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An Insider’s Guide to Incline Village & Crystal Bay

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4 North Shore Almanac
he treasures of the North Shore are the communities of Incline Village and Crystal Bay.
Some places have everything a family could desire — nature at its most beautiful, so many
outside and indoor activities and most importantly, a true sense of community.
It’s easy to see why so many people re-locate here to make this friendly village their home.
We recognize just how special this community is — a town of people who warmly open
their homes to newcomers, embracing you like an old friend and inviting you in.
There are many treasures of this mountain village which curves along the awe-inspiring
blue lake with an exquisite majestic mountain backdrop and breathtaking views.
Lake Tahoe’s truly brilliant setting, it’s fine dining restaurants perched at the edge of the
water, boutique-lined streets, gemmed with art, gifts and other shopping destinations.
Indulgent sandy beaches and the watercolor sunsets are just a few of the things that locals
enjoy each day. Integral to the community is the quality of life — from taking a few ski runs
in the winter during a lunchtime break or a walk along the lake in the summer.
This town of about 9,000 is friendly, active, caring and concerned for each other. So many
of us are invested, involved and intertwined with this community and lifestyle. In one way
or another, everyone who lives here has contributed to this village with a passion of those
who love this community.
In this year’s North Shore Almanac, the Bonanza has highlighted
50 Things You Need to Know about Incline Village and Crystal Bay.
We hope it is a delightful and fun way to give our readers an insight
into why Incline Village and Crystal Bay is such a special place — one
where tourists come to play, but end up staying to become “locals.”
Terrie Lafferty Drago
Publisher
50 Things you need to know 5
6 North Shore Almanac 6 North Shore Almanac
Contents
50 things you need to know
North Lake Tahoe Bonanza
Publisher: Terrie Lafferty Drago
Editor: Tanya Canino
Designer: CJ Drago
Advertising: Terri Lightfoot
Writers: Tanya Canino, Jean Eick, Annie Flanzraich,
Kevin MacMillan, Kyle Magin
Photographers: Carrie Richards, Jen Schmidt, Emma Garrard
Office: Tom Rosenthal, Fran Ramirez
Circulation: Michael Gaunt
Photo Gallery
To purchase photos in the North Shore
Almanac, please visit our Web site,
www.tahoebonanza.com, and look for
Photo Galleries: Almanac 2008.
On the cover
This photograph of Lake Tahoe was taken
by Brian Seppa.
The North Shore Almanac is a publication
of the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza,
925 Tahoe Boulevard, Suite 206, P.O. Drawer
7820, Incline Village, NV 89452-7820;
(775) 831-4666; www.tahoebonanza.com.
Photo/Carrie Richards
1 What is a Local? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
2 Incline’s oldest and youngest, living founder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
3 Paws & Reflect: Hank’s Hints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
4 Star Follies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
5 Powder days at SNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
6 A+ for academics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
7 On the best reader list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
8 Eccentric George Whittell leaves his mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
9 Mark Twain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
10 Sports Betting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
11 Rotary: twice the clubs, twice the service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
12 Let’s go bowling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
13 Reaching higher with High Altitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
14 Why shop anywhere else? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
15 Serenity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
16 Red, White & Tahoe Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
17 Diamond Pete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
18 Last Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
19 Fore! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
20 Holes in one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
21Tahoe bears are smart! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
22 Riding on a Sierra Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
23 A passion for community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
24The Ponderosa of Bonanza fame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
25Take the ultimate hike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
26 Scenic hikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
27 Measuring Tahoe clarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
28Tahoe’s Playground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
29 Paws & Reflect: Lola’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
30 Much ado about Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
31 Now playing: Incline at the movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
32 Environmental Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
33Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
34 XTERRA: bringing the pros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
35 Who do you go to when you want some toys . . . . . . . . . . .56
36The famous flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
37 Nonprofit Heaven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
38 Paws & Reflect: Edo’s Edicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
39 Whizzing by Dummy Downhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
40 Cheers to Tahoe! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
41 Beauty of the beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
42 A local’s environmental responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Defending homes with defensible space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
43Visitors guide to the environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Dining guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73
44 What you didn’t know about your trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
45 Paws & Reflect: Tonka’s Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
46 Who are we? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
47 Batter up! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
48Tahoe jargon hard to figure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
49Twinkle, twinkle, little star . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
50 When Incline turns 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
For information
Important numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Elected/Appointed officials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Churches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Nonprofit & service organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Incline Tahoe Glass Company
250 Village Blvd, Incline Village, NV
(775) 831-0793 • CA (530) 546-2749
Incline Tahoe Glass Company, situated in the center of Incline Village,
at 250 Village Blvd., is a full service glass company that is highly skilled in
handling all your glass needs, from broken windows, glass table tops, tub
and shower enclosures, mirrors, skylights, window and bathroom remodels,
and every aspect of windows and glass for new construction. The company
specializes in custom heavy glass showers and uniquely crafted mirror work.
John Howden and Terry Madjeski are the original owners of Incline Tahoe
Glass Company since it’s inception in January 1990. Each man has 30 years
experience in the glass business.
#FFFTCOCCPFDGCWV[VQ[QWTJQOGYKVJ+PENKPG
6CJQG)NCUU¶UEWUVQOJGCX[INCUUUJQYGTGPENQUWTGU
© Images by Dalia DeLa O, Timeless Photography
1
here is a cadre of tourists who came to visit Lake Tahoe —
and ended up settling here because of Tahoe’s beauty and
recreational lifestyle. These people are known as “locals.”
Locals are a diverse group. If you are curious about what
makes a local, here are a few tips.
Locals are caring, helpful and generous. If asked directions
about restaurants or where’s the beach, you will find them
helpful. Locals care about Lake Tahoe and preserving it for
everyone to enjoy. They pick up their trash, clean up after
their dogs and don’t want anything unpure put into the lake
because it is their drinking water. Locals take advantage of
hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, boating and all the same recre-
ational opportunities that visitors come to enjoy, so it is not
unusual to find locals in the woods, on trails, on the lake, or
at the ski resorts. But locals know it is not a good idea to go
into a business wearing your equipment — you won’t see a
local in ski boots at Raley’s. Locals also know the weather
changes quickly so they are prepared for all types of condi-
tions. When attending the Fourth of July celebration, they will
bring extra clothing and blankets to keep warm on the beach
after the sun sets. This is true when they go to any outdoor
evening event, such as the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival
(they also take a bottle of wine and a picnic).
Locals know they cannot enter a beach in Incline Village
without showing a resident card and that dogs are not per-
mitted on the Incline beaches during the summer.
Locals do not stare if they meet Santa Claus or Mark
Twain because those two celebrities are also locals. And you
will never hear a local ask where the Ponderosa Ranch is
located. You might hear a local say they are heading off to
Sheep Flats to play, while everyone else calls it the Tahoe
Meadows.
If you really want to act like a local, relax and enjoy —
remember you are now on Tahoe Time!
— Jean Eick
Locals Publication
Every September, the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza celebrates
locals with a special publication. The Locals magazine honors those
whom the community regards as very special locals
— residents who make Incline Village and Crystal
Bay a great place to live. If you would like to
nominate someone as a local, fill out a nomination
form this summer, or e-mail editor@tahoebonan-
za.com and tell us in 100 words or less why a per-
son should be named as a Bonanza Local. Please
include the nominee’s name, phone and occupation.
Deadline is Monday, Aug. 11.
T
8 North Shore Almanac
They came to play — and found
a place to stay
50 Things you need to know 9
Defensible space is the area between a house and an oncoming wildfire where the vegetation has been modified to reduce the
wildfire threat. It provides an opportunity for firefighters to effectively defend and potentially save a home from burning to the ground.
Sometimes Defensible Space is simply a homeowner’s properly maintained backyard. While in other situations it involves removing
trees and substantial amounts of brush and shrubs. What can you do to create Defensible Space around your home?
Within 30 feet:
Lean, Clean & Green Area
For a distance of at least 30 feet fromthe home, there should be a “Lean, Clean & Green
Area.” “Lean” indicates that only a small amount of flammable vegetation, if any, is present
within 30 feet of the house. “Clean” means there is little or no accumulation of dead
vegetation or flammable debris within the area. “Green” requires that plants located within
this area are kept healthy, green, and irrigated during fire season. For most homeowners,
the Lean, Clean & Green Area is the residential landscape. This area often has irrigation,
contains ornamental plants, and is routinely maintained.
• All dead trees removed?
• All branches, bark chunks, scrap lumber removed?
• All limbs within 10 feet of chimney removed and wire mesh chimney cap (spark
arrester) in place?
• All combustible materials removed frombeneath decks, stairways and overhangs?
• All pine needles removed fromroof and gutter?
• Weeds and dead grasses cut six inches or shorter.
• Firewood, lumber and large woody materials moved to a safe distance of 30 feet from
structures and covered?
• Is your address clearly visible to emergency response personnel?
Please note - during the fire season, the area that is 5 to 30 feet fromany structure should
predominately consist of noncombustible materials (including: stabilized bare ground and
mineral soil; gravel, rock asphalt, concrete, etc.; healthy, well maintained, high moisture
content herbaceous plants. Specimens or limited areas of combustible materials included
within a landscaping plan may be acceptable within this area provided they do not provide
a means of rapidly transmitting fire across this area fromthe wildlands to the structure or
visa-versa. Fallen pine needles should be removed fromareas within this zone prior to fire
season each year and should not be allowed to accumulate in any manner that creates a
fire hazard. Woodchip should not be used in a widespread manner within this zone due
to its combustible nature and the inability to maintain this material free of excessive pine
needle accumulation
Within 30 to 100 feet:
• All dry, flammable vegetation within 100 feet of structure removed?
• All trees limbed six feet fromthe ground?
• Excessively dense tree cover removed/break up continuous vegetation?
• Is the vegetation within the recommended Defensible Space area maintained on a regular
basis?
Defensible Space
What is Defensible Space?
Six Steps to Creating an
Effective Defensible Space:
There are three primary methods for informing the public: the
Emergency Alert System (EAS), door-to-door
• Step 1 – Determine the size of an effective defensible space:
The size of the defensible space is usually expressed as a
distance extending outward from the house in all directions. The
recommended distance is not the same for every home. It varies
depending on the dominant vegetation surrounding the home
and steepness of slope.
• Step 2 – Remove dead vegetation: For the most part, dead
vegetation should be removed from the Defensible Space
Zone. Exceptions are fallen pine needles covering bare soil and
downed trees embedded into ground.
• Step 3 – Create a separation between trees and shrubs:
On a flat to gently sloping terrain, individual shrubs should be
separated from one another by at least twice the height of the
average shrub. Trees should be thinned to provide an average
separation between the canopies of at least 10 feet (TRPA).
• Step 4 – Create a separation between tree branches and
lower growing plants: For large trees, the recommended
separation for ladder fuels is three times the height of the lower
vegetation layer. Do not remove more than one-third of the
total tree branches. When no understory vegetation is present,
remove lower tree branches to a height of at least five feet
above ground.
• Step 5 – Create a Lean, Clean & Green Area extending at
least 30 feet from the house (refer to “Living With Fire, A Guide
for the Homeowner” and “Home Landscaping Guide” for more
details).
• Step 6 – Maintain the Defensible Space Zone: This is an
ongoing activity. Routinely remove flammable vegetation.
For further information on Defensible Space, please contact
the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District at 775/831-0351,
ext. 0 to speak with someone in person. To set up a Defensible
Space Evaluation or request Chipping service, please call
775/833-8118. These services will be available in spring or
when we can see the bare ground. Please note – It is mandatory
that the checklist items on the Defensible Space Checklist are
completed prior to obtaining a tree removal permit.
Create a 100 foot (or to the property boundary)
“Defensible Space” safety zone around your home.
2
Incline’s oldest and
youngest living founder
anny Sylvester admits that when he
first saw Lake Tahoe it was “love at
first sight.”
Of course that was before he spent
his honeymoon here or before he was
a partner in the CPA firm, Baker and
Gillette, located in Honolulu. In 1959,
when his CPA firm learned that long-
time property owner George Whittell
was interested in selling 9,000 acres of
land along the North Shore of Lake
Tahoe, Sylvester was interest-
ed! He was so interested
in this opportunity that
he convinced his
partners to purchase
that land.
The actual sale of
the land was recorded in 1960 with
homes starting to be developed in
1960 and 1961. A development com-
pany, the Crystal Bay Development
Company, was formed to develop the
9,000 acres. The Sylvesters purchased
their first home here in 1964. They put
$100 down on a total purchase price of
$21,000 on a condominium located in
Creek Side West. Today Sylvester
remains active in the community by
belonging to the Rotary Club of Incline
Village, serving on the Incline Village
Community Hospital Foundation
Board of Directors and helping
wherever he can.
When asked about being
the “oldest living founding
member of Incline Village” he
responded with his usual sense
of humor. “To my knowledge, I
am the oldest founding member
of Incline Village living
here, but I am also the
youngest since I am
the ONLY founder
living in the com-
munity.”
— Jean Eick
Preservers
of history
Where:
North Lake Tahoe Historical
Society in Tahoe City
(530) 583-1762
Thunderbird Lodge
Preservation Society
(775) 832-8750
Nevada Historical Society
(775) 688-1190
Incline History Display - Chuck
Greene has been given office space
by Georgia MacGregor in the Village
Center for Incline’s historical society.
It is scheduled to open in time for
summer 2008 and will focus on the
original development of Incline
Village, as well as other historical
information of the area.
History book
The North LakeTahoe Bonanza and
the Sierra Sun are working on
updating the history book first pub-
lished in 1998, and updated in 2004.
This book is expected to go on sale
this summer, featuring new “old”
photographs and and
easy-to-read historical
summaries. Watch the
Bonanza for details about
how to purchase a book.
10 North Shore Almanac
m
50 Things you need to know 11 50 Things you need to know 11
TAHOE BILTMORE LODGE/CASINO · HWY. 28 · Crystal Bay, NV
*Must be a Club Biltmore Member. Must be 21+. Management reserves all rights to modify or cancel promotions at any time. Must be an active Club Biltmore member to participate.
Lodge/Casino
(800) BILTMORE · (775) 831-0660 • tahoebiltmore.com
The Tahoe Biltmore specializes in hosting your wedding or special event.
Contact our Event Coordinator at 775.833.6707
to make your special occasion unforgettable.
3
ank, the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza’s canine columnist and
the loveable mascot of Village Square Family, is actively
involved in the Incline Village and Crystal Bay community.
This dog, a King George Cavalier Spaniel, knows his stuff
and offers the following tips for all Incline Village and
Crystal Bay canines:
1. The best way to experience the local history is
through the nose. Sniffing trees and rocks reveals layers
of stories and experiences of travelers past.
2. Remember you’re at a high altitude, you’ll need a lot
more water. Luckily the water here tastes so good! Lap
it up.
3. The nights are cold and cuddling is a necessary art of
life here. Practice, practice, practice. When the time
comes, you’ll be glad it’s you and not some blanket
that gets the primo, late-night cuddling.
4. There are differences between tourists and locals, I
admit. But don’t even spend a minute thinking about
them. All you need to know is that sad eyes lead to
petting, and petting leads to people food. Work your
magic!
5. Whether or not it’s edible, if it’s lying on the side of the
road, it’s not food.
6. Trips down to the lake are fun and so are rainy days,
but they are best enjoyed separately. The same goes
for rolling in dirt, which is good, and swimming in
water is also good. Not that I don’t encourage mud,
but mud equals bath.
7. And finally, Incline Village humans try to get rid of balls
and frisbees. DON’T LET THEM! If you listen to noth-
ing else, listen to this. Bring the ball back.
1. Hank and Duchess recently had a litter of puppies, and
Mr. Community-Minded Hank plans to allow Pet
Network to auction one puppy at the Fur Ball; and
Lake Tahoe School to auction off another puppy
to help raise money for these good causes.
2. Hank urged his owner, Kathie Maxwell of
Village Square Family, to display kitties in
need of adoption at Christmastime.
3. Hank hosted the R.E.A.D. Dogs in
March, allowing children to come to
the store and read to the dogs, as a
way to build their confidence in read-
ing.
4. Finally, Hank’s column can be found
every Friday in the Bonanza’s Living
section.
— Tanya Canino,
with the help of Hank
Paws & Reflect:
12 North Shore Almanac
H
Hank’s Hints
Hank Helps
50 Things you need to know 13
“Smart Buyers are in the
Market right now.”
Tim Lampe, Realtor • Incline Village, Nevada
Tim Lampe 775-745-9730
lampetahoe@charter.net
www.marrinerrealestate.com
SALES • MARKETING •
CONSULTING
• 24years of market leadership
• Confidential professional representation
• Personalized web based property searches
• Trained real estate negotiator
• Real estate development consulting
• Serving North Lake Tahoe, Incline Village
and Truckee
Liccnocd
Maooazc
1hcraciot
Fhotozrachcr
775.5óC.8ó99
Lrian D. Sccca, LM1
Emergency 911
Poison Control Center (800) 222-1222
Red Cross (24-hour) (775) 856-1000
Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA (800) 621-3362
Tahoe Women’s Services Crisis Hotline (800) 736-1060
Non-emergency
North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District (775) 831-0351
Fire Chief Michael D. Brown
Constables Office- Constable Joe Kubo (775) 831-4103
Nevada Highway Patrol (775) 687-5300
Washoe County Sheriff ’s Office - Incline (775) 832-4110
Commander Steven C. Kelly
Road Conditions and Weather
Nevada Road Conditions 511
California Road Conditions (800) 427-7623
Tahoe Weather Hotline (775) 831-6677
Business Services
North Lake Tahoe Chamber of Commerce (775) 831-4440
Incline Village/Crystal Bay Vistors (775) 832-1606
and Convention Bureau
U.S. Post Offices
U. S. Postal Service, Incline Village (775) 831-8994
U. S. Postal Service, Crystal Bay (775) 831-9017
Health Care
Incline Village Community Hospital (775) 833-4100
Renown Regional Medical Center, Reno (775) 982-4100
Health Hotline (24-hours/7days a week) (775) 982-5757
St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center, Reno (775) 770-7100
Tahoe Forest Hospital, Truckee (800) 733-9953
Veterans Administration - Sierra (775) 786-7200
Nevada Health Care System
Transportation Services
Carson City Airport (775) 884-4708
Reno Tahoe Intl. Airport (775) 328-6870
South Lake Tahoe Airport (530) 541-4082
Truckee Tahoe Airport (530) 587-4540
North Tahoe Express Airport Shuttle (866) 216-5222
Fast Taxi (800) 977-8294, (530) 583-6699
North Shore Limousine (775) 832-0100
Alamo Car Rental (888) 426-3296
Alpine Auto Rental (775) 833-4424
Avis (800) 831-2847
Dollar Rentals (800) 800-4000
Enterprise Rent A Car (800) 325-8007
Hertz, Truckee (530) 550-9191
National Car Rental (888) 868-6203
Important numbers
Tickets
6 and 8:30 p.m. April 4 and 5
Cal-Neva Lodge.
Prices: $10 (kids) $25-$50 (adults)
Ticket outlet: The Potlatch
(775) 833-2485
www.inclinestarfollies.org.
Star Follies in sync with Incline
Star Follies in sync with Incline Star Follies in sync with Incline
4
ncline Village’s Star Follies is an annual
lip-syncing show that raises tons of cash
for local schools, and provides an
opportunity for Incline’s women to be
stars and Incline’s men to be women.
Each spring the show raises approxi-
mately $90,000 to benefit Incline’s
schools through ticket sales to Follies’
four shows. Through 2007, the show’s
eighth year, Follies has raised more than
$650,000. The money goes to the
Incline Schools Academic Excellence
Foundation, which provides funding to
the schools for both short- and long-
term goals.
The performers include
adult volunteers from
the community
and students
from each of
the Incline
public
schools.
Participants lip-sync to a list of popular
tunes, from rock and roll to Broadway
and beyond. They also learn dance rou-
tines to perform in front of the entire
community.
One of the show’s favorite highlights
is the featured annual drag number,
which places some of Incline’s men in
women’s clothing. Whether that means
they are nurses, showgirls or any other
cadre of cross-dressers, the girls who
are boys are a staple and favorite of the
Follies crowd.
— Kyle Magin
I
14 North Shore Almanac
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50 Things you need to know 15
I NCLI NE VILLAGE
Tahoe Blvd. (HWY 28)
Alder Ave.
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STAFFED WITH HIGHLY SKILLED PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL PERSONNEL
880 Alder Ave. Incline Village, NV 89451
LABORATORY OPEN
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No Appointment Necessary
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16 North Shore Almanac
ven though Sierra Nevada College, Nevada’s only four-
year liberal arts college located in Incline Village, has a
bevy of academic accolades under its belt, the students
and professors still try to keep a balance between fun
and school.
Especially on powder days.
“I’ve had students send me an e-mail to let me know
that they missed class because it was a great powder
day,” said Rick Normington, a business professor and
dean of Continuing Education.
But he emphasized that most students know how
many absences teachers will allow until it affects a grade.
16 North Shore Almanac
5
Powder days at SNC
Powder days at SNC
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50 Things you need to know 17 50 Things you need to know 17
Geoff Goodman, a member of the ski team, said
that he knows many friends who will miss class if
they feel the urge to hit the slopes.
“If it’s a big dump and especially if it’s sunny,”
Goodman said.
But for him, he said he always balances his aca-
demics with recreation.
SNC’s location within 45 minutes of eight ski and
snowboarding resorts is a draw for some students,
said spokeswoman Michelle Filippini.
“It’s a strong selling point since we’re located in
one of the recreation capitals of the world,” Filippini
said.
Normington said he’s also seen students come to
class in their gear, ready to hit the slopes afterwards.
“I don’t mind that unless they are getting ready to
do a presentation,” Normington said. “It’s a pretty
casual campus and some professors dress like
they’re ready to go cross-country skiing. You can
have fun and still be professional and serious.”
– Annie Flanzraich
Photo/Emma Garrard
Photo/Emma Garrard
Incline Elem
entary School
Principal Kathleen Watty
K-2 School, 771 Southwood Blvd. (775) 832-4240
3-5 School, 915 Northwood Blvd. (775) 832-4250
Accolades •The Incline Elementary School works to get students
interested in community service at an early age.
Students participate in a canned food drive around the
holiday season and each year students participate in the
Jog-A-Thon. The Jog-A-
Thon, which is held each
fall, goes to support
health and the school’s
PE program and stu-
dents earn money by
completing laps around
a makeshift track.
Incline High School
Principal John Clark
499 Village Blvd. (775) 832-4260
Accolades
•IHS earned an exemplary ranking for the
2006-07 school year as measured by the
Nevada No Child Left Behind legislation.
•More than 75 percent of IHS students
earned a three or above on their AP tests
for three straight years from 2004-05
through 2006-07. A three or above can
earn college credit for a student.
Incline Middle School
Site Administrator Dr. Nichole Truax
931 Southwood Blvd.
(775) 832-4220
Accolades
•Incline Middle School hosts spelling
and geography bees each year. In 2007,
two IMS students made it to the
Northern Nevada regional, and in
2006 a student earned a place in the
Nevada state spelling bee in Las Vegas.
18 North Shore Almanac
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eyond the mountains, Lake Tahoe and the Sierra’s seeming-
ly endless sunshine, one of Incline Village’s most attractive
features are its schools — from the public schools of the
Washoe County School District to the private, K-8 Lake
Tahoe School. Incline High School has turned out gradu-
ates during the past few years that go on to colleges such
as Yale, Harvard, Stanford and Cornell. The Incline schools
are also active in various community events, passing on the
value of volunteering to the younger generation.
LakeTahoe School
Headmaster Steve McKibben
995 Tahoe Blvd, (775) 831-5828
Accolades
•According to 2007 IOWA test
scores, 94 percent of 3-8 grade LTS
students tested at or above their
grade level and 77 percent scored in
the test’s top quarter. Those scores
combined puts Lake Tahoe School in
the top 95 percentile of elementary
and middle schools nationwide.
— Kyle Magin
7
50 Things you need to know 19
The top five books checked out at the Incline library are:
1. “B” is for Burglar by Sue Grafton
2. “C” is for Corpse: A Kinsey Millhone Mystery by Sue Grafton
3. Hard Evidence by John T. Lescroart
4. I Can Read With My Eyes Shut by Dr. Seuss
5. Taming a Sea-horse by Robert B. Parker
The top four most checked out items “recently” are as follows:
1. The 5th Horseman — a novel by James Patterson
2. King Kong — the movie on DVD
3. Dead Wrong — a book on DVD by Judith A. Jance
4. The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic & Madness and the Fair
That Changed America — a book on DVD by Erik Larson
— Kevin MacMillan
Incline Village Library hours
Tues. - Thurs.: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Fri. - Sat.: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Whether you are buying or selling
your property, let me handle
the details for you!
Call Pier Warmuth...
The Ultimate
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(775) 831-1515 (800) 748-5919
917 Tahoe Boulevard, Incline Village, NV 89451
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Pier
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On thebest
reader list
s
hhhhhhhh! We all know you’re supposed to be
quiet at the library, and it’s no different at the
Incline Village Library. But did you ever wonder
which books the library’s clientele are scream-
ing for? Just what are the most popular books
and items checked out from your local library?
The Bonanza asked the library to run a list of
some of the most popular checked out items.
As it turns out, it’s Incline’s children who are
running the show.
-)#(!%,$0%94/.
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|ZZ5) 831·ó233
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ECCENTRIC
GEORGEWHITTELL
LEFTHIS MARK
ONEASTSHORE
ECCENTRIC
GEORGEWHITTELL
LEFTHIS MARK
ONEASTSHORE
ions and elephants roaming along the East Shore of Lake Tahoe? It’s
true. The Thunderbird Lodge, which sits on the northeastern shore
of the lake, was home to exotic creatures at one time.
Local history provides a fascinating description of the original owner
of the Thunderbird Lodge as an eccentric, a notorious playboy and a
recluse. All of these and other descriptions have been used to
describe George Whittell.
It is also part of local history that during his summer retreats at
the lodge, frequent high stakes card games ran late into the night in
his special card house on the property. Whittell also had a special
20 North Shore Almanac
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underground tunnel that he used to walk
from his house right down to the boathouse
where his beautiful yacht, the Thunderbird,
could whisk him away without ever
being seen.
Whittell purchased the land in 1936 for
about $50 an acre, which included 27 miles
of shoreline. In 1937, work began on his sum-
mer retreat, the Thunderbird Lodge. When it
was completed in 1939, the lodge included a
complex of beautiful stone structures spec-
tacularly located on the shores of Tahoe. One
of the buildings in the complex is a structure
that looks like it could be a three-car garage,
but it really was the home for Whittell’s pets,
an elephant and a lion that traveled every-
where with him. A fireplace was included
inside this structure to keep his closest
friends and companions, the lion and ele-
phant, warm on those cool Tahoe evenings!
At one time, Whittell actually ran away
and joined the circus — Barnum and Bailey’s
Circus — when he was a young adult. It was
during his time in the circus and after
several safaris to Africa that he devel-
oped a passion for exotic animals.
For an opportunity to hear some
unusual history of the North Shore and
see this incredible complex which has
now been added to the National
Register of Historic Places, take one of
the tours offered in the summer.
There are tours by land which leave
from Incline Village and tours by water
which leave from South Shore.
For the tours by land, sign up at
the Incline Village Visitors Center
located at 969 Tahoe Boulevard.
For information about the tours, call
(800) 468-2463.
For the tours by water, call
Woodwind Cruises at (888) 867-
6394, ext. 3. For information about
the Thunderbird Lodge, visit the Web
site, www.thunderbirdlodge.org.
— Jean Eick
50 Things you need to know 21 50 Things you need to know 21
7Z EVgi d[ i]Z AZ\VXn
THUNDERBIRD LODGE
PRESERVATION SOCIETY
P.O. Box 6812 Incline Village, NV 89450
775-832-8750
www.ThunderbirdLodge.org
W
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I T
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THUNDERBI RD
LODGE
EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC
TAKE PLEASURE IN A VISIT TO THE CASTLE INTHE SKY
THUNDERBIRD LODGE IS OPEN FOR PUBLIC TOURS
JUNE TO SEPTEMBER CALL 800-GO-TAHOE FOR TICKETS
ASK US HOW YOU CAN HELP SAVE THIS
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PRIVATE EVENT RENTALS EXCLUSIVE TO
CASTLE CLUB MEMBERS
Photo/Carrie Richards
22 North Shore Almanac
9
round Incline Village, and for that matter the entire Lake Tahoe
Basin, the nation, and maybe even the world, a familiar local is
Mark Twain.
Sometimes it is easy to identify him dressed in a white suit
and sporting white hair, but there have been times when he
actually disguises himself as a lifeguard and spends time on
Tahoe’s beaches. Still, visitors do a double take when Mark
Twain boards the Tahoe Queen or shows up at some other
special event at his favorite “Lake of the Sky.”
In fact, he was so busy during the summer of 2007 he will
probably want to take this entire summer off and return to
that lifeguard stand disguised as Joe Tahoe. What local or visi-
tor will forget Mark Twain reading the Declaration of
Independence for Incline Village’s first Red, White and Tahoe
Blue celebration in summer 2007?
Nevada’s Governor, Jim Gibbons, will remember sitting
next to Mark Twain last summer when the Sand Harbor
Visitors Center was opened. The Incline High School class of
2007 will always remember that Mark Twain was not only at
their graduation, but gave the commencement address.
Mark Twain travels frequently from Incline Village to places
all around the country, and the world, speaking and sharing his
delightful sense of humor. When he is in Incline, Mark Twain
writes the popular “Pine Nuts” column in the North Lake
Tahoe Bonanza, disguised as the writer, McAvoy Layne.
He does spend a lot of time in Incline using the McAvoy
Layne disguise. This is actually the disguise he used to get out
of Hawaii and into the “Lake of the Sky” region as a radio
announcer at Incline Village’s long for-
gotten radio station, KLKT. Layne said
he met a woman while skiing at
Diamond Peak (when it was still named
Ski Incline) while he was on a skiing
trip. When she learned that he was a
radio announcer in Hawaii, she asked
him to join the local radio station. So in
1983 McAvoy Layne arrived in Incline Village to
work as a radio announcer.
Layne said that it was while he was training
for the Iron Man in Hawaii that he listened to
Hal Holbrook’s Mark Twain tapes as he trained.
“I wondered if I could portray Twain,” he said. “Eventually I
had a suit made and started going to convalescent homes, hospi-
tals and prisons as Mark Twain.”
He has been working hard the past six or eight months
exclusively as the “ghost of Mark Twain” so we can probably
expect to see more of Mark Twain around the “Lake of the Sky”
in the near future.
Ask him a question, and you’ll get a reply just like Mark Twain.
— Jean Eick
A
Mark
Twain
Photo/Jen Schmidt
S
10
Joanna Rice
775-772-6112
775-831-2144
joannarice@nlaketahoe.com
Enthusiasm, Energy
&Commitment
to personalized customer service...
Joanna Rice, GRI
Making Your Tahoe Dreams Come True
You will appreciate my attention to detail,
availability, and willingness to do whatever is
necessary to make your real estate experience
not just successful but also enjoyable!
• 2007 REALTOROF THEYEAR,
Incline Village Board of Realtors
• 2005 President,
Incline Village Board of Realtors
• Member of the Northern Nevada Regional MLS
• Annual Fundraising Chair, Kids & Horses
• Member, AAUW
TAHOE-INCLINEREALESTATE.COM
Housesmiths is quality remodeling,
customlog work, maintenance
specialists available year round to
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housesmiths@hotmail.com
JimNelson Since 1986
(775) 831-2462 NVLic#0034434
Jim’s Crew
o you’re enjoying a few weeks’ vacation in Incline
Village, you’re a sports fan and you want to gamble on the
big game, whether its next year’s Super Bowl or the NBA
Finals. But you don’t know where to go. First of all, Vegas is
out, unless you enjoy eight-hour trips. But what about
Reno or Carson City? Both are about a half hour away
and host a bevy of casinos with sports books. Not bad.
But why waste the gas at all? The North Shore has
three choices for citizens to bet on the big game.
Sports books on the North Shore are available at the
Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe, the Tahoe Biltmore and the
Crystal Bay Club. Whether it’s trying to beat the
over/under on a World Series game or trying to find the
best parlay picks for the first week of the NFL season,
these three casinos offer many different ways to bet
sports, at many different odds.
Each book offers unique specials during different sports
seasons. And, while the common adage is that “the casino
always wins,” it’s not necessarily the case with the sports
books. After all, sports fans who saw the latest Super
Bowl between New England and New York know that all
Nevada sports books lost a record $2.6 million in Super
Bowl bets because of New York’s “giant” upset.
— Kevin MacMillan
• Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe, located at 111
Country Club Drive in Incline Village. (775) 832-1234
• Crystal Bay Club and Casino, located on
State Route 28 near the Northern Nevada state
line in Crystal Bay. (775) 833-6333
• Tahoe Biltmore, located on State
Route 28 near the Northern
Nevada state line in Crystal
Bay. (775) 831-0660
Sports
betting
50 Things you need to know 23
hoices are always good.
In Incline Village you can choose which
Rotary Club you would like to belong to.
Rotary is an international organization for
business and professional people, whose
main purpose is community service.
There are approximately 1.2 million
Rotarians in more than 160 countries
and more than 30,000 Rotary Clubs.
Incline Village has the distinct honor of
having two Rotary clubs. Each club has
its own projects and fundraising activities.
Both clubs have served Incline Village by
offering special events and activities. “I
don’t have time to attend the meetings”
is not a valid excuse when a Rotarian
asks you to join their club. Most people
in Incline refer
to the
Rotary Clubs by the time of day they
meet. The Morning Club, the Tahoe-
Incline Rotary Club, meets every
Thursday morning at 7 a.m. at the Hyatt
Resort, Spa and Casino. This allows
members with a full schedule of events
the opportunity to gather for breakfast
and then still be about the activities of
the day. The current president of this
club is Bob Ellsworth. Ellsworth has been
a member of Rotary for 20 years and
originally joined the Noon Club, but
because his schedule
changed, he switched to
the Morning Club.
The Noon Club,
The Rotary Club of
Incline Village, meets
every Monday at noon
at the Donald W.
Reynolds
Community
Non-profit
Center. This
allows mem-
bers inter-
ested in taking a
lunch break the opportunity
to eat and participate in
Rotary. The current president
is Frank Spees.
— Jean Eick
The Rotary Club
of Incline Village
Noon Mondays, Donald W. Reynolds
Non-profit Center
President Frank Spees
(775) 832-7006
Top Five Events/Activities:
1. Bowl-a-Thon
2. RWTB Rubber Ducky Race
3. Highway 431 Overlook
Monument Maintenance
4. Schools’ Dictionary Project
5. Scholarships
11
Rotary:
twice the clubs
twice the service
Tahoe-Incline Rotary Club
7 a.m. Thursdays, Hyatt Lake Tahoe
President Bob Ellsworth
(775) 831-5473
Top Five Events/Activities:
1. Christmas Tree Sales
2. Sink ‘Em-Hold ’Em Golf and Poker
Tournament
3. High School Scholarships
4. International Projects
5. Incline Schools Educational Programs
C
24 North Shore Almanac
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50 Things you need to know 25 50 Things you need to know 25
Bowl Incline
the North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center
• 16 Certified Lanes
• Automatic Scoring
• Birthday Parties
• “Bumper Bowling”
• Video Poker
• Video Arcade
• Cocktails
• ATM
• Senior Groups
• Full Swing Golf Simulator
• Billiards
EVERY DAY
IS SMOKE-FREE!
AIR CONDITIONED!
920 Southwood
Incline Village
775.831.1900
email: bowlink@aol.com
ADULT AND
JUNI OR LEAGUES
open 11 am - midnight every day
TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU…
INCLINE
C A R WA S H
910 INCLINE WAY
INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
7 7 5 . 8 3 1 . 1 4 8 5
KINGS BEACH
C A R WA S H
8775 NORTH LAKE BLVD
K I NG S B E A C H , C A
TOUCHFREE
AUTOMATIC
CAR WASHES
NEVER LEAVE
YOUR CAR!
SELF SERVICE BAYS
WASHCARD SYSTEM
FOR SAVINGS & CONVENIENCE
UPGRADED VACUUMS
2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

hat phrase will mean going to the same place whether you are
driving from Lake Tahoe’s West Shore or Truckee or Incline
Village and every town in between. And that bowling destina-
tion is Bowl Incline, on the corner of Incline
Way and Southwood Boulevard.
Whether you’re a hard-core alley cat
into league play, looking for some wacky
bowling events or just a night at the
lanes, check out Bowl Incline.
With 16 bowling lanes, a video arcade
and a cocktail lounge, you can get your fill
of entertainment in one place without hav-
ing to drive down the hill to Reno.
Bowl Incline is also the home of a
favorite North Shore charity event. The
Bowl-a-Thon, held each October for the
last four years, raises money for the
Rotary Club of Incline Village and raf-
fles away over $10,000 in prizes.
Teams dress in themed clothing
and compete against one another
for prizes and fun. In 2007, “Uncle
Sam,” “Nancy Grace” and a vari-
ety of pirates made an appear-
ance at the event.
—Kyle Magin
12
Let’s go bowling
t
Bowl Incline
920 Southwood Blvd.
Incline Village
(775) 831-1900
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26 North Shore Almanac 26 North Shore Almanac
Advanced
Health & Wellness
Dedicated to Education in Health,
Fitness, Wellness and Teaching
People to Live Long, Vibrant Lives.
Call for Free Consultation
Wearing Kangoo Jumps –
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The Meaning and Purpose Of Life
Club 120 Meets at High Altitude Fitness
Everyone Is Welcome!
775-832-9091
880 Northwood Boulevard, Suite 1
(in the High Altitude Fitness building)
Incline Village, NV
775-832-9091
or Jason Burd, owner of High Altitude Fitness, being
healthy isn't about how much you can lift or how far
you can run — it’s about wellness.
Which is why he’s looking to turn High Altitude
Fitness, along with the rest of the building, into
Incline Village’s premier wellness destination.
“My whole attitude of health and fitness and
nutrition is that it’s a lifestyle,” Burd said, while walk-
ing through his 13,000-square-foot gym, Incline’s
state-of-the-art facility.
Inspired by that attitude, Burd has added different
amenities to the gym, which includes one the largest
weight rooms on the North Shore, to encourage
people to come. For example, the lobby has wi-fi
Internet access and even a general use computer.
“People have all these excuses of why they don’t
work out, we don’t want them to have any when
they come here,” he said.
Burd recently added a cafe with espresso and
smoothies and soon plans to add food. But, that’s
only the beginning.
The next step is to tear out some of the club’s
racquet courts and replace them with a 4,100
square-foot climbing wall.
“We’ll be the largest gym and climbing
wall combination in Nevada,” Burd said.
The climbing wall is part of the reason
Burd bought the gym, formerly Incline
Athletic Club. An avid climber, Burd was look-
ing for a mountain town where he could
work out and climb.
He said he envisions the climbing wall as a
gathering place for Incline Village.
Burd’s vision begins with the climbing wall,
but extends to the rest of the building as
well. In the business suites above, he envisions
a collaborative of wellness professionals such
as chiropractors, physical therapists, nutrition-
ists and acupuncturists.
— By Annie Flanzraich
High
Reaching
F
3
50 Things you need to know 27 50 Things you need to know 27
880 Northwood Blvd.
Incline Village, NV 89451
Phone: 775.831.4212 Fax: 775.831.3950
www.highaltitudefit.net
K
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T
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Altitude
higher with
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28 North Shore Almanac
i
ncline Village shopping is a truly eclectic experience for locals and
visitors. From kid's toys to grown-up luxuries, outdoor gear to
designer clothing and the most unique home décor you can find
it all in Incline.
Hub Brothers: The Fabulous Hub Bros
and the Silver and Gold shop have been
Incline Village jewelers for more than 20
years. Their expansive collection fea-
tures exquisite diamonds and gems
from the simple to the sublime, afford-
able estate jewelry, custom manufacturing and repair. A master
goldsmith and jewelry designer is located in the store.
Conveniently located in The Raley's Center you must stop in to
say "hello" to the boys and leave with a little treasure for yourself
or someone you love.
Village Square Family: Whatever you
are looking for you can certainly find it at
Village Square Family. This one-of-a-kind
store offers an extensive collection of
children's toys, games and books,
Incline Village's only grown-up book
store, and great gift’s for men and
women. Sit a spell in the comfy
chairs surrounded by the ambiance
of soft music and the mingling aro-
mas of candles and home fragrances and, if you are lucky,
our Village's very own Hank Maxwell might just offer you a
paw. In the Raley's Center.
Village Ace Hardware: So much more than a hardware
store, Village Ace Hardware has all you need for home and
garden. Whether you are sprucing up the inside or outside
of your home the friendly Village Ace Hardware staff can
be counted on for their expert advice. Watch for the
Village Ace Hardware flyers in the North Lake Tahoe
Bonanza for amazing seasonal buys. And, feeling a little
lonely? There is no better outing than Saturday morning
at the hardware store - you are bound to encounter old
friends and make new ones.
Jeunesse: This Incline Village boutique is
the ultimate reflection
of its owner's good
taste and style. At
Jeunesse, staff can outfit you from head to toe or find that one
special piece that makes the perfect impression. Located in the
Raley's Center for the ultimate in convenient Incline Village
clothes shopping you won't want to miss Jeunesse.
Incline Jewelers: Dan and Beth Wheeler
know just how to make you feel like a local
in their unique shop located in the
Christmas Tree Center. Dan is a Master
Jeweler renown for his "Tahoe" designs as
well as high quality custom jewelry design.
Whether you are shopping for a gift or a
treasure for yourself, Incline Jewelers is cer-
tain to fulfill your desire. Don't forget to
bring a little dog treat for the beautiful
Newfoundlands who welcome you at the door.
Tahoe Store: Where do you go
for that new coffee pot, the
kitchen gadget you just have to
have or a selection of great Lake
Tahoe wear? Check out the Tahoe
Store located in Christmas Tree
Village. This store has almost every-
thing but the kitchen sink including delicious bath
products, an extensive candle selection, kid's toys
and something to snuggle up in.
High Sierra Gardens: Enter
a world of pure floral and fauna
delight at High Sierra Gardens
located on Tahoe Boulevard.
Specialized nursery selections
suitable for our high mountain
climate as well as everything
the gardener needs are avail-
able right here. Don't forget
the floral shop — one of the most
outstanding in our region — for lovely
bouquets or even wedding designs.
There is also a great selection of home
décor.
— By Annie Flanzraich
Why shop anywhere else? Why shop anywhere else?
15
50 Things you need to know 29
STILLWATER
SPA • SALON • BOUTIQUE
Lake Tahoe’s Premier Spa
• soothing massage
• hydrating body treatments
• indulgent facials
• advanced hair color
• master styling
• luxury manicures and pedicures
• distinctive boutique
for appointments
775.886.6745
stillwaterspa.com
Gift cards available
at spa and salon
Serenity
n Incline Village there is always time to relax, refresh and
renew your spirits at a spa. Everyone needs time to be
pampered and Incline Village offers one unique place to
be treated to everything from a massage to a candle-lit
infinity tub and an aroma bath.
If you want to be as refreshed as the mountain air and
let your mind be as clear as the Lake Tahoe water, you
will want to visit the Stillwater Spa at the Hyatt Regency
Lake Tahoe. Here you can spend time renewing your spir-
it in the ultimate mountain setting. Whether you just
need a few minutes to meditate alone or want to
arrange for all the experiences and treatments, you will
want to visit the Stillwater Spa.
The Stillwater Spa has an extraordinary ambiance that
treats you to the ultimate spa experience. With 16 pri-
vate rooms and even a room with a fireplace you can
relax and be pampered all day long.
Sit and relax on one of the large leather couches
while sipping on fresh tea and you can even order lunch!
Plus you can have a manicure, pedicure, massage, a facial
and your hair styled as well. This is the ultimate spa in
Incline.
The spa offers two product lines, one is the Italian line
Comfort Zone and the second is the Kerstain Florian
Swiss line. According to spa supervisor, Sarah Hisey, the
spa has a staff of about 25 therapists and can offer spa
visitors appointments on Fridays and Saturdays from 8
a.m. to 9 p.m, and Sundays through Thursdays from 9 a.m.
to 8 p.m. The spa also has a special card that can be
purchased for locals of the Tahoe area for a 15 percent
discount. For appointments call (775) 886-6745 and let
the experience begin.
— Jean Eick
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...
30 North Shore Almanac 30 North Shore Almanac
Fireworks
More than 10,000 people packed the
beaches of Incline Village last summer to
watch the spectacular fireworks show
which culminated the Red, White and
Tahoe Blue celebration. The show lasted
more than 30 minutes and featured non-
stop action in bursts of patriotic colors
and dazzling greens, purples and yellows.
This year will be no different.
Already negotiations are under way
to bring back the same fireworks con-
tractor, who will explode the light show
from two barges off the shore of Incline
and Burnt Cedar beaches. It will again
be an event not to be missed!
—Tanya Canino
RED, WHITE &
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ed, White and Tahoe Blue explod-
ed onto Incline Village’s scene last
summer, establishing itself as an
emerging community tradition.
Residents and visitors embraced
the three-day celebration, giving
kudos to the organizers who spent
a year planning the new event for
Incline Village.
What specifically captured the
hearts of the community cannot
be pinned down: the fun-loving
spirit behind the all-American
small-town corny parade; the new-
found respect and honor given to
local veterans; the camaraderie of
attending special VIP dinners; the
rhythm and beat of 1,000 people
jamming to the Sol Jibe concert;
the cries of excitement during the
Rubber Ducky race, or the incredi-
ble bursts of color filling the night
sky above Incline Village on the
Fourth of July.
Perhaps it was the experience of
thousands of residents joining
together for three days to celebrate
America’s Independence Day in a
fashion that creates unity, memories
and a sense of community.
Now in its second year, Red,
White and Tahoe Blue is set again
for July 2-4, and promises to return
with a gusto.
“I can’t tell you how many
people have come up to me and
said that was the best Fourth of
July and best fireworks ever,” said
Tom Bruno, after last year’s
event. “I think it exceeded my
expectations.”
Some of the highlights will
return this year in a bigger and
better form. The parade is already
expected to increase upon last
year’s 46 entries, and parade
organizers are in search of march-
ing bands to pep up the parade.
The USO Veterans Show is also
going to be expanded with addi-
tional acts, a canopy to provide the
veterans with shade and a dance
floor. Nightly entertainment will still
be free, with Sol Jibe and the Reno
Jazz Orchestra. New for 2008, the
Reno Philharmonic will be featured
July 4.
“We’re having three nights of
entertainment that don’t cost any-
thing,” Bruno said of this year’s
event. He added that any commu-
nity member who would like to
make a donation, however, large or
small, can mail it to Red, White and
Tahoe Blue, P.O. Box 3789, Incline
Village, NV 89450.
In 2007, the event raised
$55,000, of which $42,500 was
donated to six charitable organi-
zations. The remainder of the
funds is being used for the 2008
celebration.
—Tanya Canino
TAHOE BLUE
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50 Things you need to know 31
Photos/Carrie Richards
17
d
iamond Peak Ski Resort in Incline is known for its beautiful
views of Lake Tahoe, its superior ski and snowboard instruc-
tors and its propensity for not being crowded. But did you
know Diamond Peak has a mascot, who’s been shredding
the mountain for 20 years now?
The Bonanza sat down to talk a little snow with Diamond
Pete, the friendly penguin who boasts that, in his 20 years,
he’s done it all.
Q. So Pete, what brought you to Diamond Peak? When
did you arrive?
A. I came to Diamond Peak 20 years ago because I heard
about all of the nice people and great skiing.
Q. What did you do prior to working at Diamond Peak?
What’s your background?
A. I was fishing in the cold weather of Antarctica but I
really wanted to learn how to ski. I heard that
Diamond Peak was a great place to learn, so I swam
and waddled my way over here.
Q. What made you choose Diamond Peak, consider-
ing all the different resorts in and around the Lake
Tahoe Basin?
A. I love being around kids, so that’s why I chose
Diamond Peak. I heard about the friendly ski instruc-
tors and incredible views of the lake, it’s also a great place to learn how to ski.
Q. What’s your favorite food? Something tells me it’s sushi...
A. When I’m back in Antarctica I like to eat krill, squids and fish, but when I’m
at Diamond Peak I eat graham crackers and drink hot chocolate.
Q. So what’s your poison Pete — skiing or riding? Why?
A. I love to ski, snowboard and I’ve been known to telemark a few times! In
my 20 years of being at Diamond Peak, I’ve done it all.
Q. Now here’s something everyone’s been itching to know — what does
Diamond Pete do during the summer?
A. I try to get back to Antarctica to visit my friends and family, but if I happen
to stay in Incline then I like to wakeboard and golf.
— Kevin MacMillan
Diamond Pete biography
Diamond Pete is Diamond Peak’s mascot who is closely associ-
ated with the Bee Ferrato Child Ski Center. Bee Ferrato picked
up a yellow-eyed penguin when she was walking along the
beaches of New Zealand as a little girl. She developed an inter-
est in penguins and years later she visited Diamond Pete’s
brothers and sisters in Antarctica. It was about that time when
Diamond Pete swam and waddled his way to Diamond Peak
Ski Resort in Incline Village because he heard about the fresh
powder and family-friendly terrain. Pete hangs out in
Antarctica during the summer where it’s a bit cooler and
makes his way back to Diamond Peak for winter with a
belly full of fish.
— courtesy of Diamond Peak
Diamond
Pete
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rom Diamond Peak’s mid-mountain Snowflake Lodge, guests enjoy
beautiful views of Lake Tahoe while tasting fine wines and delicious
appetizers. Afterward, guests ski, telemark or snowboard down a
freshly groomed blue corduroy run to the bottom. Last Tracks is
held Saturdays from early February until the end of the season.
Events start approximately at 4 p.m. Single event tickets are $29,
and Last Tracks Season Passes are available for $200.
For information, call Diamond Peak at (775) 832-1177 or order
your tickets at www.diamondpeak.com.
Last
Tracks
Last
Tracks
50 Things you need to know 33
Photos/Carrie Richards
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34 North Shore Almanac 34 North Shore Almanac
ncline Village is definitely a mountain town, and it
prides itself on its ski resort Diamond Peak. Incline
is also host to a pair of nationally-recognized
golf courses.
Here’s three reasons why Incline’s courses are
some of the best in the nation.
1. The Mountain Course in Incline Village was
named one of the 2007 Top Short Courses in
America by Golf Range Magazine.
2. The Nevada Golf Course Owners
Association named both the Mountain
Course and the Championship Course
as the 2007 NVGCOA Golf Course of
the Year.
3. The recognition doesn’t end with
tee shots and long putts. Also in
2007, both courses were
ranked as one of Golf
World’s 100 Best Golf
Shops in America.
— Kevin MacMillan
Fore!
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50 Things you need to know 35 50 Things you need to know 35
We enjoy being part of the Lake Tahoe
community. And we consider ourselves
very much a part of its future—whether
helping our clients strengthen their
portfolios, funding their children’s
education, or planning for retirement.
We take pride in being the world’s
largest wealth management firm
1
and
best private bank.
2
But it’s the
relationships we’ve forged with our
clients in Lake Tahoe that we consider
our greatest asset. We can show you a
world of financial opportunities.
For more information visit or call
Cynthia Ferrell, Vice President–Investments
775-833-6755 cindy.ferrell@ubs.com
Andrew Beebe, Vice President–Investments
775-833-6750 andrew.beebe@ubs.com
930 Tahoe Boulevard, Suite 104
Incline Village, NV 89450
www.ubs.com/financialservicesinc
1
Scorpio Partnership, June 2007
2
Euromoney, 2007
A global leader.
Who just happens to be
your neighbor.
20
re you an avid golfer, one who rates yourself
as pretty good, yet you’re still looking for
that elusive hole-in-one? Well you’re proba-
bly not alone, considering the odds of hitting
a hole-in-one, according to the PGA,
are 33,000 to 1.
However, you might have more luck at the
Mountain Course in Incline Village, especially if you try
the seventh hole.
During the 2007 golf season, 18 golfers
recorded aces at the Mountain Course. Aces were
recorded on holes 3, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15 and 17,
with three aces a piece coming at the 15th and
17th holes. However, a whopping six holes-in-one
were recorded on the seventh hole.
The weather doesn’t even have to be nice to get
your first ace. Take Incline resident Sam Crowell. He
got his ace on Sept. 23 — while it was raining and
snowing. Quite the accomplishment!
— Kevin MacMillan
hole in one....
hole in one....
36 North Shore Almanac
Just the bear facts!
Tahoe bears usually travel alone. However, a mother will travel with
her cubs and most mothers have two cubs. The cubs are inquisitive lit-
tle balls of fur and energy and since they have short tails, like to sit
down on their bottoms to eat. Both mothers and cubs are very good
tree climbers and will race up a tree if frightened.The bears can run
very fast and it does not matter if they are running on level ground or
up a hill. In fact they have actually clocked a black bear running at 30
miles an hour! All black bears are also excellent swimmers.
A bear has five toes on each foot, just like we do. The bears have
long curved front claws, which they use to catch an object and pry it
open. But they do not have thumbs so they cannot open items with
hooks or latches like on the bear-proof garbage containers.
Locals know that the bears are cute, very smart and want food!
That’s why it is important for locals and visitors both to help protect
these delightful natives as they travel around looking for easy food.
Please watch for the bears when driving. Slow down in areas clearly
marked as favorite crossing areas. It is the responsibility of all locals and
visitors to protect the black bears of the Tahoe Basin.
— Jean Eick
21
Tahoe’s bears are smart! Tahoe’s bears are smart!
i
t’s true that many of the black bears of Tahoe have been
to school — they have spent time on the campuses of
both Incline High School and Sierra Nevada College.
Maybe they were not there for an education, but the
bears have spent time learning about the habits of locals
and visitors to the North Shore. They have learned that
it is much easier to visit the trash cans in the Village to
find food than it is to reach into a log in the forest and
fight off bees for honey. All the bears living in the Tahoe
Basin are black bears, although they are usually some
shade of brown. Even though there are more than 300
species of birds, animals and fish living in the Lake Tahoe
Basin, locals and visitors alike find the black bears the
most fascinating.
The bears love to wander all around Incline for a lit-
tle socializing and of course to find a good meal. With a
very keen sense of smell the bears quickly find all types
of food including pet food, bird food and garbage.
Tahoe’s bears usually will begin making frequent visits
around the village sometime in March and will continue
to be spotted at their favorites places until the snow
begins to fall again in late October. They have attended
pool parties, picnics, barbecues and even the Lake Tahoe
Shakespeare Festival. They have become very accus-
tomed to humans and probably find us very entertain-
ing too. It is just a matter of time until we will see bears
carrying cameras to take pictures of the locals.
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50 Things you need to know 37
Visit our website for all Incline Village and
Northern Nevada Listings • www.TahoeRenoLiving.net
917 Tahoe Boulevard, Suite 103
Incline Village, NV 89451
Office: 775-831-1515
INCLINE VILLAGE REALTY, INC.
Considering a new address ...
www.TahoeRenoLiving.net
Dan Hane
Bill Hane Jr.
Bill Hane Sr. CRB
check out these addresses first!
BUYING OR SELLING
The Hane Team!
Decades of Experience
Integrity ' Experience ' Results
Integrity ' Experience ' Results
775-832-LAKE (5253)
877-849-LAKE (5253)
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iding on a Sierra Cloud
R
iding on a Sierra Cloud
22
v
isitors can enjoy the beauty of Lake Tahoe
during a lazy sail on the Hyatt Regency
Lake Tahoe’s 55-foot catamaran, the Sierra
Cloud. Light appetizers and beverages are
included during the two-hour sail. Contact
the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe concierge
for information at (775) 832-1234 ext. 51
or e-mail hrltconc@hyatt.com.
— Jen Schmidt
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he jokes vary from ribald to perceptive. The
opinions range from passionate to flippant,
but the heart of the discussions center
around what’s best for the community.
Every Tuesday morning, those who care
about the well-being of Incline Village and
Crystal Bay gather at the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza to
share their thoughts and opinions on local issues. The
meetings have been going strong for seven years, as com-
munity-minded residents pack into the Bonanza’s commu-
nity room weekly until there is no place left to sit. In addi-
tion to local residents, employees and elected officials of
the fire department, sheriff ’s office, general improvement
district, library, schools, hospital, Tahoe Regional Planning
Agency and other prominent political figures attend the
meetings.
Discussions include defensible space, property rights,
nuisance ordinances, TRPA updates, the property tax fight,
beach access and other hot button issues. Ideas have
hatched from the community meetings such as the Red,
White and Tahoe Blue event.
“For me, they are highly informative. It’s a good forum
to let some of the organizations, such as the TRPA, get
some very frank opinions,” said Incline Village Realtor Tom
Bruno, who regularly attends the meetings.
While the TRPA is frequently the bulls-eye of his tar-
geted questions, Bruno also commended Jeff Cowen, of
the bi-state agency, for bringing real answers to the
forum. “We’re getting news before anyone else gets the
news,” Bruno said.
The meetings are held from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. every
Tuesday in the Bonanza Community Room, and anyone is
welcome to attend.
“It has a benefit to the community because things are
aired there and things get done,” Bruno added.
— Tanya Canino
A passion for
community
The Ponderosa of Bonanza fame
24
38 North Shore Almanac
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n the eastern end of Incline Village, there is
an interesting piece of famous land on the
mountain side of State Route 28.
It is the Ponderosa Ranch, based on the
hit television series Bonanza where Ben
Cartwright and his sons, Adam, Hoss and
Little Joe, entertained millions weekly from
1959 to 1973.
For the most part, Incliners know the
history of Incline Village’s Ponderosa Ranch,
but here’s a quick recap for those who are
unaware of its local and pop culture signifi-
cance.
The Ponderosa Ranch is currently closed
to the public, as its owners are unsure of its
future. But did you know it used to be a
theme park? That it was open from 1967
until the theme park closed down indefi-
nitely in 2004? That portions of the last five
seasons of the TV series and three TV
movies were also filmed at that location?
Bill and Joyce Anderson opened the
Ponderosa Ranch, which was located in the
same area as the fictional Ponderosa in
which Bonanza was set. The Andersons
contacted NBC and Bonanza producer
David Dortort in 1965, proposing the idea
of turning their ranch into a theme park.
NBC, as well as Michael Landon and Lorne
Greene, actors in the series, agreed.
It opened in 1967 as a near-replica of
the Bonanza set, and the plan was to shoot
a majority of the show there. But in reality,
very few shows were shot there (all
occured in the 10th season), considering
the struggle it was to travel to and from
Incline. Still, Bonanza actors Landon,
Greene, Dan Blocker and David Canary
would visit the Ponderosa Ranch regularly
in costume.
The park featured Bonanza memorabilia
and museums, the famous “Hoss
Burger,” a popular lunch and dinner
item, horse-drawn wagon tours and the
Ponderosa’s
replica of Virginia City, Nev.
While the ranch remains closed indefin-
tely, it still holds a lot of memories, and it
has even been used as inspiration for other
businesses. After all, why else would the
Incline/Crystal Bay newspaper be dubbed
the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza?
— Kevin MacMillan
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50 Things you need to know 39 50 Things you need to know 39
Maureen E. Dudley
Committed To You!
775.846.3776
800.748.5919
MaureenD@cbivr.com
One of the top
producers for
Coldwell Banker
Whether you are
BUYINGor SELLING
you can expect
the very best
fromMaureen
917 Tahoe Boulevard
Incline Village, NV89451
INCLINE VILLAGE REALTY, INC.
Incline Village General Improvement District
Incline Village General Improvement District (775) 832-1100
General Manager: Bill Horn
Parks and Recreation Department (775) 832-1310
Golf Course Administration (775) 832-1143
Recreation Center (775) 832-1300
Washoe County - Incline Village
Building and Safety, Incline Village (775) 832-4140
Constable (775) 832-4103
Coopertive Extension, Reno (775) 832-4150
County Commissioner: Jim Galloway (775) 328-2005
Incline Deputy Clerk (775) 832-4166
Justice Court, Incline Village: Judge E. Alan Tiras (775) 832-4100
Washoe County Roads, Incline Branch (775) 832-4125
Washoe County Sheriff ’s Dept. (775) 832-4110
North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District (775) 831-0351
Tahoe Basin
Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) (775) 588-4547
USFS Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (530) 573-2600
California State Parks (800) 444-7275
Nevada State Parks (775) 684-2770
U. S. Coast Guard (530) 583-4433
Washoe County
Assessor (775) 328-2200
Business License (775) 328-3733
Community Development (775) 328-3600
County Clerk (775) 328-3260
County Manager Katy Singlaub (775) 328-2000
District Attorney Richard Gammick (775) 328-3200
Economic Development Authority (775) 829-3700
Juvenile Probation (775) 325-7800
Senior Citizens Center (775) 328-2575
Social Services (775) 785-8600
Voters Registration (775) 328-3670
Washoe County District Health Dept (775) 328-2400
Washoe County School District (775) 348-0200
State of Nevada
Commission on Economic Development (775) 687-4325
Commission on Tourism (775) 687-4322
Contractor’s Board (775) 688-1141
Driver’s License Information (775) 684-4368
Department of Taxation (775) 684-2000
Department of Transportation (NDOT) (775) 888-7000
Employment Security Deparmtent (775) 684-3849
Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources (775) 687-4670
Industrial Insurance Commission (775) 687-3033
Labor Commission (775) 687-4850
Nevada Highway Patrol (775) 684-4808
Nevada Small Business Development Center (775) 784-1717
Nevada Tahoe Conservation District (775) 586-1610
Nevada State Parks (775) 684-2770
State Business License Office (775) 688-1295
Every season since 1970, the buyers search the fashion world,
selecting and designing in simple good taste. We'd love
to see you at Jeunesse, where you can find quality
clothing, shoes and accessories at a great price.
Raley's Incline Center • (775) 831-5600
Better Clothing
Government
o 165 miles along the entire rim of Lake
Tahoe and you have walked the most awe-
some hike available in
the entire Lake Tahoe
Basin. This is an entire
loop that begins and
ends at the Tahoe
Meadows. Many
locals, as well as visitors from
around the country, have
traveled along the Tahoe
Rim Trail and completed
all 165 miles; some
made the trip by
completing one
section at a time.
Others have made
the entire loop as a
through hike.
There is even a spe-
cial club in the Tahoe
Rim Trail
Association known
as the 165 Milers,
boasting 710 mem-
bers at the end of summer
2007.
The club was founded in
1998 and when a person
completes the entire loop, a
club member receives a patch
and his or her name is added
to the Web
site’s 165 Mile club listing.
For the past few years, the
Tahoe Rim Trail Association has been
offering a very special hike to make this an
incredible experience and the ultimate hike
available in the Lake Tahoe Basin. In order
to participate all you need to do is contact
the Tahoe Rim Trail Association and sign up,
(775) 298-0012.
The Tahoe Rim Trail offers day hiking
adventures as well. All the trails are usually
open by June for hiking, depending on snow
levels. Of course, the trails are always avail-
able for snowshoeing during the winter and
special snowshoeing events are offered by
the Tahoe Rim Trail Association.
The Tahoe Rim Tail Association is located
in the Donald W. Reynolds Community
Non-Profit Center and memberships are
available to anyone interested in maintaining
and enhancing the TRT system. The associa-
tion encourages members to participate in
promoting healthy environmental respect of
outdoor recreation and offer members
opportunities to maintain the trails with
special trail work days. Information is avail-
able on its Web site, www.tahoerimtrail.org
or by stopping at their office in the Donald
W. Reynolds Community Non-profit Center,
948 Incline Way.
— Jean Eick
40 North Shore Almanac
25
re you ready for a hike?
Take the
ultimate hike.
A
G
Map Courtesy of
Takeitoutdoors.com
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50 Things you need to know 41
Your Local Dentist!
Dr. David F. Andrews D.D.S. • 530-546-3363
GENERAL & ADVANCED COSMETIC DENTISTRY
215 Carnelian Bay Avenue • Carnelian Bay, CA 96140
get your mouth in shape!
After 31 years of dental genius in the Bay area, Dave and his family
have moved to Incline and he now owns North Shore Dental.
Welcome Dr. Dave Andrews
and his family to the community!
Dr. Dave
When looking for
an exceptional
lifestyle, world-class
recreational amenities,
high performing
schools and a
wonderful sense of
community, you can’t
do better than Incline
Village/Crystal Bay.
I’ve been serving
buyers and sellers in
this area for over 16
years. Let me help you
find your place here.
www.mikechamberlain.com
Call Mike
Chamberlain
775-691-9990
775-831-8686
www.mikechamberlain.com
Call Mike
Chamberlain
775-691-9990
775-831-8686
Incline Village…
a place to settle down
2008 could be the year you do it! All
165 miles! The Tahoe Rim Trail Association
is now accepting applications for the 2008
hike. The 15-day trip will begin on July 26,
2008 and end on August 9, 2008.
The 2008 Annual Fundraiser Thru-Hike Event
This is truly a unique opportunity to do a "supported" 15 day
backpacking trip on the Tahoe Rim Trail. There will be two groups
of 15 people. Each group will have 2 to 3 guides and some amaz-
ing views along the way.
One of the really great things about this hike is the support. We
like to call them "trail angels." Trail angels are volunteers and staff
members that appear every 2 to 3 days with food, fuel and water
(if needed). These same trail angels take our trash. This equals
lighter packs and happier campers!
This is the eighth year the Tahoe Rim Trail Association
has offered the hike. The hike is definitely a worth
while challenge that has left many with life long mem-
ories. This great event is also one of the Tahoe Rim
Trail Associations best fundraisers. The $1,500 from
each participant goes directly toward the continued
planning, construction and maintenance of the 165
mile multi-use trail. So make this your year. Take the
challenge of backpacking the entire Tahoe Rim Trail in
15 days and donating to one of the most beautiful trails in
the world!
Contact Roberta Martinoni at rmartinoni@sbcglobal.net or call
the Tahoe Rim Trail office at (775) 298-0012.
If you want
some help...
42 North Shore Almanac 42 North Shore Almanac
here are so many hikes along the North Shore
that provide spectacular views of Lake
Tahoe. The five listed here are favorites
for locals and visitors. All of these locations
are easy to find, vary in level of skill needed
and most are even dog friendly — just be
sure to clean up after your dog. As
with any hike, no matter how easy it is
you need to remember some basic
backcountry and hiking rules:
1. Wear a good pair of athletic shoes or
hiking boots.
2. Bring water and a snack.
3. Dress in layers. A backpack helps to carry
extra water, clothing, food and a camera.
4. Remember you are in the backcountry. Be pre-
pared to experience changing weather conditions.
A map of the area should be in your backpack
along with a flashlight and first aid kit.
The Crystal Bay Fire Lookout — Easy
Take State Route 28 to Crystal Bay, turn onto
Reservoir Road, past the Tahoe Biltmore parking
lot. Turn right and continue on up the road, staying
to the uphill part. Stop when you reach the gate
across the dirt Forest Service road going up. This is
a good place to park. If the area is full it is OK to
park alongside the road. Bring a picnic and a camera.
The easy walk to the top takes about half an hour and
follows a road all the way. When you reach the trails,
they make a loop that includes incredible photo
opportunities of the lake and some interpretive signs
with history of the area. This is a nice place for a
picnic as tables are around the loop hike.
Scenic hikes
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50 Things you need to know 43 50 Things you need to know 43
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Snowflake Lodge —Moderate
Drive or hike up to Diamond Peak Ski Lodge. If you drive, park in the
upper lot that is clearly marked for hikers.You will hike on a dirt road
that will wind all the way up to the popular winter ski lodge,
Snowflake Lodge. Follow the instructions to stay on the road. It takes
about an hour to reach the lodge and it is very steep, so depending
on the ages in your group could take a little longer due to the rest
stops you will need to take along the way. Once you reach the lodge,
you have found one of the most spectacular views of Lake Tahoe in
the area. The lodge is closed during the summer but you can sit on
the huge deck area to enjoy your picnic and the view!
Tahoe Rim Trail Mt. Rose Loop —Moderate
Take Highway 431, the Mt. Rose Highway, to the summit and park in
the parking area. Restrooms are also available here. Find the trail-
head behind the restrooms for the Tahoe Rim Trail. This is the trail-
head for the Tahoe Rim Mt. Rose loop. This loop takes you into some
very scenic areas as well as some wilderness and even a magnificent
waterfall! This will include some climbing and you must be sure to
follow the signs for the Tahoe Rim Trail. For the most part you will be
staying left until you reach the old Forest Service road. Continue on
the Forest Service road all the way back down to the restrooms and
parking area.
Tunnel Creek Road Hike —Intermediate to Difficult
Tunnel Creek Road is located along State Route 28 and can be iden-
tified by the iron gates that mark the area once known as the
Ponderosa. This is a very steep climb along a trail used by mountain
bikers so you need to be aware of your location on the road at all
times. This hike provides some very scenic views of Lake Tahoe and
you can hike up as far as you want to go. This eventually will connect
with both the Flume Trail and the Tahoe Rim Trail so you can contin-
ue or turn around and return to the starting point.
Mt. Rose —Difficult and Strenuous
This trail is located off State Route 431, the Mt. Rose Highway, at
the summit. A parking area and restrooms are at this location. This
hike is not for casual hikers. It is difficult and time consuming. Do
not even think about doing this unless you are wearing hiking
boots, have several layers of clothing, lots of water — a camelbak is
the best way to carry water for this one, plenty of snacks and lots
of daylight hours. A walking or trekking stick is helpful especially
when you reach the upper level that is rocky and windy and when
coming back down. The hike takes about 3 or 4 hours to reach the
summit and another two or three to return to the parking lot.
Begin behind the restroom area at the Tahoe Rim Trail trailhead.
Follow this and continue on following the signs that are marked for
the Mt. Rose Summit. It will begin with some nice views of Lake
Tahoe and even Incline Lake before you head into wilderness. You
will also reach a waterfall and from there you must go right and fol-
low the signs to the summit. You are on top of the world — or at
least Tahoe — when you reach the summit. It is breathtaking to
view the entire Reno area and beyond. Some days you can actually
see all the way to the Lassen volcano area. The lake is of course
magnificent from this perch.
— Jean Eick
(775) 831-3537
800 TAHOE BLVD INCLINE VILLAGE, NV 89450
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • VILLAGESKILOFT.COM
VOTED INCLINE VILLAGE’S BEST OUTDOOR STORE
THE YEAR ROUND OUTDOOR STORE
Ski/Snowboard Sales & Rentals
Bike Sales & Rentals
Hiking Gear
Beach Wear - Casual Wear
44 North Shore Almanac
n 1968, a researcher dropped a white disk — called a Secchi Disk
— into Lake Tahoe to measure its depth of clarity. He could see
the white disk through the water until it reached 102.4 feet. That
is the measure clarity in Lake Tahoe is based on today.
But in the past 40 years clarity has decreased dramatically to
68 feet. Scientists attribute this decrease to an increase of fine sed-
iments in Tahoe’s waters. Fine sediments are particles smaller than
a human nail that run off into the lake and act like a layer of dust
measuring Tahoe clarity
50 Things you need to know 45
in the water. Fertilizers, vehicle emissions and road dust are also
threats to Tahoe’s crystal blue waters because they all contain
nutrients that can promote algae growth. The amount of algae in
Lake Tahoe has quadrupled since 1970.
However, in past years scientists have developed methods they
think may improve Lake Tahoe’s clarity. One of these methods is
controlling the Total Maximum Daily Load, which is a term to
describe the total pollutants entering the lake each day. Scientists
think if they can reduce the TMDL by 35 percent, the lake’s clarity
could be restored to more than 100 feet in about 20 years. The
TMDL can be reduced through a number of different methods
including increased street sweeping, reducing the number of wood-
burning stoves, paving 80 percent of the unpaved roadways in the
basin and different water treatment systems.
—Annie Flanzraich
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46 North Shore Almanac 46 North Shore Almanac
ou probably remember the school play-
ground as a child, and what a fun place it
was to do just about any activity that you
could think of. The same applies at Tahoe’s
favorite playground, the Tahoe Meadows.
The Tahoe Meadows, also known as
Sheep Flats or Mt. Rose Meadows, is avail-
able year-round for activities. It requires
no reservation, there are no parking fees
and it offers something for everyone. It is
easy to find just off State Route 431
before the Mt. Rose Summit. Bring the
dog, but please clean up!
In the winter months it is popular for
all backcountry activities such as snow-
shoeing, cross-country skiing, snowmobil-
ing, and of course, the lake is visible from
most of the higher spots. The areas for
snowmobiling are clearly marked. The
area is just as popular in the winter for
sledding, building a snowman or
enjoying the snow in whatever way
you can think of. If you do wander
into the forest on a trail you can
experience another special Tahoe
activity — the mountain chickadees
love to greet all who enter the for-
est. Sit down, hold out your hand
with a few pine nuts and watch as
they land in the palm of your hand!
In the summer months this is the area
to go to fly a kite, throw a frisbee or hike
through the many trails.
There is a hike that is actually an inter-
pretive loop and includes informative sig-
nage. This allows the casual day visitor the
ability to explore the meadow area in an
easy walk, which is handicapped accessi-
ble, to see streams, wildflowers and the
forest.
If you are interested in hiking the
Tahoe Rim Trail, the trailhead begins here
for the loop that covers all 165 miles of
the Tahoe Rim Trail, or a short day hike.
And, to watch the activities around
you and enjoy the warm Tahoe sunshine,
bring your chair.
Welcome to Tahoe’s Playground!
— Jean Eick
Y
Tahoe’s Playground
Tahoe Meadows is
the place to play
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50 Things you need to know 47 50 Things you need to know 47
Governor
Gov. Jim Gibbons (775) 684-5670
101 N. Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89701
gov.state.nv.us
U.S. Senate
Sen. Harry Reid (775) 686-5750
400 South Virginia St., Suite 902, Reno, NV 89501
www.senate.gov/~reid/
Sen. John Ensign (775) 885-9111
600 E. William St., Carson City, NV 89701
www.senate.gov/~ensign/
U.S. Representative
Congressman Dean Heller (775) 686-5760
400 South Virginia St., Suite 502, Reno, NV 89501
Nevada Senate
Sen. Randolph Townsend, R-Washoe No. 4 (775) 684-1450
P.O. Box 20923 , Reno, NV 89515-0923
townsend@sen.state.nv.us
Nevada Assembly
Rep. Ty Cobb, R-Washoe No.26; tcobb@asm.state.nv.us (775) 746-9890
P.O. Box 34375, Reno, NV 89533
Rep. James Settelmeyer, R-Washoe No. 39 (775) 684-8843
770 Hwy. 395 N., Gardnerville, NV 89410
jsettelmeyer@asm.state.nv.us
Washoe County Commission
Jim Galloway, District 1 (775) 328-2005
www.jimgalloway.com
Washoe County School Board Trustees - Incline representatives
Dan Carne, Vice President (775) 322-5111
Barbara Price (775) 786-2569
Incline Village General Improvement District Board of
Trustees
Bea Epstein, Chairwoman, bea_trustee@ivgid.org (775) 833-3963
JGene Brockman, Vice Chair, gene_trustee@ivgid.org (775) 831-3798
Chuck Weinberger, Treas.; chuck_trustee@ivgid.org (775) 831-0500
Robert C. Wolf, Secretary; bob_trustee@ivgid.org (775) 831-4121
ohn A. Bohn, Trustee, john_trustee@ivgid.org (775) 831-7974
North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District Board of Directors
Wayne Fischer, Chairman
Dale Smith, Vice Chairman
Don Epstein, Secretary/Treasurer
Paul Zahler, Director
Gene Murrieta, Director
To contact the Board of Directors, call (775) 831-0351.
Elected/Appointed officials
“Sharing Christ Serving Others”
736 McCourry Blvd.
corner of Mt. Rose and McCourry
775.831.0784
Sunday Services at 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and childcare provided
during the 10:00 a.m. service
Don’t miss worshiping outdoors in our
Chapel of the Pines July through Labor Day
Check out our web site: www.InclineChurch.org
Incline Village/Crystal Bay Citizens Advisory Board
Gene Brockman
Guy Burge
Rick Jones
Patrick McBurnett
Deborah Nicholas
Dave Zeigler
To contact the CAB call Sheri Ingley, (775) 328-3612.
Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Governing Board
Shelly Aldean, (775) 885-8282
Allen Biaggi, Vice Chair, (775) 684-2710
Mara Bresnick, Chair, (530) 878-6510
Jim Galloway, (775) 328-2005
Ross Miller, (775) 684-5709
Bruce Kranz, (530) 906-1839
Norma Santiago, (530) 573-3411
Steven Merrill, (415) 362-6868
Nancy McDermid, (775) 265-6867
Coe Swobe, (775) 322-2154
Mike Weber, (530) 542-5512
Jerome Waldie, (530) 644-6803
Stuart Yount, (775) 833-6152
John Singlaub, Executive Director, (775) 588-4547
29
am Lola and I love Incline Village — it is the best
place in the world to live if you are a dog. Everyone
here is dog-friendly; some businesses allow dogs to
come inside, and even bring their dogs to work!
Incline Village even has a dog that writes a column
for the Bonanza! Here are the top five reasons why
being a dog in Incline Village is the best.
1. Scraps Dog Bakery
They have absolutely the freshest, best treats on
the whole North Shore! I love to stand and drool
at the bakery case in Kings Beach until I get a
whole bag to take home.
2. Ski Beach
If you like a good romp
at the beach, want to go
exploring along the rocks
and chase a few ducks, Ski
Beach is where all the action is
from October 15 to April 15.
Remind your owners that every-
one needs to be responsible by
cleaning up. Special bags are
provided all around to make
this convenient.
3. Aspen Grove
With Ski Beach closed in the summer to dogs, this
is where I go for my daily romp, say woof to a few
other friends and see what’s happening in the
Village. But please follow the rules about times
when it is OK to play on or off your leash and
again make sure everyone uses the special clean
up bags provided.
4. Dog friendly beaches and hikes
My family is always hiking and wandering around
through the woods and up and down the beach-
es in the summer. Since I am a dachshund
(short legs), I would much rather go up to
Tahoe Meadows, chase a few butterflies and
hit the beach!
5. Pet Network
I spent a lot of time at Pet Network when I was a
puppy. It really is the best place in the world to live
if you do not have a family of your own. The peo-
ple there took good care of me and worked very
hard to find me a family. They are not just nice
people; they have lots of good information, have a
place for boarding and are there to help all pets in
need. I met most of my best friends at Pet
Network.
Pet Network also co-sponsors the Dog Days of
Fall! We had a blast closing down the Burnt Cedar
Beach pool! There were a couple of lifeguards
on duty that gave the usual “no running by
the pool” lecture but after the first five
dogs jumped in, the lifeguards were
soaked! It’s happening again in mid-
October! I can’t wait!
But my favorite thing to do
in Incline is take my daily walk
through the village to greet
everyone. I just love this
place!
— Jean Eick, with
help from Lola
Paws & Reflect:
Lola’s List
Lola’s List
I
48 North Shore Almanac
Boat Ramps
Ski Beach, Incline Village (775) 832-1310
Coon Street Boat Launch, Kings Beach (530) 546-4212
Sand Harbor, Incline Village (775) 831-0494
Tahoe Vista Recreation Area (530) 546-4212
Marinas/Boat rentals
North Tahoe Marina, Tahoe Vista (530) 546-8248
Sierra Boat Company, Carnelian Bay (530) 546-2551
Action Water Sports, Incline Village (775) 831-4386
Tahoe Paddle and Oar, Kings Beach (530) 581-3029
Golf Courses
Mountain Course. 18 holes, par 58 (775) 832-1150
Championship Course, 18 holes, par 72 (775) 832-1146
Old Brockway Golf Course, 9 holes, par 36 (530) 546-9909
Parks and Beaches
Burnt Cedar Beach, 663 Lakeshore Blvd. (775) 832-1231
Private beach for residents and guests. Picnic area with grills, play-
ground, pool, restrooms, snack shop.
Coon Street Picnic Area, Kings Beach (530) 546-4212
Boat launch, picnic area with grills, restrooms, lighted, parking fee.
Incline Beach, Lakeshore Boulevard. (775) 832-1231
Private beach for residents and guests. Picnic area, playground, rest-
rooms, snack shop. For info on passes, call IVGID, (775) 832-1310.
Kings Beach State Park (530) 546-4212
Long sandy beach, playground, picnic area with grills, restrooms,
parking fee.
North Tahoe Beach (530) 546-4121
Intersection of Highway 28 and 267 in Kings Beach, picnic area with
grills, restrooms, group picnic area, sand volleyball area.
Patton Beach, Carnelian Bay Beach (530) 581-6900
Highway 28 in Carnelian Bay, restrooms, picnic tables, small building
for rent for groups.
Sand Harbor (775) 831-0494
South of Incline Village on Highway 28, picnic area with grills, life
guard on duty, boat launch, restaurant and gift shop, parking fee.
Ski Beach, Lakeshore Blvd. (775) 832-1231
Private beach for residents and their guests. Fee for guests, rest-
rooms, picnic areas with grills, bocce ball and volleyball courts.
Secline Beach (530) 546-4212
End of Secline Street in Kings Beach, picnic area with grills.
Tahoe Vista Recreation Area (530) 546-4212
Highway 28 and National Avenue, Tahoe Vista, restrooms, picnic
tables, boat launch (fee), limited parking.
Tennis Courts
Incline High School, 4 courts, no lights (775) 832-4260
IVGID Tennis Complex, 7 courts, no lights (775) 832-1235
Incline Way, Incline Village,
Lakeside Private Tennis Club, 13 courts, no lights (775) 832-4860
North Tahoe Regional Park, 5 lighted courts (530) 546-4212
Swimming Pools
Burnt Cedar Beach Swimming Pool (775) 832-1231
Incline Village Recreation Center Pool (775) 832-1300
Lake Tahoe Area Ski Resorts
Alpine Meadows (530) 583-4232
Boreal (530) 426-3666
Diamond Peak (775) 832-1177
Donner Ski Ranch (530) 426-3635
Granlibakken (877) 552-5301
Heavenly (530) 586-7000
Homewood Mountain Resort (530) 525-2992
Kirkwood (209) 258-6000
Lakeview Cross-County (530) 583-3653
Mt. Rose (800) Ski-Rose
Northstar-At-Tahoe (800) Go-North
Royal Gorge Ski Resort (530) 426-3661
Sierra-at-Tahoe (530) 659-7453
Soda Springs (530) 426-3901
Spooner Lake Cross-Country (775) 749-5349
Squaw Creek Nordic (530) 583-6300
Squaw Valley USA (530) 583-6985
Sugar Bowl (530) 426-9000
Sugar Pine Point Cross-Country (530) 525-7982
Tahoe Donner Ski Area (530) 587-9444
50 Things you need to know 49
SIERRA MOBILE PET SPA
Mobile Pet Grooming
Family Owned and Operated
Located in Incline Village
“Bringing the ultimate pet spa grooming
experience right to your door step.”
775-225-5079
www.sierramobilepetspa.com • nicole@sierramobilepetspa.com
CERTIFIED
LICENSED
INSURED
Recreation
30
50 North Shore Almanac 50 North Shore Almanac
t used to be a visit to Shakespeare at
Sand Harbor entailed at least two trips
from the car to the sand amphitheater
to haul a cooler full of food and drinks,
a blanket, a beach chair and extra warm
clothing.
No more.
The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival
is not only bringing new and exciting
performances to its venue at Sand
Harbor, but it is upgrading the experi-
ence of its guests. There are three tiers
of seating, from reserved seating with
wait service, to lower gallery seating —
which now has a pre-set beach chair for
every person, to the upper gallery
where one can still bring a blanket or
your own beach chair.
Finally, Globe seating is
reserved for those who
take the shuttle to Sand
Harbor, and has a pre-set
beach chair for each patron.
In order to create a bet-
ter experience for its visi-
tors, the Lake Tahoe
Shakespeare Festival is limit-
ing coolers and bags in the
reserved seating and lower
gallery to no larger than
14-inch long by 9-inch wide
by 10-inch tall. The smaller
coolers shouldn’t be a
problem; not after
Shakespeare’s Kitchen
opened to serve an assort-
ment of fare from around
the world.
Theatre gates open for
all seating sections at 5:30 p.m. and each
performance begins at 7:30 p.m.
This year, the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare
Festival is featuring the gleefully wicked
Richard III, never before seen at Sand
Harbor, paired nicely with the charming
and beautiful Bard favorite, A Midsummer
Night’s Dream. The Monday night produc-
tion is the brand new musical CAMBIO
based on the Victor Hugo novel The
Hunchback of Notre Dame.
Attending the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare
Festival doesn’t need to be a huge affair
anymore; just show up with a blanket and
some warm clothing and you’ll be set to
be dined, wined and entertained.
Of course, if you’re a traditionalist,
attending Shakespeare for the last 36
years, and you want to haul a cooler,
chair, blanket, clothing and sleeping bag
(for warmth), no one is stopping you
from grabbing a piece of sand in the
upper gallery. The view is awesome from
anywhere you sit.
— Tanya Canino
Midweek Tickets - Monday through Thursday
Reserved Seating - $67
Globe Seating - Reno shuttle - $52
Globe Seating- Incline shuttle - $42
Lower Gallery - $35
Upper Gallery - $22
*Youth - Lower Gallery (15 & under) - $17
*Youth - Upper Gallery (15 & under) - $14
**Lap Child (2 & under) - FREE
Chair Rental (optional - Upper Gallery
only) - $3
Wine Tasting (optional) - $25
Weekend - Friday through Sunday
Reserved Seating - $72
Globe Seating - Reno shuttle - $57
Globe Seating - Incline shuttle - $47
Lower Gallery - $40
Upper Gallery - $27
*Youth - Lower Gallery (15 & under) -
$22 Sun.-Thurs.
*Youth - Upper Gallery (15 & under) -
$19 Sun.-Thurs.
**Lap Child (2 & under) - FREE
Chair Rental (optional - Upper Gallery
only) - $3
Wine Tasting (optional) - $25
Purchase tickets at:
Web site - laketahoeshakespeare.com
Phone - (800) 74-SHOWS
Box office - Donald W. Reynolds
Community Non-profit Center, 948 Incline
Way
Box Office
i
Much ado at Shakespeare
Much ado at Shakespeare
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50 Things you need to know 51 50 Things you need to know 51
Honoring the Beauty of Lake Tahoe for 24 Years
Where Our Integrity Shines in Every Diamond and Through Every Sale
Recycle the Gems of Your Life • Master Jeweler on Premises
Custom Design, Repair, Buy or Sell at Hub Bros. Jewelry
831.4544 • Raley’s Center • Incline Village
ou can’t describe Incline Village as a one-horse town — there’s lots going on in this com-
munity. But you can describe it as a one movie theater town.
The Incline Village Cinema at 901 Tahoe Boulevard is the sole movie the-
ater. With one to two showings a night, it’s a stark contast to the
megaplexes down the hill. But that contrast is what gives it
charm. Every Friday, a new movie comes to town, and
the place is packed. Although the marquee only
changes once a week, it highlights new releases
—a coup for our small town. When big
releases come, the theater provides
special events, such as the mid-
night showing of “Harry
Potter” prompting
crowds to
dress up in
line.
Tanya
For movie times,
call North Shore Theaters
at (530) 546-5951.
Y Y
— Annie Flanzraich
52 North Shore Almanac
hen you stand on the deck
of the John Le Conte
research vessel, one can almost imagine
you’re riding the waves of Lake Tahoe,
ready to measure its famous clarity with
a Secchi disk. Instead, you are on a proto-
type of the U.C. Davis vessel in an Incline
Village building dedicated to research
about Lake Tahoe.
For an interactive experience to learn
about Lake Tahoe’s history, ecosystem
and clarity look no further than the
Thomas J. Long Foundation Education
Center in the Tahoe Center for
Environmental Sciences building at Sierra
Nevada College.
The education center hosts daily tours
through its virtual research vessel, virtual
laboratory and 3-D visualization lab. It
also gives tours which demonstrate the
fascinating reasons why the building was
given a Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED), platinum
level certification. The platinum certifica-
tion, conferred by the U.S. Green Building
Council (USGBC), is the highest LEED
ranking, demanding excellence in
criteria ranging from water
efficiency to indoor envi-
ronmental quality.
Last year, a special exhibit A View
from Space was offered, and Heather
Segale, education and outreach coordi-
nator, said the center is working on a
special exhibit for this summer as well.
While the upstairs offices are filled
with scientists, docents downstairs
will explain why the building is
LEED-certified, or what type of
research is being done on Lake
Tahoe. The tours are fun, and inter-
esting, for children and adults.
The center is open during the
summer from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
and closed on Sunday. Usually, there are
different hours for the off-season and
winter. For information or to schedule a
docent-led tour, call (775) 881-7560.
—Annie Flanzraich
ENVIRONMENTAL
EXPERIENCE
w
50 Things you need to know 53
925 Tahoe Boulevard, #101,
Incline Village, Nevada
Karen Simon
775-772-0992
800-998-4996
karen@tahoeinsider.com
www.tahoeinsider.com
Whether you are
BUYING or SELLING...
In all the world, choose USA,
In the USA choose NEVADA,
In NEVADA, choose
INCLINE VILLAGE,
In INCLINE VILLAGE choose
Karen Simon!
EVENTS AT THE TAHOE CENTER
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Education Center: The Thomas J. Long Foundation Education
Center is open from 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Tues.-Fri., and 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Saturdays in the summer.
Lecture Series: No host bar opens at 5:30 p.m., lectures begin
at 6 p.m. in Rooms 139 and 141.
April 17: Troubled Waters of the Sierra, Joan Clayburgh, Sierra
Nevada Alliance
July 17: Global Climate Change, Terrence Nathan, PhD, UC Davis
May & June, Aug.-Dec.: TBA
Youth Science Institute: This year’s high school students will
graduate from the 16-week program on May 21. Students interest-
ed in next year’s program (February-May 2009) can apply.
Summer Internships: High school and college interns accepted.
Summer Course: Interdisciplinary Modeling for Water-Related
Issues, July 14-Aug. 1. Presented by University of Nevada, Reno,
University of California, Davis and Desert Research Institute.
Conference: 12th international workshop of Physical Processes
in Natural Waters will be Sept. 2-5.
Star Parties: See page 80
33
54 North Shore Almanac 54 North Shore Almanac
ot your ordinary, live at the North Pole and make toys
type of Santa Claus; and not even a jolly elf who talks
to Rudolph and takes a trip every Dec. 24. No,
there are distinct differences in this Santa as
opposed to the one who lives in the North Pole,
but there is also a huge — and rather important
— similarity.
Besides sharing the same name, Incline Village’s
Santa Claus shares the same concern for chil-
dren’s welfare and passion for children’s causes.
“I began growing out my beard in March 2004
and was pleasantly surprised by how it made me look.
So many folks remarked that I should play Santa
that winter that I appeared as Santa for several nonprofit
organizations. I am a priest and a monk, as St. Nicholas
was many centuries ago, and I liked the distant asso-
ciation with St. Nicholas and the reception by chil-
dren and adults alike. After Christmas 2004, I
thought I might change my name and serve as
many children as I could as Santa,” he said.
Santa’s Bless the Children Tour was held from
May 2006 to August 2007, when Santa visited
state and federal legislative staffs in all 50 states, dis-
cussing health, safety and welfare issues that affect the 2
million children annually in the United States who are abused,
neglected, exploited, homeless, and abandoned, particularly the
400,000 wards of the states. For information about the tour, visit
www.SantasLink.net.
Now that the year of traveling is over, Santa is continuing his chil-
dren’s advocacy, beginning a new nonprofit called The Santa Claus
Foundation, www.TheSantaClausFoundation.org, and he is writing a
book, “The Santa Diet: A complete diet for physical, emotional and
spiritual health.” See www.TheSantaDiet.com.
“I’ve cut back on appearances,” Santa said, adding that he is gradual-
ly moving from the traditional Santa look to a dark-red, hooded monk’s
robe in the tradition of St. Nicholas.
“Most people I meet realize I’m using my appearance and name as
tools to accomplish my work with and for children and seem to identify
with my dislike of the crass, commercial, secular spectacle Christmas has
become. I remind folks that the greatest gift they can give, especially to
children, is love, not presents, and that Christmas is the celebration of
the birth of Christ (no matter what one’s religious beliefs may or
may not be),” Santa said.
— Tanya Canino
Yes, Virgina, there is a Santa Claus,
n
and he lives in
Incline Village.
50 Things you need to know 55 50 Things you need to know 55
866 Tahoe Blvd.,
Incline Village, NV
Open Monday - Saturday 9 - 5
Celebrating
25 years in
Incline Village
FULL SERVICE FLORIST
Creative Wedding Designs
Arrangements for All Occasions
FTD & Teleflora
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Unique Gifts - Home Décor -
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CREEKSIDE NURSERY
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LANDSCAPING
Commercial & Residential
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Design and Construction
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Paver Patios
Walkways and Driveways
B.M.P. Design and Installation
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North Shore’s
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Schools
Incline Elementary K-2 School (775) 832-4240
Incline Elementary 3-5 School (775) 832-4250
Incline High School (775) 832-4260
Incline Middle School (775) 832-4220
Kings Beach Elementary School (530) 546-2605
Lake Tahoe School (private K-8) (775) 831-5828
North Tahoe High School (530) 581-7000
North Tahoe Middle School (530) 581-7050
Preschools and Nursery Schools
Incline Village Nursery School (775) 831-4040
Kings Beach State Preschool (530) 546-9076
Le Petit Kids Club (775) 833-3801
Village Christian Preschool (775) 831-0784
Colleges
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village (775) 831-1314
Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno (775) 673-7000
University of Nevada, Reno (775) 784-1110
Western Nevada College, Carson City (775) 445-3000
Sierra College, Truckee (530) 550-2225
Libraries
Kings Beach, California Library (530) 546-2021
Washoe County Library, Incline Branch (775) 832-4130
Incline Village
Foursquare Church of Incline Village (775) 831-5030
North Tahoe Community Church (775) 831-6626
North Tahoe Hebrew Congregation, Kings Beach (530) 546-0895
St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church (775) 831-0490
St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church (775) 831-1418
The Village Church (775) 831-0784
North Tahoe/Truckee churches
Assumption Catholic Church, Truckee (530) 587-3595
Calvary Chapel of Truckee (530) 587-1711
Christ Life Church, Kings Beach (530) 546-9078
Christ the King Lutheran Church, Tahoe City (530) 583-1222
Corpus Christi Catholic Church, Tahoe City (530) 583-4409
First Baptist Church of Tahoe City (530) 583-7458
First Baptist Church of Truckee (530) 582-4045
Kings Beach United Methodist Church (530) 546-2290
Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church, KB (530) 546-2291
River Rock Christian Fellowship (530) 587-0149
Sierra Bible Church, Truckee (530) 587-6025
Tahoe Christian Center, Tahoe City (530) 583-4656
Tahoe Faith Fellowship (530) 583-3977
Truckee Seventh Day Adventist Church (530) 587-5067
Truckee Christian Center (530) 587-4638
Queen of the Snows Catholic Church (530) 583-4409
Education
Churches
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56 North Shore Almanac 56 North Shore Almanac
t starts with a long swim through Tahoe’s crystal clear, cold waters,
bright and early in the morning. It’s followed by a bike ride, more
like a climb on wheels, ascending 2,000 vertical feet along the Tahoe
Rim Trail. A 10-kilometer run wraps it all up, weaving through Incline
before ending on the Village Green.
The event is the XTERRA United States Championship, an annu-
al heavy-duty triathlon which takes place right here in Incline. It
combines three disciplines, a 1.5-mile swim, a 32-mile bike ride and
10-kilometer run. This event caps a week of festivities including a
fun run, the XTERRA Nevada championship, a team triathlon and
activities for the whole family. Hundreds from throughout the
United States and even the world trek to Incline Village for this
televised event.
This year’s event is scheduled for the week of Oct. 5 in Incline
Village. Many of the races are open to the public, so shape up
and get ready to have a blast!
— Kyle Magin
ou don’t need much to enjoy views of Lake Tahoe. Sometimes you can
just stick your head out of a home in Incline Village and get a vista other
people only dream about.
Other times, however, you need some toys to enjoy all that Tahoe has to
offer. Incline has rentals to suit your fancy. Snowboards and skis are must-haves
in the winter to hit the slopes at Diamond Peak and Mt. Rose. Snowshoes or
cross-country skis make summer’s best hikes into winter playgrounds. Mountain
bikes will help you navigate the Flume trail in style come summer time, and
kayaks will bring you to the lake itself. So whatever your season and whatever
your passion is, you can find your rental here in Incline Village.
RENTAL SHOPS
Village Ski Loft - 800 Tahoe Blvd., (775) 831-3537
Available: Skis, snowboards, snowshoes, nordic skis and mountain bikes.
Porters Sports - 885 Tahoe Blvd., (775) 831-3500
Available: Skis, snowboards and snowshoes.
Flume Trail Bikes - (775) 749-5349
Available: Mountain Bikes.
— Kyle Magin
Who do you go to when
you want some toys?
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Challenging and scenic — it’s the must-do
trail for every mountain biker
or Mario Gallardo, mountain biking the
Flume Trail is part of his summer rou-
tine, riding it two or three times a week.
But he said there are certain days when
the trail, rising more than 1,000 feet
above Incline on Lake Tahoe’s East
Shore, is anything but routine.
“There are some days when you are
just full of awe and wow. It’s one of the
most beautiful rides in the basin, it’s
something you’ve got to see,” Gallardo
said. He said that while the Flume Trail is
outmatched by some other trails for
technicality and difficulty, there are
almost none that match it for the stun-
ning views of Tahoe.
Located southeast of Incline Village,
the mountain bike trail is perfect for the
outdoor and athletic enthusiast, provid-
ing challenging terrain and scenic views.
To enjoy the trail, go see Max Jones
at Flume Trail Mountain Bikes for a reli-
able set of wheels. Jones runs the shop,
which is just off Highway 28 at the
Spooner Lake day use area on the left-
hand side of the road before you reach
U.S. Highway 50.
Or, you can park at the base of
Tunnel Creek Road and take one of the
shuttles up to the bike rental shop,
which run every hour on the hour from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Jones will set you up with one of his
top of the line bikes and send you out
along the trails.
“The trails are well marked and you
can ride out right from the shop,” Jones
said. “The setting over the lake here is
amazing, it’s just a cool spot.”
You can contact the Flume Trail
Mountain Bikes at (775) 749-5349 or
check the Web site at www.theflume-
trail.com/ for rental information or to
schedule a rental ahead of time.
— Kyle Magin
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58 North Shore Almanac
t is rumored that Incline
Village has more nonprofits
than any other community of this
size. While that cannot be confirmed,
there is no doubt the number of nonprof-
its centered here in Incline Village is
astounding. Most of the nonprofits are located in one
building, the Donald W. Reynolds Community Non-
Profit Center, at 948 Incline Way.
Carla Hanson and Warren Trepp established the
Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation in 1996,
which is now the model for community foundations
throughout the entire country. With guidance and
direction from the Parasol Community Collaboration,
agencies from Project MANA to the Tahoe Rim Trail all
work from this unique center to promote and improve
the quality of life on the North Shore. The following are
members of the Parasol Community Collaboration, while
not all are located within the building, all are committed to
collaborating for the welfare of all. — Jean Eick
Arts & Culture
Lake Tahoe Chautauqua, Incline Chamber Music Society,
Incline Village Library, Lake Tahoe Music Festival, Lake
Tahoe Shakespeare Festival, Red, White & Tahoe Blue,
Sierra Nevada Ballet, Sierra Nevada Classical Guitar
Society, Thunderbird Lodge Preservation Society.
Education & Youth Development
American Association of University Women, American Youth Soccer
Organization, Boys and Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe, Children’s
Cabinet of Incline Village, Cymbal, Diamond Peak Ski Education
Foundation, Great Basin Outdoor School, Horses for the Spirit,
Incline After School Organization, Incline Schools Academic
Excellence Foundation, Incline Boosters Club, Incline Star
Follies, Sierra Nevada College, Sierra Nevada
Journeys, Space Science for Schools, Tahoe
Children’s Foundation, Truckee Meadows
Community College, United Nations Association -
Sierra Nevada Chapter.
Environment
League to Save Lake Tahoe, Nevada Tahoe Conservation
District, North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Garden, North
Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District, Tahoe Area, Sierra Club,
Tahoe Rim Trail Association, UC Davis-TERC, UNR Cooperative
Extension.
Social Services
American Cancer Society, American Red Cross, Incline
Village Community Hospital Foundation, IVGID, JOIN, Inc.,
Knights of Columbus, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society,
Mothers Offering Mothers Support, North Lake Tahoe
Health Care Auxiliary, Pet Network, Project MANA,
Rotary Club of Incline Village, Rotary Club of Tahoe
Incline, Sierra Recovery Center, Tahoe Women’s Services.
I
58 North Shore Almanac
50 Things you need to know 59 50 Things you need to know 59
AAUW (775) 831-5186
American Cancer Society (775) 329-0609
American Field Service (775) 328-2040
American Red Cross (530) 582-4137
AYSO (775) 833-2976
Arts for the Shcools (530) 546-4602
Better Business Bureau (775) 322-0657
Boy Scouts of America (775) 833-1071
Boys and Girls Club (530) 546-4324
Children’s Cabinet of Incline Village
(775) 298-0004
Children’s Cabinet Thrift Shop 833-4414
Christian Women’s Club (775) 853-4401
Coast Guard Auxiliary (775) 832-5065
CYMBAL (775) 831-8555
Diamond Peak National Ski Patrol
(volunteers) (775) 832-1170
Diamond Peak Ski Patrol (775) 832-1225
Girl Scouts (775) 322-0642
Incline Chamber Music Society 831-2298
Incline High School Boosters Club
(775) 832-4261
Incline Star Follies (775) 831-7469
North Lake Tahoe Community Health Care
Auxiliary (775) 833-3668
Incline Village School PTA (775) 833-3738
Incline Village Schools Academic Excellence
Foundation (775) 833-1788
Incliners (775) 832-1302
Kids and Horses (775) 267-1775
Knitters Guild (775) 831-9402
La Communidad Unida (775) 298-0006
Lake Tahoe Environmental Education
Coalition (775) 832-4150
Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival 298-0020
Lake Tahoe Music Festival (530) 583-3101
League to Save Lake Tahoe (530) 541-5388
Mothers Offering Mothers Support
(530) 583-1789
North Tahoe Art Center (530) 581-2787
North Lake Tahoe Demonstation Garden
(775) 831-8437
North Lake Tahoe Lions Club 831-1963
North Shore Duplicate Bridge Club
(775) 831-1259
North Tahoe Family Resource Center
(530) 546-0952
Optimists Club (775) 831-0754
Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation
(775) 298-0100
Philanthropic Educational (775) 831-8915
Organization (PEO)
Pet Network of No. Lake Tahoe 832-4404
Pop Warner Football League 240-0682
Presbyterian Women’s Thrift Store
(775) 831-3902
Project MANA (775) 298-0008
Quilters Group - Bee Inclined 831-4874
Rotary Club of Incline Village 831-5473
Sierra Recovery Center (530) 541-5190
Sierra Stars Square Dance Club 833-2145
Space Science for Schools (775) 720-6999
Tahoe Baikal Institute (530) 542-5599
Tahoe Children’s Foundation 832-8230
Tahoe Forest Hospital Hospice Thrift Store
(530) 582-3534
Tahoe-Incline Rotary Club (775) 831-5473
Tahoe Reno International Film Festival
(775) 298-0018
Tahoe Rim Trail Association (775) 298-0012
Tahoe Women’s Services (775) 298-0010
Village League to Save Incline Assets
(775) 831-4011
Wylie Animal Rescue Foundation 833-2319
Young Life (775) 831-1010
* Not all are members of Parasol
Community Collaboration.
Nonprofit & Service Organizations*
38
Edo is one of five dogs in the Washoe County Sheriff ’s
Office. After serving five years as a police dog, 10-year-old
Edo is retiring to WCSO Deputy Tony Miceli’s home, to
live out his days as a family dog. He’ll retire just as soon
as Deputy John Hamilton’s dog, Cartouche, is trained
and ready to take on crime. See Cartouche in a
training session on the Bonanza’s Web site,
www.tahoebonanza.com, under “More
Multimedia.” Look for “Washoe County
Sheriff ’s Dog Training.”
— Kyle Magin
oof! I’m Edo and I’m a longtime member of the Washoe
County Sheriff ’s Office K-9 unit here in Incline Village. My
days are pretty busy, fighting crime and playing fetch. I’ll
make sure you’re safe on the streets, the slopes and on our
parks and beaches. Here are a few things you can do to
help keep Incline safe...
1. Lock your cars when you park them to take
hikes, or to take your dog for a walk. Thieves
look for unlocked vehicles.
2. If you’re leaving Incline for a trip, make sure to
tell someone where you are going and who
should be allowed at your home while you’re
gone.
3. Drive slow. There are a lot of humans and us dogs
walking around Incline all the time. Look both ways at
intersections and watch for traffic on paw and on foot!
4. Lifejackets! I can’t tell you how important these are, and
hopefully you wear them every time you take a boat on
Lake Tahoe.
5. Use the buddy system. Whether you’re snowboarding or
going on a hike, take a friend and be sure to tell
someone else where you’re going and when
you’ll be back. Now I can find just about any-
one with my nose, but I’d much rather
you be safe with a buddy!
Paws & Reflect:
w
Edo’s Edicts
Learn more about Edo
60 North Shore Almanac
50 Things you need to know 61
Master IJO Jeweler
www.inclinejewelry.com • Christmas Tree Village • (775) 831-6602
31 Years of Divine
Incline Village’s Original Jeweler
A
39
62 North Shore Almanac 62 North Shore Almanac
nd they’re off! Dummies fly down
the hill at Diamond Peak, strapped
to skis and the hopes of their
builders. The Dummy Downhill is a
tradition in its eighth year at
Diamond Peak.
The concept is simple: build a
dummy, attach it somehow to two
skis and send the whole thing down
the hill and over some jumps in
Diamond Peak’s terrain park.
Dummy builders can win a variety
of categories, including longest
jump, best crash, most creative and
more. Winners receive gift certifi-
cates to Incline restaurants and
businesses.
In 2007, some of the dummies
entered looked like people, some
like giant insects and at least one
looked like a bug-eyed alien.
Here are the rules for building
your own dummy, see you at
Diamond Peak!
The 2008 Dummy Downhill is
slated to take place April 5 this year.
Dummy builders are encouraged
to be as creative as they can. The
following restrictions apply to all
dummies:
1. They cannot be alive.
2. Must not weigh more than 75
pounds.
3. Teams that build their dum-
mies to lose parts as they crash will
be required to clean up afterward.
4. At least one person from each
team must be available to transport
and/or unload their dummy at the
top of the launch.
— Kyle Magin
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50 Things you need to know 63 50 Things you need to know 63
hirsting for a sip of Tahoe? No need to dip a glass into the
lake’s crystal waters. Instead, head over to the Cutthroat
Saloon in the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort where you
can find three “Tahoe” drinks — the Blue Tahoe, the Tahoe
Tessie and the Tahoe Gold.
All three offer a variation on libation. The Blue Tahoe,
almost as clear and blue as our lake, has the smooth taste
of Ketel One Vodka augmented by Blue Curacao and
Cointreau. The Tahoe Gold, on the other hand, is
unabashedly tequila — a mix of Jose Cuervo, with hints of
Grand Marnier and banana liquor. And to finish (or start) it
off, the fruity Tahoe Tessie adds a Tahoe spin to a Long Island
Ice Tea. The frosty mug contains vodka, rum, gin and triple
sec and is turned blue with Blue Curacao and tastier with
pineapple juice and Sierra Mist. All three (priced at $8 a
drink) are worth trying, separately or at once.
Here’s to drinking Tahoe!
— Annie Flanzraich
CTRH is a not-for-profit 501c3 corporation.
The time to plan for an emergency
isn’t while you’re in the middle of one.
Here’s to your health.
www.carsontahoe.com
Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center’s
ER/Fast Track allows you easy access
to an entire system of comprehensive
healthcare professionals and advanced
technology.
• Full service emergency department –
open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
• Direct access to over 35 medical
specialties available around-the-clock
• Advanced triage process where patients
are provided the appropriate level of care
upon arrival
• Six dedicated Fast Track bays for minor
emergencies – open 11 am to 11 pm daily
• Direct access to board certified
emergency physicians (a benefit indepen-
dent urgent care centers don’t provide)
Trust Carson Tahoe for complete
peace of mind.
1600 Medical Parkway • North Carson City
The Blue Tahoe
The Tahoe Gold
The Tahoe Tessie
T
Cheers to Tahoe!
41
ast Shore
beaches are
unlike any other
in Lake Tahoe — they may be a little more
difficult to reach, but those who make the
effort are well-rewarded with clean,
granitic sand, boulders for sunbathing and
crystal clear turquoise water.
Pristinely situated in either state park or
national forest lands, the beaches here can
be less crowded, less noisy and more
serene. Although a hot August day will
bring out noisy crowds, including a bevy of
boats and kayaks, for most of the year, a
walk to one of these beaches will bring
solitude and silence.
The string of beaches that begin with
Hidden Beach tucked from sight of
Highway 28 and ends at Skunk Harbor and
its boarded up former hunting lodge vary
from free to paid, clothing optional.
Parking for Hidden Beach is tough, just
outside Incline Village, there’s very few legal
places alongside the road, and the lot at
Memorial Point does not let you leave
your car there for a day of laying on the
beach. If you are one of the early birds
who grabs a space along Highway 28 just
past the lakeshore
homes, there is a trail
alongside the highway that will lead you
down to the beach. Don’t be surprised if
you find nudists here, but there are also
plenty of people who keep their suits on.
For just $6, beach-goers can enter the
Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park’s portion of
Sand Harbor and find parking, conces-
sions and arguably the most beautiful
beach in Lake Tahoe. If the water wasn’t so
cold, and if there were palms instead of
pines, you might believe you’re in the
Caribbean, the colors are so blue and the
sand so perfect. Sand Harbor also has a
boat ramp. Scuba diving and snorkelling
are both very popular here. It is also the
location of the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare
Festival.
Next up is Chimney Beach, a popu-
lar place for families — and groups of
teenagers. Named for the stark chimney
left on the beach from a former home, the
granite sand of this beach gives the water
a beautiful clarity. On high water years,
there are rocks to jump from — if you’re
careful! Either drive to the parking lot
which is on the mountain side of the high-
way and take the 10-minute hike to the
beach, or guide your boat up to the sandy,
boulder-dotted shoreline.
There’s a parking lot on the lakeside
just up from Chimney Beach, with a trail to
this beach as well. However, there is also
another trail to Secret Cove, aka Paradise
Cove, and a set of smaller beaches farther
on. If nude sunbathers make you uncom-
fortable, don’t take the trail. It’s become
well-publicized among the nude beach set
as the place to go in Lake Tahoe.
Another beach awaits, Skunk Harbor,
although this is as much as a hike as a
beach day. Park about 2.5 miles north of
the junction of Highway 50 and 28 at
Spooner Summit, along the road, but be
careful to be in a legal area. The hike
begins at the green metal gate and it is 1.5
miles down to the cove. There are some
boarded-up stone buildings at the bottom
which were used by George Whittell, who
once owned the entire East Shore and
whose main home is the Thunderbird
Lodge.
Although several of the beaches are
remote and difficult to reach, the East
Shore offers a freedom and a beauty that
is unlike other beaches in Tahoe.
— Tanya Canino
64 North Shore Almanac
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50 Things you need to know 65
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wning a home in Lake Tahoe is a privilege. The views
are unparalleled and the natural beauty is
indescribable. But keeping that beauty pris-
tine for current and future generations
requires care and planning. Here are some
tips for homeowners to keep their homes
environmentally friendly.
1. Install Best Management Practices
— BMPs help to control the runoff from
your property, and are required for all prop-
erties in the Tahoe Basin. Examples of BMPs
include trenches to infiltrate roof and drive-
way runoff, paving your driveway, and cover-
ing bare soil with plants and mulch. For a
free BMP site evaluation, and to find out
which BMPs will work for your property,
contact TRPA or your Conservation District.
(775) 588-4547.
2. Landscape with native and adapted plants
— Don’t disturb native vegetation any more than
you have to. Create landscaping dominated by native
or adapted plants. They require considerably less irri-
gation and fertilizer or pesticides than non-native
species.
3. Pave your driveway — Paving doesn’t always
create negative impact. Sediments from even the
most compacted dirt driveway wash into the nearest
storm drain, and then into Lake Tahoe during a rain-
fall or snowmelt. Paving your driveway reduces the
amount of dust in the air during the summer
months, another factor in the decline of Lake Tahoe
water quality.
4. Replace old woodstoves — Wood smoke
contributes to air quality problems at Lake Tahoe. If
you have an old woodstove, look into purchasing a
newer, EPA-certified stove or fireplace insert. These
typically use half the wood to generate the same
amount of heat as an old stove, so you’ll save money
and help the environment.
5. Protect wetlands — Many residential areas
have stream environment zones meandering through
them. While SEZs don’t necessarily incorporate a
stream or creek, they are highly fragile areas that are
extremely important in preserving water quality and
fish and wildlife habitat. SEZs are typically located in
low-lying areas with spongy soil and support decidu-
ous trees, such as aspens.
— Annie Flanzraich
66 North Shore Almanac 66 North Shore Almanac
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A local’s
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50 Things you need to know 67 50 Things you need to know 67
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TOPROVIDE SUPPORT,
RESOURCES ANDA FORUMFOR
DISCUSSIONANDPLANNINGTO
ASSISTTHE INCLINE VILLAGE SCHOOLS
INTHEIREFFORTS TOGIVE STUDENTS
A WORLD
-
CLASS EDUCATION.
An American Celebration
commemorating our country’s
greatness on the 4th of July,
honoring our veterans fostering
community unity and giving back
to those in need of assistance.
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Red,White & Tahoe Blue collaborators:
Our vision is to enrich
our community, secure its
future and promote excellence
through education.
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Golf fore Education collaborators:
ISAEF
INCLINE SCHOOLS
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE FOUNDATION
NORTHLAKE TAHOE LIONS CLUB
TAHOE-INCLINE ROTARY CLUB
ROTARY CLUB OF INCLINE
INCLINE OPTIMISTCLUB
ISAEF
INCLINE SCHOOLS
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE FOUNDATION
AAUW
THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
UNIVERSITY WOMEN--TAHOE/NEVADA BRANCH
PROJECTMANA
MAKING ADEQUATE NUTRITION ACCESSIBLE
LAKE TAHOE SCHOOL
For information, contact Allen Ferris
AFerris417@aol.com
f you’ve been around Incline Village for more than a
week, chances are you’ve heard the term “Defensible
Space.” For those who don’t know, it’s the practice of
making the space around your home as fire safe as pos-
sible, and it’s up to everyone living in the Lake Tahoe
Basin to make it happen. Often, creating defensible space
means clearing your yard of dead and rotting vegetation,
cutting low-hanging limbs on trees and using flame-resist-
ant material around your home.
For more help, or to have your home evaluated for defen-
sible space, call the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District.
They’ll come to your home and offer a free evaluation which will
let you know what to do to make your yard fire safe.
NLTFPD — (775) 831-4666.
— Kyle Magin
I
Defending homes with
defensible space
Defending homes with
defensible space
68 North Shore Almanac
ahoe’s majestic water is famed for its clarity and pristine
blue hue. But keeping it that way is the responsibility of
visitors and homeowners. To those visiting the lake, here
are a few tips for our environment:
1. Stay on designated trails — Erosion from dirt
roads and trails are serious water quality challenges. Tread
lightly and stay on designated trails to keep erosion at a
minimum. If untrimmed wilderness is more attractive,
keep it that way by using well-marked trails. Let the wild
reclaim the rest of the land.
2. Be responsible with your motor boat —
Carbureted two-stroke engines that power boats and
personal watercraft are banned from the lake to keep it
clear. Only direct fuel-injected two-stroke engines are
allowed. Four-stroke engines are encouraged. Respect and
observe the 600-foot no-wake zone around the shoreline
of Lake Tahoe and limit speeds to 5 miles per hour within
600 feet of the shoreline. Additionally, there is a very real
threat of quagga mussels infiltrating our lake — don’t let
them. Inspect your boat before launching it into Lake
Tahoe, and if your boat has been in waterways, such as
Lake Mead, infected by the invasive and damaging zebra
or quagga mussel, keep your boat out of Tahoe, please.
3. Pick up trash — Every cigarette butt or scrap of
paper eventually ends up in Lake Tahoe. And wildlife are
fond of finding snacks you’ve left behind. Pick up any trash
you see, even if it’s not your own!
4. Be a responsible pet owner — Educate yourself
on the trails and shoreline areas around Lake Tahoe that
are dog friendly. Always clean up after your pet and try to
keep them on the trails in order to minimize their impact
on soil and native plants.
—Annie Flanzraich
Avisitor’s
environmental responsibility
Avisitor’s
environmental responsibility
T
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s
our trash will stick around for years.
Here on the East Shore, pop tops of
aluminum beer and soda cans appear
in the sand. How many years has it
been since pop tops were used?
That’s how long ago someone threw
this trash onto beach.
P
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`50 Things you need to know 69
70 North Shore Almanac 70 North Shore Almanac
INCLINE VILLAGE
CRYSTAL
BAY
Incline Village
General Improvement
District Facilities
50 Things you need to know 71 50 Things you need to know 71
B E S T P L A C E T O T A K E A D A T E 1 5 Y E A R S I N A R O W !
DINING NIGHTLY FROM 6PM • RESERVATIONS ARE REQUESTED • 530-546-7529 • 775-833-0399
Enjoy relaxed,
gourmet dining
in our elegant log cabin...
Steaks • Seafood • Vegetarian • Creative Nightly Additions
Additions to our menu: Lobster Wontons, Southwest Crab Cakes, Ahi Sashimi, Warm Spinach Shrimp Salad and Fresh Fish
1/2 block up Stateline Road, next to the Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay
Dining Guide
Soule Domain has been voted the "Best Place To Take A Date"
15 years in a row and for good reason.The quaint cabin setting with
cozy fireside tables invites a champagne toast while anticipating a deli-
cious European repast. It is a great place to fall in love, or celebrate
being in love.
The Lone Eagle Grille at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe offers
a different kind of romance. An unparalleled lakeview invites you to
linger in the deep leather chairs of the lounge while your table is being
prepared. The exquisite menu offers a sumptuous array of seafood,
chicken and steaks as well as desserts that your taste buds will beg for.
Check out the Lone Eagle for weekly cocktail specials.
Bite came on the Incline Village dining scene in the late winter
with eclectic offerings ranging from ahi sliders to macaroni and cheese in
a small plate, tapas presentation.The bar has a great urban vibe with
weekly music offerings and some of the Village's very best martinis - we
highly recommend the pomegranate. Don't forget to order a round of
desserts. You will be glad that you did!
Crosby's is a local favorite for its chicken wings, voted Best on the
Lake by the Bonanza staff, tacos and cold brews. Sports fans will rejoice
with multiple screens for watching your favorite team. Enjoy the perfect
Village days by dining on the back patio from spring through fall.
Longing for apple pie just like mom used to make? Check out
Austin's on Country Club Drive.Their traditional menu is perfect for
apres ski or a family night out. Be certain to check out the chili; and top-
ping off dinner with their signature apple pie is a must.
Thai Recipe's owner is a published cookbook author as well as
one of our favorite locals. When your taste buds are calling for some-
thing unusual,Thai Recipe is the perfect choice with its gourmet entrées
in a warm, welcoming setting.
Hungry? Incline Village and Crystal Bay have the right place to satisfy your appetite
from elegant lakeside dining to trendy tapas to good old-fashioned home cooking.
72 North Shore Almanac
for
happy hour
&
“late nite”
happier
hour
happy hour
happier
hour
907 Tahoe Blvd.
Incline Village NV
775.831.1000
bitetahoe.com
LI VE
D
Js
High
Definition
Television
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We intend to provide an approachable meal for any
diner, while satisfying the most discriminating palate.
Your meal is delivered on small plates, in appropriate
portions for one to enjoy, or many to sample.
The wine list includes diverse varietals reasonably
priced with the emphasis on pairing with food.
JOIN Us
INCLINE VILLAGE
Austin’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-7778
American Favorites and Signature Salads
Azzara’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-0346
Italian Classics and New Favorites
Bar Bar Bar Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-2700
U-Bake and Baked Pizzas
Big Water Grille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-0606
Fresh Seasonal American Dining
Bite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-1000
Tapas, Great Bar and Music
Black Bear Coffee Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-7437
Sri Lankan Food, Pastries and More
China Village . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-9090
Chinese
China Wok . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-3663
Chinese, Seafood,Vegetarian,Thai
Ciao Mein Trattoria (HYATT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-886-6675
Pacific Rim and Italian
Crosby’s Grill, Pub and Casino . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-1030
A Local Favorite for Food and Fun
Cutthroat Saloon (HYATT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-1234
Casual American – Great Happy Hours
Domino’s Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-5557
Pizza, Wings, Salads and More
Grog & Grist Market and Deli . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-1123
Breakfast, Deli Sandwiches
Hacienda de la Sierra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-8300
Great Mexican, Margaritas and Fun
La Esmeralda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-3551
Authentic Mexican Cuisine
La Fondue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-6104
Traditional Fondues
Le Bistro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-0800
Elegant French Cuisine
Lone Eagle Grille (HYATT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-886-6899
Elegant Continental Lakeside Dining
Los Mariachis Tacqueria & Market . . . . . . . . . .775-833-4546
Mexican
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Open Daily • Lounge 4:30pm
Dining Room 5:30pm
341 Ski Way • Incline Village
775.833.0606
www.bigwatergrille.com
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People’s Choice Gold Medal Winner at the 2005 Autumn Food & Wine Festival
Wine Cellar Private dining room for up to 16 people
341 Ski Way • Incline Village
775.833.0606
www.bigwatergrille.com
• Spectacular Lake Tahoe
Views and Sunsets.
• Cozy bar and deck.
• Award winning cuisine.
• Extensive wine list.
• Professional service
Open Daily • Lounge 4:30pm
BAR BAR BAR
PIZZA
U-BAKE OR BAKED ~ PHONE ORDERS ~ 831-2700
Village Shopping Center ~ Across from the Post Office
In-House ~ Take Out ~ Full Bar ~ Poker Machine
Your Local Pizza Since 1988
50 Things you need to know 73
G R I L L • P U B • C A S I N O
• Where the Locals Eat & Play
• Outdoor Creekside Seating
• Full Lunch & Dinner Menu
(featuring our Ribeye Steak & Baby Back ribs)
• Breakfast served Sat. & Sun.
(Starts July 1 all day from 9:00 am on)
• Happy Hour 7 days 3-6pm
Best of Tahoe
in5 Catagories
including:
• Best Drinks from
Margarita to Martini
Featuring:
25¢/$1.00
Multi-Play Machines
• Newly Remodeled w/11 TVs
(Including 42”Flat Screen)
• To Go Orders • Parties Welcome
• Catering • Food & Beverage Concierge
775-833-1030
Christmas Tree Village • 868 Tahoe Blvd.
Incline Village • www.crosbyspub.com
Best of Tahoe
in 5 Categories
including:
• BEST DRINKS
From margarita
to martini
• BEST CORNER BAR
• BEST BARTENDER
Shari Moorhouse
• BEST LUNCH
• BEST SLOTS
Marquez Mexican Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-0102
Authentic Mexican Cuisine with Flair
Mofo’s Pizza & Pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-4999
Pizza and Pasta
Rookie’s Sports Bar & Grille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-9008
Sports Bar, Great Food – 24/7
Sierra Café (HYATT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-1234
Casual American
Subway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-3370
Submarine Sandwiches
T’ Mesquite Rotisserie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-2832
Meat and Vegetarian Mexican Rotisserie
Thai Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-4777
Authentic Thai
Tomaato’s Pizza and Pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-2200
High Quality Pizza, Pasta and Salads
Village Pub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-7212
Great Burgers, Great Food, Great Fun
Wild Alaskan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-6777
Seafood, Steaks and Salads
Wildflower Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-8072
Best Breakfast, Great Lunch
Yoshimi Sushi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-831-2777
Sushi and More
CRYSTAL BAY
Café Biltmore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-6708
Diner – Good Food Served Anytime
Conrad’s Grill & BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-833-6748
All American Grill and BBQ
Crystal Bay Steak & Lobster House . . . . . . . .775-833-6333
Fine Cuisine in a Romantic Setting
Izzy’s Burger Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530-544-5030
Hearty Burgers Any Way You Want
Lakeview Dining Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .775-832-4000
California Style Cuisine – Lake View
The Soule Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530-546-7529
Fresh Gourmet Cuisine
Lunch
M-F 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Dinner
7 days 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(775) 832-7778
Country Club Center
www.austinstahoe.com
Serving fresh american
favorites in a cozy log
cabin atmosphere. Lunch &
dinner choices include super salad
bowls, grilled steaks & burgers, our
famous chicken fried chicken, fresh
fish and vegetarian entrees.
Homemade desserts & and a full bar.
Reservations accepted & takeout
available.
Located across from the Hyatt
Pies!
Hom
em
ade
4
74 North Shore Almanac 74 North Shore Almanac
Bea Epstein, chair
Q. How would you rate
yourself as a golfer —
and be honest!
A. On a scale of one to 10,
a negative five.
Q.What is your
favorite flavor of ice
cream?
A. Chocolate almond.
Q.What is your
favorite movie of all
time, and why?
A. A little-known movie
called Good Morning Miss
Dove, starring Jennifer Jones. It
left a lasting memory about the impact a teacher has on a student.
Q. How would you rate yourself as a skier — again, hon-
est please.
A. For someone who has trouble just negotiating snow, skiing is
out of the question.
Q. And, the always popular, what is the most embarrass-
ing moment of your life, one you’re willing to let other
people know?
A. After a long staff conference about school policy changes with a
new principal, and staff having given its recommendations, I came in
the following morning and asked what the principal’s decision had
been. No sooner did she respond than I immediately asked,
“Whose dumb idea was that?”
“Mine,” she replied.
Color me ashamed, but forgiven.
John Bohn,
trustee
No comment.
Gene Brockman, vice-chair
Q. How would you rate yourself as a golfer — and be
honest!
A. I’m an avid 25+ handi-
capper who can hit it a full
175 yards off the tee
(sometimes). I used to be
better.
Q.What is your
favorite flavor of ice
cream?
A. Without a doubt it’s
Baskin-Robbins peanut but-
ter chocolate.
Q.What is your
favorite movie of all
time, and why?
A. Singin’ in the Rain with Gene Kelly. That was real entertainment
that left one with a good feeling.
Q. How would you rate yourself as a skier — again, hon-
est please.
A. I’m a slow cruiser who only hits the slope when there is good
snow, it’s sunny and no wind.
Q. And, the always popular, what is the most embarrass-
ing moment of your life, one you’re willing to let other
people know?
A. I still get a chuckle when I think about this. Although
we’re not Jewish, Colleen and I were attending a Bar Mitzvah for
the son of a good friend in Cincinnati. In the book rack of the
pew we were sitting in was a book with the ritual in it. I had
studied German several years in high school and college and the
words looked familiar so I was following along the ritual
(I thought). Suddenly a little old man sitting behind me reached
over my shoulder and took the book out of my hands and turned
it upside down. He then pointed to where the ritual was being
followed. Just about cracked up the people sitting around me
and almost interrupted what was happening at the altar. I shrunk
to about six inches tall.
What you DIDN’t know
Five citizens comprise the Incline Village General Improvement District Board of Trustees,
the lone governing body serving Incline Village and Crystal Bay. Bea Epstein, Gene
Brockman, Chuck Weinberger, Bob Wolf and John Bohn spend countless hours discussing
4
Chuck Weinberger,treasurer
Q. How would you rate
yourself as a golfer —
and be honest!
A. My handicap is 8.9. But
that number doesn’t tell the
entire story. Because I only
play golf during our sum-
mer months, my ability
swings dramatically, from
mediocre in May, to solid in
July. And then, just when I
think that I finally have the
game figured out, I am usu-
ally back to being mediocre
again by the time that
October comes around.
Q.What is your favorite flavor of ice cream?
A. Mint chocolate chip. Unfortunately, it’s my 6-year-old son’s favorite
flavor as well. So, I’m lucky to get a few bites out of each bowl.
Q.What is your favorite movie of all time, and why?
A. Fargo. And at a close second is every other film by the Coen
brothers. I love their ability to weave humor with humanity. Their
Best Film Oscar for No County For Old Men was very well deserved.
Q. How would you rate yourself as a skier — again, hon-
est please.
A. It depends who you ask. If you talk to my friends from child-
hood back in Texas they would say that I was an expert skier. If
you talk to my friends who grew up around Lake Tahoe they
would probably describe me as being advanced intermediate.
Q. And, the always popular, what is the most embarrass-
ing moment of your life, one you’re willing to let other
people know?
A. Back in 1985 my high school had a student performance night. I
was scheduled to appear in both a two-person play and as a soloist
trumpet player in the school’s band. I was very nervous about the
play, but my performance went off without a hitch. The crowd was
still applauding as I ran over to take my place with the band. I can’t
remember much after that, but at some point I noticed that the
band had started to play. My next thought was that the band had
finished its song because the music had stopped. Then, with horror, I
realized that the auditorium was completely silent: I was supposed
to be playing my solo. I didn’t know what to do, so I played a hand-
ful of pathetic notes and then looked up at the band director with
pleading eyes. He took pity on me and started the band up again.
To this day I have never played the trumpet again.
Bob Wolf, secretary
Q. How would you rate
yourself as a golfer —
and be honest!
A. I rate myself a zero since I
have never played a full
round in my life. I have gone
to the driving range a couple
of times and played “best
ball” in a demo setting but
they don’t improve the zero.
Q.What is your favorite
flavor of ice cream?
A. Butter Pecan.
Q.What is your favorite
movie of all time, and why?
A. Citizen Kane. I’ve seen it half a dozen times and still enjoy it. It
has a great story and acting.
Q. How would you rate yourself as a skier — again, hon-
est please.
A. Intermediate. I’ve only snowboarded since 1995 and have not
been out in a couple of years due to arthritis problems.
Q. And, the always popular, what is the most embarrass-
ing moment of your life, one you’re willing to let other
people know?
A. I don’t linger on embarrassing moments very long. A couple of
weeks ago after returning from vacation, I arrived at an IVGID
meeting at 4 p.m. Unfortunately, it had started at 10:30 in the
morning. I did participate for an hour and made some contribu-
tions. The 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. alternating meeting schedule can be
confusing, especially when you’ve been away and we have a lot of
extra workshops.
50 Things you need to know 75 50 Things you need to know 75
about your trustees
budgets, public works, beach access and many other IVGID-related items. But they’re not
“all business” all the time — and they even have some fun stories to share.The Bonanza
asked the trustees a few fun questions, and some of their responses were quite humorous.
— Kevin MacMillan
45
e is 115-pounds of purebred German shepherd,
and the Mt. Rose Ski Area is his domain.Tonka is an
avalanche dog at the ski area, owned by ski patroller
John Talbot. Tonka began living with Talbot when he
was seven weeks old, growing up as a ski area dog.
His fifth birthday was March 25, and the 2007-08
season was his fifth season at Mt. Rose Ski Area. He
is even sponsored, by PetSmart and Veterinary
Specialists of Nevada! Tonka and his owner respond
to backcountry searches. Tonka offers you five tips
for skiing/riding safely in the backcountry:
1. From one pack-animal to another, never ride the
backcountry alone.
2. Tell others where you’ll be and when you plan
to be back. I can only search for you if I know
where and when to start.
3. In avalanche terrain, each humanoid should
carry an avy beacon, a probe and a shovel, but
use your well-developed brain to avoid danger
in the first place.
4. When traversing slide-prone terrain, ride one at
a time, from one safe spot to the next using all
your senses.
5. Sniff out a weather and avalanche forecast
(www.sierraavalanchecenter.org/) and take your
cell phone.
Tonka attended a backcountry avalanche training
this winter with the North Lake Tahoe Fire
Protection District, and the Bonanza caught Tonka
on film. Check out “More Multimedia” on the
Web site, www.tahoebonanza.com, and look for
“Avalanche Training.”
— Tanya Canino
Tonka’s Tips
H
Paws & Reflect:
76 North Shore Almanac
50 Things you need to know 77
• Incline’s median family income is $79,079.
• The average household size is 2.36, with the average
family size being 2.76.
• The median age of Incline is 42 years.
• For every 100 females, there are 109.5 males.
• The median price for a single-family residence in 2006
was $1.15 million and for a condo it was $584,000.
- Compiled from 2000 U.S. Census Bureau statistics.
— Kevin MacMillan
Who are we?
Here are five quick demographic statistics
about Incline Village and Crystal Bay.
78 North Shore Almanac 78 North Shore Almanac
Call Scott Tieche Direct (775) 742-1945
“Take advantage of my experience
when buying or selling Tahoe
Real Estate
“Take advantage of my experience
when buying or selling Tahoe
Real Estate”
Unique Historical
Perspective...
• 27+ Year Tahoe
Resident
• 14+ Year Realtor
(full time)
• NV & CA
Broker
• No Detail
is Too Small
Unique Historical
Perspective...
• 27+ Year Tahoe
Resident
• 14+ Year Realtor
(full time)
• NV & CA
Broker
• No Detail
is Too Small
PHONE (775) 831-0625 • (530) 546-7625 • 201 Stateline Road • Box 4
Crystal Bay, NV 89402 • www.annnichols.com
ANN NICHOLS AND COMPANY
REALTORS SERVING NEVADA AND CALIFORNIA AT LAKE TAHOE
SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 33 YEARS
910 Tahoe Blvd, Raleys Incline Center
775-831-2020
Hardware • Paint
Tools • Electrical • Plumbing
Lawn & Garden
Village Hardware
F F
or most people, there’s a diehard athlete somewhere inside.The problem for a
lot of people, though, is that the athlete is inside an out-of-shape body, without the
greatest amount of motivation. Luckily, the Incline Village Recreation Center has the
answer. The Rec Center offers the chance for these people to relive their young
adult days by offering community sports leagues in soccer, basketball, volleyball
and basketball.
Laid-back leagues take place throughout the year, with softball running
in the summer, basketball in the spring and basketball and volleyball in
the fall and winter.
But what’s a sports league without a little rivalry? It might not be
Michigan vs. Ohio State or Yankees/Red Sox, but some of the local
businesses in Incline are pretty into it when it comes to winning a
Rec League title, said Recreation Center Sports Coordinator
Indra Winquest.
Like G and E Painting and Crosby’s Pub. It seems these
two business are battling for an indoor soccer title
every fall, Winquest said. Or how about Rookies and
47
The Potlatch? They always have a
big softball rivalry. And when it
comes to women’s volleyball,
Winquest said Rookies and
Garwoods are big rivals and have
played in the league title game the
past four seasons. And of course,
it’s usually the North Lake Tahoe
Bonanza vs. everyone, when it
comes to heated rivalries, Winquest
said. Of course, anyone familiar with
the 2007 softball season will know
who got the short end of that stick ...
— Kevin MacMillan
BATTER UP!
Sports rivalaries keep
Incline amateur athletics interesting
BATTER UP!
Sports rivalaries keep
Incline amateur athletics interesting
48
50 Things you need to know 79 50 Things you need to know 79
heard at the CAB meeting that the TRPA
might change its BMP policy regarding
SEZs.”
What?
Tahoe jargon is as bad as legalese, and
has been likened to swimming in a bowl of
alphabet soup. For any recent transplants to
Tahoe, or a visitor trying to discern the local
lingo, a dictionary explaining Tahoe terms is a
necessary component of living in Tahoe.
BMP - Best Management Practices.
All property owners in the Tahoe Basin are
required to install “BMPs,” which are land-
scaping efforts designed to keep water from
running off your property and into Lake
Tahoe. BMPs are required by the TRPA.
CAB - Citizens Advisory Board.
This is a board of volunteer citizens who
meet monthly to advise the Washoe
County Commission on various issues.
Appointed by the county commission, the
board is made up of seven members. Our
local board is called the Incline Village/
Crystal Bay Citizens Advisory Board.
CEP - Community Enhancement
Project.
This is a program by the TRPA to encour-
age revitalization projects in downtown and
recreation areas that demonstrate substan-
tial environmental, as well as social and eco-
nomic benefits. A local CEP project is the
Boulder Bay development of the Tahoe
Biltmore redevelopment.
EIP - Environmental Improvement
Program.
According to the TRPA,, the Environmental
Improvement Program was envisioned dur-
ing the 1997 Presidential Summit at Lake
Tahoe.Then-President Bill Clinton and others
convened here to focus efforts on protecting
the lake for future generations.The resulting
program encompasses hundreds of capital
improvement, research, program support, and
operation and maintenance projects in the
Tahoe Basin, all designed to help restore Lake
Tahoe’s clarity and environment.
EIS - Environmental Impact
Statement.
If you are going to do a major project
around here, odds are you’ll have to file an
Environmental Impact Statement, which out-
lines the project’s potential impact on the
environment, before you’ll get an approval
to go ahead.
IVGID - Incline Village General
Improvement District.
This is the closest entity to a local govern-
ment we have.This district is chartered to
provide water, sewer, trash and recreation
for the communities of Incline Village and
Crystal Bay. It is governed by a five-member,
elected board of trustees.
NDOT - Nevada Department of
Transportation.
This one is the acronym for the state of
Nevada’s highway department — the ones
who remove the snow and keep the high-
ways maintained.
NLTFPD - North Lake Tahoe Fire
Protection District.
This is our local fire department for the
communities of Incline Village and Crystal
Bay. Keep the acronmyn intact: if you drop
the “L,” you have the fire department for
the California side of the North Shore.
NHP - Nevada Highway Patrol.
The law enforcement arm for our highways.
SNC - Sierra Nevada College.
The only four-year, private college in the
state of Nevada is located in Incline Village.
SEZ - Stream Environment Zone.
Wherever land is found to be influenced by
a stream or high groundwater, it is deemed
the most environmentally sensitive land in
Tahoe. Don’t try to build a house in an SEZ!
TRPA - Tahoe Regional Planning
Agency.
The bistate regulatory agency was created
in 1969 to preserve and protect the envi-
ronmental beauty of Lake Tahoe. Its com-
pact was revised in 1980 and, after contro-
versy and lawsuits, a regional plan was
adopted in 1987.The TRPA’s policies are the
reason for so many other acronyms abound
in Tahoe.
USFS - United States Forest Service.
Within the Tahoe Basin, you might find
another USFS acronym, the LTBMU, the
Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. It is just
the Forest Service for the Tahoe Basin.
WCSO - Washoe County Sheriff’s
Office.
This is our local law enforcement agency,
which covers all of Washoe County.The
WCSO has a substation in Incline Village,
which services North Shore communities.
— Tanya Canino
Tahoe Jargon
- hard to figure
i “
he first three crucial attributes of a good stargaz-
ing site are dark skies, dark skies, and skies that
are very, very dark, according to the Web
site, Stardate online at www.stardate.org.
“Light pollution is the single most
destructive foe to a dedicated stargaz-
er, overwhelming the delicate glow of
nebulae, clusters,and even the fiery
glow of the dense star clouds that
make up the Milky Way. For this rea-
son alone, the best stargazing oppor-
tunities are almost always to be found
in remote rural areas, far from the
lights of cities and towns,” the Web site
says, adding that another element that
helps stargazing is altitude.
Incline Village’s rural site, dark skies and
high altitude create a great area for stargazing,
and UC Davis and Space Science for Schools scien-
tists and volunteers are offering the community several Star
Parties throughout the summer.They are held at 7:30 p.m. on the
beach at Sand Harbor (follow the signs to the east side of the
south beach).These events are scheduled with the best viewing of
specific objects in the night sky in mind.
Dr. Paul Guttman of Space Science for
Schools plans each evenings’ agenda and
helps visitors find the celestial objects
through 10” reflector telescopes. Bring
your own picnic and dress warm in
case you decide to stay late into the
night with the die-hard stargazers.
Call (775) 881-7560 for infor-
mation.
The following are 2008 Star Party
dates:
June 7:Views of Saturn and Spring
Celestial Objects
June 28: Views of Saturn and Spring
Celestial Objects
Aug. 2:Views of Jupiter and Summer
Celestial Objects.
Sept. 5:Views of Jupiter, the Crescent Moon and
Summer Celestial Objects
Sept. 27:Views of Jupiter and Early Autumn Celestial Objects
—Tanya Canino
Star Photo taken by Dr. Paul Guttman
Twinkle, twinkle
little star
Mark June 1, 2011 on your calendar. That’s
the year Incline Village will officially turn 50 years old.
In 1961, Washoe County and the State of Nevada authorized the
Incline Village General Improvement District to levy taxes and make improve-
ments to the small mountain and resort town. Though people have lived in
Incline since the late 1880s, the population wasn’t steady until the 1930s and has been
growing steadily since the 1960s. So get ready for 2011, Incline will party like it’s 1961.
— Kyle Magin
80 North Shore Almanac
49
T
50
When Incline turns
A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#
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A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#A#
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week of
January 25 thru
January 31, 2008
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see page 10 for details
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50 Things you need to know 81
82 North Shore Almanac 82 North Shore Almanac
APRIL
4-5 Star Follies
6 and 8 p.m. Cal-Neva Lodge
Community members come together to
perform lip-sync song and dance routines
with all proceeds going to the Incline Village
schools. Tickets available at The Potlatch.
(775) 831-7469; www.inclinestarfollies.org.
5 8th Annual Dummy Downhill
9 a.m. Diamond Peak Ski Area
Create a dummy and send it off a big jump
on the Showoff run! Awards are given for
longest jump, best crash, and more!
(775) 832-1177
5 How To Read a Nautical Chart
8 a.m. Incline Village Community Hospital
Are you going to be chartering a boat in
strange waters this year? Do you have
paper or electronic charts but don't know
how to read them? The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Flotilla 11-01 offers this class.
(775) 831-2352; jay.schmidt@yahoo.com.
7 Where We Live School Program
2:15 p.m. Incline Elementary K-2 School
Second grade program; (775) 832-4240
7-8 Spring Concert
7:30 p.m. St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church
Sierra Nevada College Concert choir pres-
ents “Sing a Song of Seasons.”Tickets avail-
able at Potlatch, from choir members or at
the door for $15; $10 for students.
9 Powerful Sounds of Taiko Drums
4 p.m. Incline Village Library
Tsurunoka performs the ancient art of
Japanese Taiko drumming. The audience will
be invited to participate in drumming and
dancing.
9 IHS Spring Zone Concert
5:30 p.m. Incline High School gym
The concert will feature 5th through12th
grade music students: bands, choirs, orchestras.
10 Environmental Education
Symposium
9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tahoe Center for Environmental
Sciences, Sierra Nevada College campus
The symposium will be focusing on the
issues of: water quality, defensible space, cli-
mate change in the Sierras, BMPs, bear
awareness and invasive weeds.
10 Lola Haskins Poetry Reading
7 p.m Tahoe Center for EnvironmentalSciences,
Sierra Nevada College campus
A kick-off to April Poetry Month.
11 Poetry Slam
7 p.m. Sierra Nevada College's Patterson Hall
Local poets will stand and deliver for a
chance to take home the title of Tahoe
Slam Poet of the Year. Contact Professor
June Saraceno, jsaraceno@sierranevada.edu.
12 Reel Talk - The Graduate
2 to 5 p.m. Incline Village Library
View the film “The Graduate” followed by a
discussion group. Adults.
12-19 Wilderness First Responder
A 7-day Wilderness First Responder course
for outdoor explorers, enthusiasts, search
and rescue members, or anyone who
enjoys the outdoors. cwhite@laketa-
hoeschool.org, (775) 831-5828 ext. 304.
15 Fiddle Music and Poetry
8 p.m. Sierra Nevada College Patterson Hall
Ken Waldman will be fiddling around, as
well as reading his poetry.
23 Kids for Conservation Festival
3 to 6 p.m. Incline Village Recreation Center
Celebrate Earth Day by attending a fun-
filled afternoon of free, earth friendly, edu-
cational activities for children ages 3 to10.
(775) 832-1284, wastenot@ivgid.org.
24 Distinguished Speaker Series
7 to 9 p.m. Tahoe Center for Environmental
Sciences, Sierra Nevada College campus
Richard Markin, president and CEO of
Heritage Provider Network.
dnoonan@sierranevada.edu.
• Spring Clean Up
• Landscaping Maintenance
• Irrigation Maintenance
• Clean Rain Gutters
• Hauling 775-831-7749
775-831-7749
• Spring Clean Up
• Landscaping Maintenance
• Irrigation Maintenance
• Clean Rain Gutters
• Hauling
Ponderosa Property Maintenance, LLC
We are insured, bonded, licensed
and ready to work for YOU!
Ponderosa Property Maintenance, LLC
We are insured, bonded, licensed
and ready to work for YOU!
• Sizes: 5x5 thru 10x50
• 24-hour Access - Security Gate
• Household & Commercial Storage
• Boxes, Moving Supplies
• Freight Elevator to Upper Levels
• RV, Boat & Snowmobile Storage
1060 Tahoe Blvd.
Incline Vlg., NV 89452
Local & Long Distance
Truck Rental
“CALL THE SELF STORAGE
PROFESSIONALS”
(775)
831-3322
50 Things you need to know 83 50 Things you need to know 83
Dr. Jonathan Smith
780 Northwood Blvd.
Incline Village, NV ( 775) 831- 4131
“You Deserve the Finest in
Eye Care & Eye Wear”
STATE OF THE ART COMPUTER
ASSISTED EYE EXAMS
• Comprehensive Ocular Health Assessment
• Extensive Inventory of Disposable, Tinted
and Gas Permeable Contact Lenses
• Evaluation for Laser Refractive
Surgery
EMERGENCY FRAME REPAIR &
CONTACT LENS REPLACEMENT
• Extensive Frame Collection
Limited Edition - Private Collection
Affordable frames
• Board Certified in the Treatment and
Management of Ocular Disease
PET NETWORK
ANIMAL FRIENDS
Saving the lives of homeless animals
RESCUE•ADOPTION•EDUCATION
Humane Education, Spay/Neuter Assistance,
Emergency Boarding, Volunteer Programs
401 Village Blvd., Incline Village
775 832 4404
Visit us online at
www.petnetwork.org
Shelter Hours: 7 days a week, 11 am - 5 pm
Boarding: 7 days a week, 7:30 am - 5:00 pm
MAY
3 Bear League Response Team
Training
Noon to 5 p.m. at the Donald W. Reynolds
Community Non-Profit Center
The Bear League is having a training session
for volunteers who wish to join their Bear
Response Team for the North Shore.
(530) 525-PAWS, info@savebears.
3 Barbecue for CYMBAL
All day Incline Middle School baseball fields
Cymbal will be raising money for the sym-
phonic band, jazz band and choir trips to
compete May 17 in Santa Cruz.
3-4 Wilderness First Aid Course
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Donald W. Reynolds
Community Non-Profit Center
The Tahoe Rim Trail Association is hosting
Wilderness First Aid Course with the
National Outdoor Leadership School and
Wilderness Medicine Institute. Cost is $150
for textbooks, equipment and certification.
(775) 298-0012, info@tahoerimtrail.org.
10 Snapshot Day
9 a.m. to noon
Volunteers will take a "snapshot" of the
condition of Tahoe and Truckee watersheds.
(775) 832-1284 or rms@ivgid.org.
14 Spring Concert
7:30 p.m. Sierra Nevada College Patterson
Hall
Sierra Nevada College Choir features a
Broadway Concert. Tickets are $10 for
adults and $5 for children.
17 Graduation at SNC
10 a.m. Sierra Nevada College lawn
Commencement, with a reception to follow
from 12:30 to 3 pm.
15-18 Hike, Bike & Walk Conference
MontBleu Casino, in Stateline, Nev.
Alternative transportation, from bicycles
and hiking to trails, will be the topic of two
conferences in the Tahoe area. (775) 888-
7433, www.bicyclenevada.com
16-18 Trail Building and Crew
Leader Training
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Galena Creek Park
Provides the knowledge to help build and
maintain Tahoe-area pedestrian and motor-
ized trails. $65 fee includes instruction, park
lodging, food, training materials and trans-
portation, www.tahoerimtrail.org.
24 CYMBAL Rummage Sale
Incline Middle School multipurpose room.
Annual CYMBAL rummage sale is a
fundraiser for Incline school music program.
28 Spring Concert
5:30 p.m. Incline High School theater
Senior Farewell and Awards Concert.
JUNE
2-6 Meet the Artist - Sierra Nevada
College Summer Arts Program
Linda Arbuckle presents Color and
Personality on Pottery Surfaces with
Majolica.
7-8 Meet the Artist - Sierra Nevada
College Summer Arts Program
Mattie Leeds presents Large Thrown Forms;
Rachel Salvagione and Carole Hutchison
present Silver Jewelry: Silver Clay.
7 Fur Ball
Hyatt Lake Tahoe Resort, Casino and Spa
The annual fundraising event for the Pet
Network with entertainment, live auction,
silent auction and raffles.
7 Star Party
7:30 p.m. Sand Harbor State Park
Free telescope viewings with Space Science
for Schools and the UC Davis astronomers.
7 X-Treme Clean
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Incline Middle School
Clean-up, carnival and food hosted by the
Incline Village After School Organization and
IVGID. (775) 745-6484.
”LIVE AT THE LAKE,
CALL JANE AND NATE!”
Nathan Jones & Jane Barnhart
775-223-1177 or 858-349-8789
jbarnhart@cbivr.com INCLINE VILLAGE REALTY, INC.
Jane and Nate’s roots of hard work,
discipline and honesty come from being
raised in the Midwest. Moving west, Jane
worked at UCSD Med Center and man-
aged her own rental properties. Nathan,
who has a graduate degree from M.I.T
Business School, as well as a degree
in Mechanical Engineering, is also a
California licensed lawyer.
Jane and Nathan are sales agents with
Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty.
Nathan is also a Licensed Business Broker
with extensive experience in distressed
property investing and development.
WE WILL WORK HARD FOR YOU!
Check out our new community web-site at
www.InclineVillageLive.com.
7 Annual Classy Garage Sale
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Incline Village Community
Hospital parking lot
Presented by North Lake Tahoe
Community Health Care Auxiliary.
8 Tee-off 4 Toddlers Golf Tournament
Noon Mountain Course
Golf tournament, silent auction and raffle to
support the Tahoe Children's Foundation.
The cost is $125.00 per person, $500 for a
foursome. www.tcfkids.com
9-13 Meet the Artist - Sierra Nevada
College Summer Arts Program
Sam Chung presents a ceramics workshop
on teapots. Carole and William Hutchison
present Beginning Fusing and Slumping and
Sarah Whorf will have a printmaking work-
shop on suicide color printing.
11 Senior Scholarship Awards Night
5:30 p.m. Incline High School
12 Incline High School Graduation
4 p.m. Incline High School
16-20 Meet the Artists - Sierra
Nevada College Summer Arts
Xavier Gonzalez presents Crystalline
Glazes. Carole and William Hutchison pres-
ent Advanced Fusing and Slumping and
Jerry Dodrill will hold a digital photography
workshop.
21-23 GOLF Fore Education
This annual fundraiser will have an auction
on June 21, golf at Championship course on
June 22 and a special golf event at
Montreux Golf Course on June 23.
23-27 Meet the Artist - Sierra
Nevada College Summer Arts
Randy Brodnax and Don Ellis present Fast
Fire Pottree and Emily Silver will have a
photography workshop.
28 Star Party
7:30 p.m. Sand Harbor State Park
Free telescope viewings with Space Science
for Schools and the UC Davis astronomers.
JULY
2-4 Red,White & Tahoe Blue
A 3-day community celebration of the
Fourth of July with events & entertainment.
7-11 Meet the Artist - Sierra Nevada
College Summer Arts Program
Vince Pitelka will hold a ceramics workshop
on handbuilding tricks of the trade. Tim
Guthrie will hold a digital art workshop on
web page design.
July 10 - Aug. 17 LakeTahoe
Shakespeare Festival
“Richard III,” “A Midsummer Night's
Dream,” and a musical “CAMBIO,” based on
Victor Hugo's novel “The Hunchback of
Notre Dame.” Tickets range from $22-$67.
www.LakeTahoeShakespeare.com, 888-32-
SHOWS. For information, (800) 74-shows.
10 Lobster Dinner
6 p.m. The Chateau
North Lake Tahoe Community Health Care
Auxiliary dinner, (775) 833-3668.
11-13 Astro Star Explorer Camp
Clair Tappaan Lodge, Donner Summit
This camp provides a unique learning expe-
rience for the entire family.
pguttman@ss4s.org , (775) 720-6999.
13 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
An Ariel Ensemble featuring a string quartet
plus oboe. (775) 831-2298.
14-18 Meet the Artist - Sierra
Nevada Summer Arts Program
Bobby Scroggins presents Hollow Core
Ceramic Constructions.
19-20 Meet the Artist - Sierra
Nevada Summer Arts Program
Arthur Gonzalez presents “The portrait”
and the “Asymmetic Emotion.”
20 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
Sonos Handbell Ensemble with James
Meridith, conductor. (775) 831-2298.
21-25 Meet the Artist - Sierra
Nevada Summer Arts Program
Randy Johnston presents Personal
Vocabulary in Form and Function and
Gregory Kondos presents Contemporary
Landscape.
27 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
“A Trio of Lenz” with Ruth Lenz on violin,
Peter Lenz on cello and Andrea Lenz on
piano. (775) 831-2298.
July 28 - Aug. 1 Meet the Artist -
Sierra Nevada College Summer Arts
Bill van Guilder presents Lidded Pots - the
techniques of form and function. Susan Chin
presents Approaching the Brooch.
84 North Shore Almanac
50 Things you need to know 85
AUGUST
1-3 Astro Star Explorer Camp
Clair Tappaan Lodge, Donner Summit
This camp provides a unique learning expe-
rience for the entire family.
pguttman@ss4s.org. (775) 720-6999.
2 Star Party
7:30 p.m. Sand Harbor State Park
Free telescope viewings with Space Science
for Schools and the UC Davis astronomers.
3 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
Stern and Nagano featuring Kay Stern on
violin and Joan Nagano on piano. (775)
831-2298.
7-13 Lake Tahoe Concours
d’Elegance Wood Boat Show
This is the 35th anniversary of the event
hosted by the Tahoe Yacht Club. Tickets go
on sale after Memorial Day. Events are listed
on line at www.tahoeyc.com.
9 Family Star Explorer Mini Camp
Sky Tavern, Mt. Rose Highway
An action-packed program for families.
(775) 720-6999, pguttman@ss4s.org.
10 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
The Great Basin Brass Quintet. (775) 831-
2298.
17 Tahoe Chamber Music Concert
3 p.m. Location TBA
Richard Cionco on piano. (775) 831-2298.
SEPTEMBER
5 Star Party
7:30 p.m. Sand Harbor State Park
Free telescope viewings with Space Science
for Schools and the UC Davis astronomers.
13 Family Star Explorer Mini Camp
Sky Tavern, Mt. Rose Highway
An action-packed program for families.
(775) 720-6999, pguttman@ss4s.org.
18 Sink 'Em and Hold 'Em Golf and
Poker Fundraiser
Noon, the Chateau
Presented by Children's Cabinet of Incline
Village, Rotary and the North Lake Tahoe
Community Health Care Association.
27 Star Party
7:30 p.m. Sand Harbor State Park
Free telescope viewings with Space Science
for Schools and the UC Davis astronomers.
OCTOBER
Date TBA: CYMBAL Maestro for Music
Hyatt Lake Tahoe Resort
Second annual $10,000 No Limit Texas
Hold Em tournament for Cymbal.
Date TBA: Dog Days of Fall
Burnt Cedar Pool
All dogs of Incline Village are invited to this
special event. Bring your own towels!
5 to 12 Xterra
Xterra U. S. National Championship
triathlon.
8 Poetry Reading
7-9 p.m. Tahoe Center for Environmental
Sciences, Sierra Nevada College campus
Reading by Brian Turner, an Iraq veteran.
11 Chocolate Festival
7 p.m. North Tahoe Conference Center
The spectacular annual Chocolate Festival
hosted by Tahoe Women's Services.
12-14 Astro Star Explorer Camp
Clair Tappaan Lodge, Donner Summit
This camp provides a unique learning expe-
rience for the entire family.
pguttman@ss4s.org , (775) 720-6999.
17-18 Spirits Days and Octoberfest
All day, the Village Center
An Octoberfest-style event filled with
booths and outdoor seating and bands.
22-26 Tahoe-Reno Intl. Film Festival
A force for Positive World Change. (775)
298-0018, tahoefilmfest @aol.com
25 Rotary Bowl-a-Thon
Incline Bowl
Rotary Club of Incline Village event.
NOVEMBER
15 Model United Nations
9 a.m to 5 p.m. Tahoe Center for Environmental
Science , Sierra Nevada College campus
Mock U.N. experience for high schoolers.
DECEMBER
Date TBA:
Toys for Tots
Recreation Center Christmas Tree Lighting
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Advanced Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Alpine Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Austin’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Bar Bar Bar U-Bake Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Big Water Grille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Bowl Incline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Brian D. Seppa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Carson Tahoe Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Century 21 Realty, Mountain Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Crosby’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Dickson Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Dr. Dave Andrews, DDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Dr. Johnathan Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Farmer’s Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Hane Team, Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty . . . . . . . . . . . .37
High Altitude Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
High Sierra Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Housesmiths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Hub Bros. Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Incline Car Wash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Incline Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Incline Schools Academic Excellence Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Incline Tahoe Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Incline Village Community Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Incline Village General Improvement District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Jeunesse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Joanna Rice, Century 21 McGregor Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Juniper Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Karen Simon, Dickson Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Maureen Dudley, Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty . . . . . . .39
Mike Chamberlain, Dickson Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Mike Menath Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Mr. Attic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Nathan Jones & June Barnhart,
Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Nevada Security Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
North Lake Tahoe Bonanza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Pet Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Pier Warmuth, Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty . . . . . . . . .19
Ponderosa Property Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Scott Tieche, Ann Nichols & Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Sierra Mobile Pet Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Sierra Nevada College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Simonian Flooring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Stillwater Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Soule Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Tahoe Biltmore Lodge/Casino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Tahoe Store Emporium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Thai Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Thunderbird Lodge Preservation Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Tim Lampe, Marriner Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
UBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Vacation Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Village Ace Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Village Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Village Meats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Village Ski Loft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
86 North Shore Almanac 86 North Shore Almanac
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Furniture + Accessories + Tableware + Linens
When it comes to designing and furnishing your home,
drab, tedious and uninspired is strictly taboo. At least that’s how we see things.
With our flair for finding one-of-a-kind treasures, linens and accessories, we
bring charm, personality and aȜention to your home and o£ce. Our designers make the process
one that’s fun, simple, and that appeals to your tastes. As well as your wallet.
Visit our worldly liȜle store today and see how we can help your home stand out.
We think you’ll like what you see.
Juniper Hill. Usually unusual.
It says yeehaw in an upscale,
sophisticated kind of way.
775.853.8300 • 850 E. Patriot Blvd. Reno NV 89511, Suite B • juniperhillfurniture.com
Mountain Properties
(775) 832-3340 (888) 726-8821
937 Tahoe Blvd. Ste. 130 • Incline Village, NV 89451
www.century21mountainproperties.com
FINE HOMES & ESTATES
®
EACH OFFICE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED.
Nevada – Lifestyle and Tax Advantages
Lake Tahoe – A Worldwide Destination Resort
Incline Village – A Beautiful Place to Live
I desn’t get much
beter tan tis.
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Mountain Properties
Breathtaking views, pristine mountain air and the ambiance of Incline Village
combine to promise a life of peace that only a few can enjoy.
Trust Century 21 Mountain Properties
to find or sell your home in this exclusive community.
Buyers and sellers seek out the professionals of
Century 21 Mountain Properties for our award winning experience,
skill and resources. Our integrity is second to none.
You deserve the exclusive service that makes
your home buying or selling experience flawless.
Century 21 Mountain Properties is your only choice.

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