You are on page 1of 2

Items in parentheses

SOLUTIONS AND ANSWERS are not required.

1A. METHOD 1: StratefJV: Factor and regroup.


2x6x10x14 = (1 x 3 x 5 x 7) x (2x2x2x2) = (1x3x5x7) x N. N= 2x2x2x2 =16.
METHOD 2: StratefJV: Do the multiplication and solve the equation.
1680 =105 x N. N = 1680 + 105 = 16. 16
FOLLOW-UP: Find the whole number N if 22 x 33 x <f 27 x 2N. [10]

1B. METHOD 1: Strate'iJJ; Start with 1 person in each room.


After placing 26 people, 1 per room, there are 14 people left over. Place these
people, 1 per room, so that there are 14 rooms with 2 people in each. That
leaves 12 rooms occupied by exactly one person.

METHOD 2: Strategy: Start with 2 people in each room.


Place the 40 people 2 per room. This fills 20 rooms, leaving 6 rooms empty.
Take 1 person from each of 6 of the full rooms to occupy the empty rooms.
There are then 6 + 6 = 12 rooms each occupied by exactly one person.

METHOD 3: Strategy: Suppose every room has 2 people.


12
To fill all 26 rooms with 2 people in each room would require 52 people, There
are only 40 people, so 52 - 40 = 12 rooms will be occupied by just 1 person.

Follow-Ups: Suppose 60 people occupy the 26 rooms.


There are 1, 2, or 3 people per room. (1) What is the least
number of rooms with 3 people? [8J (2) What is the
greatest number of rooms with 3 people? [17J

1C. StratefJV: Find the dimensions ofthe small rectangles.


A..--_ _ _-.-....,B
Represent BC by L and DC by L + W. Then
DC BC = W. DC BC = 6, so W = 6 mm and
AD =
4W = 24 mm. L

=720 sq mm.
The area of ABCD is 24 x (24 + 6)
DL-~t-..a...t~C
L W
720
FOLLOW-UP: Determine the difference in the lengths BC and
CD given that the area of rectangle ABCD is 2000 square mm.
[10 mm]

Copyright CO 2012, Australasian Problem Solving Mathematical O{vmpiads (APSMO) Inc and Mathematical O(vmpiads for ElementalY and Middle Schools Inc,

All rights reserved.

Items in parentheses
SOLUTIONS AND ANSWERS CONTINUED are not required

10. Strategy: Find the fractional part ofthe total each paid

Call the roommates A, B, and C. A pays half the amount that Band C
together pay. That is, of every $3 paid, A pays $1 and Band C together pay
$2. A then pays 1/3 of the total, or $100. In a similar manner, since B pays
1/3 the amount paid by A and C together, B pays 1/4 of the total, or $75.
125
A and B together pay $175, so C pays 300 - 175::: $125.

1E. Strategy: List the arrangements systematically.

Denote the 6 girls, from shortest to tallest, by 1, 2, 3,4,5, and 6.

METHOD 1: Strate flY: Position the girls, workingfrom both ends ofthe list.

1 must be in the front row at the far left. 6 must be in the back row at the far
right.

2 can be in either row but must be at the far left of the available spaces.

B-8j N tilitj
5 can be in either row but must be at the far right of the available spaces.

ffijja BIllia
1
5 or
1 5
or ~
125
or @Hja
12

3 and 4 go in the remaining spaces. If they are in the same row, 3 goes to
the left. If one is directly behind the other, 3 goes in front. Otherwise, 3 and
4 may go in either available space.
5
5 6 8Iffij4 8Iffij46 8lffij5 ffiffij56
8lffij
134
or
135
a . or
125
or
124
a or
123

In all, 5 arrangements are possible.


METHOD 2: Strategy: Fill in the front row first.
As above, 1 must be at the far left of the front row and 6 at the far right of the
back row. It seems that the remaining 2 places in the front row can be filled
in 6 ways by choosing any two of 2, 3, 4, and 5, namely 23, 24, 25, 34, 35, or
45. However, if 4 and 5 are both in the front row, the back row is 236, with 3
behind 4, which is not allowed by the given conditions. The remaining 5
choices lead to the 5 arrangements shown in Method 1. Five arrangements
are possible.

FOLLOW-UP: Suppose 8 girls ofdifferent heights are lined up subject


to the same conditions. How many arrangements are possible? [14]

Copyright 2012. Australasian Problem Solving Mathematical Olympiads (APSMO) Inc and Mathematical Olympiads for ElementGlY and Middle Schools Inc.

All rights reserved.