rate of a chemical reaction, do not undergo a permanent change in composi-
tion and do not become part of the molecular structure of the final product. Occasionally, they are used to describe a setting
agent, hardener, curing agent, promoter, etc., and are added in minute quantities, typically less than one percent.
1.1.9.5 Impact Modifiers and Tougheners
Many plastics do not have sufficient impact resistance for their intended use. Rather than change to a different type of plastic,
they can be impact modified in order to fulfill the performance in use requirements. The addition of modifiers, called impact
modifiers or tougheners, can significantly improve impact resistance. This is one of the most important additives. There are
many suppliers and chemical types of these modifiers.
General-purpose impact modification is a very low level of impact modification. It improves room temperature impact
strength but does not take into account any requirements for low temperature (below 0C) impact strength. For most of these
types of applications only low levels of impact modifier are required (,10%).
Low temperature impact strength is required for applications that require a certain level of low temperature flexibility and
resistance to break. This is, for example, the case for many applications in the appliance area. For this purpose, modifier
levels between 5]15% of mostly reactive modifiers are necessary. Reactive modifiers can bond chemically to the base
polymer.
Super-tough impact strength may be required for applications that should not lead to a failure of the part, even if hit at low
temperatures (230 to 240C) at high speed. This requirement can only be fulfilled with high levels (20]25%) of reactive
impact modifier, along with a low glass transition temperature.
Figure 1.6 shows the effect of one toughener on the izod performance of a common Nylon 6 plastic. The toughener used
in this graph is DuPonts FusabondsN MN-493D. The graph shows the improvement in notched izod performance vs. tem-
perature with differing levels of toughener additive. As shown in this figure, the performance can be dramatically improved.
1.1.9.6 UV Stabilizers
Sunshine and its UV radiation have a deteriorating effect on many polymers. UV stabilizers play an important role in plastics
for external uses by counteracting the effects of the sun. UV stabilizers are used in plastic items such as greenhouse film, out-
door furniture, and automotive plastic parts. The amounts added are very small, generally less than one percent.
1.1.9.7 Antistatic Agents
Anti-static additives are capable of modifying the properties of plastics in such a way that they become anti-static,
conductive, and/or improve electromagnetic interference shielding (EMI). Carbon fibers, conductive carbon powders, and
other electrically-conductive materials are used for this purpose.
1.1.9.8 Plasticizers
Plasticizers are added to help maintain flexibility in a plastic. Various phthalates are commonly used for this purpose. Since
they are small molecules they may extract or leach out of the plastic, causing a loss of flexibility with time.
1.1.9.9 Pigments, Extenders, Dyes, Mica
Pigments are added to impart color to a plastic, but they may also affect the physical properties. Extenders are usually cheap
materials added to reduce the cost of plastic resins. Dyes are colorants and are chemically different than pigments. Mica is a
special pigment added to impact sparkle or a metallic appearance.
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxvii

Figure 1.6 Notched Izod of BASF Ultramids B-3Nylon 6 Modified with Various Levels of Fusabonds N NM-493D Toughener.

1.1.9.10 Coupling Agents


The purpose of adding fillers is either to lower the cost of the polymer, make it tougher or stiffer, or make it flame
retardant so that it does not burn when it is ignited. Often the addition of the filler reduces the elongation at break, the
flexibility and, in many cases, the toughness of the polymer because the fillers are added at very high levels. One reason
for the degradation of properties is that the fillers, in most cases, are not compatible with the polymers. The addition of
coupling agents can improve the compatibility of the filler with the polymer. As a result, the polymer will like the filler
more, adhere better to the polymer matrix and the properties of the final mixture (e.g. elongation, flexibility) will be
enhanced.
1.1.9.11 Thermal Stabilizers
One of the limiting factors in the use of plastics at high temperatures is their tendency to not only become softer, but also to
thermally degrade. Thermal degradation can present an upper limit to the service temperature of plastics. Thermal degradation
can occur at temperatures much lower than those at which mechanical failure is likely to occur. Plastics can be protected
from thermal degradation by incorporating stabilizers into them. Stabilizers can work in a variety of ways, but discussion of
these mechanisms are beyond the purpose of this book.
There are other additives used in plastics, but the ones discussed above are the most common.

1.2 Testing of Plastics


The bulk of this book contains tables and plots of the change of various properties of plastics as a function of temperature,
strain, humidity, frequency, etc. The next sections of this chapter summarize the standard tests. Details on some of the more
common test methods will follow.
Standard plastics tests are generally specified primarily by two standards organizations: ASTM International, originally known
as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is one of these; its standards are the well-known ASTM standards.
The second organization is the International Organization for Standardization, abbreviated as ISO, and is also well known. These
organizations do not specify just plastics tests, but they both develop technical standards in whatever fields need them. They are
both well accepted. Unfortunately, they do not always agree. While there is often a one-to-one correlation of ASTM and ISO
standards, they may differ in procedure and conditions, which may lead to slightly different measures. For example, tensile
modulus can be measured by ASTM D638 or ISO 527-1. While reported values are similar, they are rarely the same. These
standard tests are listed in Tables 1.1 to 1.6.
xxviii Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Table 1.1 Standard Mechanical Tests


Measurement ASTM ISO
Apparent Bending Modulus ASTM D747 ]
Coefficient of Friction ASTM D1894 ]
Compressive Modulus ASTM D695 ISO 604
Compressive Strength ASTM D695 ISO 604
Deformation Under Load ASTM D621 ]
Flexural Creep ASTM D2990 ]
Flexural Creep Modulus ] ISO 6602
Flexural Modulus ASTM D790 ISO 178
Flexural Strength ASTM D790 ISO 178
Flexural Strength at Break ASTM D790 ]
Flexural Strength at Yield ASTM D790 ]
Nominal Tensile Strain at Break ] ISO 527-1, -2
Poissons Ratio ASTM E132 ]
Shear Modulus ASTM D732
Shear Strength ASTM D732 ]
Tensile Creep Modulus ] ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Elongation at Break ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Elongation at Yield ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Modulus ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Strength ASTM D638 ]
Tensile Strength at Break ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Strength at Yield ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2
Tensile Strength, Ultimate ASTM D638 ISO 527-1, -2

Many plastics families have their own ASTM and ISO guidelines for testing. These guidelines provide standard testing
procedures including sample preparation and often define the subclassification of the plastic products. Some of these stan-
dards are given in Table 1.7.

1.2.1 Glass Transition Temperature, Tg


The glass transition temperature, often called Tg (or T sub g), is an important property when considering polymers for a
particular end-use. The glass transition temperature is the temperature below which the physical properties of plastics
change in a manner similar to those of a glassy or crystalline state, and above which they behave like rubbery materials.
A plastics Tg, is the temperature below which molecules have little relative mobility. Tg is usually applicable to wholly or
partially amorphous plastics. A plastics properties can be dramatically different above and below its Tg. The next sections
show a number of ways to measure or estimate the Tg. These methods indicate how some of the properties change around
the Tg. The value of the glass transition temperature depends on the strain rate and cooling or heating rate, so there cannot
be an exact value for Tg.

1.3 Selection Guides


Selection and evaluation of materials can be very complex. The following series of questions is based on material from
San Diego Plastics, website. It shows the wide variety of considerations one must take into account when selecting a plastic
material for an application.
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxix

Table 1.2 Standard Elastomer Tests


Measurement ASTM ISO
Compression Set ASTM D395 ISO 37
Elongation at Break ASTM D412 ]
Elongation at Yield ASTM D412 ]
Elongation Set After Break ASTM D412 ]
Tear Strength ASTM D624 ISO 34-1
Tear Strength, Split ASTM D412 ]
Tensile Set ASTM D412 ]
Tensile Strength at Break ASTM D412 ISO 37
Tensile Strength at Yield ASTM D412 ISO 37
Tensile Stress at 100% ASTM D412 ISO 37
Tensile Stress at 200% ASTM D412 ISO 37
Tensile Stress at 300% ASTM D412 ISO 37
Tensile Stress at 50% ASTM D412 ]

Table 1.3 Standard Impact Tests


Measurement ASTM ISO
Charpy Notched Impact Strength ASTM D256 ISO 179
Charpy Unnotched Impact Strength ] ISO 179
Drop Impact Resistance ASTM D4226 ]
Gardner Impact ASTM D5420 & D5628 ]
Instrumented Dart Impact ASTM D3763 ]
Multi-Axial Instrumented Impact Energy ] ISO 6603-2 MAII
Multi-Axial Instrumented Impact Peak Force ] ISO 6603-2 MAII
Notched Izod Impact Strength ASTM D256 ISO 180
Reverse Notch Izod Impact Strength ASTM D256 ]
Tensile Impact Strength ASTM D1822 ISO 8256
Unnotched Izod Impact Strength ASTM D256 ISO 180

Table 1.4 Standard Hardness Tests


Measurement ASTM ISO
Ball Indentation Hardness ] ISO 2039-1
Durometer (Shore) Hardness ASTM D2240 ISO 868
Rockwell Hardness ASTM D785 ISO 2039-2

It may be necessary to ask some or all of the following questions to define the performance needs of a plastic material for
a particular application.
1) WHAT LOAD WILL THE PLASTIC PART HAVE TO CARRY?
(a) Will it carry high loads?
(b) What will the highest load be?
xxx Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Table 1.5 Standard Electrical Tests


Electrical ASTM ISO
Dielectric Constant ASTM D150 IEC 60250
Dielectric Strength ASTM D149 IEC 60243-1
Dissipation Factor ASTM D150 IEC 60250
Surface Resistivity ASTM D257 IEC 60093
Volume Resistivity ASTM D257 IEC 60093

Table 1.6 Standard Thermal Tests


Thermal ASTM ISO
Brittleness Temperature ASTM D746 ISO 812 & ISO 974
Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion (CLTE) ASTM D696 &ASTM E831 ISO 11359-1, -2
HDT (Heat Deflection Temperature) at 8.0 MPa ] ISO 75 Method C
HDT at 1.80 MPa ASTM D648 ISO 75 Method A
HDT 0.45 MPa ASTM D648 ISO 75 Method B
Ductile/Brittle Transition Temperature ] ISO 6603-2 Ductile
Brittle
Glass Transition Temperature ASTM E1356 ]
Melting Temperature (DSC) ] ISO 3146
Specific Heat ASTM C351 ]
Thermal Conductivity ASTM C177 ISO 8302
Vicat Softening Temperature ASTM D1525 ISO 306
Melt Flow Rate/Melt Flow Index ASTM D1238 ISO 1133

(c) What is the maximum stress in the part?


(d) What kind of stress is it (tensile, flexural, torsional, etc.)?
(e) How long will the load be applied for?
(f) What is the projected life of the part?
Thermosets often perform well under high continuous loads. Reinforced thermoplastics, such as thermoplastic polyester,
may also perform satisfactorily.
2) WILL THE PART HAVE TO WITHSTAND IMPACT?
(a) Will the part be subjected to impact?
(b) Which impact test/data more nearly duplicates the impact occurring in this application?
Reinforced plastics, such as glass-reinforced thermosets like epoxy, melamine, or phenolic generally have good impact
strength. Polycarbonate and UHMW polyethylene also exhibit excellent impact resistance.
3) WILL THE PART SEE CYCLIC LOADING (FATIGUE)?
(a) Will the part be subjected to a variable load?
(b) Is the load alternating compressive/ tensile?
(c) What will the stress levels be?
(d) What is the thickness of the part being flexed?
(e) By how much will the part be deflected?
Fatigue is the subject of another book in this series, though not discussed here. However, materials like acetal and nylon
are generally good candidates for cyclic loading.
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxxi

Table 1.7 ISO and ATSM Standards for Common Polymer Families
Polymer Family ISO Standardsa ASTM Standards
Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene resin (ABS) DIS 2580]1&2: 2003 D4673]02
Styrene-Acrylonitrile resin (SAN) 4894]1&2: 1997 D4203]07
Polystyrene (PS) 1622]1&2: 1994 D4549]03
Polystyrene, impact (PS-I) 2897]1&2: 2003 D4549]03
Polypropylene (PP) D4101]06b
1873]1&2: 1997
D5857]05a
Polyethylene (PE) 1872]1&2: 2007 D4976]06
Polyvinyl chloride, plasticized (PVC-P) 2898]1&2: 1997 D2287]96
Polyvinyl chloride, unplasticized (PVC-U) 1163]1&2: 1995 D1784]06a
Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) 8257]1&2: 2001 D788]06
Polycarbonate (PC) 7391]1&2: 2006 D3935]02
Acetals (POM) 9988]1&2: 2006 D6778]06
Polyamides (PA) 1874]1&2: 2006 D4066]01a
Thermoplastic polyester 7792]1&2: 1997 D5927]03
Polyketone (PK) 15526]1&2: 2000 D5990]00
Polyphenylether (PPE, PPO) 15103]1&2: 2000 D4349]96
Thermoplastic polyester elastomer 14910]1&2: 1997 D6835]02
E-CTFE D3275]06
Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) (PVDF) D3222]05
Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) D4894]04
Ethylene-Tetrafluoroethylene Copolymer (ETFE) D3159]06
Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) D3307]06
Tetrafluoroethylene-Hexafluoropropylene Copolymer (FEP) D2116]02
Part 1 of each ISO material standard addresses the Designatory Properties and part 2 describes specific tests, test specimens, and test conditions.
a

(4) WHAT TEMPERATURES WILL THE PART SEE AND FOR HOW LONG?
(a) What is the maximum temperature the material will see in use?
(b) What is the minimum temperature the material will see in use?
(c) How long will the material be at these temperatures?
(d) Will the material have to withstand impact at the low temperature?
(5) WILL THE MATERIAL BE EXPOSED TO CHEMICALS OR MOISTURE?
(a) Will the material be exposed to normal relative humidity?
(b) Will the material be submerged in water? If so, at what temperature?
(c) Will the material be exposed to steam?
(d) Will the material be autoclaved?
(e) Will the material be painted?
(f) Will the material be submerged or wiped with solvents or other chemicals? If so, which ones?
(g) Will the material be exposed to chemical or solvent vapors? If so, which ones and at what temperature?
(h) Will the material be exposed to other materials that can outgas or leach detrimental materials, such as plasticizers?
Fluoroplastics, crystalline, and thermoset materials generally exhibit good chemical resistance. Chemical resistance is the
subject of this book and the associated database.
xxxii Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Figure 1.7 Selection Guide Based on Mechanical Properties.

(6) WILL THE MATERIAL BE USED IN AN ELECTRICAL APPLICATION?


(a) What voltages will the part be exposed to?
(b) Alternating (AC) or direct (DC) current?
(c) If AC, what frequencies?
(d) Where will the voltage be applied (opposite side of the material, on one surface of the material, etc.)?
Enough carbon reinforcement can make a plastic conductive. Temperature can also dramatically affect electrical properties.
(7) WILL THE MATERIAL BE USED AS A BEARING OR NEED TO RESIST WEAR?
(a) Will the material be expected to perform as a bearing?
(b) If so, what will the load, shaft diameter, shaft material, shaft finish, and rpm be?
(c) What wear or abrasion conditions will the material see?
(d) Will a lubricant be used?
Materials with friction reducers added, such as PTFE, molybdenum disulfide, or graphite, generally exhibit less wear in
rubbing applications. Tribology is the subject of another book in this series.
(8) DOES THE PART HAVE TO RETAIN ITS DIMENSIONAL SHAPE?
(a) What kind of dimensional stability is required?
An application requiring a very high level of dimensional stability may not be suitable for plastic materials. Remember
that plastic materials generally expand and contract more with changes in temperature than do metals. They may also expand
and contract differents amount in different directions (flow and cross flow).
The most stable plastics are reinforced with glass, minerals, etc.
(9) WILL THE MATERIAL HAVE TO STRETCH OR BEND A LOT?
(a) Are rubber-like properties needed?
(b) Does the material have to stretch?
A flexible material like flexible vinyls, urethanes, rubber, or a thermoplastic elastomer may be used.
Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers xxxiii

Figure 1.8 Selection Guide Based on Chemical Resistance

(10) WILL THE PART HAVE TO MEET ANY REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS?


(a) Is an Underwriters Laboratories (UL) listed material required? If so, which rating?
(b) Is a UL yellow card required?
(c) Is a low smoke generating material required (FAA)?
(d) Is an FDA approved material required?
(e) Does the material have any taste or odor?
Make sure the supplier has approval from the desired agency and not just its own lab. Obtain written proof of approval.
(11) DOES THE MATERIAL OR FILM HAVE TO PREVENT CERTAIN GASES OR LIQUIDS FROM PASSING
THROUGH?
(a) Does the material have to be impermeable to gases and/or liquids? If so, which ones? Permeability is the subject of
another book in this series.
This is important for packaging foods and some medical applications.
(12) WILL THE PART BE EXPOSED TO ANY RADIATION?
(a) Will the material be exposed to radiation? If so, how much and for how long?
This requirement could occur for military, utility (atomic power plants), or medical applications.
(13) DOES THE MATERIAL HAVE TO HAVE A SPECIAL COLOR AND/OR APPEARANCE?
(a) What color material is desired?
(b) Does it have to match anything else?
(c) Is a textured surface needed?
(14) DOES THE PART HAVE ANY OPTICAL REQUIREMENTS?
(a) Does the material need to be transparent?
(b) Does the material need to transmit any particular wavelengths? If so, which ones?
Acrylics, polycarbonates, and amorphous polymers (such as amorphous nylon), in general, have excellent optical properties.
xxxiv Introduction to Plastics and Elastomers

Figure 1.9 Selection Guide Based on Continuous Operating Temperature

(15) WILL THE PART BE USED OUTDOORS?


Acrylics have excellent weatherability. UV stabilized compounds are often used. The effects of UV light and weather are
the subject of another book in this series.
(16) CAN THE MATERIAL GIVE OFF ANY VOLATILES?
This is often referred to as outgassing and usually occurs at elevated temperatures.
The remainder of this section contains several general selection guides, shown in Figures 1.7 to 1.9.
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

2.1 Introduction
Plastics and elastomers often come in to contact with various chemicals in applications in chemical processing, semiconduc-
tor, automotive, aerospace, consumer and other applications. Even in mundane applications, plastics have to contend with the
ever present ambient oxygen and moisture. Further, many applications rely on interactions (or lack thereof) of polymers with
chemicals in industries such as microlithography, membrane technologies, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, plastics recy-
cling, and drug delivery.
This chapter describes the general effects of chemicals on plastics and elastomers (elastomers) which will be referred to as
polymers for brevity purposes. Even metals are not immune from attack by chemicals. Water corrodes iron, acids dissolve
many metals. There is, however, a perception that metals are by and large not attacked by a large number of chemicals, start-
ing with organic solvents. This perception is basically correct, but it does not apply to plastics. Solvents, acids, bases and
other chemicals affect the overwhelming majority of polymers.
There are several examples of different types of interactions between plastics and chemicals. Water does not wet polyethyl-
ene or polypropylene or affect them in a perceptible manner. Acetone and other ketones swell polyvinyl chloride. Polyvinyl
alcohol is completely dissolved in water. Cellulosic polymers react with acids such as concentrated sulfuric acid, as mani-
fested by the color of the polymer turning black. In this reaction the acid removes the hydrogen and oxygen molecules from
the cellulosic in the form of water leaving behind the carbon backbone that is naturally black.
An ever-present issue when working with plastics and elastomers is that nearly every one of them is affected by chemicals
upon exposure. A chemical environment often poses one of the most demanding tests of a polymers durability. There are
two basic ways that a chemical can affect a polymer: chemical and physical. The extent of the impact of the chemicals varies
based on a variety of factors. Foremost among these factors are the chemical structure and composition of the polymers, and
the properties of the impacting chemical. Increasing the temperature of the environment compounds the effects. There are
other factors that influence the severity of the effect of chemicals on plastics and rubbers, which are described in this chapter.

2.2 Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers


Chemical environments decrease the integrity of polymers by two mechanisms ] physical and chemical means. The primary
effect is physical or solvent effect while chemical effect or degradation occurs in a minority of cases. Physical effects are
mainly functions of polymer and solvent structures. A number of predictive tools have been developed which are helpful-
though less than perfect. They include a number of solubility parameters such as Hildebrand and Hanson systems. Solubility
parameters are discussed later in this chapter. Other parameters, such as polarity (or lack thereof) of the polymer and solvent,
can be used as rough estimators of interaction between these materials.
The highest losses in mechanical properties of a polymer take place when the solubility parameters of a polymer and sol-
vent match. The same statement can be made when the polarities of a solvent and a primary polymer bond match. A close
match of the solubility parameters or polarities results in the incompatibility of the polymer and the solvent. To be clear,
incompatible here means that the solvent attacks the polymer. Selection of a polymer for a given chemical environment must
be made by evaluating the materials that have the largest solubility differences or polarity differences with the chemical envi-
ronment. For example nylon 6/6 resists cleaning solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, and polystyrene and ethylene glycol
are incompatible. Nylon 6/6 has polar amide bonds, while carbon tetrachloride is a non-polar solvent. In comparison, water is
a polar liquid and is absorbed by nylon 6/6. Similarly polystyrene and ethylene glycol are both polar, and thus interact.

2.2.1 Water ] A Potent Chemical


Resistance of polymers to chemicals often receives a great deal of attention while the effect of water, the most commonly
encountered liquid in our environment, is ignored. Polymers and composites used to make parts for various applications are
nominally resistant to moisture; otherwise, their use as engineering materials would be precluded. For example, water soluble
ethyl vinyl acetate polymers (EVA) would not be suitable candidate materials for the majority of applications.
Water transmission through polymeric parts occurs in two ways ] sorption and diffusion. Sorption is the entrance of water
molecules into the resin; diffusion is the distribution, by random molecular motion, throughout the polymer. If the water is
xxxvi Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

present in the form of vapor, the equilibrium water absorption is a function of the relative humidity (partial pressure of vapor).
At low partial pressures, there is a linear relationship between water absorption (and consequent dimensional change), accor-
dance to Henrys Law ] the concentration of water within a thermoplastic equals a constant times the partial pressure.[1]
Variations from the ideal case, that is a uniform distribution of water molecules, are caused by molecular clusters of water
that form at high concentrations, and by site effects around a molecular bond. Site effects, which occur in nylons, polye-
sters, polyurethanes and polycarbonates, account for the dramatic changes in physical properties when dry, molded material is
moisture-conditioned.
When a thermoplastic is immersed in water, effects of the water are more rapid than those in a vapor environment.
Attainment of equilibrium is controlled to a greater degree by sorption. Sorption becomes a direct function of water contact,
or wetting. No thermoplastic is wet-out completely by water, since the surface tension of water (72.5 dynes/cm) is too high.

2.3 Chemical Reaction or Degradation Mechanisms


Some chemicals actually degrade the polymer structure. They act by breaking down the chains into smaller ones, thus reduc-
ing molecular weight (molecular degradation), react with the chemical bonds of functional groups or a combination of both
mechanisms. Oxygen, water, alkalis and acids are examples of chemicals that can react with some plastics and elastomers. A
number of the properties of polymers, including tensile strength, elongation, impact strength and fatigue are determined by
the size of its molecules. If a chemical environment results in a reduction in molecular weight by chemical reaction, then this
will affect especially the tough and resilient properties of the material.
A feature of the chemical mechanism is the irreversibility of impact on polymers. After the molecular weight of a polymer
has been reduced, say in a fabricated part, there are no practical ways to restore the original molecular weight. In contrast, a
physical effect such as swelling may be reversible in some cases. For example, the plastic/elastomeric part can be removed
from the offending environment and heated to force the chemical out of the part. Such restoration is unlikely to work
completely for a high boiling point solvent.
There are many examples of molecular degradation of a polymer by chemicals. Polycarbonates are esters of bisphenol A
and carbonic acid. Their molecules will slowly break down into these constitutive compounds by hydrolysis by water at a ele-
vated temperatures. Bases are strong catalysts of the hydrolysis. Acids are weak catalysts, while alcohols and carboxylic acids
bring about molecular degradation via ester interchange. Amines can cause molecular damage in some cases through trans-
amination. Ammonia and low molecular, aliphatic, primary and secondary amines are quite aggressive in the presence of
traces of water. High-molecular and slightly basic amines are less effective in degrading polycarbonates.[2]
Nylons contain amide groups (aCOaNHa) which can react with water and split the polymer chain. An amide group
consists of a nitrogen atom and carbonyl (CQO), that is, RaNHaCOaR. The degradation stems from the fact that
polymerization reactions that form nylon are actually equilibrium reactions as seen in equations (2.1) and (2.2). Equation
(2.1) shows the reaction scheme for nylons such as nylon 6, while equation (2.2) shows the reaction for nylons such as
nylon 6/6.

(2.1)

(2.2)

Since they are condensation reactions, Le Chateliers Principle predicts that the addition of water to nylon will push the
reactions back toward the left. This would break the polymer chains down into monomers again with the release of water by
hydrolysis. Hydrolysis reduces the strength of nylon and causes it to become brittle as well. Fortunately, polymerization is
also an exothermic process, so at room temperature the forward direction of the polymerization reaction is heavily favored.
Nylon-66 soaked in water becomes brittle after about 2 months at 66C.
Thermoplastic polyesters have similar physical properties to nylon 66 but have much lower moisture absorption. They are
attacked by ethylene dichloride and is susceptible to hydrolysis in prolonged contact with hot water.
Oxygen has a prominent role in degrading polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyolefins, polyvinyl fluoride, and
others. PVC degrades by a thermo-oxidative mechanism in the presence of oxygen at elevated temperatures. Degradation usually
begins by oxygen attack at an unsaturation point followed by a loss of hydrochloric acid and decrease in unsaturation of the chain.
Consequently, the polymer molecule is destabilized resulting in chain scission or splitting of the chain into two fragments.[3]
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xxxvii

Many elastomers undergo reactions with oxygen. When elastomers oxidize, they lose mechanical properties, such as tensile
strength, may become rough or cracked on the surface, or discolor. These typical manifestations of oxidation are referred to
as aging when they occur during normal use. The net effect of oxidation on the elastomers is degradation of their chemical
structures. For example, natural rubber and polyolefinic elastomers are among elastomers that are subject to oxidation. Aging
and degradation can be inhibited or retarded by incorporating antioxidants in the compounds.[4]

2.4 Physical Mechanism


There are several ways in which chemicals physically interact with polymers, that is without any reaction or change in the
chemical structure of the polymer. The important interactions include absorption and swelling, plasticization and dissolution.
Permeation is another physical phenomenon that is closely related to the absorption and swelling of polymers.

2.4.1 Absorption and Swelling


The phenomena of absorption and swelling will be covered together because swelling is an extension of the absorption of sol-
vents and chemicals by plastics and elastomers. Interactions of chemicals with polymeric materials take place according to
Van der Waals forces which govern the intermolecular interactions. The components of these forces have been further identi-
fied by other researchers.[5]12] They have classified the Van der Waals intermolecular forces into four components:
1. Dispersion (or nonpolar) force
2. Dipole-dipole force
3. Dipole-induced-dipole (induction) force
4. Hydrogen bonding
Van der Waals interactions can take place between any pair of molecules. When one or more of these interactions take
place between molecules of a chemical and the molecules of a polymer the chemical is then absorbed by that polymer. The
specific volume of the amorphous region in a polymer is larger than that of the crystalline region. The accumulation of a
chemical in amorphous regions of a polymer results in swelling which is a consequence an increase in the volume of the poly-
mer relative to its original state prior to interaction with that chemical. The types of Van der Waals interaction between poly-
mer and chemicals depend on their respective chemical structures.
For example, water can be absorbed into nylon 6/6 by forming hydrogen bonds with the amide groups. At elevated tem-
peratures nylon swells by water absorption. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) becomes increasingly susceptible to attack by
aromatic, chlorinated and aliphatic hydrocarbons as the temperature is increased. Attack of LDPE by aliphatic hydrocarbons
is an example of dispersion (non-polar) forces.
Another important consideration in absorption or swelling is the size of the solvent molecules. While smaller liquid hydro-
carbon molecules, such as heptane or hexane, can swell low density polyethylene, larger wax molecules with similar chemical
structures do not have similar effects.
Swelling can be treated thermodynamically as a phenomenon involving two processes, namely mixing and expansion. The
diffusion of solvent into the polymer matrix is a type of mixing phenomenon, whereas the expansion due to swelling is similar
to an elastic deformation. For systems exhibiting limited swelling, the degree of swelling is defined by the mass of absorbed
liquid per unit mass or unit volume of the polymer.[13]
Some linear polymers can dissolve in certain solvents. For example, Styrene-(ethylene-butylene)-styrene dissolves in hep-
tanes and tertiary butyl acetate to form a uniform solution of 20% solids.[4] If chemical (covalent bond) cross-links are intro-
duced to tie the chains in a network, the polymer cannot dissolve. Instead the solvent is absorbed into the polymer network
thus giving rise to swelling. A swollen elastomer is in fact a solution, except that its mechanical response is now elastic rather
than viscous. As solvents fill the network, the polymer chains are extended. The resulting refractive force works against the
swelling force. The maximum degree of swelling is reached when these two forces are at equilibrium.[14]
It is important to note that cross-links can be formed by physical means. Physical linking can be obtained[15] by (1) absorp-
tion of chains onto the surface of finely divided particulate fillers; (2) formation of small crystallites; (3) coalescence of ionic
centers; and (4) coalescence of glassy blocks. These physical crosslinks are, in general, not permanent and may disappear on
swelling or increase in temperature. Physical, thermoreversible networks are present in most thermoplastic elastomers
(TPEs).[4]
Swelling has consequential implications for the applications of polymers, particularly elastomers where solvent contact is
likely. For example, olefinic thermoplastic elastomers are not affected by water or aqueous solutions of chemicals and resist
acids and bases. Hydrocarbon solvents tend to swell and soften TPO products. This effect is much more pronounced for softer
grades. Cross-linking (vulcanization) is used to improve mechanical properties, to reduce swelling in oils and solvents, and to
xxxviii Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

eliminate dissolution of the polymer in oils and solvents. Another strategy is the introduction of halogen atoms in elastomeric
macromolecules, which impart a number of improvements to their properties, including an increase in chemical resistance
and decrease in swelling in hydrocarbon solvents and oils.
Swelling in liquids is frequently used to estimate the molecular weight between effective cross-links in conventionally vul-
canized elastomers. This molecular weight, Mc, is calculated from the Flory]Rehner in equation (2.3):
1=3
Mc 52 V1 2 22 =2=ln122 12 11 22 2:3
where Mc, is the molecular weight between effective cross-links, 2 is the density of the elastomer in the unswollen state, V1 is
the molar volume of the swelling agent, 2 is the volume fraction of the elastomers in the swollen state, and K1 is the
Flory]Huggins solvent interaction parameter.[4]

2.4.2 Plasticization
A plasticizer is defined as an additive that is incorporated into a plastic to impart softness and flexibility in order to facilitate
the manufacturing process. When added to a plastic, a plasticizer increases its workability and flexibility. Plasticizers tend to
lower the melt viscosity, the glass transition temperature and/or the elastic modulus.[16]
Plasticizers are low molecular or oligometric additives that are compatible with rigid thermoplastic polymers, rendering
them semi-rigid or leathery/rubbery in behavior. They can be either non-polymeric materials or polymer impact modifiers.
Some forms of copolymerization can also produce a degree of internal plasticizing. Certain plasticizers can also perform other
functions, assisting in viscosity control, in the dispersion of particulate additives such as fillers and pigments, and general
lubrication of the compound.[17]
Some plastics may be mixed with high boiling temperature, low-volatility liquids to give products of lower Tg. An impor-
tant example is PVC, which is often mixed with liquids such as di-iso-octyl phthalate, tritolyl phosphate, or other diesters to
reduce the Tg to below room temperature. Some solvents, including aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, ketones and
ethers, will soften PVC by acting as additional plasticizers
The liquid plasticizers work by increasing the free volume in the materials thus facilitating the segmental motions that con-
stitute the glass transition process. If their volatility is a problem in a given case, it may be possible to use either a polymeric
plasticizer or a chemically bound plasticizer. The resultant plasticized PVC is flexible and to some degree quite rubbery.
Other commonly plasticized materials are cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate. It is important to note that such plasticizers
may be able to modify the chemical properties of the plastic material, since the plasticizer may be readily extracted by certain
chemicals and chemically attacked by others while the base polymer remains unaffected.[18]20]

2.4.3 Dissolution or Polymer Solubility [Adopted from D. J. Hourston, Degradation of Plastics and Polymer, in
Shreirs Corrosion, 4th ed, edit T. J. A. Richardson, Elsevier, Oxford, UK, pp 2369-2386, 2010]
The solution properties of polymers have been subjected to intensive study, in particular to complex mathematical
treatment.[21]23] This section will, however, confine the discussion to a qualitative and practical level.[21]
One chemical will be a solvent for another if the molecules are able to co-exist on a molecular scale, that is, the molecules
show no tendency to separate. In these circumstances, the two species are said to be compatible. The definition concerns equi-
librium properties and gives no indication of the rate of solution, which will depend on other factors such as temperature, the
molecular size of the solvent and the size of voids in the solute.
Molecules of two different species will be able to coexist if the force of attraction between different molecules is not less
than the forces of attraction between two like molecules of either species. This is shown more clearly by reference to Figure 2.1,
which shows two types of molecules A and B. The average forces between like molecules are FAA and FBB, and the average
forces between dissimilar molecules are FAB. If FAA was the largest of these three forces, then the A molecules would tend to
congregate or cohere, rejecting the B molecules. A similar phase separation would occur if FBB was the greatest.
It is, therefore, seen that only when FAB$FAA and FAB$FBB will coexistence or compatibility be possible. Obviously, if it
is possible to obtain some measure of these forces, it should be possible to make predictions about polymer solubility. What
then is a suitable measure of the forces holding like molecules together? One would expect the latent heat of vaporization, L,
to exceed the cohesion energy by an amount corresponding to the work done by evaporation, an amount approximating to
RT, where R is the gas constant and T the absolute temperature. Such a diagram of (L2RT) might be a sufficient measure if
all of the molecules were of about the same size.
However, it is reasonable to suppose that compatibility should not be greatly affected by molecular size and that the shorter
polymer molecules in Figure 2.2(a) should be just as compatible as the longer ones in Figure 2.2(b), although their theoretical
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xxxix

Figure 2.1 Two different molecular species will be compatible if FAB $ FAA and FAB $ FBB. In other circumstances the
molecules will tend to separate if they have sufficient energy for molecular movement.

Figure 2.2 Polymer molecules: (a) short and (b) long.

latent heats of vaporization will be greatly different. In such circumstances, a reduced diagram of (L2RT)/M will give a mea-
sure of intermolecular energy per unit weight. Similarly, a measure of the intermolecular or cohesion energy per unit volume
will be given by the following expression, where D is the density.
L2RT
M=D
Equation (2.4) is known as the cohesive energy density[21,24] with units of megapascal. The square root of this expression
is more commonly encountered in quantitative studies, and is known as the solubility parameter and given the symbol .
s
L2RT
5 MPa1=2 2:4
M=D

The solubility parameter is, thus, an experimentally determinable property, at least for low-molecular weight materials. In
the case of polymers that cannot be vaporized without decomposition, a method of calculating this from a knowledge of struc-
tural formula has been devised by Small and others.[24,25] It is now possible to provide an estimate of FAA and FBB, but the
magnitude of FAB has to be considered separately for each different system.
2.4.3.1 Amorphous Nonpolar Polymers and Amorphous Nonpolar Solvents
It is generally assumed in these circumstances, by analogy with gravitational and electrostatic attractions, that FAB will be equal
to the geometric mean of FAA and FBB. Thus, if by definition FAA.FBB, then, FAA.FAB.FBB. Considering these conditions, it
can be seen that compatibility will occur between amorphous nonpolar polymers and solvents only when FAA5FAB5FBB; that is,
when polymer and solvent have similar solubility parameters (in practice to within about 2 MPa1/2). Reference to the values of
in Tables 2.1 and 2.2 provides examples of this. For example, natural rubber (unvulcanized) (516.5) is soluble in toluene
(518.2) and carbon tetrachloride (517.5) but not in ethanol (525.9). Cellulose diacetate (523.2) is soluble in acetone
(520.4), but not in methanol (529.6) or toluene (518.2). It should be noted that apart from the problem of achieving a
molecular level of dispersion, it is not necessary for the solvent to be liquid; it may be an amorphous solid. Such tables are of
greatest use with nonpolar materials with values of d not exceeding 19.4 MPa1/2 and when the polymers are amorphous.
2.4.3.2 Crystalline Nonpolar Polymers and Amorphous Solvents
Most polymers of regular structure will crystallize if cooled below the melting point, Tm. This is in accordance with the ther-
modynamic law that a process will occur only if there is a decrease in Gibbs free energy (2G) in going from one state to
another. Such a decrease occurs on crystallization as the molecules pack in a regular fashion. Since a process occurs only
when it is accompanied by a decrease in free energy, there is no reason why a crystalline nonpolar polymer should dissolve in
xl Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

Table 2.1 Solubility Parameters () of Polymers


Polymer (MPa1/2) Polymer (MPa1/2)
Polytetrafluorethylene 12.6 Polyethyl acrylate 18.8
Polychlorotrifluoroethylene 14.7 Polysulfide rubber 18.4]19.2
Polydimethyl siloxane 14.9 Polystyrene 18.8
Ethylene]propylene rubber 16.1 Polychloroprene rubber 18.8]19.2
Polyisobutylene 16.1 Polymethyl methacrylate 18.8
Polyethylene 16.3 Polyvinyl acetate 19.2
Polypropylene 16.3 Polyvinyl chloride 19.4
Polyisoprene (natural rubber) 16.5 Bisphenol A polycarbonate 19.4
Polybutadiene 17.1 Polyvinylidene chloride 20.0]24.9
Styrene]butadiene rubber 17.1 Ethylcellulose 17.3-21.0
Poly-t-butyl methacrylate 16.9 Cellulose dinitrate 21.5
Poly-n-butyl methacrylate 17.7 Polyethylene terephthalate 21.8
Poly-n-hexyl methacrylate 17.5 Acetal resins 22.6
Polybutyl acrylate 18.0 Cellulose diacetate 23.1
Polyethyl methacylate 18.4 Nylon 66 27.7
Polymethylphenyl siloxane 18.4 Poly methyl -cyanoaerylate 28.8
Polyacrylonitrile 28.8

a solvent at temperatures well below the melting point. However, as the melting point is approached, the TS term in the
equation below increases.
G5H2TS 2:5

Here, T is the absolute temperature, S the entropy change, and H the enthalpy change. So, with increasing temperature,
G can become negative and dissolution can therefore occur.
Hence, at room temperature, there are no solvents for polyethylene, polypropylene, poly-4-methylpentene-1, polyacetal or
polytetrafluoroethylene, but at temperatures of about 30C below their melting points, solvents of similar solubility parameter
are effective. It should also be noted that at room temperature swelling may occur in the amorphous zones of the polymer in
the presence of solvents of similar solubility parameter.
2.4.3.3 Amorphous Nonpolar Polymers and Crystalline Solvents
This situation is identical to the previous one, and occurs, for example, when paraffin wax is mixed into rubber above its
melting point. On cooling, the paraffin wax tends to crystallize, some of it on the surface of the rubber. Such a bloom is one
way of protecting a diene rubber from ozone attack.
2.4.3.4 Amorphous Polar Polymers and Solvents
Molecules are held together by one, or more, of four types of forces: dispersion, dipole, induction and hydrogen bonding. In
the case of aliphatic hydrocarbons, the so-called dispersion forces predominate. However, many covalent bonds contain
dipoles, with one end being partially positively charged and the other partially negatively charged. Such dipoles may interact
with dipoles on other molecules and lead to enhancement of the total intermolecular attraction. Molecules that possess dipoles
and interact in this way are said to be polar. Many well-known solvents (e.g., water) and polymers (e.g., PVC) are polar and
it is generally considered that for interaction both the solubility parameter and their degrees of polarity should match. This is
usually expressed in terms of partial polarity,24 which expresses the fraction of total forces which are due to dipole bonds.
Some figures for the partial polarities (P) of solvents are given in Table 2.2, but there is a lack of quantitative data on the par-
tial polarities of polymers. A comparison of polarities has to be made by common sense rather than by a quantitative
approach. For example, hydrocarbon polymers would be expected to have a negligible polarity and would therefore be more
likely to dissolve in toluene rather than diethyl ketone, although both have similar solubility parameters.
2.4.3.5 Crystalline Polar Polymers and Solvents
It has already been pointed out that at temperatures well below their melting point, crystalline nonpolar polymers will not inter-
act with solvents, and similar considerations can apply to a large number of polar crystalline polymers. It has, however, been
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xli

Table 2.2 Solubility Parameters () and Partial Polarities (P) of Some Common Solvents
Solvent (MPa1/2) P Solvent (MPa1/2) P
Dimethylpropane 12.9 0 Chloromethane 19.8 ]
2-Methylpropene 13.7 0 Dichloromethane 19.8 ]
Hexane 14.9 0 1,2-Dichloroethane 20.0 0
Ethoxyethane 15.1 0.03 Cyclohexane 20.2 ]
Octane 15.5 0 Carbon disulfide 20.4 0
Methyleyctonexane 15.9 0 Acetone 20.4 0.69
2-Methylpropanoate 16.1 ] Octanol 21.0 0.04
2,4-Dimethylpentan-3-one 16.3 0.3 Butanenitrile 21.4 0.72
2-Methyl butyl acetate 16.3 ] Hexanol 21.8 0.06
Cyclohexane 16.7 0 2-Butanol 22.0 0.11
2,2-Dichloropropane 16.7 ] Pyridine 22.2 0.17
3-Methyl-1-butyl acetate 16.9 ] Nitroethane 22.6 0.71
Pentyl acetate 17.3 0.07 Butanol 23.3 0.10
Tetrachloromethane 17.5 0 Cyclohexanol 23.3 0.08
Hexan-2-one 17.7 0.4 2-propanol 23.4 ]
Piperidine 17.7 ] Propanol 24.3 0.15
Xylene 18.0 0 Dimethyl formamide 24.7 0.77
Methoxymethane 18.0 ] Hydrogen cyanide 24.7 ]
Toluene 18.2 0 Acetic acid 25.7 0.30
1,2-Dichloropropane 18.4 ] Ethanol 25.9 0.27
Ethyl acetate 18.6 0.17 Formic acid 27.5 ]
Benzene 18.8 0 Methanol 29.6 0.39
4,4-Hydroxymethylpentan-2-one 18.8 ] Phenol 29.6 0.06
Trichloromethane 19.0 0.02 Glycerol 33.7 0.47
1, 1,2-Trichloroethene 19.0 0 Water 47.7 0.82
Tetrachlorethane 19.2 0.01
2-Hydroxyethoxyethan-2-ol 19.6 ]

possible to find solvents for some polar, crystalline polymers such as the nylons, polyvinyl chloride and the polycarbonates. This
is because of specific interactions between polymer and solvent that may often occur by, for example, hydrogen bonding.
For example, nylon-6,6 will dissolve in formic acid, glacial acetic acid and phenol, solvents that not only have similar solubil-
ity parameters but also are capable of acting as proton donors while the carbonyl groups on the nylon act as proton acceptors.
More interesting examples are PVC and the polycarbonate of bis-phenol A ] both slightly crystalline polymers. It is
noticed here that while dichloromethane is a good solvent and tetrahydrofuran a poor solvent for the polycarbonate, the
reverse is true for PVC, yet all four materials have similar solubility parameters. It would seem that the explanation is that a
form of hydrogen bonding occurs between the polycarbonate and methylene chloride and between PVC and tetrahydrofuran.
In other words, there is a specific interaction between each solvent pair:

Many studies have been made to assess the propensity for hydrogen bonding of chemical structures.24 As a result, the fol-
lowing broad generalizations may be made.
xlii Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

1. Proton donors include highly halogenated compounds such as chloroform and pentachlorethane; less halogenated materials
are weaker donors.
2. Polar acceptors include, in roughly descending order of strength, amines, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, and esters, with aro-
matic materials usually being more powerful than aliphatic ones.
3. Some materials such as water, alcohols, carboxylic acids, and primary and secondary amines may be able to act simulta-
neously as proton donors and acceptors. Cellulose and polyvinyl alcohol are two polymers that also function in this way.
4. A number of solvents such as the hydrocarbons, carbon disulfide and carbon tetrachloride are quite incapable of forming
hydrogen bonds.
2.4.3.6 Rubbers and Thermosetting Plastics
Covalently cross-linked rubbers and plastics cannot dissolve without chemical change. They will, however, swell in solvents
of similar solubility parameter, the degree of swelling decreasing with increasing cross-link density. The solution properties
of the thermoplastic elastomers, which are two-phase materials, are much more complex and depend on whether or not the
rubber phase and the thermoplastic domains are dissolved by the solvent.

2.4.4 Environmental Stress Cracking (ESC)


A weakness of many polymers is their tendency to fail at fairly low stress levels when exposed to certain hostile chemicals.
Many rigid plastics and elastomers are unaffected when exposed to chemicals in the absence of stress. They may, however,
crack under stresses well below the normal yield stress in the same chemical environments. A well-known example includes
the failure of vulcanized natural rubber in the presence of ozone. It reacts with unsaturated hydrocarbons at the surface and,
even when the elastomers are subjected to low stresses, cracks can develop and lead to failure.
Another example is stress cracking of polyolefins, such as high-density polyethylene, in the presence of surfactants.
When polyethylene is held under stress in the presence of some detergents, its behavior changes from short time
ductile failure at high stresses to brittle fracture at low stresses after relatively longer times with very small break
elongations.[26]
The mechanism for this stress-cracking phenomenon is not entirely understood and, indeed, it is likely that different
mechanisms govern different circumstances. There do, however, appear to be four main types:[18]
1. Solvent cracking of amorphous polymers.
2. Solvent cracking of crystalline polymers.
3. Environmental stress cracking.
4. Thermal cracking.
Different molecular mechanisms for ESC have been proposed over the years.[27]28] Interlamellar failure has been postu-
lated as the controlling mechanism of ESC, with the concentration of the tie molecules as a factor in ESC resistance.
Brown[29] concluded that the mechanism of slow crack growth involves the disentanglement of the tie molecules from the
crystals. The number of tie molecules and the strength of the crystals that anchor them are considered the controlling
factors.
Three examples of ESC of amorphous polymers include polystyrene with white spirit, polycarbonate with methanol and
polysulfone with ethyl acetate. Susceptibility to environmental stress cracking is not predictable, thus requiring end-use testing
of a polymer prior to finalizing part designs.
In the case of crystalline polymers, cracking is probably caused by the action of the chemical environment in the amor-
phous regions of the more complex morphologies. Benzene and toluene impact on polyethylene are two such examples. The
more troubling issue with polyethylene, however, is ESC by exposure to a broad range of common chemicals such as soap,
alcohols, surfactants and silicone oils.[30] Most are highly polar materials that do not cause swelling, but are simply absorbed
either into, or on to, the polymer. This seems to weaken the surface and allows cracks to propagate from minute flaws, some
degree of which are inevitable when molding polymers.
Cracking caused by heat (thermal cracking) appears to act in a similar manner, but in this case oxygen is the hostile agent,
that becomes active at 70]80C with some polyethylene grades.
2.4.4.1 Factors Influencing the ESC-Behavior
Environmental stress cracking behavior of a polymer is highly dependent on the concentration of the stress-cracking agent,
exposure temperature, exposure time, and most importantly, the level of strain of the polymer.
Polymer transition to brittle behavior is quickened to shorter times by increases in temperature, cyclic loading, stress result-
ing in micro-yields and stress concentrations. The effect of temperature is complex. Physical aging is a manifestation of small
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xliii

scale relaxation processes that take place in the amorphous regions of a glassy polymer, causing volume contraction and den-
sification of the sample. The polymer structure remains unchanged but the local packing of the chain alters. This leads to
dimensional changes and alteration of physical properties such as brittleness, tensile strength, and the glass transition tempera-
ture. As the extent of physical aging increases there are corresponding decreases in the enthalpy, the specific volume and the
fracture toughness, while increases in glass transition temperature, the yield stress and tensile modulus of the material may
also be observed.
Localized concentration of the stress due to local geometrical features as notches, voids, and inclusions will increase the
stress and modify the nature of the stress field. Craze initiation is accelerated by stress fields with high dilational stress and
retarded under hydrostatic pressure.
There are critical polymer properties and variables which affect ESC. The higher the molar mass the longer the polymer
chains, which results in more tie molecules and increased ESC resistance. ESC resistance decreases with increasing the degree
of crystallinity. Higher co-monomer content and longer co-monomer short chain branches (higher ]olefins) provide better
ESC resistance of linear low density polyethylene due to a decrease in the degree of crystallinity. Increased pigment content
usually decreases the ESC resistance. The thermal history of the material and the processing conditions are also important fac-
tors for the ESC resistance behavior of the polymers.

2.4.4.2 Characteristics of ESC Failures


More than 25% of plastic part failures have been found to be due to ESC. Environmental stress crack failures share several
typical characteristics:[31]
 Brittle fracture: ESC failures are caused by brittle fracture, even in materials that would normally be expected to produce a
ductile yielding mechanism. The crack initiation sites for ESC failures are always on the surface. They normally correspond
to localized areas of high stress, such as microscopic defects or points of stress concentration. The initiation location is gen-
erally related to direct contact with an active chemical agent, either liquid or gas.
 Multiple cracks: Multiple individual cracks are initiated, and these subsequently coalesce into a unified fracture. Numerous
crack origins and the corresponding unions are illustrative of an ESC failure mechanism.
 Smooth morphology: The crack origin areas usually exhibit a relatively smooth morphology, indicative of slow crack
growth. However, aggressive chemical agents can produce rapid initiation and extension, characterized by more coarse sur-
face features.
 Craze remnants: The presence of opened craze remnants, either within the crack origin regions or in adjacent areas, is fur-
ther indication of ESC. In many cases, the final fracture will develop via ductile overload after the crack length has reached
a critical size.
 Stretched fibrils: The final fracture zone can include stretched fibrils and other features indicative of ductile cracking. It is
important to note that ESC is not a chemical attack mechanism; therefore, features that are normally associated with chemi-
cally induced molecular degradation will not normally be present.
 Alternating bands: Recent experimentation has shown that ESC commonly develops by a progressive crack-extension
mechanism. Examination of fracture surfaces created under laboratory conditions reveals a series of alternating bands corre-
sponding to crack extension cycles. The observed bands are thought to represent repeated cycles of crazing, followed by
crack extension via brittle fracture, consistent with the steps involved in creep and ESC failure mechanisms.[31]
2.4.4.3 Prevention and Coping with ESC
Environmental stress cracking must be considered when designing parts from polymers. For some materials, such as fluori-
nated polymers, ESC is not considered to be an extensive problem. Permeation variables have a strong influence on stress
cracking which should be considered in part design and material selection. Different polymers differ in their propensity to
environmental stress cracking, primarily based on their degree of crystallinity.
Lowering the crystalline phase content of the part tends to increase resistance to stress cracking due to the increasing break
elongation. High crystallinity can be mitigated by the use of copolymers, whenever possible. Adding a comonomer almost
always decreases the crystalline phase content of polymers.
Resin processing can affect crystallinity. Reducing the processing temperature and time, and using rapid cooling (or
quenching) at the end of the fabrication process reduces the crystalline content, and thus increases the amorphous content. If
the cooling is too fast, however, parts will contain residual stress which could reduce ESC resistance.
Increasing the molecular weight of the polymer reduces its crystallinity and enhances its stress crack resistance. Longer
chains have higher tensile strength, i.e., load-bearing ability.
Chemicals with structures similar to the polymer tend to permeate and plasticize, thus reducing its mechanical strength.
The environmental stress cracking effect of chemicals on polymers can be measured by exposing the polymer to the chemical
xliv Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

under the desired conditions. Tensile properties of the exposed sample can then be measured. Any loss of elongation and ten-
sile strength would indicate environmental stress cracking.

2.5 Permeation of Chemicals through Plastics and Elastomers


Permeation can be defined as the passage of gases and liquids through a second material such as a solid. It is a significant
consideration in the selection of plastic materials for the construction of chemical processing equipment, because process
fluids may travel across the thickness of the polymer by permeation. Permeated species in sufficient quantities could cause
corrosion, contamination, or unacceptable environmental emission, singly or in combination.
In its simplest form, permeation can be expressed as a product of the solubility and diffusion coefficient of the permeant in
the polymer. Permeation of a gas can be calculated from equation 2.6. This equation is derived from Ficks first law of mass
transfer. Permeation concerns the movement of a species through the molecules of another species, e.g., a gas through a poly-
mer. It does not take into account transport of material through cracks, voids, and general physical flaws in the structure of
the second species such as the polymer. However, both phenomena result in the migration of chemicals through the structure.
This means that after an appropriate plastic material has been selected to meet the permeation requirements of a process, the
equipment must be fabricated carefully to avoid flaws in the polymer structure.
P5D S 2:6
P (cm /sec  cm  atm) is the permeability of the gas, D is the diffusion coefficient (cm /sec), and S (cm /cm .atm) is the
3 3 3 3

solubility coefficient.
No permeation will occur if either the diffusion or the solubility coefficients are zero. The lowest diffusion rates occur
with crystalline polymers below the Tg, since there is very little space through which diffusing molecules may pass.[18]
Amorphous polymers below the Tg have a somewhat higher permeability, but diffusion is still difficult. For amorphous poly-
mers above the Tg, that is, in the flexible and rubbery states, there is more space (free volume) available through which dif-
fusing molecules may pass, and so these materials show comparatively high diffusion rates with low molecular-weight
diffusing fluids. For crystalline polymers between Tg and Tm, the diffusion rate is very dependent on the degree of
crystallization.
Several factors affect the permeation rate of the polymer. Temperature increase raises the permeation rate for two rea-
sons. First, solubility of the permeant increases in the polymer at higher temperatures. Second, polymer chain movements
are more abundant which allow easier diffusion of the permeant. The permeation rate of gases increases at higher partial
pressures. For liquids, permeation rates rise with an increase in the concentration of the permeant. Unless the permeant spe-
cies are highly soluble in the polymer, the permeation rate increases linearly with pressure, concentration, and the area of
permeation.
The effect of thickness is usually nonlinear. The permeation rate is very high at a low thickness and rapidly decreases with
an increase in the thickness. After a critical thickness is reached, the effect of thickness is diminished and the permeation rate
reaches a plateau. At lower thicknesses, the effect of surface structure begins to play a significant role in the permeation. A
more oriented (ordered) surface will serve to inhibit permeation.
Chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer have powerful effects on the rate of permeation, by as much as four
orders of magnitude.[32] Chemical affinity for the permeant, intermolecular forces such as van der Waals and hydrogen bond-
ing forces, degree of crystallinity, and degree of cross-linking are the influential variables.
A similarity of chemical structures of the polymer and the permeant will promote solubility and permeation rate. Higher inter-
molecular forces of the polymer result in less permeation because of the resistance that they present to the development of space
between adjacent molecules, which is required for the passage of the permeant. Crystallinity is an important factor, which can be
controlled during the processing of the polymer. The crystalline phase can be considered impermeable by most species because of
its orderly structure (packing) which usually minimizes its specific volume. This means that there is little or no free space among
the polymer chains for the passage of a permeant. The amorphous phase has the opposite construction - it is disorderly with inter-
chain space available for permeation. Cross-linking acts somewhat similar to crystallinity, though is less effective, in limiting
space for permeation. Cross-linking is size-dependent and smaller species may permeate.
The molecular size of the permeant, its chemical structure, and its condensation characteristics affect permeation.
Diffusion of the permeant increases as its molecular size decreases, thus contributing to an increase in permeation. Molecular
structure is important. A polar chemical will normally have a lower permeation rate in a nonpolar polymer than a nonpolar
species and vice versa. This is due to the ability of chemicals with similar structures to the polymer to swell the polymer, that
is, to create space between the chains for permeation. A more easily condensed chemical will also be more effective in swell-
ing the polymer, resulting in higher rates of permeation.
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xlv

2.6 Methods for Determination of Chemical Resistance of Plastics


An important point about chemical resistance testing is the non-uniformity of the available data. There are a few standard test
methods but many people conduct their own tests and do not follow the standard methods. Only a few of the currently applied
chemical resistance tests have been standardized. One reason for the absence of widespread acceptance and use of standard-
ized chemical resistance test methods is the magnitude of the number of applications and conditions which are impractical to
capture in standardized tests.
Most companies conduct their own test methods. Determination of the level of attack is usually done by:
1. Appearance of the specimen compared before and after testing;
2. Weight change of the specimen due to exposure;
3. Performing mechanical tests (tensile, impact) after the chemical resistance tests.
Any data obtained from outside sources should be considered with a thorough knowledge of the method and criteria used
in the determination of chemical resistance of the polymer.
The most common method for testing the chemical resistance of a part is by immersing it in the solvent, acid, base or other
chemical. Immersion of an unloaded part in water at elevated temperatures (with or without detergent/disinfectant) can also
be used to test the hydrolytic stability of a product. A small amount of a detergent or surfactant is sometimes added to water
to reduce its surface tension, in order to wet the polymer surface.
Room temperature immersion testing of polymer coupons is a good starting point. It may be sufficient if the application
happens to be at the room temperature, and free of load on the polymer part. An example is a plastic or plastic tubing that
transports a chemical at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. If the end-use conditions deviate from ambient conditions,
then testing using methods and conditions which approach the actual application of the part becomes necessary.
Immersion testing can be set up to test chemical resistance at elevated temperatures by use of a heated bath or in reflux
mode. Elevated temperature testing can also be used as an accelerated technique as a proxy for aging tests. Data obtained
from accelerated testing should be carefully analyzed, because time and temperature are not always interchangeable. Testing
against gases or at elevated pressures requires more complex equipment. Tests can be carried out on either stressed or
unstressed parts. The worst-case-scenario is to test the part under stress as previously discussed in the environmental stress
cracking section. This mode is, however, realistic and required if the polymeric material carries a load (i.e., is under stress) in
the application.
Another cautionary note has to do with the processing of parts, as this can influence the behavior of the product when it
comes into contact with an aggressive chemical environment. For example, a polymer coupon may resist a solvent, but the
actual part may be impacted. One simple way this can happen is by molecular weight reduction of parts as a result of proces-
sing steps during part production. The actual parts might contain smaller molecular weight species that could dissolve in a
solvent whilst larger molecular weight polymer species would not.
There are several ASTM and ISO test methods for determining chemical resistance of polymers. Brief descriptions provided
by the respective standard organizations have been given for some of the chemical resistance methods in the following sections.

2.6.1 ASTM D543 Method Specification for Evaluating the Resistance of Plastics to Chemical Reagents
The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the D543
test method.
Significance and Use
The choice of types and concentrations of reagents, duration of immersion or stress, or both, temperature of the test, and proper-
ties to be reported is necessarily arbitrary. The specification of these conditions provides a basis for standardization and serves
as a guide to investigators wishing to compare the relative resistance of various plastics to typical chemical reagents.
Correlation of test results with the actual performance or serviceability of plastics is necessarily dependent upon the simi-
larity between the testing and the end-use conditions. For applications involving continuous immersion, the data obtained in
short-time tests are of interest only in eliminating the most unsuitable materials or indicating a probable relative order of
resistance to chemical reagents.
Evaluation of plastics for special applications involving corrosive conditions should be based upon the particular reagents
and concentrations to be encountered. The selection of test conditions should take into account the manner and duration of
xlvi Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

contact with reagents, the temperature of the system, applied stress, and other performance factors involved in the particular
application.
Scope
1. These practices cover the evaluation of all plastic materials including cast, hot-molded, cold-molded, laminated resinous
products, and sheet materials for resistance to chemical reagents. These practices include provisions for reporting changes
in weight, dimensions, appearance, and strength properties. Standard reagents are specified to establish results on a compa-
rable basis. Provisions are made for various exposure times, stress conditions, and exposure to reagents at elevated tem-
peratures. The type of conditioning (immersion or wet patch) depends upon the end-use of the material. If used as a
container or transfer line, specimens should be immersed. If the material will only see short exposures or will be used in
close proximity and reagent may splash or spill on the material, the wet patch method of applying reagent should be used.
2. The effect of chemical reagents on other properties shall be determined by making measurements on standard specimens
for such tests before and after immersion or stress, or both, if so tested.

2.6.2 ASTM D1239-07 Method Specification for Resistance of Plastic Films to Extraction by Chemicals
The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the
D1239-07 test method.
Significance and Use
This test method is intended to be a rapid empirical test to determine the loss of the plasticizer or other extractable compo-
nents from the plastic film when immersed in liquids commonly used in households.
Scope
This test method for resistance of plastic films to chemicals covers the measurement of the weight loss of film after immer-
sion in chemicals.
1. There is no known ISO equivalent to this test method.
2. Film is defined as sheeting having nominal thickness not greater than 0.25 mm [0.010 in.], in accordance with
Terminology D 883.

2.6.3 ASTM D3681-06 Method Specification for Chemical Resistance of Fiberglass (Glass-Fiber-Reinforced
Thermosetting-Resin) Pipe in a Deflected Condition
The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the
D3681-06 test method.
Significance and Use
This test method evaluates the effect of a chemical environment on pipe when in a deflected condition. It has been found that
effects of chemical environments can be accelerated by strain induced by deflection. This information is useful and necessary
for the design and application of buried fiberglass pipe.
Pipe of the same diameter but of different wall thicknesses will develop different strains with the same deflection. Also,
pipes having the same wall thickness but different constructions making up the wall may develop different strains with the
same deflection.
Scope
1. This test method covers the procedure for determining the chemical-resistant properties of fiberglass pipe in a deflected
condition for diameters 4 in. (102 mm) and larger. Both glass-fiber-reinforced thermosetting resin pipe (RTRP) and glass-
fiber-reinforced polymer mortar pipe (RPMP) are fiberglass pipes.
2. For the purposes for this standard, polymer does not include natural polymers.

2.6.4 ASTM D4398-07 Method Specification for Determining the Chemical Resistance of Fiberglass-Reinforced
Thermosetting Resins by One-Side Panel Exposure
The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the
D4398-07 test method.
Significance and Use
The results obtained by this test method may serve as a guide in, but not as the sole basis for, predicting the possible perfor-
mance of the particular glass-fiber-reinforced thermosetting resin laminate in the one-side exposure to the specific environ-
ment under evaluation. No attempt has been made to incorporate into the test method all of the factors that may enter into the
serviceability of a glass-fiber-reinforced resin structure when subjected to chemical environments.
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xlvii

This test method provides for the determination of changes in the physical properties of the test panel and test media dur-
ing and after the one-side exposure in the test media. Determination of changes include: Barcol hardness, appearance of panel,
appearance of test media, flexural properties, and thickness.
Scope
This test method is intended for use in the evaluation of the chemical resistance of fiberglass-reinforced thermosetting resins
that are subjected to one-side panel exposure to specific environments. It takes into consideration the cold wall effects and
radiation losses of heat transfer through the laminate wall.

2.6.5 ASTM C868-02(2008) Method Specification for Chemical Resistance of Protective Linings
The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the C868-
02(2008) test method.
Significance and Use
The results obtained by this test method should serve as a guide in, but not as the sole basis for, selection of a lining material
for particular application. Simple chemical-resistance evaluations of the lining materials may be performed more conveniently
by other pertinent methods as a prescreening test for this procedure in accordance with Test Methods C 267 and D 471.
Scope
1. This test method covers a procedure for evaluating the chemical resistance of a polymer-based protective lining in immer-
sion service. The method closely approximates the service conditions, including the temperature differential between the
external and internal surfaces of the equipment, which may accelerate permeation of the lining by a corrosive media.
2. This test may be used to simulate actual field use conditions insofar as a qualitative evaluation of the lining system after a
predetermined period of exposure.

2.6.6 ISO 4600 Method Specification for Determination of environmental stress cracking (ESC) ] Ball or Pin Impression
Method (Ref. www.ISO.org)
Abstract The test is applicable to finished products and to test specimens, prepared by molding and/or machining, and can be
used for the assessment of both environmental stress cracking of a plastic product or material exposed to different environ-
ments, and for the determination of ESC of different plastics materials exposed to a specific environment.

2.6.7 ISO 4599 Method Specification for Plastics ] Determination of resistance to environmental stress cracking
(ESC) ] Bent Strip Method (Ref. www.ISO.org).

2.6.7.1 ISO 6252 Method Specification for Plastics ] Determination of environmental stress cracking (ESC) ]
Constant-tensile-stress Method (Ref. www.ISO.org)
Abstract
The test is applicable to test specimens, prepared by molding and/or machining, and can be used for the assessment of both
environmental stress cracking of a plastic product or material exposed to different environments, and for the determination of
ESC of different plastics materials exposed to a specific environment.

2.7 Methods for Determination of Chemical Resistance of Rubbers and Elastomers


An important point about chemical resistance testing of rubbers and elastomers is the non-uniformity of the available data.
There are very few standard test methods but many people conduct their own tests and do not follow the standard methods.
Only few of the currently applied chemical resistance tests have been standardized. ASTM D1417 is the most frequently cited
standard method. One reason for the absence of widespread acceptance and use of standardized chemical resistance test methods
is the magnitude of the number of applications and conditions which are impractical to capture in standardized tests.
Companies often conduct their own test methods. Determination of the level of attack is usually done by:
1. Appearance of the specimen compared before and after testing;
2. Weight change of the specimen due to exposure;
3. Performing mechanical tests (tensile, impact) after the chemical resistance tests.
Any data obtained from outside sources should be considered with a thorough knowledge of the method and criteria used in
the determination of chemical resistance of the rubbers and elastomers. A group of companies has been assembled by The Los
Angeles Rubber Group and chemical resistance evaluation of various elastomers has been established (Section 2.7.2).
xlviii Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

2.7.1 ASTM D1417-10 Standard Test Methods for Rubber Lattices-Synthetic


The following description has been provided by American Society for Testing Materials (Ref. www.ASTM.org) for the
D1417 test method.
Abstract These test methods cover the synthetic rubber lattices ABR, BR, CR, IIR, NBR, NCR, NIR, PBR, PSBR, SBR,
SCR, SIR, synthetic rubber lattices with substituted carboxylic acid groups on the polymer chain, and reinforced synthetic
rubber lattices. Covered tests include the procedure for collecting samples and determining total solid content, volatile unsatu-
rates content, pH, surface tension, viscosity, coagulum, bound styrene, Mooney viscosity, mechanical stability, polystyrene
reinforcement in contained polymer, and residual acrylonitrile content. Each test method contains information on material
exceptions, apparatus, and test procedures.
This abstract is a brief summary of the referenced standard. It is informational only and not an official part of the
standard; the full text of the standard itself must be referred to for its use and application. ASTM does not give any war-
ranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents of this abstract are accurate, complete or up to
date.
Scope
These test methods cover test procedures for synthetic rubber lattices ABR, BR, CR, IIR, IR, NBR, NCR, NIR, PBR, PSBR,
SBR, SCR, SIR, synthetic rubber latices having substitute carboxylic acid (COOH) groups on the polymer chain (X), and syn-
thetic rubber lattices that are reinforced (Y). Exceptions to the above are noted in the individual test procedures. The test
methods include procedures for sampling, and for determining total solids, volatile unsaturates (residual styrene), pH value,
surface tension, viscosity, coagulum, bound styrene, Mooney viscosity, mechanical stability, polystyrene reinforcement in
contained polymer, and residual acrylonitrile content.

2.7.2 The Los Angeles Rubber Group Chemical Resistance


A group of companies has been assembled by The Los Angeles Rubber Group and chemical resistance evaluation of various
elastomers has been established. This effort is intended to simplify the task of making sense of the chemical resistance data
provided by various companies [Source: DuPont Performance Elastomers, www.dupontelastomers.com][33]. The Los Angeles
Group includes the following companies:
Asahi Glass
Bayer
Copolymer Rubber and Chemical Corporation
Cytec
Dow Corning Corporation
DuPont
Dyneon
Federal Mogul Corporation
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company
Handbook of Plastics and Elastomers, Harper
Hutchinson
Malaysian Rubber Bureau
Parker Seal Company
Precision Rubber Products Corporation
Thiokol Corporation
Uniroyal
Zeon Chemical
The criteria used for the ratings were primarily volume swell resistance, compression set resistance, and in addition, aging
resistance.[33] The ratings were primarily derived from specific data or general agreement of the above sources. When no data
or agreement was found, the ratings were developed by theory and analogy. In some cases they are the considered opinion
of experienced compounders. The Los Angeles Rubber Group cannot guarantee their accuracy nor assume responsibility for
their use.
Several factors must always be considered when using a rubber part in service. The most important factors are:
a. The temperature of service. Higher temperatures increase the effect of all chemicals on polymers. The increase varies with
the polymer and the chemical. A compound quite suitable at room temperature might fail miserably at elevated
temperatures.
b. Conditions of service. A compound that swells badly might still function well as a static seal yet fail in a dynamic application.
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers xlix

Table 2.3 Chemical Resistance Guide Evaluation Method[33]


Material Chemical Group Generally Resistant to Generally Attacked by
NR, IR Natural rubber, Polyisoprene Most moderate wet or dry Ozone, strong acids, fats, oils,
Isoprene chemicals, organic acids, alcohols, greases, most hydrocarbons
ketones, aldehydes
SBR, Butadiene, Styrene Styrene, Butadiene Copolymer, Similar to natural rubber Similar to natural rubber
BR Butadiene Polybutadiene
IR Butyl Isobutylene, Isoprene, polymer Water and steam Petroleum solvents, coal, tar,
solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons
EPM, Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene copolymer and Water, steam and brake fluids Mineral oils and sovents, aromatic
EPDM terpolymer hydrocarbons
NBR Nitrite Butadiene, Acrylonitrile copolymer Many hydrocarbons, fats, ails, Ozone, ketones, esters, aldehydes,
greases, hydraulic fluids, chlorinated and nitro hydrocarbons
chemicals
HNBR Hydrogenated nitrile Butadiene, Acrylonitrile copolymer Similar to NBR but with improved Ozone, ketones, esters, aldehydes,
chemical resistance and higher chlorinated and nitro hydrocarbons
service temperature
CO1 Epichlorohydrin Epichlorohydrin polymer and Similar to nitrile with ozone Ketones, esters, aldehydes,
ECO copolymer resistance chlorinated and nitra hydrocarbons
CR Neaprene Chloroprene polymer Moderate chemicals and acids, Strong oxidizing acids, esters,
ozone, oils, fats, greases, many ketones, chlorinated, aromatic and
ails, and solvents nitro hydrocarbons
CSM Chlorosulfonated polyethylene Similar to Neoprene with Concentrated oxidizing acids, esters,
improved acid and ozone ketones, chlorinated, aromatic and
resistance nitro hydrocarbons
CM, Tyrins Chlorinated polyethylene Similar to Neoprene with Concentrated oxidizing acids, esters,
CPE improved acid and ozone ketones, chlorinated, aromatic and
resistance nitro hydrocarbons
AU, Urethane Urethane polymer Ozone, hydrocarbons, moderate Concentrated acids, ketones, esters,
EU chemicals, fats, ails, greases chlorinated and nitro hydrocarbons
T Polysulfide Organic polysulfide polymer Ozone, oils, solvents, thinners, Mercaptons, chlorinated
ketones, esters, aromatic hydrocarbons, nitro hydrocarbons,
hydrocarbons ethers, amines, hetercocyclics
Si, Silicone Organic silicone polymer Moderate or oxidizing chemicals, Many solvents, oils, concentrated
VMQ ozone, concentrated sodium acids, dilute sodium hydroxide
hydroxide
FSI Fluorosilicone Fluorinated organic silicone polymer Moderate or oxidizing chemicals, Brake fluids, hydrazine, ketones
FVMQ ozone, aromatic chlorinated
solvents, bases
TFE/P Tetrafluoroethylene/ Fluorinated copolymer Steam, amines and amine Aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated
Propylene corrosion inhibitors, caustics, high solvents, ethers, limited in low
pH media, wet sour gas, oil temperatures
ACM Polyacrylate Copolymer of acrylic ester and Ozone, extreme pressure, Water, alcohols, glycols, alkali,
acrylic halide lubricants, hot oils, petroleum esters, aromatic hydrocarbons,
halogenated hydrocarbons,
Si, Silicone Organic silicone polymer Moderate or oxidizing chemicals, Many solvents, oils, concentrated
VMQ ozone, concentrated sodium acids, dilute sodium hydroxide
hydroxide
FSI, Fluorosilicone Fluorinated organic silicone polymer Moderate or oxidizing chemicals, Brake fluids, hydrazine, ketones
FVMQ ozone, aromatic chlorinated
solvents, bases
TFE/P Tetrafluoroethylene/ Fluorinated copolymer Steam, amines and amine Aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated
Propylene corrosion inhibitors, caustics, high solvents, ethers, limited in low
pH media, wet sour gas, oil temperatures
ACM Polyacrylate Copolymer of acrylic ester and Ozone, extreme pressure, Water, alcohols, glycols alkali,
acrylic halide lubricants, hot oils, petroleum esters, aromatic hydrocarbons,
solvents, animal and vegetable halogenated hydrocarbons, phenol
fats
l Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers

Material Chemical Group Generally Resistant to Generally Attacked by


AEM Ethylene acrylic Copolymer of ethylene, methyl Weather, ozone, hydrocarbon Aromatic hydrocarbons, esters,
Elastomer acrylate (peroxide curable). lubricants/greases, hydraulic fluids gasoline, ketones
Terpolymer contains cure site
monomer
FKM#1 Fluoroelastomer Standard fluorocarbon dipolymer All aliphatic, aromatic and Ketones, low molecular weight
66% fluorine halogenated hydrocarbons, acids, esters and alcohols and nitro-
animal and vegetable oils containing compounds
FKM#2 Fluoroelastomer Standard or specialty type Same as FKM#2. Greater chemical Ketones, low molecular weight
fluorocarbon. Typically, .66% resistance esters and nitro-containing
fluorine compounds
FFKM Perfluoroelastomer Fully fluorinated fluorocarbon Best fluid resistance of any Fluorocarbon-containing
elastomer refrigerants cause minor effects

c. The grade of polymer. Many types of polymers are available in different grades that vary greatly in chemical resistance.
d. The compound itself. Compounds designed for other outstanding properties may be poorer in performance in a chemical
than one designed especially for fluid resistance.
Each polymer is rated (Table 2.3) for use in individual chemicals at room temperature.[33] Where multiple chemicals are in
use, refer to the rating of the most aggressive fluid when evaluating polymer performance. Polymers are rated as:
1. Recommended. Little or minor effect, 0]5% volume swell where applicable.
2. Minor to moderate effect. Rubber parts probably still useful in most applications, 5]10% volume swell where applicable.
3. Moderate to severe effect. Rubber parts useful in some static applications only. 10]20% volume swell where applicable.
4. Not recommended.
No data available or insufficient evidence.

References
1. Choosing Plastics for Chemical Resistance, SABIC Innovative Plastics, LNP Specialty Compounds, 2008.
2. The chemical resistance of Makrolon, Bayer Corporation, www.plastics.Bayer.com, File No.: KU28057-0409 en, Issued Sep 28, 2004.
3. Thermal Degradation of Polyvinyl Chloride, D. Braun, http://old.iupac.org/publications/pac/1971/pdf/2602x0173.pdf, The International Union of Pure
and Applied Chemistry, 2010.
4. J. G. Drobny, Handbook of Thermoplastic Elastomers, PDL, Elsevier, 2007.
5. Margenau, H., and Kestner, N., Theory of Intermolecular Forces, 3rd ed., Pergamon Press, London, 1971.
6. Hirschfelder, J. O., ed., Intermolecular Forces, Interscience, New York, 1967.
7. Intermolecular Forces, Discussion, Faraday Society, Vol. 40, 1965.
8. Israelachvilli, J. N., and Tabor, D., Prog. Surf. Member. Sci., 7(1), 1973.
9. Israelachvilli, J. N., Quart. Rev. Biophys., 6(4):341, 1974.
10. Israelachvilli, J. N., in Yearbook of Science and Technology, pp. 2331, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976.
11. Krupp, H., Adv. Colloid Interface Sci., 1:111, 1967.
12. Hirschfelder, J. O., Curtiss, C. F., and Bird, R. B., Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids, Wiley, New York 1954]
13. Principles of polymer science, P. Bahadur, N. V. Sastry, Alpha Science International, Ltd; 2nd ed, February 2005.
14. Introduction to polymer viscoelasticity by Montgomery T. Shaw, William J. MacKnight, Wiley-Interscience; 3rd ed, New York, 2005.
15. Erman, B., and Mark, J.E., in Science and Technology of Rubber, 2nd ed (Mark, J.E., Erman, B., and Eirich, F.R., Eds.), Academic Press, San Diego,
CA, 1994, p. 190.
16. Materials Selection Deskbook, Chapter: 3: Properties and selection of materials, N. P. Cheremisinoff, Elsevier, Noyes Publications, New York,
1996.
17. Additives for Plastics Handbook, Chapter: Chapter 14: Modifying Processing Characteristics: Plasticizers, J. Murphy, Elsevier, 2001.
18. D. J. Hourston, Degradation of Plastics and Polymer, in Shreirs Corrosion, 4th ed, edit T. J. A. Richardson, Elsevier, Oxford, UK, pp 2369-2386,
2010.
19. www.dsm.com/en_US/html/drs/polymericplasticizers.htm, December, 2010
20. Wilson, A. S. Plasticisers Principles and Practice; The University Press: Cambridge, 1995]
21. Cowie, J. M. G.; Arrighi, V. Polymers: Chemistry & Physics of Modern Materials, 3rd ed.; CRC Press, 2007.
22. Yamakawa, H. Modern Theory of Polymer Solutions; Harper & Row: New York, 1971.
Effect of Chemicals on Plastics and Elastomers li

23. Richards, E. G. An Introduction to Physical Properties of Large Molecules in Solution; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1980.
24. Van Krevelen, D. W. Properties of Polymers: Their Correlation with Chemical Structure; Their Numerical Estimation and Prediction from Additive
Group Contributions, 3rd ed.; Elsevier: Amsterdam, 1990.
25. Small, P. A. J. J. Appl. Chem. 1953, 3, 7178.
26. Young, R. J., and Lovell, P. A., Introduction to Polymers, 2nd ed., Chapman & Hall, London, 1991.
27. Environmental Stress Cracking: the Phenomenon and Its Utility, Lustiger, A, in Failure of Plastics, pp. 305-329, 1986, Carl Hanser Verlag.
28. A. Lustiger, A. and Corneliussen, R. D., The role of crazes in the crack growth of polyethylene, J. Materials Science, V. 22, No. 7, pp2470-2476,
1987.
29. Brown, H. R., A theory of the environmental stress cracking of polyethylene, Polymer, V 19, pp1186-1188, October 1978.
30. Brostow, W., Corneliussen, R. D. Failure of Plastics; Hanser: Munich, 1986.
31. Jansen, J. A., Environmental Stress Cracking The Plastic Killer, Advanced Materials & Processes, pp50-53, June 2004.
32. Imbalzano, J. F., Washburn, D. N., and Mehta, P. M., Basics of Permeation and Environmental Stress Cracking in Relation to Fluoropolymers,
Technical Information, DuPont Co., No. H-24240-1, Nov. 1993.
33. DuPont Performance Elastomers, www.dupontelastomers.com, December, 2010.
Part 1: Acrylic Polymers and Copolymers

1. Acrylic Polymers and Copolymers


Chapter Outline:
1.1 Acrylic
1.2 Methyl Methacrylate Terpolymer
1.3 MMA Butadiene Styrene (MBS)
1.4 Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)

1.1 Acrylic

%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength

Accelerated D1501 or L-P-406a, 10 9 No crazing, warping Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Weathering method 6024; or unmolding According to ASTM D1925-63T for
Fluorescent sunlamp observed yellowness index change
with dew, 10 cycles
" 10 9 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas VH; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change
" 10 9 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925-63T for
yellowness index change

Woishnis and Ebnesajjad. Chemical Resistance of Thermoplastics. DOI: 10.1016/B978-1-4557-7896-6.00001-7


2
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetic Acid 5 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries
5 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
5 23 7 9 No visible change 0.06 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
5 23 7 9 " 0.06 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
5 23 28 9 " 0.15 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
5 23 28 9 " 0.15 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
5 23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetic Acid (cont) 5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
5 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
5 .25 7 Good resistance "
5 .25 7 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
75 23 2 Not recommended for
use
75 65 2 "
100 23 7 3 Crazed or whitened 3.22 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
100 23 7 3 " 3.22 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 2 Partly dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
100 23 28 2 " NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
glacial 100 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas

3
4
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetic Acid (cont) glacial 100 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
" 100 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
" 65 2 "
" 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Acetone 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetone (cont) 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
Alcoholic Beverages 20 3 Not suitable for XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
packaging Containers, bottles
Aluminum Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Aluminum Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "
Ammonia 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Ammonium ,49 8 " Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Chloride
,49 8 " Acrylite FF
Ammonium 10 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Hydroxide Containers, bottles
10 20 "
10 23 7 9 0.24 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 23 7 9 No visible change 0.24 "
10 23 28 9 0.17 "
10 23 28 9 No visible change 0.17 "

5
6
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ammonium 10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Hydroxide (cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 25 9 Excellent resistance "
10 ,49 Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
10 ,49 8 Resistant "
10 .25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
10 .25 9 Excellent resistance "
28 23 7 9 0.44 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
28 23 7 9 No visible change 0.44 "
28 23 28 9 0.37 "
28 23 28 9 No visible change 0.37 "
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:

Acrylic
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ammonium 28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Hydroxide (cont) Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
28 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
concentrated 28 25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 28 25 9 Excellent resistance "
" 28 .25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
" 28 .25 9 Excellent resistance "
23
23 6 Good - minor attack
65
65 5 Fair - limited use
concd. ,49 Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
" ,49 8 Resistant "
Amyl Acetate 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 2 " " Acrylite; Specimen: Molded, tested @
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; Specimen: 50% Relative
Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress

7
8
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Amyl Acetate 20 3 Susceptible to attack XT; Specimen: 50% Relative Humidity,
(cont) low stress

Aniline 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:


50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 2 Not recommended for
use
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Animal Fats lard 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:

Acrylic
Containers, bottles
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Animal Oils 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Aniseed 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Aromatic low molecular weight 20 3 Not suitable for XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Hydrocarbons packaging Containers, bottles
Baby Oil 20 8 Suitable for packaging "
Bath Oils 20 8 " "
Battery Acid ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Bay Leaves 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Beer 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Benzaldehyde 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Benzene 100 23 7 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved "
20 Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

9
10
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Benzene (cont) 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 Susceptible to attack "
20 XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20 3 Susceptible to attack "
25 7 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 "
25 7 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
25 7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In

Acrylic
accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 Dissolved "
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Benzene (cont) 25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
25 2 Not recommended for "
use
65 "
65 2 Not recommended for "
use
Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
0 Not resistant "
Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
2 Do not use as a "
cleaner-remover
Benzoic Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Bleach bleaching powder 0]2 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
bleaching powder; 0]2 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
solution 50% Relative Humidity
" 0]2 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
bleaching powder; paste 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Boric Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Bromine 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Butyl Acetate 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Butyl Alcohol butanol 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity

11
12
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Butyl Alcohol (cont) butanol 20 3 Susceptible to attack XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
" 23 2 Not recommended for
use
" 65 2 "
Butyric Acid 23 2 "
65 2 "
Calcium Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
satd. ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Calcium Hydroxide 23 5 Fair - limited use
65 2 Not recommended for
use
Calcium 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Hypochlorite Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
,49 8 " Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Calcium Nitrate 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Calcium Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "
Carbon Bisulfide 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
Carbon Dioxide 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:

Acrylic
50% Relative Humidity
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Carbon Dioxide 20 8 Resistant XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
(cont) Relative Humidity, low stress
23 6 Good - minor attack
65 6 "
Carbon Monoxide 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 6 Good - minor attack
65 6 "
Carbon 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
Tetrachloride 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
23 2 Not recommended for
use
25 7 2 Attacked; edge 25 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
swelling In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 " 25 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 " 25 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 2 " 25 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 " 25 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 " 25 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 1 " 28 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 1 Attacked 211 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 1 " 211 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 1 " 224 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543

13
14
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Carbon 25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
Tetrachloride (cont) use
65 2 "
Chlorinated 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Hydrocarbons Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Chlorinated 20 3 Not suitable for XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Solvents packaging Containers, bottles
Chlorine 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
dry 23 6 Good - minor attack
wet 23 5 Fair - limited use
dry 65 5 "
wet 65 2 Not recommended for
use
Chloroacetic Acid 23 2 "
65 2 "
Chlorobenzene 23 2 "
65 2 "
Chloroform 23 2 "
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Chlorophenol 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Chocolate milk chocolate 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Chocolate (cont) milk chocolate 20 8 Resistant Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Chromic Acid 40 23 7 9 No visible change 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
40 23 28 9 " 0.11 "
40 25 7 4 Discolored 4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 4 " 4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 2 Attacked; discolored Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
40 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
40 .25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
use Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress

15
16
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Chromic Acid (cont) 23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
65 2 Not recommended for
use
Cinnamon 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Citric Acid 1 23 7 9 No visible change 0.08 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
1 23 28 9 " 0.09 "
10 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 8 0.7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Citric Acid (cont) 10 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Cloves 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Cod Liver Oil 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Coffee 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Cooking Oils 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Copper Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Copper Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "
Corn Oil 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Cottonseed Oil 20 8 " "
edible grade 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

17
18
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Cottonseed Oil edible grade 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
(cont) Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
edible ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
edible grade .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Cresol 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Cyclohexane 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Detergents heavy duty 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:

Acrylic
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Detergents (cont) heavy duty 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 0.25 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
solution, heavy grade 0.3 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 0.3 25 7 " Plexiglas V
" 0.3 .25 7 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated

19
20
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Detergents (cont) solution, heavy grade 0.3 .25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Specimen: Literature lists test
temperature as elevated
solutions 23 7 9 No visible change 0.12 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
" 23 7 9 " 0.12 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
" 23 28 9 " 0.1 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
" 23 28 9 " 0.1 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
soln., heavy duty ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
" ,49 8 " Acrylite FF
Diacetone Alcohol 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Diamyl Phthalate 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
1,2-Dibromoethane 20 2 Susceptible to attack " "
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Dibutyl Phthalate 20 2 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 2 " " Acrylite; Specimen: Molded, tested @
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; Specimen: 50% Relative
Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20 3 " XT; Specimen: 50% Relative Humidity,

Acrylic
low stress
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Dibutyl Sebacate 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
.25 5 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
1,2-Dichloroethane 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
23 2 Not recommended for
use
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

21
22
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
1,2-Dichloroethane 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Diesel Fuels diesel oil ,49 8 Resistant "
Diethyl Ether 100 23 7 2 Partly dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 2 " "
23 2 Not recommended for
use
25 7 3 Rubbery; swollen Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Diethyl Ether (cont) 25 7 3 Rubbery; swollen Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 3 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
65 2 Not recommended for
use
.25 2 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Diethylene Glycol 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Dioctyl Phthalate 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
1,4-Dioxane 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Electron Beam 1 megarad 8 100 Impact retained is dart Acrycal MP CP1000IG; Continental;
Radiation impact per ASTM Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
D3209 GB (4 lbs dart samples
weight)
2 megarads 8 100 " "
3 megarads 8 100 " "
4 megarads 8 100 " "
5 megarads 8 100 " "
5 megarads, tested 5 The thinner the "
14 days stored at room plastic; the faster the
temperature after yellowness index
exposure drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 4 " "
stored at 30C after
exposure

23
24
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Electron Beam 5 megarads, tested 1 day 7 The thinner the Acrycal MP CP1000IG; Continental;
Radiation (cont) stored at 50C after plastic; the faster the Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
exposure yellowness index samples
drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 9 " "
stored at 80C after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 1 day 3 " "
stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 6 " "
30 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 7 " "
60 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 4 " "
7 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 9 " "
90 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
1 megarad 8 97.1 Impact retained is dart Acrycal MP CP924G; Continental;
impact per ASTM Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
D3209 GB (4 lbs dart samples
weight)
2 megarads 8 95.6 " "
3 megarads 7 93.7 " "
4 megarads 7 91.6 " "
5 megarads 7 89.5 " "
5 megarads, tested 3 The thinner the "
14 days stored at room plastic; the faster the
temperature after yellowness index
exposure drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 3 " "
stored at 30C after
exposure

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Electron Beam 5 megarads, tested 1 day 5 The thinner the Acrycal MP CP924G; Continental;
Radiation (cont) stored at 50C after plastic; the faster the Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
exposure yellowness index samples
drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 7 " "
stored at 80C after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 1 day 2 " "
stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 5 " "
30 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 6 " "
60 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 3 " "
7 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 7 " "
90 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
1 megarad 8 97.1 Impact retained is dart Acrycal MP CP927G; Continental;
impact per ASTM Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
D3209 GB (4 lbs dart samples
weight)
2 megarads 8 94.8 " "
3 megarads 7 91.9 " "
4 megarads 7 89.8 " "
5 megarads 7 87.1 " "
5 megarads, tested 4 The thinner the "
14 days stored at room plastic; the faster the
temperature after yellowness index
exposure drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 3 " "
stored at 30C after
exposure

25
26
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Electron Beam 5 megarads, tested 1 day 6 The thinner the Acrycal MP CP927G; Continental;
Radiation (cont) stored at 50C after plastic; the faster the Specimen: 3.2 mm (0.125 in) thick
exposure yellowness index samples
drops
5 megarads, tested 1 day 8 " "
stored at 80C after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 1 day 3 " "
stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 5 " "
30 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 6 " "
60 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 3 " "
7 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
5 megarads, tested 8 " "
90 days stored at room
temperature after
exposure
Ethers 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Ethyl Acetate 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress

Acrylic
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Acetate (cont) 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
Ethyl Alcohol 30 23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
50 23 7 9 No visible change 0.18 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
50 23 7 9 " 0.18 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
50 23 28 9 " 0.23 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
50 23 28 9 " 0.23 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

27
28
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Alcohol (cont) 50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 5 2 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 4 3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 4 3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 2 5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 2 5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
50 25 7 2 5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 2 5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
50 25 7 1 7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
50 25 7 1 7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
aqueous 50 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 50 .25 9 " "
" 50 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
95 23 7 9 No visible change 0.28 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
95 23 7 9 " 0.28 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
95 23 28 8 " 0.52 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
95 23 28 8 " 0.52 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543

Acrylic
discs in closed glass jars
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Alcohol (cont) 95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 3 4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 1 10 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 1 10 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 2 Swelled 28 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 2 " 28 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 2 " 28 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 2 " 28 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
95 25 7 2 " 33 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
95 25 7 2 " 33 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
95 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
95 .25 5 Fair resistance "
95 .25 5 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
95 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
.15 20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries
.15 20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:

29
50% Relative Humidity
30
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Alcohol (cont) .15 20 3 Susceptible to attack XT; CYRO Industries
.15 20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
0]15 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries
0]15 20 8 " " Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]15 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries
0]15 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]15 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries
0]15 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
concentrated 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries
" 20 2 " " Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
Ethyl Bromide 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Ethyl Butyrate 20 2 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Ethylene Glycol 20 6 Limited resistance Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Ethylene Oxide 12 54 0.17]0.25 9 Data from Novacor 100 Specimen: General purpose grade
report
12 54 0.17]0.25 9 " 100 100 Specimen: Toughened

Acrylic
with 88% Freon 12 54 0.17]0.25 9 " 100 Specimen: General purpose grade
" 12 54 0.17]0.25 9 " 100 100 Specimen: Toughened
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethylene Oxide 100 54 0.17]0.25 9 Data from Novacor 100 Specimen: Gamma grade
(cont) report
100 54 0.17]0.25 9 " 100 Specimen: General purpose grade
100 54 0.17]0.25 9 " 100 100 Specimen: Toughened
2-Ethylhexyl 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Sebacate In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
.25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Ferric Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Ferric Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "
Fluoboric Acid 23 8 "
65 8 "
Formaldehyde 37 23 8 "
37 65 6 Good - minor attack

31
32
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Fruit Juices 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Gasoline 100 23 7 2 Partly dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 2 " "
with benzene 20 2 Susceptible to attack Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 2 " Low stress "
without benzene 20 8 Resistant "
" 20 8 " Low stress "
motor fuel with benzene 20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
motor fuel without 20 6 Limited resistance "
benzene
motor fuel with benzene 20 3 Susceptible to attack XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
motor fuel without 20 6 Limited resistance "
benzene
23 5 " Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
23 6 Good - minor attack
65 5 Fair - limited use
Glycerin ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Glycols 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
Hair Tonic 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Hexane 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 Limited resistance Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries

Acrylic
Hydrobromic Acid 25 23 6 Good - minor attack
25 65 5 Fair - limited use
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Hydrochloric Acid 10 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries
10 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
10 23 7 9 No visible change 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
10 23 7 9 " 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 23 28 9 " 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
10 23 28 9 " 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543

33
34
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Hydrochloric Acid 10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
(cont)
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 .25 9 " "
10 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
37 23 6 Good - minor attack
37 65 5 Fair - limited use
38 23 7 9 No visible change 0.45 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
38 23 7 9 " 0.45 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
38 23 28 6 Discolored 0.78 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
38 23 28 6 " 0.78 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
38 25 7 2 Attacked; turbid Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Hydrochloric Acid 38 25 7 2 Attacked; turbid Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
38 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
concentrated 38 .25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 38 .25 7 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries
20 2 " " Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Hydrocyanic Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Hydrofluoric Acid 25 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
40 23 7 9 0.49 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
40 23 28 6 Crazed or whitened 0.7 "
0]20 20 8 Resistant Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]20 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 6 Good - minor attack

35
65 5 Fair - limited use
36
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Hydrogen Peroxide 3 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
3 23 7 9 No visible change 0.08 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
3 23 28 9 " 0.08 "
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
3 25 7 8 0.7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
3 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
3 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
28 23 7 9 No visible change 0.16 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
28 23 28 9 " 0.19 "
28 23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Hydrogen Peroxide 28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 0.8 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 7 7 1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
28 25 7 7 1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
28 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
28 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0]40 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]40 20 6 Limited resistance Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]40 20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Hydrogen Sulfide 23 5 Fair - limited use
65 5 "
Hypochlorous Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 5 Fair - limited use
Iodine Tincture of Iodine 5 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 5 20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 5 20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress

37
38
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Isooctane 100 23 7 9 No visible change NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " "
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
.25 7 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Isopropyl Alcohol 95 0.01 0 Sample broke after Specimen: Impact modified
15 minutes; data from
Novacor Zylar
brochure
isopropanol 100 23 7 9 No visible change NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
" 100 23 28 9 " 20.06 "
" 20 5 Limited resistance Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

Acrylic
" 20 5 " Low stress "
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Isopropyl Alcohol isopropanol 20 3 Susceptible to attack Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
(cont) 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
isopropanol 8 Acceptable as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner
Kerosene 100 23 7 9 No visible change 0.02 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " "
20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Fuel Oil #2; ASTM D396 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Fuel Oil #2; ASTM D396 .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated

39
40
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ketones 20 3 Not suitable for XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
packaging Containers, bottles
Lacquer Thinners 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
.25 2 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Lactic Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Lactic Acid Butyl 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Ester Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Lanolin 1.9 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:

Acrylic
Containers, bottles
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Lighter Fluid 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Liquors 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Magnesium 23 8 Excellent resistance -
Chloride no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Maleic Acid 23 6 Good - minor attack
65 5 Fair - limited use
Mayonnaise 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Methane 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Methyl Alcohol 30 23 Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
30 23 5 Limited resistance "
100 23 7 6 1.08 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 7 7 No visible change 1.08 "
100 23 28 4 2.32 "
100 23 28 4 Crazed or whitened 2.32 "
100 Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
100 0 Not resistant "
.15 20 Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
.15 20 3 Susceptible to attack "
.15 20 XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
.15 20 3 Susceptible to attack "
0]15 20 Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

41
42
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Methyl Alcohol 0]15 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
(cont) Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]15 20 Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]15 20 6 Limited resistance "
0]15 20 XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
0]15 20 6 Limited resistance "
concentrated 20 Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 2 Susceptible to attack " "
25 7 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 7 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM

Acrylic
D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Methyl Alcohol 25 7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
(cont) accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 2 Attacked; turbid "
25 Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
25 5 Fair resistance "
65
65 2 Not recommended for
use
Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
8 Acceptable as a "
cleaner
Methyl Chloride 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Methyl Ethyl 20 2 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Ketone Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
Methylene Chloride 23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
Milk 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
Mineral Oils 100 23 7 9 No visible change 0.02 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars

43
44
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Mineral Oils (cont) 100 23 28 9 No visible change 0.02 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
White, USP 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
White; USP 25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
White; USP .25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
use Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Motor Oils SAE 20 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
N,N- 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
Dimethylformamide 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
.25 2 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Nail Polish 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Naphtha VM&P 8 Acceptable as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner
" 8 " Acrysteel IGP;
Natural Gas 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

45
46
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Natural Gas (cont) 20 8 Resistant Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Neats Foot Oil 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
n-Heptane 100 23 7 9 No visible change 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " 0.12 "
20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 Limited resistance Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
n-Heptane (cont) ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
.25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Nitric Acid 10 23 7 9 No visible change 0.06 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 23 28 9 " 0.06 "
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
10 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
40 23 7 9 No visible change 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
40 23 28 8 Discolored 0.16 "
40 23 5 Limited resistance Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries

47
48
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Nitric Acid (cont) 40 25 7 2 Attacked 5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
concentrated 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 40 25 7 2 " 5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
40 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
40 .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
65 23 2 Not recommended for
use
70 23 7 6 Discolored NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
concentrated 70 25 7 2 Attacked Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Nitric Acid (cont) 70 25 7 2 Attacked Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
70 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
concentrated 70 25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 70 .25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
use Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0]20 20 8 Resistant Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]20 20 8 " Low stress "
0]20 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]20 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
20]70 20 5 Limited resistance Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20]70 20 5 " Low stress "
20]70 20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20]70 20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
concd. 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Nitrobenzene 23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
Nitrogen Dioxide 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Nitrogen Monoxide 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

49
50
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Nitrogen Monoxide 20 8 Resistant XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
(cont) Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Nutmeg 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Oleic Acid 100 23 7 9 No visible change 0.12 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " 0.1 "
25 7 9 20.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 20.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 20.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 20.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 20.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 9 0 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 9 0 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
.25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as

Acrylic
elevated
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Oleum 23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
Olive Oil 100 23 7 9 No visible change NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " "
20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
edible grade 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
edible grade .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Onions 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%

51
Relative Humidity, low stress
52
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Outdoor West Virginia 182 6 Excellent UV 72 Impact retained is Korad; Polymer Extruded Products;
Weathering resistance; many falling dart impact Specimen: 0.076 mm (0.003 in)
years of successful measured on coated pigmented protective film over 3.2 mm
applications surface ABS substrate
" 365 5 " 65 " "
Pennsylvania 730 7 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas VH; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
" 730 7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
According to ASTM D1925 for yellowness
index change
West Virginia 1095 4 Excellent UV 28 Impact retained is Korad; Polymer Extruded Products;
resistance; many falling dart impact Specimen: 0.076 mm (0.003 in)
years of successful measured on coated pigmented protective film over 3.2 mm
applications surface ABS substrate
Florida 1460 6 78 Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
" 1460 6 78 Acrysteel IMA; Aristech
Pennsylvania 1825 8 Light transmittance: Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
parallel - 90% total - 2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
92%; haze - 3% ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:

Acrylic
2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
ASTM D542, D1003
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Outdoor Pennsylvania 1825 8 Light transmittance: Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Weathering (cont) parallel - 90% total - 2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
92%; haze - 3% ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 Light transmittance: Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
parallel - 91% total - 2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
92%; haze - 2% ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 Light transmittance: Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
parallel - 90% total - 2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
92%; haze - 3% ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 " Plexiglas VH; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
ASTM D542, D1003
" 1825 8 Light transmittance: Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
parallel - 88% total - 2.54 mm (0.1 in) thick, according to
92%; haze - 5% ASTM D542, D1003
Oxalic Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Paint Thinners 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Paints acrylic 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
cellulose 20 2 Susceptible to attack " "
oil base 20 8 Resistant " "
acrylic 20 6 Limited resistance Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
cellulosic 20 3 Susceptible to attack "
oil base 20 8 Resistant "
acrylic 20 6 Limited resistance XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
cellulosic 20 3 Susceptible to attack "

53
oil base 20 8 Resistant "
54
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Paraffin 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Peanut Butter 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Pepper 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Perchloric Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Petroleum Ether 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
Petroleum Jelly 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Phenol 5 23 7 9 No visible change 0.19 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
5 23 28 9 " 0.5 "
5 25 7 2 Attacked Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Phenol (cont) 5 25 7 2 Attacked Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 2 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
Aqueous solution 5 25 2 " "
5 .25 2 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Aqueous solution 5 .25 2 " "
5 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
soln. 5 0 " "
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
65 2 Not recommended for
use
Phosphoric Acid 25 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
25 65 6 Good - minor attack
85 23 6 "
85 65 5 Fair - limited use
0]10 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]10 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]10 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Photographic Fixing photographic baths 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Baths Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%

55
Relative Humidity, low stress
56
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Phthalic Acid 23 6 Good - minor attack
65 5 Fair - limited use
Potassium 23 6 Good - minor attack
Bicarbonate
65 5 Fair - limited use
Potassium 23 6 Good - minor attack
Carbonate
65 5 Fair - limited use
Potassium 23 6 Good - minor attack
Dichromate
65 6 "
Potassium 20 8 Resistant Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Hydroxide Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Low stress "
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 5 Fair - limited use
65 2 Not recommended for
use
Potassium Nitrate 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Potassium 23 6 Good - minor attack
Permanganate
65 6 "
Potassium Sulfate 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Propylene 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
Pyridine 20 2 Susceptible to attack " "
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Salad Dressings 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:

Acrylic
Containers, bottles
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Soaps white flakes; solution 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543

57
58
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Soaps (cont) white flakes; solution 1 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
" 1 25 7 " Plexiglas V
" 1 .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
" 1 .25 5 " Plexiglas V; Specimen: Literature lists test
temperature as elevated
soap suds 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " " Acrylite; Specimen: Molded, tested @
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; Specimen: 50% Relative
Humidity
" 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
" 20 8 " XT; Specimen: 50% Relative Humidity,
low stress
solutions 23 7 9 No visible change 0.13 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
" 23 7 9 " 0.13 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
" 23 28 9 " 0.13 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
" 23 28 9 " 0.13 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
soln., mild dish soap ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
" ,49 8 " Acrylite FF;
Sodium 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Bicarbonate Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 6 Good - minor attack

Acrylic
65 5 Fair - limited use
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Carbonate 2 23 7 9 No visible change 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
2 23 7 9 " 0.09 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
2 23 28 9 " 0.06 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
2 23 28 9 " 0.06 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543

59
60
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Carbonate 2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
2 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
2 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
2 25 7 " Plexiglas V
2 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 ,49 8 " Acrylite FF
2 .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
2 .25 5 " Plexiglas V; Specimen: Literature lists test
temperature as elevated
20 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
20 20 8 " XT; Specimen: Containers, bottles
20 23 7 9 No visible change 0.08 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 23 7 9 " 0.08 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
20 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V044; Specimen: In accordance

Acrylic
with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Carbonate 20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045FH; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V052; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V811; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V825; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V920; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
20 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VS; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
20 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
20 25 7 " Plexiglas V
20 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries

61
62
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Carbonate 20 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF
(cont)
20 .25 5 Fair resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
20 .25 5 " Plexiglas V; Specimen: Literature lists test
temperature as elevated
23 6 Good - minor attack
65 5 Fair - limited use
Sodium Chloride 10 23 7 9 No visible change 0.1 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 23 28 9 " 0.07 "
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
10 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
(cont) no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Sodium Cyanide 23 6 Good - minor attack
65 6 "
Sodium 23 6 "
Ferricyanide
65 6 "
Sodium Hydroxide 1 23 7 9 No visible change 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
1 23 7 9 " 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
1 23 28 9 " 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
1 23 28 9 " 0.09 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas

63
64
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Hydroxide 1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
1 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
1 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
1 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
1 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
1 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
1 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
5 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries
5 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
10 23 7 9 No visible change 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
10 23 7 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
10 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:

Acrylic
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Hydroxide 10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
(cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
10 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
10 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
10 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
10 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
10 8 Acceptable as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner
60 23 7 9 No visible change 20.01 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
60 23 7 9 " 20.01 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
60 23 28 9 " 20.01 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
60 23 28 9 " 20.01 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

65
66
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium Hydroxide 60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
(cont)
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
60 25 7 9 20.2 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
60 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
60 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
60 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
60 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Sodium 5 23 7 9 No visible change 0.08 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
Hypochlorite 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
5 23 28 9 " 0.07 "
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

Acrylic
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sodium 5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Hypochlorite (cont) In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
5 25 7 9 0.4 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
5 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
5 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
5 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
6 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Sodium Nitrate 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Sodium Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "
Soybean Oil 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
Spraylat 200 thinner 5 Not recommended as Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
a cleaner-remover
Stannic Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Sulfur Dioxide dry 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

67
68
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sulfur Dioxide liquid 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
(cont) Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
dry 20 8 Resistant Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
liquid 20 3 Susceptible to attack "
dry 20 8 Resistant XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
liquid 20 3 Susceptible to attack "
dry 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
moist 23 8 "
dry 65 8 "
moist 65 8 "
Sulfuric Acid 3 23 7 9 No visible change 0.1 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
3 23 7 9 " 0.1 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
3 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
3 23 28 9 " 0.07 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas

Acrylic
3 25 7 9 0.5 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sulfuric Acid (cont) 3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
3 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
3 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
3 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
3 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
3 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
10 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
10 65 6 Good - minor attack
20 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries
20 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
30 23 7 9 No visible change 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
30 23 7 9 " 0.05 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
30 23 28 9 " 0.03 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
30 23 28 9 " 0.03 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

69
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
70
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sulfuric Acid (cont) 30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
30 25 7 9 0.3 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
30 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
30 ,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
30 .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
30 .25 9 " Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
78 23 2 Not recommended for
use
78 65 2 "
93 23 2 "
93 65 2 "
98 23 7 9 No visible change 20.19 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
98 23 7 9 " 20.19 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:

Acrylic
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sulfuric Acid (cont) 98 23 28 9 No visible change 20.26 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals
98 23 28 9 " 20.26 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
concentrated 98 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
" 98 25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
98 25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
98 .25 2 " "

71
72
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Sulfuric Acid (cont) 98 .25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
use Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
0]30 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries
0]30 20 8 " " Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]30 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries
0]30 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]30 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries
0]30 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
concd. 0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Sulfurous Acid 0]5 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
0]5 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
0]5 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
concentrated 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Tannic Acid 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Tartaric Acid 23 8 "
65 8 "
Tea 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Tetrachloroethene 20 5 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity

Acrylic
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Tetrachloroethene 20 6 Limited resistance XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
(cont) Relative Humidity, low stress

Toluene 100 23 7 0 Completely dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals


100 23 7 0 " NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries
20 2 " " Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas

73
74
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Toluene (cont) 25 7 0 Dissolved Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas
25 7 0 " Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
Transformer Oils 100 23 7 9 No visible change 0.03 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 9 " 0.03 "
ASTM D1040 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543

Acrylic
" 25 7 9 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Transformer Oils ASTM D1040 25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
(cont)
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
ASTM D1040 .25 7 Good resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Trichloroethene 23 2 Not recommended for
use
65 2 "
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
Tricresyl Phosphate 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Triethylamine 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Trisodium 23 6 Good - minor attack
Phosphate
65 5 Fair - limited use
Turpentine 100 23 7 2 Partly dissolved NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 7 2 " NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
100 23 28 2 " NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
100 23 28 2 " NAS 10; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm
(230.125 in), ASTM D543 discs in closed
glass jars
20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " " Acrylite; Specimen: Molded, tested @
50% Relative Humidity

75
76
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Turpentine (cont) 20 8 Suitable for packaging XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Containers, bottles
20 8 " XT; Specimen: Containers, bottles
distilled spirit; ASTM D13 25 7 6 Crazing 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V044; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V045; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V045FH; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V052; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V811; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V825; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas V920; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas VM; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas VMHF; Specimen: In accordance

Acrylic
with ASTM D543
Acrylic
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Turpentine (cont) distilled spirit; ASTM D13 25 7 6 Crazing 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 6 " 0.1 Plexiglas VS; Specimen: In accordance
with ASTM D543
" 25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
use
" 25 2 " Plexiglas V
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
,49 8 " Acrylite FF
distilled spirit; ASTM D13 .25 2 Not recommended for Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
use Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
" .25 2 " Plexiglas V; Specimen: Literature lists test
temperature as elevated
Vegetable Oils 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Vinegar 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Water mineral water 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
23 7 9 No visible change 0.11 NAS 10; Novacor Chemicals; Specimen:
50.833.2 mm (230.125 in), ASTM D543
discs in closed glass jars
23 28 9 " 0.11 "
distilled, all 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V044; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
concentrations In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V045; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543

77
78
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Water (cont) distilled, all 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V045FH; Rohm & Haas;
concentrations Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V052; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V811; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V825; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas V920; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VM; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
In accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 7 8 0.6 Plexiglas VMHF; Rohm & Haas;
Specimen: In accordance with ASTM
D543
" 25 7 8 0.7 Plexiglas VS; Rohm & Haas; Specimen: In
accordance with ASTM D543
" 25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas
,49 8 Resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
distilled, all .25 9 Excellent resistance Plexiglas V; Rohm & Haas; Specimen:
concentrations Literature lists test temperature as
elevated
Waxes wax polish 20 5 Limited resistance Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
" 20 6 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
" 20 6 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Whitewash 20 8 Resistant Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
Wines 20 8 " Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 8 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%

Acrylic
Relative Humidity, low stress
Methyl Methacrylate Terpolymer
%
% Retained
Conc. Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Resistance note Test note Material note
(%) (C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Xylene 20 2 Susceptible to attack Low stress Acrylite; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
Molded, tested @ 50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " Cyrolite G20; CYRO Industries; Specimen:
50% Relative Humidity
20 3 " XT; CYRO Industries; Specimen: 50%
Relative Humidity, low stress
0 Not resistant Acrylite FF; CYRO Industries
2 Do not use as a Acrysteel IGP; Aristech
cleaner-remover
xylol 2 " "
Zinc Chloride 23 8 Excellent resistance -
no recognizable attack
65 8 "
Zinc Sulfate 23 8 "
65 8 "

1.2 Methyl Methacrylate Terpolymer


Supplier: CYRO Industries

% Retained
Exp. medium PDL
Exposure medium Resistance note Tensile Impact Material note
note # Elong.
strength strength
Gamma Radiation 7.5 megarads, 6 Color is time dependent 75.7 98.6 78.9 Cyrolite G20; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for yellowness
Cobalt 60 index change
2.5 megarads, 7 Turns light green; color is time dependent 93 98.6 89.5 "
Cobalt 60
5 megarads, 7 Color is time dependent 100.9 100 84.2 "
Cobalt 60
7.5 megarads, 5 " 150.9 101.5 72.2 Cyrolite G20 HIFLO; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for
Cobalt 60 yellowness index change
5 megarads, 7 " 72.7 100 88.9 "
Cobalt 60
2.5 megarads, 8 Turns light green; color is time dependent 93.6 100 94.4 "
Cobalt 60
" 6 Turns dark olive green; color is time dependent 163 101.3 92.9 XT 250; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for yellowness
index change
5 megarads, 6 Color is time dependent 153 101.3 85.7 "
Cobalt 60

79
80
% Retained
Exp. medium PDL
Exposure medium Resistance note Tensile Impact Material note
note # Elong.
strength strength

Gamma Radiation 7.5 megarads, 7 Color is time dependent 115 101.3 78.6 XT 250; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for yellowness
(cont) Cobalt 60 index change
2.5 megarads, 6 Turns dark olive green; color is time dependent 138 102.7 90.5 XT 375; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for yellowness
Cobalt 60 index change
5 megarads, 6 Color is time dependent 161 102.7 81 "
Cobalt 60
7.5 megarads, 6 " 147 102.7 76.2 "
Cobalt 60
5 megarads, 5 " 173.7 101.5 84.2 XT X800RG; Specimen: 50.833.2 mm (230.125 in) discs for yellowness
Cobalt 60 index change
7.5 megarads, 6 " 122.5 101.5 79 "
Cobalt 60
2.5 megarads, 7 Turns dark olive green; color is time dependent 81.2 97 94.7 "
Cobalt 60
Outdoor 4 Not recommended; impact modifier will be Cyrolite; Specimen: Transparent
Weathering affected by UV light
5 Not recommended for long term outdoor use Cyrolite; Specimen: Opaque
4 Not recommended; impact modifier will be XT; Specimen: Transparent
affected by UV light
5 Not recommended for long term outdoor use XT; Specimen: Opaque

1.3 MMA Butadiene Styrene (MBS)

% Retained
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Temp. (C) Time (days) PDL # Material note
Elong. Tensile strength Impact strength

Ethylene Oxide 12 54 0.17]0.25 9 100 91 Zylar 90; Novacor Chemicals


with 88% Freon 12 54 0.17]0.25 9 100 91 "
100 54 0.17]0.25 9 100 93 "

MMA Butadiene Styrene (MBS)


Isopropyl Alcohol 95 0.042 9 98 Zylar 94-568
95 0.042 9 95 Zylar ST 94-560
95 0.042 9 98 Zylar ST 94-561
95 0.042 9 98 Zylar ST 94-562
Lipids solution; 20%I.V. fat emulsion 23 1 9 100 Zylar 93-546
" 23 1 9 96 Zylar ST 94-560
" 23 1 9 100 "
Toothpaste Arm & Hammer dental care 6 83 Zylar 93-546
" 8 108 Zylar ST 94-560
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
1.4 Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)

%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength

Accelerated Outdoor EMMAQUA-Arizona, 365 7 Aristech 300; Aristech; Specimen:


Weathering specimens track sun, 3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
1 yr. = 4 yrs. normal caliper, continuous cast
exposure
" 365 7 Aristech GPA; Aristech; Specimen:
3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
caliper, continuous cast
" 365 7 Aristech GPA; Aristech; Specimen:
5.6 mm (0.22 in) nominal caliper,
continuous cast
" 365 8 Data from Aristech Lucite L; DuPont; Specimen:
literature 3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
caliper, continuous cast
" 365 6 " Polycast; Specimen: 3.2 mm
(0.125 in) nominal caliper, cell
cast
Accelerated carbon arc Weather- 125 9 Retains 99% of light 106 100 Aristech 300; Aristech; Specimen:
Weathering Ometer transmission 3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
caliper, continuous cast
" 125 9 " 100 97.5 Aristech GPA; Aristech; Specimen:
3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
caliper, continuous cast
" 125 9 " 101 103 Aristech GPA; Aristech; Specimen:
5.6 mm (0.22 in) nominal caliper,
continuous cast
" 125 7 Retains 99% of light 103 72 Lucite L; DuPont; Specimen:
transmission; data from 3.2 mm (0.125 in) nominal
Aristech literature caliper, continuous cast
" 125 5 " 89 74 Polycast; Specimen: 3.2 mm
(0.125 in) nominal caliper, cell
cast
9 Exposure shows no Acrylite; CYRO Industries
yellowing and
insignificant property
loss
Acetaldehyde 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Acetic Acid 5 23 7 8 0.7 Chemical resistance Acrylite H-12; CYRO Industries
per ASTM D543

81
82
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetic Acid (cont) 5 23 7 8 0.7 Chemical resistance Acrylite H-15; CYRO Industries
per ASTM D543
5 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite M-30; CYRO Industries
5 25 7 9 0.4 Aristech GPA; Aristech
5 25 7 9 0.5 Aristech I-300; Aristech
10 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI
10 23 8 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
,25 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
.25 0 Not resistant "
23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI
23 2 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
glacial 23 2 " Diakon; ICI
" 23 2 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Acetic Anhydride 23 5 Some attack but only "
slight reduction in
mechanical properties
Acetone 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
25 0.6 6 Cleaned by application Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
of a mild abrasive 2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
25 7 0 Dissolved Aristech GPA; Aristech
25 7 4 Rubbery; swollen Aristech I-300; Aristech
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
8 No stain per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech;

Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)


Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Uncovered specimen
4 Stained and required Aristech I-300; Aristech;
sanding to remove per Specimen: Covered samples
ANSI Z124.1-1987
6 Superficial stain only per Aristech I-300; Aristech
ANSI Z124.1-1971
8 No stain per ANSI Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Uncovered specimen
5 Stained and required Aristech S-300; Aristech;
sanding to remove per Specimen: Covered samples
ANSI Z124.1-1987
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Acetonitrile 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Acetophenone 23 2 " "
Aircraft Fuels 100 octane 23 5 Some attack but only "
slight reduction in
mechanical properties
Alcohols ,30 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
concentrated 0 Not resistant "
2 Poor resistance RTP 1800; RTP Company
Allyl Alcohol 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Aluminum Alum 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Aluminum Chloride 9 " "
Aluminum Oxalate 9 " "
Aluminum Potassium saturated solution 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
Sulfate unstressed samples
Aluminum Sulfate 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Ammonia 10 8 No stain per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Covered samples
10 8 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
10 8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
10 8 No stain per ANSI Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Covered samples
10 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
0.88 relative density 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
solution unstressed samples
liquefied 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
aqueous 5 Limited resistance "
Ammonium Chloride saturated solution 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
" 23 8 " Diakon; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Ammonium Hydroxide 10 23 7 8 0.7 Chemical resistance Acrylite H-12; CYRO Industries
per ASTM D543
10 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite H-15; CYRO Industries

83
84
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ammonium Hydroxide 10 23 7 8 0.7 Chemical resistance Acrylite M-30; CYRO Industries
(cont) per ASTM D543
10 25 7 9 0.4 Aristech GPA; Aristech
10 25 7 9 0.5 Aristech I-300; Aristech
Ammonium Sulfate 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Amyl Acetate 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
23 2 " Diakon; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
25 0.6 8 Sample unaffected Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
25 0.6 8 " " Aristech I-300;
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
8 No stain per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Covered samples
8 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
8 No stain per ANSI Aristech I-300; Specimen: Covered
Z124.1-1987 samples
8 " Aristech I-300; Specimen:
Uncovered specimen
8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300;
Z124.1-1971
8 No stain per ANSI Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Covered samples

Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)


8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
8 " Aristech S-300; Specimen:
Covered samples
8 " Aristech S-300; Specimen:
Uncovered specimen
Amyl Alcohol 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
23 2 " Diakon; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Aniline 23 2 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Aniline (cont) 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Animal Oils 9 Resistant "
Aniseed 9 " "
Anthracene solution in paraffin 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Arsenic 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Bay Leaves 9 " "
Beer 9 " "
Beet Juice 8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
Benzaldehyde 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Benzene 23 Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Aristech I-300; Aristech
6 Superficial stain only per "
ANSI Z124.1-1971
Benzoyl Chloride 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Benzyl Alcohol 23 2 " "
Bleach hypochlorite 25 0.6 6 Cleaned by application Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
of a mild abrasive 2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
hypochlorite 6 Superficial stain only per Aristech I-300; Aristech
ANSI Z124.1-1971
Bleach Powder solution ,20 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
9 " "
Bluing 25 0.6 6 Cleaned by application Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
of a mild abrasive 2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
6 Superficial stain only per "
ANSI Z124.1-1971

85
86
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Bromine 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
0 Not resistant "
1-Bromonaphthalene 9 Resistant "
Butyl Acetate 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Butyl Acetyl 23 5 Some attack but only "
Ricinoleate slight reduction in
mechanical properties
Butyl Alcohol n-butyl alcohol 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Butyl Chloride n-butyl chloride 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Butyl Lactate 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Butyl Stearate 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
Butyraldehyde 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
Butyric Acid ,5 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
n-butyric acid; 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
concentrated unstressed samples
Calcium Chloride saturated solution 23 8 Satisfactory resistance "
9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Calcium Hypochlorite 9 " "
Carbon Bisulfide 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Carbon Dioxide 9 Resistant "

Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)


Carbon Tetrachloride 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
25 7 9 0.03 Aristech GPA; Aristech
25 7 9 0 Aristech I-300; Aristech
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
Cetavlon aqueous solution 1 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
in 5% ethyl alcohol/ 1 23 8 " "
aqueous solution
aqueous solution 10 23 8 " "
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Chlorinated 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Hydrocarbons
Chlorine aqueous solution 2 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
aqueous 5 " "
liquid 0 Not resistant "
Chlorobenzene 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Chloroethyl Ether 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Chloroform 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Chlorophenol 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Chromic Acid 10 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
saturated solution 23 2 " "
5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Cinnamon 9 Resistant "
Citric Acid 10 25 7 9 0.3 Aristech GPA; Aristech
10 25 7 9 0.4 Aristech I-300; Aristech
10 8 No stain per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Z124.1-1987 Specimen: Covered samples
10 8 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
10 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Covered samples
10 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
19 8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
,20 9 Resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
saturated solution 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
25 0.6 8 Sample unaffected Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass

87
88
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Cloves 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Coffee 9 Resistant "
8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
Cooking Oils 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Cresol 0 Not resistant "
Cyclohexane 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Cyclohexanol 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
23 2 " Diakon; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Cyclohexanone 23 2 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Cyclohexene 23 2 " "
Decahydronaphthalene decahydronaphthalene 23 2 " "
Detergents solutions 23 7 8 0.7 Chemical resistance Acrylite H-12; CYRO Industries
per ASTM D543
" 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite H-12;
" 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite H-15; CYRO Industries
" 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite H-15;
" 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite M-30; CYRO Industries
" 23 7 8 0.7 " Acrylite M-30;
soapless 8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
" 8 " Aristech I-300;

Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)


Diacetone Alcohol 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Dialkyl Phthalate 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
Dialkyl Sebacate 23 5 " "
Diamyl Phthalate 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
1,2-Dibromoethane 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Dibutyl Phthalate 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
23 5 " Diakon; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Dibutyl Sebacate 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
25 7 9 20.1 Aristech GPA; Aristech
25 7 9 0 Aristech I-300; Aristech
1,2-Dichloroethane 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
25 0.6 3 Surface attacked Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
25 7 0 Dissolved Aristech GPA; Aristech
25 7 4 Rubbery; swollen Aristech I-300; Aristech
Diesel Fuels diesel oil 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Diethyl Ether 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance "
Diethylene Dioxide 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Diethylene Glycol 9 Resistant "
Dinonyl Phthalate 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
slight reduction in unstressed samples
mechanical properties
Dioctyl Phthalate 23 5 " "
Dioctyl Sebacate 23 5 " "
Disinfectants such as 3% phenol 25 0.6 6 Cleaned by application Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
solution of a mild abrasive 2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
Dyes 25 0.6 6 " " "
6 Superficial stain only per "
ANSI Z124.1-1971
Epichlorohydrin 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
Ethers 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries

89
90
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Acetate 23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
25 0.6 6 Cleaned by application Per ASTM D-1300; Aristech I-300; Aristech
of a mild abrasive 2]3 drops applied
and covered with
watch glass
25 7 0 Dissolved Aristech GPA; Aristech
25 7 4 Rubbery; swollen Aristech I-300; Aristech
0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
4 Stained and required Aristech I-300; Aristech;
phenol solution to Specimen: Covered samples
remove per ANSI
Z124.1-1987
4 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
6 Superficial stain only per Aristech I-300; Aristech
ANSI Z124.1-1971
5 Stained and required Aristech S-300; Aristech;
phenol solution to Specimen: Covered samples
remove per ANSI
Z124.1-1987
5 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
Ethyl Alcohol 10 23 6 Short term contact Diakon; ICI
satisfactory; not
recommended for
prolonged contact
10 23 6 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
50 23 7 4 2.5 Chemical resistance Acrylite H-12; CYRO Industries
per ASTM D543

Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)


50 23 7 4 2.3 " Acrylite H-15; CYRO Industries
50 23 7 3 3.4 " Acrylite M-30; CYRO Industries
50 23 5 Some attack but only Diakon; ICI
slight reduction in
mechanical properties
50 23 5 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
50 25 7 7 0.8 Aristech GPA; Aristech
50 25 7 5 1.7 Aristech I-300; Aristech
95 25 7 6 1.4 Aristech GPA; Aristech
Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA)
%
% Retained
Temp. Time PDL Change
Exposure medium Exp. medium note Conc. (%) Resistance note Test note Material note
(C) (days) # Tensile Impact
Weight
strength strength
Ethyl Alcohol (cont) 95 25 7 6 1.1 Aristech I-300; Aristech
,30 5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
.30 0 Not resistant "
23 2 Unsatisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI
23 2 " Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
8 Unaffected per ANSI Aristech I-300; Aristech
Z124.1-1971
ethanol 8 No stain per ANSI "
Z124.1-1987
" 8 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Covered samples
" 8 " Aristech I-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
" 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech
" 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Covered samples
" 8 " Aristech S-300; Aristech;
Specimen: Uncovered specimen
Ethyl Bromide 0 Not resistant ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Ethyl Butyrate 0 " "
Ethylene Glycol 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,
unstressed samples
5 Limited resistance ACRYLITE PLUS; CYRO Industries
Ethylene Oxide 23 8 Satisfactory resistance Diakon; ICI; Specimen: Small,