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CHAPTER 1 CHAPTER 2 CHAPTER 3 CHAPTER 4 CHAPTER 5
OVERVIEW GETTING STARTED NETWORK MANAGEMENT MAP AND TREE FAULT MANAGEMENT
PROCEDURES

CHAPTER 6 CHAPTER 7 CHAPTER 8 CHAPTER 9 CHAPTER 10
EVENT MANAGEMENT 1 EVENT MANAGEMENT 2 DEVICE MANAGEMENT CONFIGURATION LOAD MANAGEMENT
MANAGEMENT

CHAPTER 11 CHAPTER 12 CHAPTER 13 CHAPTER 14 CHAPTER 15
ADMINISTRATION PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE RECOMMENDED RECOMMENDED REPORTS
PROCEDURES MANAGEMENT 1 MANAGEMENT 2 OPERATIONS

INDEX

Cellular Infrastructure Group
ISSUE 18 REVISION 0
Software Release 4

NET01 (OMC02)
OMC NETWORK OPERATIONS

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ISSUE 18
REVISION 0

Software Release 4

NET01 (OMC02)
OMC NETWORK
OPERATIONS

FOR TRAINING
PURPOSES ONLY

NET01 (OMC02)
OMC NETWORK OPERATIONS

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0
Software Release 4

NET01 (OMC02)
OMC Network Operations

E Motorola 1993 – 2000
All Rights Reserved
Printed in the U.K.

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Copyrights, notices and trademarks

Copyrights
The Motorola products described in this document may include copyrighted Motorola computer
programs stored in semiconductor memories or other media. Laws in the United States and other
countries preserve for Motorola certain exclusive rights for copyright computer programs, including the
exclusive right to copy or reproduce in any form the copyright computer program. Accordingly, any
copyright Motorola computer programs contained in the Motorola products described in this document
may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the express written permission of Motorola.
Furthermore, the purchase of Motorola products shall not be deemed to grant either directly or by
implication, estoppel or otherwise, any license under the copyrights, patents or patent applications of
Motorola, except for the rights that arise by operation of law in the sale of a product.

Restrictions
The software described in this document is the property of Motorola. It is furnished under a license
agreement and may be used and/or disclosed only in accordance with the terms of the agreement.
Software and documentation are copyright materials. Making unauthorized copies is prohibited by
law. No part of the software or documentation may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored
in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any
means, without prior written permission of Motorola.

Accuracy
While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of this document, Motorola
assumes no liability resulting from any inaccuracies or omissions in this document, or from the use
of the information obtained herein. Motorola reserves the right to make changes to any products
described herein to improve reliability, function, or design, and reserves the right to revise this
document and to make changes from time to time in content hereof with no obligation to notify any
person of revisions or changes. Motorola does not assume any liability arising out of the application
or use of any product or circuit described herein; neither does it convey license under its patent
rights of others.

Trademarks

and MOTOROLA are trademarks of Motorola Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through
X/Open Company Limited.
Tandem, Integrity, Integrity S2, and Non-Stop-UX are trademarks of Tandem Computers
Incorporated.
X Window System, X and X11 are trademarks of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Looking Glass is a registered trademark of Visix Software Ltd.
OSF/Motif is a trademark of the Open Software Foundation.
Ethernet is a trademark of the Xerox Corporation.
Wingz is a trademark and INFORMIX is a registered trademark of Informix Software Ltd.
SUN, SPARC, and SPARCStation are trademarks of Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation.
IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
HP is a registered trademark of Hewlett Packard Inc.

ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Important notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Cross references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Text conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
First aid in case of electric shock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Artificial respiration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Burns treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Reporting safety issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Warnings and cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Warning labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Specific warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
High voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
RF radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Laser radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Lifting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Do not ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Battery supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Toxic material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Human exposure to radio frequency energy (PCS1900 only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Maximum permitted exposures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Maximum permitted exposure ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Example calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Power density measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Other equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Beryllium health and safety precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Health issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Inhalation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Skin contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Eye contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Handling procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Disposal methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Product life cycle implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
General cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Caution labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Specific cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Fibre optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Static discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii

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Devices sensitive to static . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Special handling techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Motorola GSM manual set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Generic manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Tandem OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Scaleable OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Related manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Service manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Category number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Catalogue number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Ordering manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Introducing the Motorola OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1
Definition of OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1
Naming convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–2
Communication with GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–2
OMC-R network management functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Configuration management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Event/alarm management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
The OMC-R in GSM network management architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
Network hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
Network levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
The OMC-R configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5
OMC-R configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5
The System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5
SPARCstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5
Optional processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5
OMC-R configuration summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–7
Scaleable configuration details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–7
The OMC-R MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8
MMI user interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8
GUI interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8
Command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8
The OMC-R GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–9
Introducing the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–9
OMC-R Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–9
The command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–11
UNIX-based utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–11
The OMC-R in a GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–12
A typical GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–12
OMC-R functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13
RXCDR functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13
Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13

iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 CELL configuration . 1–27 Communications handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Link Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Power control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–30 Peak traffic capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–15 Ports . . 1–23 X. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Types of RTF . . . . 1–23 Transferring data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Handover control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 BTS software relating to traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 connection configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–30 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 SITE link requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations v FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 BSS configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 PATH devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–29 Connections . . . . 1–20 Connection . . . . . 1–28 Packet switch / multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–23 Operations and maintenance of a BSS or RXCDR . . . . . 1–15 Site configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .transceiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Transceiving functionality . . . . . . . . . . . 1–25 O&M information flow between OMC-R and NEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–29 O&M network traffic capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 DRI/RTF groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Logical devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 RXCDR configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 Physical link requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Information on links . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–21 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 CELL resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Redundancy (within a cell) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–15 Containment relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–26 Summary of information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–26 OMC-R system configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–22 OMC-R connection to the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–27 Motorola OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–25 Simplified network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 Logical links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 BTS hardware relating to traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–27 Typical hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Links in a GSM network: overview . . . . . . . . . 1–21 Types of link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–28 Communications software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–29 Packet switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–26 Information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 NE device containment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Physical links – PATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 BSS and RXCDR configuration (SITES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–21 Introduction to links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–41 The SPARCstation configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 Additional information . . 1–49 Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–31 System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 OMC-R processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–31 Introduction to the System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–48 Graphical User Interface (GUI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–45 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–48 OMC-R front panel: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–46 Software configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Tools and applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–46 Hardware features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 A standalone server . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 Other configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Database size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–44 GUI Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Database schema: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–35 OMC-R GSM application software: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 Version number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 Running the OMC-R MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–47 The OMC-R MMI: overview . . . . . . . 1–31 Feature description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 The OMC-R database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–43 MMI Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 UNIX: Solaris 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 vi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 RDBMS . . . . . 1–42 LAN configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–34 Configuration . . . . . . . . 1–49 Operator name . . . . . 1–38 Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Applications and utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–44 Server Client Relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . 1–45 Display Processor Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 System Processor software elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SPARCstation 5 . . . . . . . 1–41 Configuration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–46 Night concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–45 GUI Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–40 The CM MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–55 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 Help . . . . . 2–3 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–56 Xterm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Using a SPARCstation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–54 Remote Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Monitor controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–51 Event Management . . 2–8 Restarting/exiting the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Introduction to Chapter 1 – Getting started . . . . . . . . 2–3 The RC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–55 Event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–56 Administration options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Example console messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–53 Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–52 Load Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–51 Performance Management . 2–1 Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNFG file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Exiting the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Middle mouse button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Restarting the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8 Left mouse button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–53 Load Management options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 Chapter 2 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Right mouse button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 CDE desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4 Enabling resync on OMC startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–54 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–2 Logging in to the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4 Enabling resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4 Common Desktop Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 Mouse button utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Configuration Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations vii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–10 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . 2–3 Changing password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 Other front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 Consolidated alarm report . 3–2 Configuration data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–4 Different maps available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Procedure . . . . . . . . . 2–23 Window menu buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 Using window controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 The edit commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1 How the network status summary feature works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Procedure . . . . . . . 3–1 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 Editing a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–19 Running a remote MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–4 Map modes . . 3–5 Map configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–24 Using the text editor xedit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–13 Event management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23 Peripheral controls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–16 Maps . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Expert desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–17 Event logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2 The EM proxy process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Remotely running the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1 Features . . . 2–23 Introduction . . . . . 2–25 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Printing an OMC MMI window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i The network status summary (NSS) feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–26 Chapter 3 Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 viii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . 2–18 Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2 Map process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–19 Other Front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–12 Configuration management . . . . . . 2–18 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–14 Load management . . 3–3 Network maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–15 Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–13 Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 Opening xedit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–17 Remote Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–4 Functionality .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–12 How maps are configured . . . 3–6 Alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–19 Automatically created network objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Shared procedures . . . . . . . 3–18 Logical Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18 Radio Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–10 How alarms work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–20 Automatically created map display objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13 Graphic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 MSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 Graphic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations ix FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 MapLink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 The alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 SITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Using the map: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13 Introduction to the CMMIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11 Alarm icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–7 The alarms icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18 ProxyCell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9 How administrative and operational state changes work . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 BSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Overview to alarms icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Map links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15 Network . . 4–2 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15 Configuration objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11 Colours . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The map display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 Hardware Devices . . . . 3–9 Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–20 Chapter 4 Map and Tree Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13 Two object groups . . . . . . . . 3–14 Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–17 Software Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 RXCDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 MapNode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 State changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15 OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–10 State changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 CommsLink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9 Overview of alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Further information . . . . . . . . 3–19 UserProfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 Configuration objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 PCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Map backgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 No connection . 4–11 Expanding a node cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3 Closing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Opening and closing a map . . . . 4–18 Remote login to a NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–13 Organizing map nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3 Opening a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Prerequisite . . . . . . 4–13 Contained devices report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Logging in remotely from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 No connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Moving a node on the map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Zooming in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9 Device states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Viewing OOS devices from popup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14 Using the Organize Nodes function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Expanding an NE map node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync a node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–7 Colour legend . . . . . . 4–5 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Printing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Viewing node OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Prerequisite . 4–6 Device mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9 Moving and expanding nodes . . 4–5 Subscriber mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14 Viewing map levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Printing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–23 x NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–12 Contracting a map node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–8 Alarm severity colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–4 Map display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Zooming a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Node detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–21 Viewing OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 Resync from a map . . . . . . . . 4–5 Map modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Viewing alarms from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Viewing alarms from popup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Viewing network OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Zooming out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–38 Checking device status from the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Viewing a detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–28 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–33 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Procedure . . . . 4–41 Viewing OOS devices via the popup . . . . . 4–41 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Moving from a map to the navigation tree . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xi FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–42 Printing a navigation tree diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–36 Swap a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Fault management: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1 Other FM indications . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Opening the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . 4–34 INS a device . . 4–28 Opening and closing a navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–42 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reset a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Fault management from navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reset a Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Further information . . 5–1 Definition of fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–25 Deleting a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–28 Procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–27 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1 Principles of FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–33 Lock a device . . . . . . 4–40 Displaying OOS devices from the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Moving levels on a navigation tree . . . 4–43 Chapter 5 Fault Management . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2 Additional information . 4–27 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Before deleting a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1 FM and the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–43 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . 4–33 Unlock a device . . . . . . . 4–41 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Closing the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Using the autoclose function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Panner and porthole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–27 Using the navigation tree: overview . . . 4–30 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reassign a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing a detailed view from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–34 Shutdown a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–37 Devices supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–43 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13 Fault handling . . . . . . . 5–16 Fault handling and remote login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 Resync . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 Introduction to alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11 The resyncAlarm process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4 Introduction to status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–5 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11 Periodic Supervision of Accessibility (PSA) . . . 5–17 xii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4 Operational states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9 Multiple alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13 System Processor partition full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4 Device states . . . 5–8 Buffering alarms and state change events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–5 Alarm categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11 Definition of resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9 Alarms . . . . 5–13 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14 Alarm priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 Intermittent alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–16 On-site personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 CERM feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–17 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12 PSA failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7 Save alarm context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management at the NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14 Handling: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–17 Remote login interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–6 Alarm severities . . . . . . 5–6 Alarm category overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9 Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12 Definition of PSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11 The resyncState process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3 Device status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8 Fault indication at the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11 When to perform a resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10 OIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14 Fault handling process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3 FM process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14 Changing device states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7 Alarm severity overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3 Local maintenance terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–16 Additional information . . . . . . 5–10 FMIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4 Two states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4 Administrative states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–15 Parent device relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12 Disk usage exceeded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–20 Chapter 6 Event Management 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Thresholding . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Events and alarms . . . . 6–6 Blacklist subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Clearing at the NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 Subscription procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Introduction to consolidated alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xiii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Clearing at the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Alarms: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Blocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Introduction to alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Two types of windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Reading the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Event routing . . . . . . . 6–8 Differences between event and alarm windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Viewing alarm throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 The Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Event/alarm subscription procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Events in alarm subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7 Event/alarm display windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–2 How event and alarm management works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm clearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Example display . . . . . . . . . 6–6 The subscription process . 6–5 Event/alarm subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Consolidated alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Primary functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Overview of EM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Alarm handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Intermittent alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 Subscription functions . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Subscription criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4 The difference between events and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Event and alarm management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Fault escalation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Troubleshooting events and alarms . . . . . . 6–1 Event Mgmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Events: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Additional information . . . . . . . . 5–20 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Consolidated alarm report format . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–11 xiv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–3 Opening an alarm window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 Post-processing of event logfiles . . 6–14 Logfile creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 How the event log utilities are used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–19 Online printing of alarms . . . 7–3 Alarms: the basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–19 Chapter 7 Event Management 2 . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Purpose of the Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–8 OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 The handling process . 7–3 Further options . . . 6–12 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–16 The search event log window . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 Alarm handling options . . . . . . 6–14 Introduction to event logfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Example display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–8 Functional Unit severities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 Purpose of event logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Adding a utility to the CDE menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 The event display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–9 The View menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–16 Event Logs . . . . . . . . . 7–1 Alarm types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2 Checking alarms from the network map . . . . . . . . . 7–1 Events and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7 Introduction to consolidated alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm handling . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Logfile procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–17 Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Creating a Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7 Reconfiguration information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 The event logfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–4 Creating a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 Alarm clearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Event management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6 Consolidated alarm reporting . . . . . . . . 7–1 Subscriptions . 6–14 Logfile location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 Utility listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–10 The Log Search menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–15 Logging events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6 Adding a utility to the CDE menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–3 After detecting an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Creating an option in the Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–15 Logfile rollover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7 Consolidated alarm report format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Naming convention . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–33 Alarm logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–21 Modifying a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–33 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–20 Creating a new subscription list . . . . . . . 7–12 Viewing or adding to an alarm comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Event windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–41 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 OIC alarm clearing . . . . . . . . . 7–24 Subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23 Managing subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–14 Managing subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–40 Connectivity summary window . . 7–32 Acknowledging an alarm arrival . . . . . 7–34 Introduction . . . . . . . . . 7–37 The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–29 Alarm handling: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Displaying events with history or from now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–30 Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 When to handle an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Opening an alarm/event window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–24 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 Further details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Fault management actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–22 Renaming a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38 RCI alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–24 Accessing subscriptions . . . 7–12 Entering an alarm comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–19 Blacklist this event from selected device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 Subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–16 Displaying NSS subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–25 Displaying subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Purpose of the Events From Now function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–34 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xv FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23 Deleting a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–33 Checking the subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–36 Displaying events with history or from now for an NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Alarm windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–16 Opening a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17 Blacklist subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Purpose of the Events With History function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–18 Blacklist all events from selected device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the alarm comment field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–26 Adding GPRS subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–30 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . 7–20 Blacklist selected event from all devices . . . . . . . . 7–38 CIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–30 Personalizing the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–34 Handling an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–26 Adding a subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 Viewing available subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Content of the paging configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–48 Sort criteria . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . 7–47 Changing format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–71 Truncated severity types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 Introduction . . . .CNFG template files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–50 Filtering event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–64 Using sld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–44 Logging of events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–71 Overview of paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–42 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–73 Installing the paging modem at the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–74 Defining the contents of the pager configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Throttling alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–55 Enabling event logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–67 Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 ces example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 ces example 2 . . . . . . 7–49 Setting the sort criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Paging: how it works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–42 Changing the alarm throttle time period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CNFG file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–68 Example . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 Using cel . . . . . 7–60 Using qfes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–69 Introduction to cron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–71 Paging performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–43 Deleting an alarm throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Paging error handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–53 Displaying current active event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–62 Using ces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–54 Printing event log search window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–75 xvi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . 7–64 Output format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–56 Disabling event logging . . . . . . . . . 7–75 Starting paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 Input parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–65 sld example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–75 Stopping paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–70 Setting up a cron job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–50 Reloading event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–44 Intermittent alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–66 Using dpr . . . . . . . . 7–42 Viewing alarm throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–46 Loading event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–58 Creating an AutoInit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–66 sld example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–59 Using the event logging utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 Searching of event log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–58 Introduction . . . . . . . 7–57 Creation of auto initiation files . . . . . 7–71 Contents of a page message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–58 AutoInit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–70 OMC alarm paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8–8 Find feature overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–12 Overview of the Call Trace function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–16 Call Trace Detailed View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 Creating a Tools menu in the Trace View window . . 7–76 Chapter 8 Device Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site or Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–20 Trace Record View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Creating a call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 Prerequisite: a Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 Locking a device . . . . 8–27 Creating an option in the Trace View Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–21 Using the Call Trace function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Device management from the map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–6 BTS reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–10 Additional operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–6 BSC/RXCDR reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 Creating an e-mail alarm option in the Tools menu . . . . . . 8–1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 Description of e-mailing alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–28 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–25 Deactivating an active trace . . . . . . . 8–29 Introduction to Remote login . . . . . . . . 8–2 Resetting a device . . . . . . . . . 8–28 Remote login . . . . . . 8–10 Examples of using find . . 8–29 Multiple Rlogin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–28 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–30 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–18 Invoked Instances window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 INS a device . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Viewing trace records . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xvii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 EAS alarm objects . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–16 Trace View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site or Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–7 Finding a Network Element. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 Unlocking a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Logging in remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–23 Aborting a trace . 8–22 Viewing a call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Viewing call trace details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–8 Locating an NE. . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Sending alarms to an e-mail address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15 Description of the Call Trace windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–26 Creating a Tools menu in the Trace View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2 Contained Devices window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–25 Deleting a trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–20 Abort Trace on Call window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–9 Locating the parent of a Site or Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–4 Resetting an NE from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Three interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 Purpose of a Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–7 Device reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15 Call trace statuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15 Introduction to call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Displaying channel status . . . . . 8–39 Command file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 Disabling Forms logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–33 Security level 2 activity . 8–31 Changing security levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Beginning a TTY session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 Chapter 9 Configuration Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–3 Configuration management implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–42 Exit codes . . . . . . . . . . . 8–42 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 BatchOutput file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–37 Creating command files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Configuration management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Ending a BATCH session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using TTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–48 Enabling Forms logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–4 Load management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 BatchInput file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–4 Configuration management from the OMC GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Additional information . . . . . . . . . 8–35 Terminating a TTY session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–2 How configuration management works . . . . . . . . . . . 8–42 A batch_rlogin example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Associated parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Forms session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–38 The batch_rlogin utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Batch login exit codes . . . 9–3 The CM MIB function . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Displaying circuit status . . . 8–41 Associated environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–34 Change level procedure . . . . . . . . . 8–32 Security level 1 activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–4 Changes to the network . 8–39 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . 9–1 Detailed views . . . . . . . . 9–1 The Navigation form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 Exiting a Forms session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–35 Using Batch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–1 Overview of Configuration management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–37 Using batch from the command line . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Terminating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–3 Operational database parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Beginning a BATCH session . . . . . 9–1 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–39 Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–1 Audits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–5 xviii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Batch access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–45 Using Forms . 8–46 Worksheet cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–19 Install Load dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Network configuration at the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–12 How audit works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–10 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–27 CSFP status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–27 Download CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–16 Load Mgmt option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–20 Deleting a software load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–15 Software load management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–26 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–29 CSFP download process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–12 OMC areas changed by audit . . . . . . . . 9–30 EMOTOROLA LTD. . 9–16 NE and OMC software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–22 Conventional download to a new NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–20 Load names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–18 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–28 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–10 Typical detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–26 The activate_db script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–30 Download control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–10 Definition of detailed views . . . . . . . . . 9–17 Software inventory window . . 9–14 Admin Options . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–8 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–27 Configure CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–21 NE software loads . . . . . . 9–30 Aborting download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–25 CSFP database setup (for download) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–29 A two stage process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–21 The NESoftware detailed view form . 9–8 Uses of the Navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–6 Description of network configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–18 Software load installation . . . . . . . 9–27 Swap CodeLoad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–27 Introduction to CSFP options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–16 Requirements of software load management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–26 Criteria for CSFP download . . . . . . . . 9–9 Detailed views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–28 Download to CSFPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xix FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–24 Download procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–24 Download process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–8 Definition of Navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–21 Archiving a software load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–6 Navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–13 Periodic auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–11 Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–12 Definition of audit . . . . . . . 9–28 Unconfigure CSFP . . . . . . . . . . 9–29 Criteria and guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–14 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–15 EAS alarm form . . . 9–29 Download monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–16 Overview of software load management . 9–26 CSFP options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–15 Overview of EAS alarm . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–32 Operational database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–41 The batch_rlogin utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–32 Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–31 Overview of backup databases . 10–7 Enabling/ disabling downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–1 Introduction to Load management . . . . . . . . . . 9–31 NE database management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–36 Off-Line MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–34 DataGen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–2 Software load information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BSS remote login interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–38 OMC . . . . . . . . . 9–42 Command line example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–37 Network configuration status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–35 DataGen configuration management . . . . . 9–41 The batch user interface . . . 9–38 Packet switch / multiplexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–1 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–43 Command line example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–4 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–35 Introduction to DataGen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Load management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fallback to backup database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–4 Selecting new software loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–39 Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–42 The logfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–36 NE configuration changes . . . . . . 9–39 NE database upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–37 Procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–4 Displaying upload/download status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–40 TTY interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–33 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–1 Overview of Downloading . . . . . . . . 9–31 The fallback_db utility . 9–38 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–34 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–7 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–32 Database status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–38 X. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–38 Event and alarm subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–3 Software loads . . 10–5 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–6 Enabling/disabling the download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–7 xx NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . 10–3 Software Load management window . . . . . . . . 9–33 NE database management utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–39 Remote Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–43 Chapter 10 Load Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–31 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9–32 Database upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 DTE addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . 9–34 Load management utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–33 Swapping a CSFP load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–34 CSFP Status form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–37 Uploading an NE database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–20 Activating the database . . . . 10–14 Loading a database from DataGen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–26 Introduction . . . . 10–32 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–22 Activating for normal /conventional download . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–38 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–25 Conventional download . 10–35 Fallback to previous CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–18 Loading from a specified directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–15 Loading a database from the off-line MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–35 Abort CSFP download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–28 Checking BSSspecific files . . . . . 10–40 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–37 Aborting a bootload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–16 Example of off-line MIB install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–28 Conventional (live) downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–25 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–32 Configure CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–28 Resetting a NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–26 NE software detailed view form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–38 Confirming compressed database . . . . . 10–8 Removing a software load . . . . . . . 10–36 Aborting loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–30 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–8 Installing a software load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–25 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–19 Loading an existing database for CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–8 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–32 Downloading for CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 Loading a database from tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–26 Complete load flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–12 Loading an NE database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–29 Falling back to a previous live NE database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–11 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–38 Uploading an object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Installing and removing software loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–11 Procedure . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xxi FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 NE database utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–31 CSFP download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–11 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–34 Unconfigure CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–10 Displaying NE database information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–29 Post-download checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–22 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–22 Activating for CSFP download . . 10–24 Downloading an NE database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–21 Deleting a scheduled audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–12 Auditing a BSS/RXCDR via the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–22 Printing an audit log list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–16 Modifying a scheduled audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–3 Editing a user profile list . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–23 Aborting an audit in progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–14 Introduction to BSS/RXCDR auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–21 Managing audit logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–11 Auditing a network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–1 PM scheduled reports and logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–6 Introduction to audit function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–1 Access control . . . . . . . 11–27 Scheduling an FM resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–14 Scheduling an audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–29 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–2 Introduction . . 11–36 Deleting a scheduled resync . . . . . . . 11–26 Deleting audit logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–15 Creating a scheduled audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–26 Updating database with inconsistencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Administration: overview . . . . 11–36 xxii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–4 Printing a user profile detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–9 Audit scenarios and NE basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–6 List of audit procedures . . . . . . 11–20 Printing a list of scheduled audits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–29 Introduction FM resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–5 Overview and recommendations for audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–10 Auditing a network via the navigation tree . . . . . . . 11–34 Printing resync schedule list . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 11 Administration Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–14 Auditing a BSS/RXCDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–6 Audit functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–2 Command partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–29 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–22 Viewing an audit log list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–8 Scheduled audits queuing support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–11 Introduction to auditing a network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–15 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–2 Opening a user profile list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–23 Viewing an audit inconsistency report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–9 Number of operations run at a given time . . . . . . 11–5 Printing the user profile list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–10 Audit logs and expired logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–29 Creating a scheduled resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–25 Printing an inconsistency report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–30 Modifying a scheduled resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–7 Recommended audit use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–15 PM reports on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–1 Overview of Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Resynchronizing logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–41 Chapter 12 Performance Management 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Performance management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–2 Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–37 Printing a resync log list . . . . . . . 12–1 Statistics: definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–17 Creating a new custom statistic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–1 Performance management data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–4 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–3 PM from Contained Devices form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–12 Running a new report from the PM GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–4 Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–7 Accessing the PM GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–38 Aborting a resync in progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–3 PM Report Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–12 Running a report from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . 12–14 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1 Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–15 Accessing the OMC on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–37 List of procedures . 12–14 Accessing PM reports on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–10 Running reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–17 Chapter 13 Performance Management 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–6 PM GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–15 PM on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xxiii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . 13–3 PM from the map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1 Accessing performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1 Introduction to Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–12 Reset file indicator . . . . . . . . 11–40 Deleting a resync log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–2 Introduction . . . 12–15 Custom Statistics Manipulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–2 Overview of PM data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–1 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–2 PM from the front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–9 Report options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–8 Opening a stored selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–7 The selections window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–2 PM from the Navigation Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–39 Printing a resync report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–3 PM report logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–2 Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11–37 Viewing a resync log list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–12 Running stored reports from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–13 Running a scheduled report . . . . . . . . . 11–39 Resync report . . 12–13 Running a delimited report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–17 Overview of the window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12–13 Viewing a report log . . . . . . 11–39 Viewing a resync report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–26 Filter criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–19 Network elements and statistics menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–32 Delimited report format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–35 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–14 Running a new report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–36 Custom Statistics Manipulation window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–32 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . 13–32 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–41 Filtering custom statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–15 Running a new report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–15 Introduction to Running a new report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–43 Stored selections . . . . . . . . . . 13–5 Statistics management menu . . . . . . . . 13–9 Statistics intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–31 Delimited reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–48 xxiv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–13 Status window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–46 Running a stored selection from the selections window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–44 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–20 Searching list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–7 Disabling statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–9 Setting intervals . . . . . . 13–29 Axis scale range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–23 Start/end dates and times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Statistics management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–25 Sort criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–36 Non-numerical data symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–30 Saving reports . . . . . . . 13–33 Delimited report example . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–27 Data scale factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–15 Device type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–11 Displaying current intervals . . . . . . . . 13–22 Report options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–40 Deleting a custom statistic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–38 Introduction . . . 13–46 Saving a stored selection . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–21 Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–5 Enabling statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–46 Procedure for saving a stored selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–6 Displaying enabled statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–35 Reset file indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–38 Renaming a custom statistic . . . . . . . . 13–35 Non-numerical data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–38 Creating a new custom statistic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–44 Running a stored selection from the PM window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–5 Introduction . . . . 13–42 Searching a custom statistic list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–11 Setting the alarm threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–47 Adding a stored selection to shortlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–13 Clear Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–34 The Display menu on PM reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–44 Opening a stored selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . 14–1 Overview of chapter structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–75 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–63 Scheduling a report from Admin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–79 Chapter 14 Recommended Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–56 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–64 Modifying a report schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–49 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–62 PM report scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xxv FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–67 Deleting a report schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–52 Searching from a completed report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–57 Displaying devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–71 Running a PM report from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–68 Printing a report list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–57 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . .CFG file . . . . . . . . . . 13–56 Stored selections . . . . . . 13–69 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . 13–60 Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–56 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–72 Running new PM reports . . . . . . . . . . 13–70 Viewing a PM report . . . . . 14–2 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Introduction to recommended operations . . . . . 13–49 Deleting a completed report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–78 PM_RESYNCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–61 Saving graphical reports . . . . . . 13–75 PM reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–63 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–74 Performance management troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–68 PM reports logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–53 Accessing PM reports on the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–79 FPOMCAUDIT file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–57 Modifying the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–68 Printing a schedule detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–56 Modifying graphical output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–59 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–1 Purpose of this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–75 Introduction to PM troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–69 Printing an PM reports list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–54 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–2 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–51 Reloading the completed report list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–70 Deleting a PM report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–49 Opening a completed report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–54 Modifying selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–69 Viewing a PM reports logs list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–63 Scheduling a report from Selection Name window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–79 Informix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Completed reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–74 Completed report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–54 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–50 Renaming completed reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–72 Stored selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–58 Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13–77 PMGUI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–24 Recommended performance management tasks . . 14–3 Real-time fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–21 Command logging enable/disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–9 Setting up and maintaining OMC maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–16 Overview of logging faults . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–23 Implementing the change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–23 Escalating fault management problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–24 Escalating problems to Motorola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–27 Enabling and disabling neighbour cell statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–9 Setting up e-mail alarm facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–7 Setting up users for FM activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–14 Alarm help installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–25 Overview of recommended performance management tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–17 Ways of logging faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–22 Response logging enable/disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–25 Examining key statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–6 Overview of fault management setup . . . . . 14–27 Generating a report from the command line using Applix . . . . 14–4 Setting up fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–18 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–21 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–9 Setting up alarm paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–10 Alarm handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–6 Setting up the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–13 Alarm handling . . . 14–13 Alarm notification . . . . . . . . . 14–29 Hints for generating PM reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–7 Setting up alarm subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . 14–30 xxvi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–27 Preparing PM reports . . . . 14–24 Escalating problems internally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–17 Keeping manual logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–3 Overview of fault management facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–3 Fault management based on historical data . . . . 14–28 Monitoring MTL connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–22 Set the command logging variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–22 Documenting network changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–6 Creating multiple CDE workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–15 Review event history . . . . . 14–13 Investigating alarms . . . 14–26 Setting up performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–23 Change request forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–18 Typical logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–3 Methods of fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–15 Optimization of process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–23 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Recommended methods of fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–18 BSS command logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–14 Alarm context sensitive help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–9 Setting up a blacklist subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–61 At the BSS . . . . 14–55 Monitoring ISG 6560 MPRouter statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–36 Procedure for checking PM enabled stats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–73 Fallback to old database at BSC/RXCDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–53 Port record list . . . . . . . 14–40 Data Gathering Tool (DGT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–31 Manually parsing PM statistics files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–70 Initiate download to BSS/RXCDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–71 Enable/Disable database downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–61 Troubleshooting the OML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–34 Definition of PM Resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–64 Load Management configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–49 Route selection table . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–44 Checking ISG 6525 packet switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–31 Cleaning up PM statistics data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–39 Performance Management tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–74 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–63 Link failures . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–56 CPU utilization threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–41 Event Counting Tool (ECT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–60 DTE address mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–33 Resynchronizing PM databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–31 Cleaning up PM device naming data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–40 Network Health Analyst (NHA) tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–55 Checking ISG 6560 MPRouter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–72 Check all sites and devices after BSC/RXCDR reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xxvii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–61 At the OMC–R . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Cleaning up PM data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–34 Manually resynchronizing PM databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–68 Install new BSS/RXCDR database onto OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–48 Printing packet switch configuration . . . . . . . . . . 14–40 Cell Analysis Tool (CAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–54 Checking ISG 6560 MPRouter health . . . . . . 14–41 Call Trace Product (CTP) . . . . 14–34 Automatic PM Resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–45 CPU utilization threshold . . . . . 14–37 Motorola PM and FM tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–72 Unconfigure a CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–41 dri_status utility . 14–43 Introduction to troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–55 Introduction . . . . . . . 14–61 Introduction . . 14–41 site_outage utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–66 Introduction to Load managment configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–41 rtf_status utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–66 Backup BSS/RXCDR configuration database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–39 Overview of Motorota Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–42 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–67 Deploy new BSS/RXCDR databases . . . . . 14–69 Configure a CSFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–63 Possible faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–44 Monitoring ISG packet switch statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–73 Scheduling an upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–36 Example script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–44 Introduction . . . . . . . 14–34 Checking enabled statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–43 Checking ISG 6525 packet switch health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . 15–4 Link and channel usage reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–4 Daily performance management reports . . . . . . . . . 14–82 Weekly meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–77 Daily procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–88 Checking LAN connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–89 Using the ping utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–2 Handover reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–77 Chase actions on Major Alarms . 14–79 Weekly procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–82 Weekly system procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–87 Schedule configuration audits . . . . . . . . . . . 15–6 Setting up a daily report . . . . . . . . 15–7 Setting up a weekly historical trending graph report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–76 Hourly procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–6 Setting up a daily peak hour report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Overview of recommended reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–83 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–81 Uploading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–85 Routine administration procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–1 Performance management (statistical) reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–86 Procedures described . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–8 xxviii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . 15–3 Paging reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Overview of regular procedures . 14–88 Check configuration audit logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–84 Backups and archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–89 Example of output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–80 NE database checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–81 Backup NE directory format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–4 TCH performance reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–84 Check system after changes . . . . . 14–76 List of procedures . . . . . . . . 15–3 Quality of service reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–6 Introduction to using the Report Options fields . . 14–78 Recommended procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–80 Typical database directory structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–77 Recommended procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–5 Using the Report Option fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–79 Examination of event logs . . . . . . . 14–77 Chase actions on Critical Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–2 Types of performance management (statistical) reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–78 Introduction . . . . 15–2 Cell activity reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–78 Analysis of PM statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–89 Chapter 15 Recommended Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–83 Checking OMC version . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–83 Check software version at a NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–1 Types of recommended reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–87 Check alarm and state resync logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–7 Setting up a delimited report . . . . . . 14–86 Schedule alarm and state resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–3 Network status reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–86 Manually initiate alarm and state resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–80 Recommended procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–9 Index . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–9 List of fault management reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations xxix FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 xxx NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

S Use the operating procedures detailed in the GSM manual Operating Information: GSM System Operation GSM-100-201. EMOTOROLA LTD. although they can be used to supplement and enhance the knowledge gained through such training. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . lead to serious injury or death. If it was supplied under normal operational circumstances. It is intended for TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY. Objectives On completion of this course the student will be able to: S Understand the concepts of operating a network of BSSs and remote transcoders using an OMC-R. WARNING Failure to comply with Motorola’s operation. Purpose Motorola Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) Technical Education manuals are intended to support the delivery of Technical Education only and are not intended to replace the use of Customer Product Documentation. S Use the OMC GUI to manage the processing of network element events/alarms. it will not be updated or amended by Motorola. in exceptional circumstances. S Use the OMC GUI to monitor the performance management data of network elements and generate reports. S Understand the procedures required for OMC operating staff. S Apply knowledge attained on the course to troubleshoot the system. to support a major software release. These manuals are not intended to replace the system and equipment training offered by Motorola. S Understand the principles of GSM fault management and acquire practical experience of suing a Motorola OMC-R to perform fault management tasks.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 General information General information Important notice If this manual was obtained when you attended a Motorola training course. installation and maintenance instructions may. About this manual This manual comprises of chapters taken from 68P02901W14-G (GMR01) and 68p02901W31-G (GMR01). S Use the OMC GUI to perform Load Management tasks. then corrections will be supplied automatically by Motorola in the form of General Manual Revisions (GMRs).

Text conventions The following conventions are used in the Motorola GSM manuals to represent keyboard input text. utilities. prompts. 2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. and are listed in the table of contents. file listings. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Special key sequences Special key sequences are represented as follows: CTRL-c Press the Control and c keys at the same time. Input Characters typed in at the keyboard are shown like this. The Return key is identified with the ↵ symbol on both the X terminal and the SPARCstation keyboards. CR or RETURN Press the Return (Enter) key.General information ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Cross references Throughout this manual. screen output text and special key sequences. Output Messages. and environmental variables that appear on the screen are shown like this. but are individually named at the top of each page. The SPARCstation keyboard Return key is also identified with the word Return. directories. are divided into sections. | Press the pipe symbol key. in turn. ALT-f Press the Alt and f keys at the same time. cross references are made to the chapter numbers and section names. This manual is divided into uniquely identified and numbered chapters that. Sections are not numbered. The section name cross references are printed bold in text.

EMOTOROLA LTD. 3. Artificial respiration In the event of an electric shock it may be necessary to carry out artificial respiration. cover the wound with a dry dressing. Do not attempt to remove clothing adhering to the burn. then. Do not apply oil or grease in any form. Send for medical assistance immediately. 2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 First aid in case of electric shock First aid in case of electric shock Warning WARNING Do not touch the victim with your bare hands until the electric circuit is broken. or as soon as artificial respiration is no longer required. Switch off. If this is not possible. Burns treatment If the patient is also suffering from burns. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . If help is available. without hindrance to artificial respiration. carry out the following: 1. protect yourself with dry insulating material and pull or push the victim clear of the conductor.

3. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . by removing power. Make no further attempt to tamper with the equipment. Report the problem directly to GSM MCSC +44 (0)1793 430040 (telephone) and follow up with a written report by fax +44 (0)1793 430987 (fax). 2. 4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. for example. Collect evidence from the equipment under the guidance of the MCSC. Make the equipment concerned safe. Procedure Whenever a safety issue arises: 1. 4.Reporting safety issues ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Reporting safety issues Introduction Whenever a safety issue arises. Ensure that all site personnel are familiar with this procedure. carry out the following procedure in all instances.

However. this presents no danger to personnel. Example and format CAUTION Do not use test equipment that is beyond its calibration due date when testing Motorola base stations. Example and format WARNING Do not look directly into fibre optic cables or optical data in/out connectors. or ill health. or individual items of equipment within a system. This includes hazards introduced during maintenance. Laser radiation can come from either the data in/out connectors or unterminated fibre optic cables connected to data in/out connectors. EMOTOROLA LTD. as well as those inherent in the equipment. physical injury.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Warnings and cautions Warnings and cautions Introduction The following describes how warnings and cautions are used in this manual and in all manuals of the Motorola GSM manual set. for example. the use of adhesives and solvents. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Cautions Definition A caution means that there is a possibility of damage to systems. Warnings Definition A warning is used to alert the reader to possible hazards that could cause loss of life.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Therefore. painted over or obscured in any way. IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields. Motorola assumes no liability for the customer’s failure to comply with these requirements. Laser radiation Do not look directly into fibre optic cables or optical data in/out connectors.1-1991. as must any other warnings given in text. Within the United Kingdom (UK) regard must be paid to the requirements of the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. There may also be specific country legislation which need to be complied with. Refer to the following standards: S ANSI IEEE C95. depending on where the equipment is used. on the illustrations and on the equipment. or with specific warnings elsewhere in the Motorola GSM manuals. Laser radiation can come from either the data in/out connectors or unterminated fibre optic cables connected to data in/out connectors. 3kHz to 300GHz. High voltage Certain Motorola equipment operates from a dangerous high voltage of 230 V ac single phase or 415 V ac three phase mains which is potentially lethal. Warning labels must not be removed. the mains input isolator must be set to off and locked. installation and maintenance of the equipment described in the Motorola GSM manuals. violates safety standards of design. 6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. the areas where the ac mains power is present must not be approached until the warnings and cautions in the text and on the equipment have been complied with.General warnings ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 General warnings Introduction Observe the following warnings during all phases of operation. Warning labels Personnel working with or operating Motorola equipment must comply with any warning labels fitted to the equipment. manufacture and intended use of the equipment. Human Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields High Frequency (10kHz to 300GHz). These must be observed by all personnel at all times when working with the equipment. Ensure that all transmitters are switched off when any antenna connections have to be changed. To achieve isolation of the equipment from the ac supply. Do not key transmitters connected to unterminated cavities or feeders. Failure to comply with these warnings. Specific warnings Warnings particularly applicable to the equipment are positioned on the equipment and within the text of this manual. RF radiation High RF potentials and electromagnetic fields are present in the base station equipment when in operation. S CENELEC 95 ENV 50166-2.

.. S The dust created by breakage of Beryllia is inhaled. Toxic material Certain Motorola equipment incorporates components containing the highly toxic material Beryllium or its oxide Beryllia or both. do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized modification of equipment. Battery supplies Do not wear earth straps when working with standby battery supplies. Because of the danger of introducing additional hazards. Where provided.. or removing or replacing equipment. lifting frames must be used for these operations..ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 General warnings Lifting equipment When dismantling heavy assemblies. EMOTOROLA LTD. See the Beryllium health and safety precautions section for further information. reference must be made to the Manual Handling of Loads Regulations 1992 (UK) or to the relevant manual handling of loads legislation for the country in which the equipment is used. mouth.. or a wound. Contact Motorola if in doubt to ensure that safety features are maintained. Do not . the competent responsible person must ensure that adequate lifting facilities are available. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . When equipments have to be manhandled. S Toxic fumes are inhaled from Beryllium or Beryllia involved in a fire. substitute parts or modify equipment. These materials are especially hazardous if: S Beryllium materials are absorbed into the body tissues through the skin.

Controlled environment Controlled environments are locations where there is exposure that may be incurred by persons who are aware of the potential for exposure as a concomitant of employment. usually expressed in units of watts per square metre (W/m2) or. 377 ohms. Definitions This standard establishes two sets of maximum permitted exposure limits. 8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. for uncontrolled environments. and S in units of W/m 2. For plane waves. the maximum permitted exposure levels are set in terms of power density. one for controlled environments and another. by other cognizant persons. for convenience. respectively. units such as milliwatts per square centimetre (mW/cm2). electric field strength (E) and magnetic field strength (H) are related by the impedance of free space. S + E + 377 2 H2 377 where E and H are expressed in units of V/m and A/m. Although many survey instruments indicate power density units. whose definition and relationship to electric field and magnetic field strengths are described by the standard as follows: Power density (S) Power per unit area normal to the direction of propagation. In particular. The exposures may occur in living quarters or workplaces where there are no expectations that the exposure levels may exceed those shown for uncontrolled environments in the table of maximum permitted exposure ceilings. These terms are defined by the standard.Human exposure to radio frequency energy (PCS1900 only) ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Human exposure to radio frequency energy (PCS1900 only) Introduction This equipment is designed to generate and radiate radio frequency (RF) energy.1-1991. as follows: Uncontrolled environment Uncontrolled environments are locations where there is the exposure of individuals who have no knowledge or control of their exposure. that allows less exposure. 3kHz to 300GHz. At the frequency range of this Personal Communication System equipment. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Licensees of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) using this equipment are responsible for insuring that its installation and operation comply with FCC regulations designed to limit human exposure to RF radiation in accordance with the American National Standards Institute IEEE Standard C95. the actual quantities measured are E or E2 or H or H2. Maximum permitted exposures The maximum permitted exposures prescribed by the standard are set in terms of different parameters of effects. 1930-1970MHz. depending on the frequency generated by the equipment in question. IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields. or as the incidental result of transient passage through areas where analysis shows the exposure levels may be above those shown for uncontrolled environments but do not exceed the values shown for controlled environments in the table of maximum permitted exposure ceilings. power density. It should be installed and maintained only by trained technicians.

and measurements are averaged over a period of 30 minutes. also expressed in mW/cm 2. in part. the maximum permitted exposure ceiling for uncontrolled environments is a power density (mW/cm2) that equals f/1500. The maximum permitted exposure ceiling for controlled environments.287mW/cm 2 1. are excluded from demonstrating compliance. upon antenna type. compliance should be assured at the frequency which produces the lowest exposure ceiling (among the frequencies at which operation will occur). 100 milliwatts or less. antenna placement and the output power to which this equipment is adjusted. EMOTOROLA LTD. is f/300 where measurements are averaged over 6 minutes.433mW/cm 2 6. and the exclusion is not applicable. where f is the frequency expressed in MHz. Licensees must be able to certify to the FCC that their facilities meet the above ceilings.313mW/cm 2 6.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Human exposure to radio frequency energy (PCS1900 only) Maximum permitted exposure ceilings Within the frequency range. Applying these principles to the minimum and maximum frequencies for which this equipment is intended to be used yields the following maximum permitted exposure levels: Uncontrolled Environment Controlled Environment 1930MHz 1970MHz 1930MHz 1970MHz Ceiling 1. The following example sets forth the distances from the antenna to which access should be prevented in order to comply with the uncontrolled and controlled environment exposure limits as set forth in the ANSI IEEE standards and computed above. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Whether a given installation meets the maximum permitted exposure ceilings depends.567mW/cm 2 If you plan to operate the equipment at more than one frequency. Some lower power PCS devices. but this equipment operates at power levels orders of magnitude higher.

Human exposure to radio frequency energy (PCS1900 only) ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Example calculation For a base station with the following characteristics.0 dBm (8 watts) Antenna feeder cable loss. what is the minimum distance from the antenna necessary to meet the requirements of an uncontrolled environment? Transmit frequency 1930MHz Base station cabinet output power. P +39.0–2.3-1991 may be purchased from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.87 W/m2 was obtained from table listed above and converting from mW/cm 2 to W/m2. see IEEE Recommended Practice for the Measure of Potentially Hazardous Electromagnetic Fields .0dB Antenna input power Pin P–CL = +39. Box 1331. Inc. the effects of which may add to the level of exposure.4dBi (43. Therefore.3-1991. the overall exposure may be affected by radio frequency generating facilities that exist at the time the licensee’s equipment is being installed or even by equipment installed later.0 = +37.65) Using the following relationship: G + 4pr W 2 Pin Where W is the maximum permissible power density in W/m2 and r is the safe distance from the antenna in metres. validation that the operating facility using this equipment actually complies will require making power density measurements. Power density measurements While installation calculations such as the above are useful and essential in planning and design.87 where W = 12. the desired distance can be calculated as follows: r+ ǸGPin + Ǹ 43. Copies of IEEE C95. the effects of any such facilities must be considered in site selection and in determining whether a particular installation meets the FCC requirements. NOTE The above result applies only in the direction of maximum radiation of the antenna. P. Accordingly.. CL 2. Piscattaway.1-1991. For information on measuring RF fields for determining compliance with ANSI IEEE C95. Actual installations may employ antennas that have defined radiation patterns and gains that differ from the example set forth above.0dB (5watts) Antenna gain. IEEE Std C95. (800) 678-IEEE or from ANSI. 10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . (212) 642-4900. NJ 08855-1331. 445 Hoes Lane. Other equipment Whether a given installation meets ANSI standards for human exposure to radio frequency radiation may depend not only on this equipment but also on whether the environments being assessed are being affected by radio frequency fields from other equipment.1-1991 and IEEE C95.16m 4pW 4p 12. Persons responsible for installation of this equipment are urged to consult these standards in determining whether a given installation complies with the applicable limits.RF and Microwave. The distances calculated can vary depending on the actual antenna pattern and gain.65 5 + 1.O. Attn: Publication Sales. G 16.

First aid Seek immediate medical assistance. Incubation period for lung symptoms is 2–20 days. and difficulty with swallowing and breathing. shortness of breath.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Beryllium health and safety precautions Beryllium health and safety precautions Introduction Beryllium (Be). or occasionally bloodstained sputum. and chest with discomfort. and a cough that produces yellow/green sputum. possibly pain. released. The onset of the illness is insidious but only a small number of exposed persons develop this reaction. Severe poisoning causes chest pain and wheezing which may progress to severe shortness of breath due to congestion of the lungs. The injured person may become blue. Inhalation Inhalation of Beryllium Oxide can lead to a condition known as Berylliosis. EMOTOROLA LTD. There may be lesions in the kidneys and the skin. throat. there exists the potential for harm. Chronic response. Any contaminated clothing should be removed. The casualty should be kept warm and at rest until medical aid arrives. The casualty should be removed immediately from the exposure area and placed in a fresh air environment with breathing supported with Oxygen where required. is a hard silver/white metal. However. Both sexes are equally susceptible. With the exception of the naturally occurring Beryl ore (Beryllium Silicate). It is stable in air. Captive within the component it presents no health risk whatsoever. There have been deaths in the acute stage. but burns brilliantly in Oxygen. Exposure to moderately high concentrations of Beryllium in air may produce a very serious condition of the lungs. This condition is more truly a general one although the lungs are mainly affected. the symptoms of Berylliosis are similar to Pneumonia and may be identified by all or any of the following: Mild poisoning causes fever. feverish with rapid breathing and raised pulse rate. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Certain features support the view that the condition is allergic. There is no relationship between the degree of exposure and the severity of response and there is usually a time lag of up to 10 years between exposure and the onset of the illness. Inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose. which is in the form of dust. if the component should be broken open and the Beryllium Oxide. Health issues Beryllium Oxide is used within some components as an electrical insulator. all Beryllium compounds and Beryllium metal are potentially highly toxic. Recovery is usual but may take several months.

The spatula/tool used to collect the paste is also to be placed in the container. The container is then to be sealed and labelled. Under no circumstances are boards or components containing Beryllium Oxide to be put into the general waste skips or incinerated. These components require specific disposal measures as indicated in the preceding (Disposal methods) paragraph. A suitable respirator is to be worn at all times during this operation. Seek medical assistance as soon as possible. Product life cycle implications Motorola GSM and analogue equipment includes components containing Beryllium Oxide (identified in text as appropriate and indicated by warning labels on the equipment). The removal station will be equipped with extraction equipment and all other protective equipment necessary for the safe removal of components containing Beryllium Oxide. First aid Flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes. Disposal methods Beryllium Oxide or components containing Beryllium Oxide are to be treated as hazardous waste. sealed and labelled. All components must be removed where possible from boards and put into sealed bags labelled Beryllium Oxide components. First aid Wash area thoroughly with soap and water. Motorola will arrange for the disposal of all such hazardous waste as part of its Total Customer Satisfaction philosophy and will arrange for the most environmentally “friendly” disposal available at that time. Persistent itching and blister formations can occur which usually resolve on removal from exposure. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . If during removal a component is accidently opened. the Beryllium Oxide dust is to be wetted into a paste and put into a container with a spatula or similar tool. Components which are successfully removed are to be placed in a separate bag. Handling procedures Removal of components from printed circuit boards (PCBs) is to take place only at Motorola approved repair centres. These bags must be given to the safety and environmental adviser for disposal. Eye contact May cause severe irritation. redness and swelling of eyelid(s) and inflammation of the mucous membranes of the eyes. If skin is broken seek immediate medical assistance. 12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Beryllium health and safety precautions ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Skin contact Possible irritation and redness at the contact area.

Specific cautions Cautions particularly applicable to the equipment are positioned within the text of this manual. installation and maintenance of the equipment described in the Motorola GSM manuals. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Although the damage caused by static discharge may not be immediately apparent. Fibre optics The bending radius of all fibre optic cables must not be less than 30 mm. Caution labels Personnel working with or operating Motorola equipment must comply with any caution labels fitted to the equipment. Wear an approved earth strap when adjusting or handling digital boards. Static discharge Motorola equipment contains CMOS devices that are vulnerable to static discharge. CMOS devices may be damaged in the long term due to static discharge caused by mishandling. These must be observed by all personnel at all times when working with the equipment. See Devices sensitive to static for further information. on the illustrations and on the equipment.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 General cautions General cautions Introduction Observe the following cautions during operation. painted over or obscured in any way. Caution labels must not be removed. Failure to comply with these cautions or with specific cautions elsewhere in the Motorola GSM manuals may result in damage to the equipment. as must any other cautions given in text. EMOTOROLA LTD. Motorola assumes no liability for the customer’s failure to comply with these requirements.

When mounted onto printed circuit boards (PCBs). Wipe insulated plastic work surfaces with an anti-static cloth before starting the operation. S If possible work on an earthed metal surface. Special handling techniques In the event of one of these devices having to be replaced observe the following precautions when handling the replacement: S Always wear an earth strap which must be connected to the electrostatic point (ESP) on the equipment. Provided the leads are shorted it is safe to handle the device. wire strapping. for example. S Do not wear outer clothing made of nylon or similar man made material.Devices sensitive to static ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Devices sensitive to static Introduction Certain metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices embody in their design a thin layer of insulation that is susceptible to damage from electrostatic charge. MOS devices are normally despatched from the manufacturers with the leads shorted together. 14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. MOS devices are normally less susceptible to electrostatic damage. These charges can be built up on nylon overalls. These components may be providing protection to the device. by pushing the hands into high insulation packing material or by use of unearthed soldering irons. they should be transferred directly from their packing to the equipment (or the other way around) and never left exposed on the workbench. S Leave the short circuit on the leads until the last moment. A cotton overall is preferable. preferably by their edges and not by their tracks and pins. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . by friction. S All metal tools should be used and when not in use they should be placed on an earthed surface. It may be necessary to replace the conductive foam by a piece of wire to enable the device to be fitted. or by inserting the leads into conductive plastic foam. However PCBs should be handled with care. by metal foil eyelets. S Take care when removing components connected to electrostatic sensitive devices. Such a charge applied to the leads of the device could cause irreparable damage.

Generic manuals The following are the generic manuals in the GSM manual set. these manuals are release dependent: Category Name Catalogue number number GSM-100-101 System Information: General 68P02901W01 GSM-100-201 Operating Information: GSM System Operation 68P02901W14 GSM-100-311 Technical Description: OMC in a GSM System 68P02901W31 GSM-100-313 Technical Description: OMC Database Schema 68P02901W34 GSM-100-320 Technical Description: BSS Implementation 68P02901W36 GSM-100-321 Technical Description: BSS Command 68P02901W23 Reference GSM-100-403 Installation & Configuration: GSM System 68P02901W17 Configuration GSM-100-423 Installation & Configuration: BSS Optimization 68P02901W43 GSM-100-501 Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at 68P02901W26 the OMC GSM-100-521 Maintenance Information: Device State 68P02901W57 Transitions GSM-100-523 Maintenance Information: BSS Field 68P02901W51 Troubleshooting GSM-100-503 Maintenance Information: GSM Statistics 68P02901W56 Application GSM-100-721 Software Release Notes: BSS/RXCDR 68P02901W72 Tandem OMC The following Tandem OMC manuals are part of the GSM manual set for systems deploying Tandem S300 and 1475: Category Name Catalogue number number GSM-100-202 Operating Information: OMC System 68P02901W13 Administration GSM-100-712 Software Release Notes: OMC System 68P02901W71 EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . install and maintain the Motorola GSM equipment.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Motorola GSM manual set Motorola GSM manual set Introduction The following manuals provide the information needed to operate.

but they can all be ordered using the overall catalogue number shown below: Category Name Catalogue number number GSM-100-020 Service Manual: BTS 68P02901W37 GSM-100-030 Service Manual: BSC/RXCDR 68P02901W38 GSM-105-020 Service Manual: M-Cell2 68P02901W75 GSM-106-020 Service Manual: M-Cell6 68P02901W85 GSM-201-020 Service Manual: M-Cellcity 68P02901W95 GSM-202-020 Service Manual: M-Cellaccess 68P02901W65 GSM-101-SERIES ExCell4 Documentation Set 68P02900W50 GSM-103-SERIES ExCell6 Documentation Set 68P02900W70 GSM-102-SERIES TopCell Documentation Set 68P02901W80 GSM-200-SERIES M-Cellmicro Documentation Set 68P02901W90 16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Motorola GSM manual set ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Scaleable OMC The following Scaleable OMC manuals replace the equivalent Tandem OMC manuals in the GSM manual set: Category Name Catalogue number number GSM-100-202 Operating Information: Scaleable OMC System 68P02901W19 Administration GSM-100-413 Installation & Configuration: Scaleable OMC 68P02901W47 Clean Install GSM-100-712 Software Release Notes: Scaleable OMC 68P02901W74 System Related manuals The following are related Motorola GSM manuals: Category Name Catalogue number number GSM-001-103 System Information: BSS Equipment Planning 68P02900W21 GSM-002-103 System Information: DataGen 68P02900W22 GSM-005-103 System Information: Advance Operational 68P02900W25 Impact GSM-008-403 Installation & Configuration: Expert Adviser 68P02900W36 Service manuals The following are the service manuals in the GSM manual set. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The internal organization and makeup of service manual sets may vary. they may consist of from one to four separate manuals. these manuals are not release dependent.

EMOTOROLA LTD. Ordering manuals All orders for Motorola manuals must be placed with your Motorola Local Office or Representative. Remember. Catalogue number The Motorola 68P catalogue number is used to order manuals. specify the manual issue required by quoting the correct suffix letter. Manuals are ordered using the catalogue number. manuals with the category number GSM-100-2xx contain operating information. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . For example.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Motorola GSM manual set Category number The category number is used to identify the type and level of a manual.

Motorola GSM manual set ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

Chapter 1 Overview EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5 OMC-R configuration summary . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Redundancy (within a cell) . . . . . . . . . . 1–7 Scaleable configuration details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Types of RTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 GUI interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1 Definition of OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–15 Containment relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13 RXCDR functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–9 Introducing the GUI . 1–11 UNIX-based utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3 The OMC-R in GSM network management architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 Transceiving functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 NE device containment . . . . . . . . . . 1–3 Event/alarm management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 DRI/RTF groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 MMI user interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–11 The OMC-R in a GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–17 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4 Network levels . . . . . . . . . . 1–2 Communication with GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–2 OMC-R network management functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 The OMC-R GUI . . . . . . . . . 1–9 OMC-R Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Introducing the Motorola OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 RXCDR configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3 Performance management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4 Network hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4 The OMC-R configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–14 BSS configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3 Configuration management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–9 The command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . .transceiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–15 Site configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1 Naming convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3 Fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–7 The OMC-R MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 BTS hardware relating to traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5 OMC-R configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 BTS software relating to traffic . . . . 1–5 Optional processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–12 A typical GSM network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13 Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–13 BSS and RXCDR configuration (SITES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–15 Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5 The System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–8 Command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–16 CELL resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–5 SPARCstations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–12 OMC-R functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–23 X. . . . . . . . . 1–31 Feature description . . . . . 1–39 RDBMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–25 Simplified network . . . 1–23 Operations and maintenance of a BSS or RXCDR . 1–26 Information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Tools and applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Link Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Database size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 Physical link requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–25 O&M information flow between OMC-R and NEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–27 Communications handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 System Processor software elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–34 Configuration . . . . . . 1–21 Introduction to links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–27 Typical hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 OMC-R processes . . . . 1–20 Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Database schema: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–35 OMC-R GSM application software: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–29 Connections . . . . . 1–29 Packet switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Information on links . 1–18 Links in a GSM network: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–40 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–36 UNIX: Solaris 2. . . . . . . 1–23 Transferring data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 Logical links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–31 System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 SITE link requirements . . . . 1–38 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–21 Types of link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–28 Packet switch / multiplexer . . 1–18 Logical devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Handover control . 1–22 OMC-R connection to the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–21 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–26 Summary of information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–26 OMC-R system configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 CELL configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–38 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–39 Applications and utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 connection configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–18 Power control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–20 PATH devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 operating system . . . . . 1–38 The OMC-R database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–30 OMC-R System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–30 Peak traffic capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–29 O&M network traffic capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–31 Introduction to the System Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–27 Motorola OMC-R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–28 Communications software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–19 Physical links – PATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–41 The SPARCstation configuration . . . . . . 1–42 LAN configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–51 Performance Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–48 OMC-R front panel: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 Other front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 Using the front panel icons . . . 1–49 Version number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 Icons . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 A standalone server . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Example console messages . . . . . . . . . 1–46 Night concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 Help . . . . . . 1–43 MMI Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–44 GUI Server . . . . . . . . . . . 1–56 Administration options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–53 Load Management options . . . 1–45 Display Processor Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–49 Operator name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–48 Graphical User Interface (GUI) . . . . . . . . . . 1–45 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–50 Configuration Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–55 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–47 The OMC-R MMI: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SPARCstation 5 . 1–51 Event Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 Running the OMC-R MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–54 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The CM MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–41 Configuration Data . . . . . . . . 1–46 Hardware features . . . . 1–44 Server Client Relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–56 Xterm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–52 Load Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–53 Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–55 Event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations v FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . 1–49 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–42 Other configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–54 Remote Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–45 GUI Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–46 Software configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–57 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 vi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

The OMC-R supports the day to day operations and maintenance of network components within a GSM network. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . MSC OMC-S XCDR OMC-R BSC BTS BTS BTS Figure 1-1 T he OMCĆR in a GSM system EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Introducing the Motorola OMC-R Introducing the Motorola OMC-R Definition of OMC-R A simplified GSM network is shown at Figure 1-1.

or up to 30. 1–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. via a Private or Public Switched Packet Data Network (PSPDN). SGSN. BSS or RXCDR).000 traffic channels. Communication with GSM network The Motorola OMC-R communicates with the GSM network using X.Introducing the Motorola OMC-R ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Naming convention An OMC-R configured to manage only Base Station Systems (BSS) and Remote Transcoders (RXCDR) is called an OMC-Radio (OMC-R).000 traffic channels. The Motorola OMC-R is configured to monitor Motorola base station equipment and will be referred to as an OMC-R in this manual to prevent confusion with other types of OMC.the Motorola MSC.25 packet switching to exchange Operation and Maintenance (O&M) data with the Base Station Systems (BSS) and Transcoders (XCDRs) in the GSM network. the System Processor can be configured for up to 5. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . OMC-R. The OMC-R can handle a GSM network of up to 120 Network Elements (NEs .

database load management and the management of operating parameters. These statistics can be then used to analyze network performance and aid long term planning. The OMC-R also provides the facilities to re-configure the operating parameters of NEs using the remote login facility and facilities to optimize via the GUI. Fault management Fault management provides the facility to change the status of any device using fault handling procedures. The OMC-R collects.25 network. via the X. These messages notify the operators of any potential problems occurring in the network. Event or alarm messages containing information on the state of the different devices and links in the entire network are sent. the GSM network operator can react to changes in the network and re-configure the site by taking devices in or out of service as required. Event/alarm management A primary function of an OMC-R is to maintain the quality of service to customers/users of the GSM network by monitoring the state of Motorola equipment in the network. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . thus maintaining continuity of service to mobile phone users. to the OMC-R. The OMC-R provides facilities to initiate uploads and downloads of NE operating software. the alarm window. Performance management Performance management provides collection and reporting of network performance statistics. and provides reporting facilities for the presentation and printing of the processed statistics. processes and stores performance statistics on the different NEs in the network. EMOTOROLA LTD. There is the optional Alarm notification via Paging feature which automatically notifies key personnel of certain alarm or state changes over a modem. Fault management tasks can be performed from the map. or to back-up or download configuration databases for the different NEs. and through contained devices.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R network management functions OMC-R network management functions Configuration management Configuration management provides centralized software load management. From the OMC-R. Navigation tree.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . and software loading can be performed by connecting a personal computer to the BSC or RXCDR. Built-in alarm and event management. Procedures are provided by which the radio resources can be dynamically reconfigured. An NMC could perform O&M functions at a network-wide level with OMC-Rs as its subordinates. configuration management. Additionally. and fault handling facilities enable operators at remote OMC-R sites to manage O&M in a consistent and standardized manner. The OMC-R provides monitoring and control for a number of BSSs in a specific geographical area.The OMC-R in GSM network management architecture ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R in GSM network management architecture Network hierarchy The position of the OMC within the GSM network management hierarchy.3010) PHYSICAL IMPLEMENTATION SERVICES MANAGEMENT OF THE LOWER THREE LAYERS NETWORK MANAGEMENT NMC NETWORK ELEMENT MANAGEMENT OMC-R OMC-R NETWORK ELEMENT LEVEL NE NE NE NE NE NE Figure 1-2 GSM network management architecture Network levels Operation and Maintenance (O&M) management of the BSS and RXCDR can be performed at several network levels: Local level Local level monitoring. and faults rectified from a single remote location. 1–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. is shown in Figure 1-2. the OMC-R provides databases for O&M data and system performance statistics. where reconfiguration. Regional level The OMC-R provides facilities for performing functions on NEs at a regional level. Top level The top level of network management is implemented by the Network Management Centre (NMC). BUSINESS MANAGEMENT FIVE-LAYER TMN MODEL (DEFINED IN ITU M. The prime function of the OMC-R. is to maintain the quality of service to customers/users by monitoring the performance of the radio equipment.

The System Processor contains a database based on an INFORMIX Database Management System (DBMS). known as the OMC-R Man Machine Interface (MMI). The processors that can be used are SPARCstation 20s or UltraSPARCs. Each SPARCstation is a complete UNIX system. The System Processor The GSR4 System Processor is a UNIX system that runs the OMC-R application software that handles all O&M communication with the NE. Remote Login. The Network Health Analyst (NHA) can be used on a Sun Enterprise 3000 or 3500. EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . such as those for OSI stack. S A laser printer. The System Processor contains the Configuration Management Information Base (CM MIB) holding all the network and map configuration data. Each processor is a complete UNIX system. S Several MMI processors (which also provide colour operator workstations). and DataGen can be included into the basic OMC-R configuration. and is primarily concerned with running the OMC-R operator interface. alarms. and WWW Server on SPARCstation 5s. S A GUI Server that is configured as an MMI. It processes all incoming events. The SPARCstation 5s execute the OMC-R display software and provide the operator with workstations for the system processor. The GUI Server which is a much faster SPARCUltra or SPARCstation 20 runs the GUI processes while the GUI clients run the display interface. SPARCstations The remainder of the OMC-R is made up of SPARCUltras or SPARCstations. uploads/downloads. which are GUI Clients. Optional processors Optional processors. comprising the following: S A System Processor. configured for storing performance statistics and subscription lists. enabling operators to monitor incoming events and alarms.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R configuration The OMC-R configuration OMC-R configuration The Scaleable OMC-R system configuration is shown in Figure 1-3. and performance statistics It also processes the setting up of remote login sessions to different NEs. It is suitable for GSM networks with low-end (5k) or high-end (20k) traffic channels (TCHs). Typically the OMC-R configuration contains several SPARCstation 5s.

The OMC-R configuration ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 TO GSM NETWORK SUN HSI/S card (4-port HSI / interface ) Sunlink X. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .25 FOR OMC-R OMC-R SYSTEM OMC-R DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR Application Software (DBMS) System Processor CM Applix MIB cm_mi b MMI LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN) Ultra 5 MMI PROCESSOR Workstation MMI Ultra 200E SUN SPARCstation 5* MMI PROCESSOR MM SUN SPARCstation 5* Workstation I WWW SERVER PROCESSOR (optional) SUN SPARCstation 5* OSI PROCESSOR (optional) SUN SPARCstation 20 or SUN Ultra 200E* Network Health Analyst PROCESSOR NHA processor* (optional) Datagen/OffLine MIB PROCESSOR DataGen/OffLine (optional) MIB processor* Laser Printer Lexmark Optra RN+ printer (with software) *Optional Figure 1-3 Typical Scaleable OMC-R system configuration 1–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.25 package System processor CONSOLE X.

The GUI servers run the GUI sessions while the GUI clients run the display software only. Each processor can support one GUI session. Low-end TCH Scaleable OMC-R The minimum configuration of the Scaleable OMC-R provides support for up to 5. up to four additional machines may be added to the system. EMOTOROLA LTD. Up to 10 MMI interfaces may be used in the OMC-R system.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R configuration summary OMC-R configuration summary Scaleable configuration details A summary of the Scaleable OMC-R configuration is as follows: High-end TCH Scaleable OMC-R The high-end TCH configuration of the Scaleable OMC-R provides support for 30.000 TCHs with a maximum of 120 NEs. One of the high end machines must be configured as a server. a SPARCstation Ultra 200E can be configured as a server. as on the standard OMC-R. For very small systems. The GUI server runs the GUI sessions while the display processes are run on slower SPARCstation 5 machines which act as GUI clients. The MMI interface is provided on SPARCstation 5/20 machines and UltraSPARCs. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .000 TCHs with a maximum of 15 NEs. The total number of GUI sessions supported is 10. A second can be configured as a server when the two will share the load of the clients for redundancy purposes should one server fail. Each processor can support one GUI session. However.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .The OMC-R MMI ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R MMI MMI user interfaces The OMC-R MMI has two user interfaces to operate the OMC-R system: S The Graphical User Interface (GUI). Command line interface The UNIX-based system utilities are executed at the command line of an Xterm window which is opened from the GUI Front Panel. 1–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Command line interface. GUI interface The GUI presents the user with a Front Panel displaying icons that represent all the modules of the OMC-R.

An expert Front Panel that is smaller and does not have icon titles is also available. can be executed through a single interface. apart from equipment repair and replacement. troubleshooting. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 1 4 5 6 8 3 2 7 GSR4. to facilitate use by experienced personnel.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R GUI The OMC-R GUI Introducing the GUI The OMC-R MMI provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI).6. A summary of the current alarms in the network is always displayed on the right hand side of the GUI Front Panel. The OMC-R GUI Front Panel is shown in Figure 1-4. and network administration. shown in Figure 1-5. network reconfiguration.3 15 14 9 16 13 12 11 10 Figure 1-4 The OMC-R GUI Front Panel Figure 1-5 The Expert OMC-R Front Panel EMOTOROLA LTD. All maintenance.1–1. based on the Open Software Foundation Motif (OSF-Motif). The OMC-R GUI enables operators to interact with the OMC-R and to carry out network management functions. OMC-R Front Panel The GUI Front Panel contains icons that represent different modules of the OMC-R MMI.1.

Alarm summary 9. Access to network maps 1–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Remote access to BSS or RXCDR 16. Access to UNIX command line 13.The OMC-R GUI ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Table 1-1 describes the icons on the OMC-R GUI Front Panel. Access to OMC-R console 3. Access to OnLine Help 12. Access to configuration management 4. Access to event management 5. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Access to load management 7. Table 1-1 Number Description 1. Access to performance management 6. Front Panel exit button 11. Access to administrative and scheduled functions 14. Access to find facility 8. Operator name and OMC-R version number 2. Incoming alarms display icon 10. Access to system event logs 15.

S NE database management. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Performance management. S Synchronization of time with the OMC-R-BSS.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The command line interface The command line interface UNIX-based utilities UNIX-based utilities are provided to give additional network management functionality to the OMC-R MMI in the following functional areas: S Remote login. EMOTOROLA LTD. searching and filtering event logs. S System administration utilities. S Event log processing. S Event management.

MSC OMC-R CBC X. is shown in Figure 1-6.25 64 kbit/s VOICE O&M DATA FROM 64 TRAFFIC kbit/s CBL Ñ FROM 64 BSS1. Mobile Switching Centre (MSC) or Cell Broadcast Centre (CBC). BSSn. a Remote Transcoder (RXCDR).The OMC-R in a GSM network ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R in a GSM network A typical GSM network A typical GSM network (900 MHz. & 64 kbit/s BSS1 kbit/s RXCDR CBL Ñ 2Mbit/s 64 2Mbit/s AND 64 link RXCDR kbit/slink Ñ MESSAGE INFO BSSn kbit/s 64 kbit/s 4x16kbit/s 64kbit/s 4x16kbit/s 64kbit/s TRAFFIC O&M DATA TRAFFIC O&M DATA 2Mbit/s link BSSn BSS1 BSC BSC/BTS 2Mbit/s link MS BTS BTS BTS 2Mbit/s link MS BTS MS MS BTS 16 kbit/s traffic MS MS Figure 1-6 T he OMCĆR in a GSM network 1–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. which may be a Base Station System (BSS). It consists of an Operations and Maintenance Centre (OMC-R) and one or more Network Elements (NE or nodes).25 X. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 1800 MHz or 900/1800 MHz).

A BSS configuration may have all BTS directly connected to the controlling BSC (spoke connection) or the BSS may be connected via another BTS (daisy chaining). usually connected using a LAN. This is the most efficient arrangement. BSC capacity is expanded as a result of the faster processing and memory of the GPROC2. Each 2 Mbit/s link between the BSSs and the RXCDR typically consists of two 64 kbit/s O&M links plus 120( ( 30 x 64 kbit/s) x (4 x16 kbit/s) ) traffic channels. as the primary feature of the RXCDR is that it converts the 64 kbit/s PCM output of the MSC to a 16 kbit/s rate required for transmission over the air interface (between the BSS and the MS). usually located in the same area as the MSC. At GSR4 BSCs are required to use the GPROC2 (second generation processor board). Configurations A BSS consists of a Base Site Controller (BSC) and one or more remote Base Transceiver Stations (BTS). NE software uploading and downloading. Thus. NE re-configuration. Every BTS must be physically connected to its controlling BSC using a 2 Mbit/s link. and traffic channels (voice) between the BSS and MSC. S Monitoring of events and alarms. four 16 kbit/s channels from the RXCDR can be fitted on each 64 kbit/s terrestrial circuit. RXCDR functions The RXCDR routes the O&M data packets between the BSS and the OMC-R.25 packet switching.000 traffic channels for the Scaleable OMC-R. The RXCDR is located between the MSC and the BSS. and performance data collection and reporting for all the NE under its control.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R in a GSM network OMC-R functions The OMC-R performs the following functions: S Direct management of BSS and RXCDR and the links between them. A BTS may also have more than one connection to its controlling BSC for redundancy. the BSSs and RXCDRs. In this way. performing fault handling. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The O&M data packets are routed between the OMC-R and the RXCDR using X. EMOTOROLA LTD. thus creating a collocated BSC/BTS. S Provides a centralized facility for network management of up to 120 NEs with up to 30. each 30 channel 2 Mbit/s PCM link can carry 120 GSM-specified channels with obvious cost savings. A BTS can also be located in a BSC cabinet. This is all done using the O&M data packets sent to/from the NE. S Management of the NE devices associated with the links (on the RXCDR side) between the MSC. this means 100 sites can be supported.

they cannot contain the BSC. Sometimes the transcoding functionality is located within a BSC. S Collocated BSC and BTS site. the BSS is configured to contain a series of one or more SITES. 1–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Sites 1 to 100 contain only BTS equipment. SITE 0 always contains the BSC equipment. In the example above.BSS and RXCDR configuration (SITES) ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 BSS and RXCDR configuration (SITES) BSS configuration In a GSM network. Thus there are 3 possible types of BSS site: S BSC site. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . it may also contain BTS equipment (collocated BSC and BTS connected by a LAN). S BTS site. the transcoding hardware is regarded as a subset of the BSS SITE 0 configuration. (Figure 1-7). Example An example configuration is shown in Figure 1-7. and is regarded as a separate NE (or node). REDUNDANT LINK – 2 Mbit/s TERRESTRIAL OR MICROWAVE LINK SITE 0 (BSC) SITE 1 (BTS) SITE 2 (BTS) SITE 3 (BTS) MSI BOARD 2 MMS 2 Mbit/s PORTS link 2 Mbit/s TERRESTRIAL OR MICROWAVE LINK TO/FROM RXCDR Figure 1-7 The naming convention and physical links of BSS RXCDR configuration An XCDR placed at the MSC is known as a Remote Transcoder (RXCDR).

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . configuration purposes and event management. An instance of an MMS can be uniquely identified to an MSI/XCDR card as follows: Example MMS port 1 on MSI board 2 in SITE 0 would be named MMS 2 1 X. There can be up to 64 MSI boards in a SITE and up to 100 SITEs in a BSS. For more details on containment relationships refer to Chapter 5 of this manual. This containment relationship is used for logical naming.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 NE device containment NE device containment Containment relationship There is a containment relationship between each entity in the GSM Network that is modelled at the OMC-R. EMOTOROLA LTD. The first digit is the parent MSI card. This hierarchical structure is known as the Containment Tree. which may consist of more than one entity known as containees. Each entity is contained within a container. the second refers to the port number and the third is not required. which in turn is contained within a SITE. an MMS is contained within an MSI. For example. Ports There are two MMS ports on an MSI board.

S RTF Groups. SITE Radio Frequency CELL DRI Group RTF Group Neighbour Handover Power DRI RTF Control Control Figure 1-8 Site configuration BTS hardware relating to traffic A BTS cabinet would contain one or more radio units. There is one RTF Group per cell on each site for redundancy purposes. which contains DRIs. BTS software relating to traffic From a software perspective. a single BTS consists of one or more cabinets and controls one or more CELLs. which contain a number of Receive Transmit Functions (RTFs). There is one DRI Group per cell on each site for redundancy purposes. 1–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. each of which is serviced by a single radio unit. The Motorola term CELL is equivalent to the GSM term BTS. Each carrier has eight TDMA timeslots. GSM requirements specify one cell per BTS. The different related resources of a CELL configuration are shown in Figure 1-8. Each CELL is serviced by one or more carriers. S CELLs.Site configuration ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Site configuration CELL resources In the Motorola implementation of GSM. since Motorola BTS sites can contain more than one cell. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . a BTS contains the following software devices/functions: S DRI Groups.

An RTF contains eight digital channels. This provides the radio carrier which. EMOTOROLA LTD. rather than relating to a physical piece of hardware. equipped to a remote SITE. Refer to Physical links . If the DRI goes Out Of Service (OOS). one for each timeslot on the air interface. One of the more important of these control channels is the Broadcast Control Channel (BCCH). Redundancy (within a cell) The DRIGroup and RTFGroup are used to support transceiving redundancy for CELLs. If the PATH availability changes and a shorter PATH becomes available to the RTF. this is called the RTF Limit. When an RTF is equipped. for n RTFs there will be n+1 DRI devices equipped. consists of eight TDMA timeslots. These are called the Primary and Secondary PATHs. where 64 = 4 x16 kbit/s) timeslots per PATH device. it attaches itself to an available In Service (INS) DRI. and is set by Motorola engineers during staging. which is 90% of the RTF Limit. These digital channels carry speech and various control data.PATH for more details of PATHS. then a switchover will occur so that the RTF starts to use this new PATH. Each RTF function. 2 x 64 kbit/s. the shorter will be the connected PATH and the longer will be the redundant PATH. There are two types of RTF: S BCCH (one of the timeslots is used as a BCCH) S Non-BCCH To provide redundancy of RTF traffic. Each OMC-R is limited to supporting a particular number of RTFs. Each OMC-R has a threshold RTF value. Every CELL must have at least one BCCH.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 DRI/RTF groups .transceiving Transceiving functionality Motorola has implemented transceiving functionality using the DRIs and RTFs. in a GSM digital system. it is possible to specify two routes or PATHs that are potentially able to carry the RTF traffic from the BTS to the BSC. If two PATHs are available. Types of RTF RTFs are used to carry the traffic part of the call (speech or data). Typically.transceiving DRI/RTF groups . uses two PCM (that is. They are defined as functions rather than devices as they are a logical representation of the traffic. the RTF will attach itself to another available DRI to maintain transceiving functionality to the CELL. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

in order to maintain acceptable service to the user. in order to maintain an acceptable service to the user. There are thresholds supported for each measurement and when a threshold is exceeded. Handover detection algorithm There are a number of parameters used to detect when a handover should occur. Handover control. When a threshold is exceeded transmission power modification may occur. There are thresholds supported for each measurement. A number of factors are input to this algorithm. S Handover Control. both for the MS and BTS. Handover control Handover means switching a call from a channel in a given CELL. NOTE Uplink is from the Mobile Station (MS) to the BTS. S Power budget.CELL configuration ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 CELL configuration Logical devices A CELL contains the following logical devices: S Neighbour. ideally in a way not noticeable by the users. Power control detection algorithm There are a number of parameters used to detect when power control should occur. These factors are as follows: S Uplink and downlink receive signal strength. downlink is from the BTS to MS. When a power budget handover is enabled. the call will hand to a neighbouring cell at the point where a lower power budget can be achieved (both the MS and the BTS can reduce their TX power). S Uplink and downlink receive signal quality. S Uplink and downlink receive signal quality. A number of factors are input to this algorithm. These factors are: S Uplink and downlink receive signal strength. Power control In order to reduce Radio Frequency interference in the network. S Interference. and increase battery life on MSs. a handover may occur. 1–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Distance (between the BTS and the MS). S Power Control. is the functionality required to detect and effect a handover. This is done keeping disturbance to a minimum. Power control is the functionality to detect and effect the modification of transmission power. to another channel in either the same or another CELL. it is desirable to run all the BTSs and MSs in the network at the minimum TX power that provides adequate rxqual (quality) and rxlev (level) for a call. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

links within a BSS. those between the BSC and BTSs and between one BTS and another. S Similarly. are all links between SITEs. Link Types There are two types of links used in the GSM network: S Physical links S Logical links EMOTOROLA LTD. which is a communications controller that contains two 2 Mbit/s (MMS) ports.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Links in a GSM network: overview Links in a GSM network: overview Information on links Note the following BSS link definitions: S All links to and within BSSs and RXCDRs are in reality links to and between SITEs. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . is a link to the SITE configured as a BSC within the BSS. SITE link requirements Every SITE must contain at least one Multiple Serial Interface (MSI) board (NIU for M–Cellt). S A link to a BSS.

or via the RXCDR or MSC. every BSC must be physically connected to its controlling MSC. Physical link requirements The following are physical link requirements: S Every BSC must be physically connected to the OMC-R. to one MMS port of an MSI (NIU for M–Cell) card on another SITE. It is a logical representation of a 2 Mbit/s route between the BSC and a destination BTS. PATH devices A PATH device defines the connectivity between a BSC site and BTS sites under its control. S Similarly. S Every BTS must be physically connected to its controlling BSC. A BSC may be directly connected to its controlling MSC or it may be connected via an RXCDR. The connection information between any two sites consists of an MSI (NIU for M-Cell)/MMS device at each end of the link. and one direct connection between BSC0 and BTS3 (D). a PATH through BTS1 and BTS2. A BSC may be directly connected to the OMC-R. 1–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. A PATH may contain a route through a maximum of 10 BTS sites. A BTS may have more than one signalling and traffic connection to its controlling BSC giving load sharing and redundancy. This connectivity specifies the physical route from the BSC. (A–B–C).Physical links – PATH ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Physical links – PATH Connection A physical link between two SITEs is made by connecting one MMS port of an MSI (NIU for M–Cell) card on one SITE. A BTS may be directly connected to its controlling BSC or it may be connected via another BTS (daisy chaining). BSC0 A BTS1 D B BTS2 C BTS3 PATH 1 = A–B–C PATH 2 = D Figure 1-9 Example of path settings within a BSS Figure 1-9 shows two PATHs connecting BSC0 with BTS3. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . through intermediary BTSs to the destination BTS.

this is a physical connection between the BSC and the MSC. alarms. S Cell Broadcast Link (CBL). S Message Transfer Link (MTL). These are reported to the OMC-R. The two RSLs provide both load sharing and redundancy functions for the signalling link. in Figure 1-10. A CBL link can be configured between the BSC or RXCDR and the Cell Broadcast Centre (CBC). and performance statistics. The purpose of the OML is to provide communication between an OMC-R and a BSC or RXCDR for transferring network management (O&M) data. The purpose of an RSL is to provide signalling information between a BSC and a remote BTS.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logical links Logical links Introduction to links The 2 Mbit/s physical links in the GSM network. The timeslots used. The purpose of the MTL is to provide a link for signalling information between the BSC and the MSC. This is used for downloading messages to broadcast along with other necessary information such as repetition rate and number of broadcasts. added to the network. one OML is used at any one time. In the Motorola system. When a Remote Transcoder is used. the connection between the BSC and the RXCDR and the connection between the RXCDR and the MSC. at the BSC (or RXCDR) site where they are equipped. when local transcoding is used. S Radio System Link (RSL). An XBL link may be configured between the BSC and the RXCDR for exchanging internal Fault Management (FM) data between them. Up to four OML links can be configured between an OMC-R and BSC or RXCDR. are configured to carry (as well as the voice traffic channels) many logical links containing signalling information or O&M data. the other three OMLs exist for redundancy purposes. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The different logical links are as follows: S Operation and Maintenance Link (OML). This is possible because of the daisy chain connection in the BSS. This is to ensure that new BTSs. These links are monitored by the OMC-R. can be communicated with on default timeslots. When more than one MTL is configured between the BSC and MSC. are chosen automatically by the Motorola software. the logical MTL is made up of two physical parts. Types of link The types of logical link are shown in Figure 1-10. EMOTOROLA LTD. S RXCDR to BSC Link (XBL). both load sharing and redundancy are present. Each RSL link is associated with a PATH. These links generate events. there are two RSLs between BTS2 and the BSC. It is possible to have multiple (up to eight) RSLs between a BSC and a remote BTS. Up to 16 MTLs may be configured between a BSC and MSC. For example. A signalling link between a BSC and a remote BTS is called a Radio System Link (RSL).

S An RXCDR will always contain at least one OML. S A BTS will always contain at least one RSL.25 XBL:RXCDR–BSC LINK Ñ ÀÀ (FAULT MANAGEMENT DATA) 2Mbit/s link Ñ RSL:BTS–BSC LINK (SIGNALLING INFORMATION) ÍÍ MTL2 OML1 CBL:BSC–CBC Link VOICE TRAFFIC 2Mbit/s link (MESSAGE INFORMATION) OML2 RXCDR Voice Traffic OML3 ÍÍ CBL ÑÑ ËË ËË ÑÑ ÍÍÍ MTL2 XBL2 OML2 XBL1 OML1 MTL1 CBC CBC CBL 2Mbit/s link 2Mbit/s link 2Mbit/s link BSC À BSC/BT S1 À À RSL11 À À BT S2 BT S3 ÀÀ À RSL22 RSL11 ÀÀ BT S1 À ÀÀ À (BTS1 to BSC ) RSL12 ÀÀ (BTS1 to BSC ) RSL12 RSL21 ÀÀ ÀÀ (BTS2 to BSC) ÀÀ RSL22 BT S2 (BTS2 to BSC) Figure 1-10 T he different logical links in a GSM network 1–22 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Logical links ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Requirements Note the following about logical links: S A BSC will always contain at least one OML (with a maximum of four). one MTL or XBL (depending on how it is connected to the MSC) and at least one RSL for each remote BTS under its control. and at least one XBL. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . MSC OMCĆR ÑÑ Different logical links: MTL:MSC–BSC LINK Ñ (C7 SIGNALLING INFORMATION) Ñ OML:OMC-R–BSC LINK MTL 1 ËË (O&M DATA) VOICE TRAFFIC X.

The X. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The virtual circuits EI and BL can be accepted on any of the X. then the packet switch / multiplexer will switch to a different port. S Bootload (BL). one or two timeslots (64 kbit/s) on a 2 Mbit/s link is used to carry the O&M data between the BSC and RXCDR. The UL circuits consists of two processes and each is assigned to a single OMC-R connection. The RL is assigned to a single OMC-R connection. X. The RXCDR transfers the information to a packet switch / multiplexer. All the timeslots from the different BSC-RXCDR links are grouped onto one or more 2 Mbit/s links by the RXCDR or the MSC.21 connections on the OMC-R.21 connections. The circuit is made by the NE calling the OMC-R. The circuit is made by the OMC-R calling the NE. Each physical connection can support up to 256 virtual circuits. also called Download. The circuit is made by the OMC-R calling the NE.25 network/switch. Normally two connection are set up for EI and BL. The circuit is made by the NE calling the OMC-R.21 connection configuration The physical connection between the OMC-R processor and the packet switch / multiplexer consists of two to seven X.21 links are connected to the OMC-R via a public or private X. EMOTOROLA LTD. S Upload (UL) transfers BSS database back-ups and raw statistics (performance data) to the OMC-R.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R connection to the network OMC-R connection to the network Transferring data For every BSC in the network. There are four types of virtual circuits that can be made on the OML: S Event Interface (EI) transfers data packets (events and alarms). If a given port is not working. S Remote login (RL) provides sessions for transfer of BSS MMI commands/responses to the NE. plus the OMC-R-BSS message from the NE to the OMC-R. transfers BSS software and BSS databases to the NE. Illustrated in Figure 1-11 is the method of transferring O&M data between the BSS and the OMC-R.

OMC-R connection to the network ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R OMC-R SYSTEM PROCESSOR ÑÑ X.25 Ñ Ñ O&M Data Packets X.21 connections ÎÎÍ (two to seven physical connections) ÎÎÍ RXCDR Packet switch / multiplexer Ñ Ñ Î Ñ Î Ñ 2 Mbit/s Í Ñ link Í NAILED CONNECTIONS (ONE PER O&M TIMESLOT) 64 kbit/s 64 kbit/s O&M TIMESLOT RXCDR O&M TIMESLOT ÑÑ Î ÑÑ Ñ Ñ Î Í 2 Mbit/s link 2 Mbit/s link ÎÑÍ BSS1 Ñ BSSn BSS2 BSS4 BSS3 Figure 1-11 Interconnection of network elements and OMC-R 1–24 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

BSS1 from Figure 1-11 is used as the example BSS. is shown in Figure 1-12. and the links between them. X.25 OMC- R OML RXCDR LINKS MSI RXCDR: MTL SITE0 LINK X MSC C KSW MSC D R MSI XBL LINK BSS MSI BSS1: SITE0 RCU KSW COLLOCATED BSC/BTS MSI MSI DRI BTS BTS BSS1: SITE1 BSS1: SITE2 MCell RCU K M N TCU M + S S I C DRI W I U RSL U LINKS Figure 1-12 Simplified GSM network showing devices and links of BSSs EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–25 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Operations and maintenance of a BSS or RXCDR Operations and maintenance of a BSS or RXCDR Simplified network A simplified network showing some of the hardware devices in the different sites.

NE RESPONSES TO – FAULT HANDLING MMI COMMANDS – SITE CONFIGURATION 3. The alarms can be configured to update a network map. link. via the RXCDR and the X. and runs only one software load. where they are processed into a standard format. SOFTWARE and NE 4. The alarms or events can also be displayed on the operator terminals. or function) and alarms (changes which could be service affecting) are sent to the OMC-R.0. diagnosing the problem. 1–26 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. The primary function of the OMC-R is to monitor the health of the radio network. MMI COMMANDS 1. Regardless of the number of BTSs. the entire load is first sent to the BSC which then distributes the appropriate load objects to the configured BTS. When loading a BSS. links and functions as the BSS. and generates events and alarms in the same way. Each BSS and RXCDR contains an operational database.x. This data is stored in a database at the OMC-R. by remote logging in to the BSS or RXCDR. NE DATABASE DATABASE DOWNLOADS UPLOADS 3. OMC-R TO NE OMC-R NE TO OMC-R 1. in which the configuration data for all the devices and links in the SITES within the NE is stored. The network operator then takes action to handle the reported fault.O&M information flow between OMC-R and NEs ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 O&M information flow between OMC-R and NEs Summary of information flow A summary of the information flow between the OMC-R and the NEs is shown in Figure 1-13. The RXCDR receives the same software load as a BSS. Performance measurements for the different BSS and RXCDR are periodically routed every 30 or 60 minutes to the OMC-R as raw statistics in a data file. it just implements a different part of it. The RXCDR contains several of the same devices. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . which will give the operator a visual warning by causing the appropriate BTS or BSC to flash. NE DATABASE DOWNLOADS NE NE NE NE NE Figure 1-13 Information flow between the OMCĆR and BSSs Information flow All events (changes of state of a hardware device. depending on how the network operator (or OMC-R administrator) has configured them. A copy of the active BSS load is stored at the OMC-R.25 packet switch. the BSS is regarded as a single NE. and processed into statistics which provide valuable information for efficient network management and planning. PERFORMANCE DATA – SITE RESETS (RAW STATISTICS) 2. EVENTS & ALARMS (VIA GUI OR REMOTE LOGIN) 2. as is a copy of the previous version of the BSS software. These software loads must be compatible with the load installed on the OMC-R. A backup copy of the active database is kept at the OMC-R.4. for example BSSGSM 1. within different windows. and taking appropriate action.

EMOTOROLA LTD.25 PACKET ÓÓÓ ÓÓ SWITCH X.25 ÓÓÓ INTERFACE ÓÓ ÓÓÓ ÓÓ TO GSM NETWORK X.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R system configuration OMC-R system configuration Motorola OMC-R A typical hardware configuration of a Motorola OMC-R. The GUI server is a fast high specification machine that allows older machines to run the display software while it runs the GUI sessions. for specific information the OMC-R Bill Of Materials (BOM) should be consulted. X. and comprises a central System Processor and several Man-Machine Interface (MMI) processors that also provide colour operator workstations. is shown in Figure 1-14. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–27 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .25 MULTIPLEXER OMC-R SYSTEM PROCESSOR Laser Printer LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN) OSI processor OMC-R GUI client – Operator Workstations + GUI Server (optional) Figure 1-14 An example Motorola OMCĆR system configuration Typical hardware configuration Each processor is a complete UNIX system. and a laser printer. NOTE Some systems may be configured differently.

11 driver software is loaded in the MMI Processors. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . or other OMC-Rs. 1–28 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. – X. S The NEs in the GSM network . Bridges and gateways can also be used to connect to other computer systems such as an NMC.25 software is loaded in the System Processor.11. – Ethernet. The OMC-R network can be extended to include further MMI Processors.X. or secondary GUI servers. The X. The operating processes are linked between machines by Interprocess Communication (IPC). provides control and support for the protocol stacks which interface the OMC-R with the following: S Internal OMC-R communications: – TCP/IP.Communications handling ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Communications handling Communications software The OMC-R communications software. and the X.25. The remaining communication software is shared between the two processors. connected either locally or via a Wide Area Network (WAN).

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–29 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The Packet switch makes a maximum of 256 x X. (as shown in Figure 1-15).25 virtual circuits available for the exchange of O&M data between the OMC-R and the NEs. 2 Mbit/s 2 Mbit/s LINKS LINKS Packet switch / multiplexer HSI Card HSI Connections SYSTEM OMC-R SYSTEM PROCESSOR PROCESSOR Figure 1-15 Example Packet switch / multiplexer connections Packet switch The connection between the System Processor and the packet switch could be direct or connected through a private or public packet data network. to receive O&M data using a packet switch / multiplexer. EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Packet switch / multiplexer Packet switch / multiplexer Connections The OMC-R is connected to the GSM Network.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .O&M network traffic capacity ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 O&M network traffic capacity Peak traffic capacities The System Processor supports the following O&M peak network traffic capacities: S 100 x X. with a packet length of 128 bytes. 1–30 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. or up to 30.000 traffic channels.000 traffic channels. aggregate. S 100 kbit/s aggregate.25 packets per second.25 virtual circuits. S The System Processor can be configured to handle up to 5. associated with a maximum of 120 NEs via the 256 x X.

EMOTOROLA LTD.1/4.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R System Processor OMC-R System Processor Introduction to the System Processor The hardware configuration of the GSR4 System Processor (for example. Thus. SUN HSI/S card (4-port HSI interface) E3000 OMC-R System Processor Graphics Head 4 (or 7) x 2. The external disks require an additional disk controller that is already available. All system and data areas are mirrored for redundancy. and configuring out the broken hardware.1 handles hardware failure by rebooting on failure.high-end System Processor The System Processor running Solaris 2.2 Gb disks (Internal and External) Or E3500 OMC-R System Processor System Processor Graphics Head 4 (or 8) x 9. System Processor System specifications The System Processor software is installed on internal and external disks for the E3000 system and on Internal disks only on the E3500 system. the number of CPU processors. disk capacity) can be varied depending on whether the low-end TCH or high-end TCH OMC-R is chosen. Table 1-2 (software) and Table 1-3 (hardware) show the specifications for the System Processor. the Scaleable OMC-R provides easy and cost effective expansion from low-end TCH configuration to high-end TCH. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–31 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The software requirements are the same for both the low-end and high-end Scaleable OMC-R configurations.5. memory.1 Gb disks (Internal) Figure 1-16 Scaleable OMC-R .

4 Applixware Applix Data 4.5.0 Netscape Navigator 4 Licensing FlexLM 6. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .UC3 ISQL 6.4 TK 4.13.01 IXI Motif User Pack 1.2.1 (network edition) Sunlink X25 9.2 HSI/S driver software 2.1 Solaris 2.1 Common Desktop Environment (CDE) 1.1 Solstice Backup 5.0.OMC-R System Processor ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Table 1-2 GSR4 System Processor software requirements Software Applicable to both low-end TCH and high-end TCH SUN Solaris 2.0 1–32 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.3 SunVTS 2.4.3 Applix Spreadsheet 4.2 Expect 5.01 Informix 7 OnLine 7.1 AnswerBook NS Transition Kit 1.3 Shareware TCL 7.0.13.1A Interleaf Interleaf Worldview 2.5.4d 1 2 4d X window X11R5 Patch level 26 system TCSI OSP 4.2 Solstice DiskSuite 4.03 UC1 WINGZ 1.0 Symon 1.19 Netscape p Netscape Enterprise Server ((Webserver)) 3.UC2 ESQL 7.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–33 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .1 or 4 x 4. SparcStorage multipack- SMCC 8.8 Gb (in 4 x 2.5” 1.1 or 7 x 4. or to be connected to a public packet switched network.7/29.2) SparcStorage multipack.4 Gb (in 7 x 2.4/1.1 Gb SCSI–2 disk (7x 2.2 Gb disks) or 7 x 4. Twisted pair interface Dial-in modem ISG 3265 Fast (optional) Console Graphics Head Drives Internal 644Mb CD-ROM 3.2 Gb disks) Backup SMCC 12–24 Gbyte DAT tape drive I/O Slots Fast Wide Intelligent SCSI Sbus. This allows the Scaleable high-end OMC-R to be used where there is existing packet switching and multiplexing equipment available. I/O (GSM 1 x HSI/S card 2 x HSI/S card Network Connection) Printer Network printer Network Ethernet.1 or SMCC 14.1 Gb SCSI–2 Internal Disk – 1 disk pack of disk (4 x 2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R System Processor Table 1-3 System Processor hardware specifications using E3000 Hardware (Low-end TCH only) (High-end TCH only) Model Sun Enterprise 3000 Processor (CPU) 1 x 250/336MHz or 2 x 250/336 4 x 250MHz UltraSPARC-I MHz UltraSPARC-I (subject to change) (subject to change) Memory 256 MB 512 MB External Cache 1 MB (subject to change) 1 MB (subject to change) Disk Capacity Internal Disk – 2. EMOTOROLA LTD.44Mb Internal Floppy I/O boards 1 2 CPU memory 1 2 boards Connection to GSM Network The Scaleable OMC-R uses Sunlink X.2) 2.25 application software and connects to the network using the HSI/S card.1 4 x 4.

5” 1.1 OS. Twisted pair interface Dial-in modem ISG 3265 Fast (optional) Console Graphics Head Drives Internal 644 Mb CD-ROM 3. Feature description Table 1-5 gives a comparison between the two Scaleable OMC-R configurations.000 30.44 Mb Internal Floppy I/O boards 1 2 CPU memory boards 1 2 OMC-R application software impact Existing system processor OMC-R application software has been ported to work on the Solaris 2. continued 1–34 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . .OMC-R System Processor ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Table 1-4 System Processor hardware specifications using E3500 Hardware (Low-end TCH only) (High-end TCH only) Model Sun Enterprise 3500 Processor (CPU) 1/2 x 336 MHz 4 x 336 MHz Memory 256 MB 512 MB External Cache 1 MB (subject to change) 1 MB (subject to change) Disk Capacity Internal Disk = 4 x 9.000 (minimum 5.1 Gb Internal Disk = 8 x 9. There is no performance impact due to the Scaleable high-end OMC-R.000) NEs supported 15 120 Total GUI sessions 5 10 supported Dial-up sessions per MMI 1 1 processor Total remote dial-up 2 2 sessions Remote login sessions 6 20 Simultaneous downloads 6 12 Simultaneous uploads 4 15 .5. Table 1-5 Scaleable OMC-R configurations (Maximum values) Feature Scaleable OMC-R Scaleable OMC-R low-end high-end Maximum traffic channels 5.1 Gb Backup SMCC 12–24 Gbyte DAT tape drive I/O Slots 2 x Sbus slots SunFastEthernet 2 x FC-AL sockets I/O (GSM Network 1 x HSI/S card 2 x HSI/S card Connection) Printer Network printer Network Ethernet. .

1 UNIX operating system. and contains a Database Management System (DBMS) from Informix which is configured for storing the performance statistics. Configuration The configuration of the System Processor is shown in Figure 1-17.25 Applix HANDLER CM cm_mib MIB MMI Figure 1-17 System Processor software configuration EMOTOROLA LTD.5.1) CONSOLE Event Log OMC-RGSM ETHERNET FOR OMC-R SYSTEM DATABASE GSR 4 CONTROLLER ADMINISTRATOR [Informix] X. SYSTEM SOLARIS PROCESSOR (2. There is an Event Management Information Base (EM MIB) that contains the incoming events and alarms which update the map displays to present the operator with visual indication of alarms in the network. The System processor also contains the CM MIB which holds the configuration data required to run the network maps. It uses a Solaris 2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R System Processor Feature Scaleable OMC-R Scaleable OMC-R low-end high-end Sustained event rate 8 alarms+2 state changes 12 alarms+3 state changes Maximum event burst 20 events/s over 20 mins 60 events/s over 20 mins External Interface (OMC-R to BSS) The OMC-R–BSS (rlogin) and the SMASE–NMASE interface will not be affected by the high-end Scaleable OMC-R.5. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–35 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

25 network.OMC-R GSM application software: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R GSM application software: overview OMC-R processes The functional software areas of the OMC-R are split between the OMC-R System Processor and the MMI processor. The processes of the OMC-R application software installed on the System Processor. S Event/Alarm Management. the OMC-RGSM GSR 4. It manages events and alarms routed to the OMC-R from NEs. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Configuration management allows the operator to perform network configuration tasks. Performance management controls the collection. provide database storage facilities. Load management provides a facility for uploading and downloading NE software loads. S Software Load Management. 1–36 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. and storage of NE performance statistics. S Performance Management. Event/Alarm management provides a mechanism at the OMC-R for alarm surveillance. perform the network element O&M management tasks. are shown in Figure 1-18. and NE operational databases. OMC-RGSM GSR 4 (System Processor) SW Load Performance Event/Alarm Management Configuration Management Management Management Device Remote Event Login Management Interface Figure 1-18 OMC-RGSM (System Processor) software components System Processor software elements The software elements that constitute the System Processor software. administration. The operator is provided with a front end to all these processes at the OMC-R MMI. and additional front end functionality is provided by command line utilities. The OMC-R System Processor software elements are as follows: S Configuration Management. processing. and provide the interface to the network elements via the X. It also provides a means of managing multiple copies of software loads for back-up purposes. or generated within the OMC-R. and to maintain all details of the network configuration at the OMC-R.

S Event Interface. Device management allows the operator to perform fault management and configuration management at the OMC-R. The remote login software manages the X.25 alarm connections to the network elements. S Device Management. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–37 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Remote login is a means by which the operator performs configuration management. The event interface handles the X.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R GSM application software: overview S Remote Login.25 connection for remote login to network elements from the OMC-R. and some performance management procedures at the network elements. The OMC-R supports most hardware devices and software functions located at the remote network elements. then translates and forwards incoming events and alarms to the Event/Alarm Management functional software. fault management. EMOTOROLA LTD.

disks.5. and setting up backup schedules for file systems and databases. Features The Solaris 2. which facilitates the fast asynchronous transfer of large amounts of data between memory and disk. Solstice Backup provides simple centralized administration. This provides users with a flexible open user environment that has a common look and feel across all major UNIX desktops. S Solstice AdminSuite 2. secure and reliable operating environment. administrative data. printers. through a single unified view of the entire data management operation from any point on the network.3.1 utilities.5. This environment allows transparent access to network resources.5. Tools and applications The Solaris 2. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 1–38 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. including Kernal Asynchronous Input/Output (KAIO).1 operating system ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 UNIX: Solaris 2.5. file systems.1 Operating System includes the following tools and applications: S Solstice Backup 5. Included with this release is the Common Desktop Environment (CDE). high performance backup. Intuitive user interfaces simplify administrative tasks such as configuring clients and servers. Solstice AdminSuite software provides an integrated collection of graphical user interfaces to perform administrative tasks such as managing hosts. users. Advantages The main advantages of this operating system are that it is designed to provide: S An enhanced multi-architecture solution for systems to support Internet/Intranet connectivity. This provides the platform for the OMC-R software applications and provides facilities for system administration. The Solaris operating system allows the OMC-R to be administered as a typical UNIX system. groups.UNIX: Solaris 2. and allows frequently used UNIX commands to be iconized.1 operating system Platform The SUN system processor operates under the Solaris 2. and serial port devices.1 release contains several 64-bit features.1 operating system. S A system offering a scaleable. The Solstice Backup software allows a Solaris operating system server to provide automated. recovery and storage management services to machines on the network. It is also possible to drag and drop between files and commands.5.

either by system users or other OMC-R application areas. complete definition of the data to be stored. are predefined by the database schema and their physical structure cannot be altered. while the EM sub-schema stores the subscription lists used to subscribe to incoming events and alarms (see Figure 1-19). The DBMS manages access to its own stored data and provides its own data protection. rows. The disk is hardware mirrored to provide a high level of protection against loss of data in case of hardware failure. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–39 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . It provides a formal notation data model of tables. RAW STATISTICS TABLES NETWORK CONFIGURATION PM SUB-SCHEMA TABLES PM REPORT TABLES EM SUBSCRIPTION LISTS EM SUB-SCHEMA Figure 1-19 OMC-R database – database schema breakdown Database size The database can be sized at installation to meet the requirements of the GSM Network.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R database The OMC-R database RDBMS The OMC-R database. It is made up of a PM sub-schema and an EM sub-schema. The PM sub-schema is used for storing processed performance statistics from the GSM Network. only their contents can be manipulated. A database schema is a data model of a precise. and keys. maintained at the system processor. uses an industry standard Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) known as INFORMIX. The tables in which the data is stored. columns. EMOTOROLA LTD. Database schema: defined The OMC-R database may be thought of as a centralized data store for data that will need to be further manipulated.

The OMC-R system administrator is provided with a facility for on-line back-up of the OMC-R database. S Database back-up and administration utilities. 1–40 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .The OMC-R database ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Applications and utilities The management of the OMC-R database is accomplished using INFORMIX-OnLine utilities and OMC-R applications built around them. The OMC-R database supports the following applications: S Structured Query Language (SQL) and Applix access for custom reporting. This avoids halting the OMC-R during routine back-up operations. SQL and Applix are industry standard languages. which can be used to write applications to extract performance management data from the database. Read-only access to the data is available.

Information in the CM MIB includes lists of the various types of nodes in the GSM network.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The CM MIB The CM MIB Configuration Data The System Processor contains the CM Management Information Base (CM MIB) that holds all the configuration data needed for the network maps of the OMC-R MMI and for cell parameter optimisation. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–41 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. with their attributes and interconnections. communicate with the CM MIB using an internal process called cm_mib. as well as lists of maps containing nodes and connections on each map. or S Detailed View Forms (for each object). The CM MIB can be populated with NE data by selecting: S Audit. All the MMI processors which run the NSS feature.

the GUI server. 1–42 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. and several SPARCstation 5s known as GUI Client processors. This configuration allows each SPARC some degree of independence while still allowing resources to be shared. which runs the same version. The faster GUI server runs the GUI sessions while the slower machines run the display process only. SPARCUltra 5/1 SPARCUltra 5/1 MMI MMI GUI SERVER GUI SERVER SPARCstation 5 SPARCstation 5 MMI MMI GUI CLIENT GUI CLIENT SPARCstation 5 SPARCstation 5 MMI MMI GUI CLIENT GUI CLIENT LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN) TO SYSTEM PROCESSOR Figure 1-20 OMC-R SPARCstation configuration A standalone server The OMC-R MMI expects all the SPARCstations to be configured as standalone NFS (Network File System) servers. describes a central store for the software. The OMC-R MMI software is made accessible over the LAN by configuring the SPARCstations in the following way: S A SPARCUltra1 is installed as a GUI Server to the SPARCstation 5s. LAN configurations The SPARCstation 5s display the GUI and function as operator workstations. The term server. Each SPARCstation is a complete UNIX system. A typical configuration is shown in Figure 1-20. Typically the OMC-R configuration contains a single SPARCstation 20 or SPARCUltra 5/1. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . older machines and the OMC-R GUI is made accessible to the 5s through NFS.The SPARCstation configuration ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The SPARCstation configuration Running the OMC-R MMI SPARCstations are primarily concerned with running the OMC-R MMI. used in this context. This configuration allows the use of slower.

such as an MMI processor configured to run the OMC-R MMI from a remote site. In networks containing two OMC-Rs. a MMI processor in the local OMC-R is configured to monitor a remote OMC-R during the night shift (the local OMC-R is known as the night concentration centre). EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The SPARCstation configuration Other configurations Other network configurations may also exist. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–43 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

Table 1-6 GUI Processor hardware specifications Hardware Applicable to both Low End and High End Model Sparc 5 model 170E.3 Informix I–Connect 7.19 Applix (GUI server only) Applix 4. One of the machines must be configured as an GUI server.44Mb Internal Floppy Printer Network Printer Table 1-7 GUI Processor software specifications Software Applicable to both Low End and High End SUN Solaris 2.1 OS patches Solstice Backup Client 5.3 Wingz Wingz 1. The GUI processor will be configured with software as shown in Table 1-7.1 (GUI server only) TCL (GUI server only) TCL Version 7.2 Gbyte disk drives Network Ethernet.13 UC2 X11 X11 Release 5 Version 26 Desktop Motif 1.0. 1 x 250MHz or 1 x 270 MHz Memory 64 MB or 256 MB Disk Capacity 1/2 x 2.5” 1. SMCC Drives 3. An example of an GUI processor hardware configuration is shown in Table 1-6.2 Interleaf Ileaf Worldview 2. Sparc Ultra 1 or Sparc Ultra 5 Processor (CPU) 1 x 167MHz. Each Processor will support one GUI session.1 Solaris 2. The additional machines mount the display software from the GUI server. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .0.x single user licence Sun Solaris CDE 1. Twisted pair interface CD–ROM Internal CD–ROM drive. The total number of GUI sessions supported is 10.MMI Processor ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 MMI Processor Server Client Relationship Up to 10 additional processors can be added to the system.2.1/Solstice AdminSuite 2.4.5. as on the standard OMC-R.4 Expect (GUI server only) Expect Version 5.1 or 4.1 1–44 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.5.5G for SPARC 2.

Display Processor Definitions This matrix clarifies the differences between the MMI and GUI concepts.5. the MMI Server having additional RAM and disk space to enable it to serve files to the MMI Client. For this reason.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 GUI Server GUI Server Overview GSR2 (1. but with a higher minimum hardware specification to ensure adequate performance on the new release.6. GSR4 (1.0. but only the high end MMI Server (Ultra 5) will have the power to run as a GUI Server. The GUI Server and GUI Client machines on the other hand are much more dissimilar – the GUI Server being significantly more powerful to run the specified number of GUI sessions. Table 1-8 Processor differences Processor GUI Files GUI GUI Display Number of Process processes per machine MMI Server Local Local Local 1 MMI Client Remote Local Local 1 GUI Server Local Local Remote N GUI Client Not Remote Local 1 applicable The MMI Server and MMI Client machines have similar specifications. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–45 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD.0) saw the introduction of GUI Servers and GUI clients alongside MMI Servers and MMI Clients. the GUI Client simply acting as an X-display.0) continues this trend. MMI Servers and MMI Clients can both be re-deployed as GUI clients. or as replacements for them.0.

giving redundancy in the event of a failure to a SPARCstation 20. or on a SPARCstations 20 that has been installed as a GUI server. They are usually configured as standalone NFS (Network File System) servers. 1–46 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. The SPARCstation 5s are complete UNIX systems and are loaded with the same UNIX operating system as the SPARCstation 20.SPARCstation 5 ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 GUI Client . S 20 inch colour terminal.GUI Client . MMI PROCESSOR OPERATOR SunOS MMI WORKSTATION Figure 1-21 SPARCstation 5/IPX hardware and software configuration Hardware features The SPARCstation 5s contain the following hardware features: S Local Disk 535/424 Mb (minimum configuration). 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .SPARCstation 5 Software configuration The Sun Microsystems SPARCstation 5 (the operator workstations) displays the GUI. This GUI may be installed on either the System processor. A second SPARCstation 20 is also designated as a GUI server to half the GUI clients. In all cases the OMC-R MMI software is executed on the local SPARCstation 5s.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–47 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . which is configured as a GUI server for both region A and region B.21 GUI SERVER ROUTER GUI CLIENT SYSTEM PROCESSOR Regional OMC-R B (Remote) Figure 1-22 Night concentration configuration EMOTOROLA LTD. This means that only one SPARCstation 20 is required. PRINTER PRINTER GUI SERVER LAN BRIDGE/ X.SPARCstation 5 Night concentration Figure 1-22 shows a night concentration centre with one SPARCstation 20.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 GUI Client .21 GUI ROUTER LAN SERVER GUI SERVER ROUTER (REGION A) GUI GUI CLIENT SERVER (REGION B) SYSTEM Leased PROCESSOR Line Concentration centre Regional OMC-R A (local) PRINTER LAN GUI SERVER BRIDGE/ X.

1. This means that apart from equipment repair and replacement.The OMC-R MMI: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The OMC-R MMI: overview Graphical User Interface (GUI) The OMC-R MMI provides a Graphical User Interface (GUI). . and network administration can be executed through a single focal point.6. all site configuration changes. The OMC-R GUI Front Panel and the icons are shown in Figure 1-23. which enables operators to easily interact with the OMC-R application software on the System Processor. audits.1 – 1. and to carry out the various GSM network management functions.3 Figure 1-23 T he OMCĆR GUI Front Panel 1–48 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. troubleshooting. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

S Event Management (Event Mgmt). Click on this icon to acknowledge the alarm and open an alarm window. EMOTOROLA LTD. Additional information For complete information on the OMC-R Front Panel icons. S Configuration Management (Config Mgmt). S Load Management (Load Mgmt). S Performance Management (Performance). Management of the set-up file is the responsibility of the OMC-R System Administrator. Version number The version number shows the OMC-R operating software version in use. S Find facility. Click on this button to exit from the OMC-R GUI. S Administration (Admin). S Exit. S Event Logs. refer to the OMC-R Online Help facility by clicking on the Help icon. refer to Operating Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100-201) or Operating Information: Scaleable OMC-R System Administration (GSM-100-202).0.0 is compatible with BSGSM 1. The operator name is assigned to the operator’s login ID in a set-up file. S Remote Login. and audio indication is also given if the audio feature is enabled.X. S Alarms. the OMC-R MMI and the OMC-R application software. For more information. This icon flashes if there is a new alarm. OMC-RGSM 1.X. S Help. Operator name The operator name is displayed at the top left side of the GUI Front Panel.5.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC-R front panel: overview OMC-R front panel: overview Icons The OMC-R GUI Front Panel and the Expert panel contain the following icons: S Console.6. Both parts always have the same version number. S Network Maps (Maps). Other Front Panel icons The system status display is positioned to the right of the icon controls. Counters indicate the number of each different alarm severity currently active throughout the system and the total number of alarms unhandled. for example. S Xterm. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–49 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The OMC-R operating software is usually compatible with two versions of NE operating software. The OMC-R operating software consists of two parts.

Example console messages Example messages which may be displayed in a console window are: S At the start of an GUI session. or when the options available on the OMC-R console menu bar are deselected. S When the MMI connection is successful a warning or information message will be displayed: OMC-R Processes are initializing All Essential OMC-R Processes Have Been Started S If an OMC-R process fails a warning message is displayed indicating which OMC-R process is affected. Messages are displayed from the different processes of the OMC-R application software. a connection is established using the OMC-R Init process. A pop-up window is automatically displayed for all warning messages and to indicate an OMC-R process has failed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . followed by an information message: Restart the GUI to Reconnect to OMC-R Init Process 1–50 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S If the OMC-R Init process dies. Figure 1-24 OMC-R console window When the operator first displays the OMC-R console window. If the connection fails a warning message will be displayed. a warning message is displayed.Using the front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons Console Select this icon to display the OMC-R console window shown in Figure 1-24. This window is used to display information on OMC-R processes. warning and information messages are displayed in the window.

and object attributes are consistent at the NE and the CM MIB. such as a communications failure. The attributes of the objects represented on the tree reflect their actual settings in the network. Information relating to the NE is stored at the CM Management Information Base (CM MIB). Audits are carried out to check if the same objects. but only if the object already exists or at the time of saving in an object detailed view. The changes can be propagated out onto the network using the audit function. and changed using forms called Detailed Views. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–51 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . (GSM-100-403) for detailed information regarding Configuration procedures. The attributes of these objects can be viewed. Cell parameters can be modified to improve the overall performance of the network. an NE issues an event to the OMC-R to indicate that a statistics file is ready for collection. The Navigation Form gives a containment tree representation of all configurable objects. S Monitoring any events or alarms subscribed to in an event or alarm display window. Groups of events and alarms are routed to the same display window through subscription lists. EMOTOROLA LTD. Alarms are sent to indicate a fault condition. The NEs report to the OMC-R through events. The main functions of Event Management are: S Defining the subscription criteria for grouping event or alarm information.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons Configuration Management Select this icon to display the Navigation Form. Further Information Refer to the Installation and Configuration: GSM System Configuration Manual. S Handling alarms viewed in an alarm display window. Alarms are a special type of event. For example. An object is any Network Element (NE) that can be configured from the Navigation Form. Event Management Select this icon to monitor events and alarms generated by the NEs.

1–52 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Network map. This feature provides a pull down menu based window environment. S NE contained devices form.Using the front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Performance Management Select this icon to gain access to the OMC-R Performance Management feature. based on Applix. to simplify data selection and give flexible report options. PM GUI can also be accessed from the following: S Navigation tree. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The Performance Management (PM) GUI also provides the Device Management of statistics for any Cell under the control of the OMC-R.

Load Management options For each NE. the entries in the window will be displayed in alphabetical order and according to NE type. This window will display an overall view of the software load information for the entire network. Multiple selection will be permitted for the following menu options: S Edit – New Software Load. All software load related options currently available for an NE are selectable from pull down menus within this window. In addition. EMOTOROLA LTD. S NE Type.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons Load Management The Software Load Management window will be displayed when the Load Management icon is selected on the OMC-R desktop panel. S Edit – Download – Enabled/Disabled. the following information is displayed: S NE Name. S Current and New CSFP software load. S Edit – New CSFP Software Load. will be capable of displaying 25 NEs before a scrollbar is used. S Current and New software load. The default action for double clicking on an entry in the Load Management window opens the NE Detailed View form. S Edit – Complete Load – Enabled/Disabled. When the Load Management window is opened. S Complete Load Enabled/Disabled. S Download Enabled/Disabled. The window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–53 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . the NE Software form includes a field indicating if download is enabled or disabled. when opened.

Incoming alarms are reported by a colour change in the NE and link icons. and details the administrative and operational states. From this list display a map of all. that is in-service. Maps Select this icon to display a scrollable map list. From this window the user can find NEs. An audible warning alarm is also available. it is possible to resynchronize alarm and state information for a device. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . A change in the state of the node is represented by a different icon. The network map provides an option to display a Status Summary window which summarizes the alarm states in the NE. The NEs and links are represented by different icon types. The network map also provides Alarm Display windows for individual NEs displaying the incoming alarm messages enabling alarm handling to be performed. The operator monitors the state of the network from this window. 1–54 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. the network. Colours are used to represent the alarm states of the NEs. Sites or Cells in the network by entering some or all of the following: S NE Name S Site Name S Site Id S Cell Name S GSM Cell Id Once the NE. Remote login to an NE is also available from the Options menu.Using the front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Find Select this icon to display the Find window. or on a geographical background map (depending on what is set up by the network administrator). or the complete network. Site or Cell has been found the operator can do the following: S Open a Navigation Tree with the node found at its root S Open a detailed view for a node S Remote login (RLogin) S Open a Contained Devices window for a node S Open a map for a BSS Refer to the manual Operating Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100-201) for Find procedures. and the Alarm icon flashing. From the Options menu. or part of. The network map shows Network Elements (NEs) and links on a solid colour background. out-of-service and unknown state.

A filtering option is also available to aid the search procedure. Batch or Navigation tree. It is possible to search and print Event Logs using this application.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons Remote Login This application enables the operator to have remote access to a Network Element. Logging of events can also be enabled or disabled from this application. Event logs Select this icon to open a window for searching event logs. All events sent to the OMC-R are stored in Event Logs. Select this icon to display a list of nodes on the network which can be logged into. Refer to manual Technical Description: BSS Command Reference (GSM-100-321) for information on MMI commands. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–55 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. Configuration of the BSS or RXCDR is done using TTY.

edit. Administration options The Admin Options window includes the following items: S Access Control . the scheduled operation can be aborted. Scheduled reports include Name. 1–56 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. view. Times. Status. The resync scheduler window contains a list of all scheduled resyncs. Select PM Reports Scheduler from the list to view the PM reports scheduler window.deletes Audit Logs after a predefined period of between 1 and 7 days. The reports scheduler window contains a list of all scheduled reports.enables the frequency of audits of the network to be scheduled. Status. S Audit Scheduler . Types and Owner information.enables performance management report logs to be checked. Types.enables the frequency of a resync of the network to be scheduled.enables the results of a network resync to be checked. Administration is related to the audit and resync functions. they will be allowed/disallowed options on the OMC-R user interface that could be used to alter OMC-R/BSS information. If a scheduled audit and resync has already started. They can be one-shot or periodic. which are also available in the Network and Configuration applications. RXCDR.enables the results of a network audit to be checked.enables the frequency of a performance management report on the network to be scheduled. S Audit Log Management . and also improves the way the OMC-R works by providing users with a more applicable selection of menu options from which to choose. Access control provides a level of safety so that OMC-R users cannot invoke commands accidentally/maliciously that they are not privileged to use. Status. S PM Reports Logs .enables the OMC-R System Administrator to change the command partitioning options for all users. They can be one-shot or periodic. If a scheduled audit or resync has not started. and Owner information. and Owner information. Depending on which security area the user has access to. S Resync Logs . Select Resync Scheduler from the list to view the resync scheduler window. and print scheduled audits and resyncs of the network. The user can create. Types.Using the front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Administration Select the Admin icon to view the Admin Options window. S PM Reports Scheduler . Scheduled audits include Name. S Audit Logs . BSS. The audit scheduler window contains a list of all scheduled audits. the operation can be deleted. They can be one-shot or periodic. Scheduled resyncs include Name. Select Audit Scheduler from the list to view the audit scheduler window. or SITE. S Resync Scheduler . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the front panel icons Xterm Selecting this icon opens an Xterm window. Help Select this icon to invoke the Online Help facility. If there are no further alarms. the user will be presented with a confirmation dialogue box. and the number of alarms that are Unhandled. Other front panel icons The System Status Display is positioned to the right of the icon controls. Click on this icon to acknowledge the alarm and open an alarm window. A Help option can also be selected from many of the windows shown throughout this manual. When this button is clicked with the mouse. Online Help for the Front Panel display and the Map function is provided. EMOTOROLA LTD. EXIT The EXIT soft button is located in the bottom right corner of the OMC-R front panel. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 1–57 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . the limit is predefined by X window software. There are two icons positioned beside the System Status Display: Alarms This icon flashes if there is a new alarm. and audio indication is also given if the audio feature is enabled (determined by the setting of the OMC–AUDIBLESEVERITY environment variable). The Help option is described in the OMC-R Online Help facility. prompting the user to confirm that they wish to exit from the OMC-R front panel. Six counters indicate the corresponding numbers of each different severity of alarm currently active throughout the system. the Alarm icon stops flashing. Multiple Xterm windows can be invoked.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Using the front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 1–58 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

Chapter 2 Getting Started EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–12 Configuration management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 2 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–2 Logging in to the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 The RC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Changing password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–15 Find . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–19 Other Front panel icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4 Enabling resync on OMC startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 Mouse button utilities . . . . 2–16 Maps . . . 2–4 Common Desktop Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Restarting the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–18 Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Printing an OMC MMI window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . i Introduction to Chapter 1 – Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Right mouse button . . . . . . . . 2–1 Using a SPARCstation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–17 Event logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–3 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Exiting the GUI . . . . 2–14 Load management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–10 Front panel icons . . . 2–13 Event management . . . . . . . . .CNFG file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8 Restarting/exiting the GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Remotely running the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8 Left mouse button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–5 CDE desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–20 Procedure . 2–4 Enabling resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–13 Performance management . . . . 2–18 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Middle mouse button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–17 Remote Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Console . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11 Expert desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–19 Running a remote MMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1 Monitor controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22 Introduction . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23 Peripheral controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23 Window menu buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 Opening xedit . . . . . . . 2–23 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–26 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . 2–24 Using the text editor xedit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 Editing a file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using window controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25 The edit commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S Remote X-terminals. S Using the text editor xedit.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Introduction to Chapter 1 – Getting started Introduction to Chapter 1 – Getting started Getting started This chapter gives an introduction to operators of the Motorola GSM OMC detailing: S Logging in to the OMC. S Drag . and hold the button while moving the mouse. S Double click . Using a SPARCstation overview The SPARCstation colour monitor and SPARC system unit controls are shown in Figure 2-1. EMOTOROLA LTD.means to press a button.means to click a button twice in rapid succession. S Restarting/exiting the GUI. S Mouse button utilities. Terminology Throughout this manual the following mouse terminology is used: S Click . S Use the VERTICAL CENTRING control to set the vertical picture positioning. S Remotely running the OMC. (The green LED Power On indicator on the monitor indicates that ac mains is available to the display). there can be some variations on the monitor controls. and described as follows: S Use the BRIGHTNESS and CONTRAST controls to provide a screen display which is comfortable to view in existing ambient light conditions. S Using window controls. to apply the ac mains to the display. S Use the VERTICAL STATIC CONVERGENCE and HORIZONTAL STATIC CONVERGENCE controls to control the colour separation. S Front panel icons. S Printing an OMC window. S Set the monitor ON/OFF switch to ON. S The Common Desktop Environment (CDE). S Running a remote MMI. NOTE Figure 2-1 depicts a possible version of a SPARCstation. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .means to press and release a button without moving the mouse.

Introduction to Chapter 1 – Getting started ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Monitor controls This diagram shows the monitor controls for a SPARCstation. NOTE Later models of the SPARCstation may have some of the monitor controls replaced with a remote control device. 3. VERT ICAL ST AT IC CONVERGENCE POWER ON INDICAT OR SPARC 10/20 SYST EM UNIT HORIZONT AL ON/OFF ST AT IC SWIT CH (AT REAR) CONVERGENCE CONT RAST VERT ICAL BRIGHT NESS CENT RING Figure 2-1 SPARCstation monitor controls 2–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.5 INCH SYST EM UNIT ON/OFF SWIT CH (AT REAR) MONIT OR ON/OFF SWIT CH . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . .

S mar10! . Procedure Log in to the OMC at the operator terminal as follows: omcuser 1. After switching ON or logging out. the omcuser ID is displayed as typed. Type in the password and press the Return key.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging in to the OMC Logging in to the OMC Prerequisite Before attempting to log in (LOGIN) a valid account and password must be available. suitable and unsuitable: S marion . It is important to change the password to something easily remembered but difficult to obtain. Type in the omcuser ID and press the Return key. However. The OMC processor password must be at least six characters long. Do not use birthdays. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .is not a suitable password. a login screen similar to Figure 2-2 displays. Information on changing passwords can be obtained from the system administrator. the password is not displayed. first names or words which appear in a dictionary. as the screen can be personalized it may have a different appearance. and should consist of a mixture of alphabetic and numeric characters and symbols. 2. The following are examples of passwords. EMOTOROLA LTD.is much better. trnmmi1 Login: Figure 2-2 Login screen – SPARCstation Changing password The password initially given with the ID should be changed immediately after the first successful LOGIN.

Default: not set Enabling resync The OMC is shipped with resync disabled. To enable resync. Default: N TIMER No. 2. Select Edit on the Network Detailed View. Select Save on the Network Detailed View. To enable this feature the following steps should be followed : 1. Select the Network icon and open its Detailed View. The three options in the RC. 2–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 5.CNFG file is read by the ResyncController process on the system processor. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the Configuration Management icon from the GUI. 4.CNFG Change the following line: ENABLERESYNC N to read: ENABLERESYNC Y Save the file and the change will then be picked up automatically. Enabling resync on OMC startup The OMC is shipped with resync on OMC startup disabled.CNFG file are detailed in Table 2-1.Logging in to the OMC ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The RC. The resync on startup feature is now enabled. of seconds the OMC will 150 to 3600 wait for resync to complete. Resync on OMC startup is a feature that results in a network resync being initiated every time the OMC starts up. Exit the Network Detailed View. Default: 600 AUTORESYNC Used to enable or disable Y/N autoresyncs.CNFG file The RC. edit the following file: /usr/gsm/config/global/RC. 3. 6. Change the Resync on Startup attribute to True. Table 2-1 OPTION Description Values ENABLERESYNC Used to enable or disable Y/N resync.

Extra workspaces can be created. and applications. workspaces. and closes them when done. copy. and a file manager which provides a graphical front end to the UNIX file system. A batch scheduler is also provided which allows the user to schedule cron jobs from the CDE. such as add_user. for example a personal workspace is useful for keeping together all the tools and applications needed for weekly reports and other administrative tasks. S The CDE Front Panel is a customizable collection of frequently used controls. Solstice Backup. move. For the root user the CDE Front Panel provides access to system administration utilities. S Workspaces are the screen areas where the user places the windows needed for work. available in every workspace. select choices. sized. open and delete. File manager File Manager which is accessible from the CDE Front Panel of the desktop provides a GUI to the UNIX file system. such as root and omcadmin have customized desktop menus to enable them to quickly access some of the tool required to carry out their respective administrative and maintenance tasks on the OMC system. S Controls are provided to manipulate objects. controls. files. and can be used to create. and use workspace objects such as. and indicators used in everyday work. The different OMC users. applications. find. providing windows. This would prevent the workspace which contains the OMC applications from becoming cluttered. File Manager allows the user to do a number of things with these objects. S Menus provide access to commands which manage windows and operate applications. or type information. add_host. reduced window clutter through the use of multiple panes. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . or placed in additional workspaces. The CDE Front Panel also provides the workspace switch for selecting a workspace. and the CDE Front Panel.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Common Desktop Environment Common Desktop Environment Introduction The Common Desktop Environment (CDE) provides an industry standard desktop manager for the OMC and is provided on different SUN workstations. arranges them. A summary of the functionality provided is as follows: S Windows contain software applications and are framed with controls so that they can be moved. folders. add_group. for example. EMOTOROLA LTD. and Port Manager. It supports operator configurable windows. CDE Front Panel The CDE Front Panel provides controls. CDE desktop The CDE desktop enables each user to manage their work. Each object is represented by an icon in File Manager.

Common Desktop Environment ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Style manager Style manager is available from the CDE. window behaviour and startup preferences. font. keyboard click volume. backdrop. Figure 2-3 Style Manager from the CDE desktop 2–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. It may be used to change desktop preferences such as colours. screen lock. mouse speed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

are the database load management utilities. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 2-4 Default menu (using right mouse button) EMOTOROLA LTD. Right mouse button The main functions available from the right mouse button (Figure 2-4).ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Mouse button utilities Mouse button utilities Introduction The mouse buttons can be used to access various utilities when logged in. Press and hold the right mouse button anywhere on the main screen background to view the Utilities menu. and editor tools. this menu can be configured by the System Administrator. NOTE Not all the options shown below are always available.

NOTE Not all the options shown below are always available.Mouse button utilities ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Middle mouse button Press and hold the middle mouse button on the main background to view a default menu as displayed in Figure 2-5. Figure 2-5 Default menu (using middle mouse button) Left mouse button Press and hold the left mouse button on the main background to view a default menu as displayed in Figure 2-6. These options allow the user to restart processes and utilities started during login. NOTE Not all the options shown below are always available. These options are used to open new xterm windows and manipulate those already in existence. this menu can be configured by the System Administrator. Figure 2-6 Default menu (using left mouse button) 2–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . this menu can be configured by the System Administrator.

If the command gui & is entered then the command is run in the background and UNIX commands can be entered in the normal way. or the following procedure can be used: 1. However. The window that the gui command was entered from will now function as a Console window for the GUI. use the middle mouse button. No further UNIX commands can be entered in this window. Restarting the GUI To restart the GUI the operator can click the middle mouse button to display the default menu and select StartGUI. and the Console option to select a new window. If the Console window icon is not visible.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Restarting/exiting the GUI Restarting/exiting the GUI Introduction The Front Panel is automatically displayed after the login procedure is completed. 2. Minimize the window from which the GUI was started. to open the window. EMOTOROLA LTD. 3. Double click on the Console window icon located bottom left of the desktop. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . there may be occasions where it is required to restart the Graphical User Interface (GUI). Enter the following command at the prompt: gui The GUI opens and the Front Panel is displayed.

Only the OMC and the associated MMI processes are closed by exiting in this manner. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .6.Restarting/exiting the GUI ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Exiting the GUI To exit the GUI (that is. The front panel display is closed.1. Figure 2-8 Exiting GUI confirmation window 2–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. to close down the Front Panel and all processes associated with it) use the following procedure: Click on the Exit button located in the bottom right corner of the Front Panel display (Figure 2-7).0 Figure 2-7 Front Panel display In the confirmation window (Figure 2-8) click Yes to exit the GUI. and all the processes initiated from the OMC are also closed down.1 . GSR4.1.

Expert desktop The Front Panel can be reduced in size to optimize screen coverage. The Front Panel includes ten GSM OMC icons. The Front Panel is re-sized (Figure 2-9). To reduce the screen size of the Front Panel. Alarm and Help icon. and an Xterm. Each icon represents a specific GSM OMC application. To view the alarm summary window right-click on the expert desktop and select the Alarm Summary option from the popup menu. right-click on the expert desktop and select Standard Desktop from the popup menu. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on an icon to select an OMC application. Figure 2-9 Expert desktop To return to the standard desktop. The Alarm Summary window (Figure 2-10) is displayed. The name of the logged in operator is displayed at the top left of the Front Panel.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons Front panel icons Introduction The Front Panel provides the top level controls (icons) and a display of the overall status of the network. Figure 2-7 shows the Front Panel display of the OMC. right-click on the Front Panel and select Expert Desktop from the popup menu. and the software version number is shown below the operator name. Figure 2-10 Alarm Summary window EMOTOROLA LTD. Alarm summary The alarm summary is not automatically shown within the expert desktop environment. The standard desktop (NO TAG) is displayed.

a connection is established using the OMC Init Process. S If the OMC Init Process dies. This window is used to display information on OMC processes. If the connection fails a warning message is displayed. a warning message is displayed indicating which OMC process is affected. Figure 2-11 OMC console window Example console messages Example messages which can be opened in a console window are: S At the start of a GUI session.Front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Console Select this icon to display the OMC Console window. S When the GUI connection is successful a warning or information message is displayed: <Date + Time> – NOTE: Connected to OMC Init Process S If an OMC Process fails. a warning message is displayed. A popup window is automatically displayed for all warning messages and to indicate an OMC process has failed. followed by an information message: <Date + Time> – WARNING: OMC Init Process is down Restart the MMI to Reconnect to OMC Init Process 2–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Warning and information messages are displayed from the different processes of the OMC application software.

Alarms are a special type of event. such as a communications failure. The attributes of the objects represented on the tree reflect their actual settings in the network. Refer to the manual Installation & Configuration: GSM System Configuration. The NEs report to the OMC through events. or at the time of saving within an object detailed view.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons Configuration management Select this icon to display the Navigation Form. Cell parameters can be modified to improve the overall performance of the network. and changed using forms called Detailed Views. an NE issues an event to the OMC to inform it that a statistics file is ready for collection. An object is any Network Element (NE) that is represented on the Navigation Form. S Handling alarms viewed in an alarm display window. The attributes of these objects can be viewed. Event management Select this icon to monitor events and alarms generated by the NEs. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . changes can be propagated out onto the network in two ways. Information relating to the NE is stored at the CM Management Information dataBase (MIB). Groups of events and alarms are filtered to display windows through subscription lists. The Navigation Form is a family tree representation of all configurable objects. The main functions of Event Management are: S Defining the subscription criteria for grouping event or alarm information. Alarms are sent to indicate a fault condition. Configuration is performed using detailed views. For example. EMOTOROLA LTD. using the audit function if the object already exists. Refer to Event management: overview in Chapter 3 of this manual for an further information on Event Management functionality. Audits are also carried out to ensure consistency between corresponding objects and their attributes at the NE and the CM MIB. (GSM-100-403) for detailed information on Configuration procedures. S Monitoring any events or alarms subscribed to in an event or alarm display window.

such as time period. Refer to Performance management: overview in Chapter 7 of this manual for further information regarding Performance Management functionality. and all reports can be output to the screen. number of sites. file or printer. which enables detailed analysis of performance. number of cells. 2–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Raw statistics are generated by an NE. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Raw statistics summaries reports (produces summary reports of a subset of raw statistics). collected and stored in the Performance Management(PM) database. S Raw statistics. Three main types of reports are provided: S Key statistics. Reporting criteria can be selected. The Performance Management window enables the user to produce reports specific to the performance of the network.Front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Performance management Select this icon to open the Performance Management window. which provide an indication of the quality of service being offered by the network.

with an option to abort. EMOTOROLA LTD. S Upload Status is a dynamically updated window giving a status report on any software uploads in progress. Current CSFP Load and New CSFP Software Load statuses. Refer to Load management: overview in Chapter 5 of this manual for further details on Load Management functionality. Select the Load Management icon to display the Software Load management window. with an option to abort. Download. S Download Status is a dynamically updated window giving a status report on any software downloads in progress. Current Software Load. and deletion of old software loads. New Software Load. S in the Software Load Management window a list is displayed of all BSS and RXCDRs in the system. Complete Load. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S in the Software Inventory Dialog window information is displayed on all software loads currently installed at the OMC. Information is also displayed on software loads currently installed at each of the BSS and RXCDRs such as.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons Load management This application enables the installation of new software loads.

Refer to Finding a Network Element. The Find feature is used to find NEs. S Cell Name. S Open a Contained Devices window for a node. S GSM Cell Id. When the NE. The following information can be entered to find an NE. Site or Cell in Chapter 4 of this manual for further details on Find functionality. Sites or Cells. S Open a Detailed View for a node. S Site Name. S Perform a TTY Rlogin to a BSS. S Open a Map for a BSS. S Site Id.Front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Find Select this icon to open the Find window. Site or Cell: S NE Name. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Site or Cell has been found the operator can: S Open the Navigation Tree with the node as its root.

A change in the state of the node is represented by a different icon. Remote Login This application enables the operator to have remote access to a Network Element. it is possible to resynchronize alarm and state information for a device. Batch. The Network map shows Network Elements (NEs) and links on a solid colour background. An audible warning alarm is also provided. EMOTOROLA LTD. From the Options menu. Refer to Using the map: overview in Chapter 2 of this manual for more information on the operation of the Network Management facility. The NEs and links are represented by different icon types. or the complete network. Remote login to a NE is also available from the Options menu. which are command line based. Refer to manual Technical Description: BSS Command Reference. GSM-100-321 for information on Base MMI commands. The alarm icon on the Front Panel starts flashing. or on a geographical background map (depending on what has been set up). which is menu driven. These windows display the incoming alarm/event messages for an NE and allow alarm handling to be performed. The operator monitors the state of the network from this window. Refer to Remote login in Chapter 4 for more information on Rlogin (TTY. The network map provides an option to open a Status Summary window which summarizes the alarm states in any selected NE. Select this icon to display a list of nodes on the network which can be logged into. Programming the BSS or RXCDR is done using Base MMI commands. The network map also provides alarm/event display windows for selected NEs.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons Maps Select this icon to display a scrolling map list. Colours are used to represent the alarm states of the NEs. Rlogin provides three methods: TTY and Batch. or Forms methods). From this list. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Incoming alarms are reported by a colour change to the NE and link icons which are affected. or part of the network. select a map of all. or Forms.

allows access to generated performance management reports. The resync scheduler window contains a list of all scheduled resyncs. The user can create. They can be one off or periodic. The audit scheduler window contains a list of all scheduled audits. 2–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Administration is related to the audit and resync functions. It is possible to search and Print Event Logs using this application.displays the results of a resync. S PM Report Logs . the operation can be aborted through the respective log window. The Admin Options window includes the following eight items: S Access Control . Types.enables an audit to be scheduled. S Audit Log Management – to open audit log admin detailed view monitor. They can be one off or periodic. and print scheduled audits and resyncs of the network. A filtering option is also available to aid the search procedure. If a scheduled audit or resync has not started. the operation can be deleted. Select Resync Scheduler from the list to view the resync scheduler window. and Owner information. S Audit Scheduler . If an audit and resync has started.allows the setting of access to destructive command areas in the OMC. S Resync Scheduler . Status. edit.enables a resync to be scheduled. or SITE. Status. Times. S Audit Logs . BSS. which are also available in the Network and Configuration applications. S PM Report Scheduler . Administration Select the Administration (Admin) icon to view the Admin Options window.enables a performance management report to be scheduled.displays the results of an audit. Logging procedures are described in more detail in Logging of events in Chapter 3. Refer to Administration: overview in Chapter 6 of this manual for more information on Admin functionality. S Resync Logs . Scheduled audits require Name. Select Audit Scheduler from the list to view the audit scheduler window. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Logging of events can also be enabled/disabled from this application.Front panel icons ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event logging Select this icon to open a window for searching event logs. view. Scheduled resyncs require Name. It is also possible to view and print audit logs and resync logs detailing the results of the operation. Types and Owner information. All events sent to the OMC are stored in Event Logs. RXCDR.

A separate counter indicates the total number of unhandled alarms. Alarms This icon flashes if there is a new alarm. Xterm Select this icon to open an Xterm window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Other Front panel icons The System Status Display is positioned to the right of the icon controls. Five alarm severity counters are present – each counter individually indicates the total number of alarms active throughout the system with a particular severity (see Chapter 3). Online Help is provided for all features. Alarms are described more detail in Checking alarms from the network map and other sections of Chapter 3 of this manual. Click on this icon to acknowledge the alarm. A Help menu option can be selected from many of the windows shown throughout this manual.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Front panel icons Help Select this icon to invoke the Online Help facility. an audio indication is also given if the audio feature is enabled (determined by the setting of the OMCAUDIBLESEVERITY environment variable). The alarm icon ceases flashing until the next alarm arrives. EMOTOROLA LTD.

Logout of the local MMI processor by entering the following command at the UNIX prompt: logout 2. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Contact the OMC System Administrator for the user ID of the remote user. Login to the local MMI processor using the remote user ID and password. 2–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. and is known as night concentration.Running a remote MMI ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Running a remote MMI Introduction Where there is more than one OMC in the network. it is possible to hand over management of one OMC to another. Procedure Use the following procedure to manage a remote OMC from a local MMI server processor: 1. it is necessary to logout of the remote OMC and login again as the local user. NOTE Only one OMC can be managed at any one time. To manage the local OMC when logged in as the remote user. This may be required during the night shift.

0 4.0 where <mmi_local> is a recognizable host name on the remote SPARCstation.11.1. Procedure Use the following procedure to login and run the OMC GUI remotely: 1. 3. then release the left mouse button to open a shell window.0 where <address> is the actual address for <mmi_local> in the /etc/hosts directory of the local SPARCstation.1:0. not in a window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Set the environment variable DISPLAY to the local SPARCstation where the GUI is to be displayed. or setenv DISPLAY <address>:0. Enter the following command to run the GUI: gui EMOTOROLA LTD. Open a UNIX shell and rlogin to the SPARCstation where the GUI to be run is located. and left click and select New Window from the popup menu.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Remotely running the OMC Remotely running the OMC Introduction The OMC GUI can be run using a workstation remotely located from the OMC. click on the desktop. login as described in Logging in to the OMC 2. Example: setenv DISPLAY 111. At the SPARCstation which will be used to run the GUI. using one of the following commands: setenv DISPLAY <mmi_local>:0. To open a UNIX shell.

With the mouse pointer in the screen background area.Printing an OMC MMI window ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Printing an OMC MMI window Introduction An operator can print what is displayed in an X-window. 2–22 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Procedure Use the following procedure to print what is displayed in an X-window: 1. The mouse pointer will change to a +. 2. 3. Position the window to be printed so that it is fully visible on the desktop. The system beeps once to indicate the start of the printing process and beeps twice to indicate the end of the process. select Print Window from the Root Menu popup menu. Click in the window to be printed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

EMOTOROLA LTD. The left or right sections will size horizontally while the top or bottom sections size vertically. S To resize a window – Click and hold the left mouse button in the window frame section and drag the mouse to size the window. S To maximize/ restore a window – Click with the left mouse button on the window Maximize/ Restore button. using the mouse. at either the window peripheral controls or the window menu button. S To raise a window – Click with the left mouse button on any part of the window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Peripheral controls Use the window peripheral controls as follows: S To move a window – Click and hold the left mouse button in the window title bar and drag the mouse to move the window to a new position. WINDOW FRAME SECT ION MAXIMIZE WINDOW T IT LE BAR MINIMIZE WINDOW MENU BUT T ON SCROLL BAR Figure 2-12 Window controls NOTE Some windows do not have the scroll bar facility.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using window controls Using window controls Introduction The window (Figure 2-12) shows the window controls that can be selected. (The window occupies the full screen). S To minimize (iconize) a window – Click with the left mouse button on the window Minimize button. The corner sections will size horizontally and vertically simultaneously.

For many OMC application windows the procedure to close them is to select File – Close from the window menu bar. S Move. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Moving the cursor to an edge or corner of the window provides the sizing cursor. as a button or as an option in the File menu) then the Close option on the window menu is inoperative. Clicking a second time sets the size of the window. Clicking a second time sets the position. S Size. Window menu options are as follows: S Restore – is shown greyed out as the window is currently restored. S Minimize – changes the window to an icon. Size is indicated by the cursor. S Lower – moves the window below the other windows on the screen. Move is indicated by the cursor. Selecting this option by clicking on the left mouse button allows the window to be moved by moving the mouse. S Close – where there is a Close option within the OMC application window (for example. S Unoccupy Workspace – removes the window from the workspace. S Occupy All Workspaces – opens up the window in all workspaces. S Occupy Workspace – opens up occupy workspace window. S Maximize – enlarges the window to full screen size. 2–24 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Using window controls ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Window menu buttons Click on the Window menu button with the left mouse button to access the Window menu.

The xedit window (Figure 2-13) is displayed. Opening xedit To open the text editor xedit: From the SPARCstation background. EMOTOROLA LTD. S Edit window. S Filename display. The text editor provides an easy to use window for creating and editing files without the need to use one of the command driven UNIX editors such as vi. S Message window. Displays the name of the file currently being edited. this window can be used as a scratch pad. A set of command buttons which allow the operator to carry out the functions described in the next subsection. Displays the text of the file that is being edited or created. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 2–25 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . xedit.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the text editor xedit Using the text editor xedit Introduction The SPARCstations are provided with an industry standard text editor. In addition. with the mouse cursor not in a window. as follows: S Commands section. click the right mouse button and select X editor from the popup menu. Displays xedit messages. xedit Quit Save Load Use Control-S and Control-R to search no file yet Figure 2-13 An xedit window Editing a file The xedit window is divided into four areas.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Load. 2–26 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Control character key sequences can be used to edit the text within the Edit Window. Loads the specified file and displays it in the Edit window. Quits the current editing session. unedited file and then overwrites the original file with the edited contents. See the xedit user manual for further details. Stores a copy of the original.Using the text editor xedit ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The edit commands The following command buttons are provided: S Quit. textedit displays a warning message and allows the file to be saved. If any changes have not been saved. S Save.

Chapter 3 Network Management EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 The map display . 3–9 Overview of alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1 Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 Graphic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Map links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 3 Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2 The EM proxy process . . . . 3–10 How alarms work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9 Display . . . . . . . . 3–4 Different maps available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13 Graphic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Alarm reporting . . 3–2 Map process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Map backgrounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–7 The alarms icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i The network status summary (NSS) feature . . . . . . . 3–10 State changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–4 Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Overview to alarms icon . . . . . 3–13 Two object groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11 Alarm icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1 How the network status summary feature works . . . . 3–3 Network maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 3–14 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . 3–4 Map modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 Map configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2 Configuration data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8 The alarm summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 MapNode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5 Consolidated alarm report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 State changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14 MapLink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9 How administrative and operational state changes work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13 Introduction to the CMMIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6 Additional information . . . . . . . . . 3–11 Colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–12 How maps are configured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 3–20 Automatically created map display objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18 Radio Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Configuration objects . . . 3–16 MSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 CommsLink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 PCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 RXCDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 Hardware Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–19 UserProfile . . . . . . 3–15 Configuration objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18 ProxyCell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–20 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 SITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–17 Software Functions . . . . . . . 3–19 Automatically created network objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16 BSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–18 Logical Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15 OMC . . . . . . . . . . . .

S Alarm summary. Features The NSS features are as follows (refer to Figure 3-1): S Network maps.1 – 1. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Alarms icon. and to ensure that the service to the customer is maintained.1. Alarm summary 4.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The network status summary (NSS) feature The network status summary (NSS) feature Maps The role of the OMC in a GSM network is to allow network operators to perform network management functions to ensure that the network operates efficiently.6.0 Incoming alarms Launches indicator network maps Figure 3-1 The network status summary options on the MMI front panel EMOTOROLA LTD. The OMC acts as a central collection point for measurement data used in the analysis of current performance and future planning of the network.

How the network status summary feature works ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How the network status summary feature works Map process When a network map. The CM MIB stores a series of managed objects to which relevant network configuration data and data needed to configure maps are assigned. for example. is selected via the Maps icon on the OMC front panel. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . All the MMI processors that run the network maps communicate with the CM MIB using an internal process called cm_mib. Network 1600b: Device Mode (see Figure 3-2). both a BSS and a Map are regarded as managed objects with different data. 3–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. MAP_ALARMS State change MAP_EVENTS events ALM_ALARMS Test-Network map CM MAPNODES MIB MAPLINKS FROM NETWORK MMI FRONT PANEL Alarm events Active NSS EM subscription list Proxy SYSTEM PROCESSOR MMI PROCESSOR Figure 3-2 Map processes Configuration data All the configuration data needed to run the network map are stored in the CM MIB. a map process is invoked on the MMI processor. which is maintained on the OMC System Processor. For example.

as configured in the CM MIB. Similarly. EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How the network status summary feature works The EM proxy process The EM Proxy process contains a list of all NEs. The Contained Devices form and alarm icons are also updated. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . representing the physical devices in the network. The process examines the incoming alarm messages and compares it to the list. Every two seconds a changed list is forwarded to the MMI processor. The list contains attributes which reflect the severity of the alarm and its handling state. These in turn update the Alarm Summary on the MMI front panel. incoming StateChangedEvents from SITEs and MMSs change the state of the attributes in the CM MIB. cells. and links. It updates the list if a change has occurred. This reflects the administrative and operational states of the different SITE and CommsLink configuration objects. and the attributes of the links and nodes on the active map. sites.

This window allows standard alarm handling to be performed. If the system is configured. Alarm state Incoming alarms are reported by a colour change in the NE and link icons on the map. The responses to the commands can be monitored. initiated to ensure consistency between the MIB and the Network. An alarm display window for an NE or SITE on the map Each map provides an alarm display window that subscribes only to incoming alarm messages for selected NEs or SITEs. The icon types represent in service (INS). Remote login via TTY window for an NE on the map Remote login. Provide resynchronization functions The system checks the active alarm list for any unhandled alarms and retransmits any state changes that have occurred since the previous Resync operation. containing all configured nodes and links. These are determined by the operational and administrative states of the SITE or MMS. which displays all NEs and links in the network is available. out of service (OOS). Network configurations can be updated using the Detailed Views and an Audit. and where available. containing all configured SITEs and links. S One map for each BSS or RXCDR. via a TTY window for a selected NE. MMS and SITE service states The map display uses three different icon types to represent state changes in SITEs (represented by SITE map nodes) and MMS devices (represented by map links). The alarms icon on the front panel will also flash. Each NE can be expanded to show the SITEs and links within the NE. Maps can be zoomed or expanded when displayed. and unknown states. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 3–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Different maps available The following maps are available for selection: S One map showing the full network configuration. more detailed maps of any part of the network can be displayed. allows BSS MMI commands to be sent to the NE. there will be an audible warning. (refer to Figure 3-2).Network maps ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Network maps Functionality Network maps show status information on the network and enable the following different types of functionality to be invoked for a selected NE: Current network configuration Network maps present the current network topology. A full network map. Refer to State Changes in the Map Display section. All other maps can be configured by the administrator.

a critical redundant device will produce a critical severity. and consolidates all the information relating to a failure in a report. When the MIB is initially populated with data from configuration files. Map configuration Different maps of the network can be displayed. capacity or redundancy loss. For example. For example. The OMC GUI provides facilities for the automated process. usually a geographical map. This is achieved by adding the new map configuration data to the CM MIB through the Detailed View forms and Audit. service. is assigned to the map object which configures the network map. This feature reduces the amount of alarms reported to the operator. the maps are displayed on a default map background consisting of a single solid colour. In the absence of any geographical map background files. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. Consolidated alarm report Consolidated alarm reports provide information about the OMC map so that the operator can identify problems in the network. To use map backgrounds other than the default. default maps are created. a background map.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Network maps Map modes There are two map modes available from the View menu: S Device Mode displays severities according to the impact of faults on devices. S Subscriber Mode displays severities according to the impact of faults on subscribers. followed by operator input for longitude and latitude data. depending on what type of information the operator needs to monitor.

it is unable to support user traffic. State changes The status of a SITE or MMS in the network determines whether it is in service (INS). or out of service (OOS). or an alarm clear message is received from the network. to flash. a SITE is INS if its operational state is enabled or busy.The map display ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The map display Map backgrounds When maps are initially configured they are displayed on a default map background of a single solid colour. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The different combinations of operational and administrative states determine whether the node or link is INS. or a SHUT-DOWN command in the case of a DRI/RCU. Alarm reporting If an icon on a map is flashing. Unknown and OOS device: An INS RXCDR An Unknown RXCDR 3–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. A background. usually a geographical map background. An operator or the NE fault management software can take a device OOS by issuing a LOCK command. that is. This is set when the map is configured. OOS. A cluster icon is used to represent a group of icons which are too close together to be displayed separately on the map. and its administrative state is unlocked. is assigned to the network map. or enabled/unlocked for a redundant device). it is supporting (or able to support) user traffic. The icon colour will automatically be reset to the colour representing Clear (defaulted to green) when the operator clears the alarm. The map display uses different icon types to represent a change in state of devices. Each map background is specified when defining the MapNode object. The SHUTDOWN command permits the operator to specify a time interval before the device changes from UNLOCKED to LOCKED state. that is. Map links Each map link represents one or more 2 Mbit/s links between the NEs or SITEs in the network. The device status is determined by the administrative state (controlled by the operator) and the operational state (controlled by the NE fault management application). where the faulty MSI/MMS is contained. or has an unknown state. it indicates that there are unhandled alarms for the device or devices it contains. For example. A LOCK is intrusive as it terminates all activity on the device when the command is executed. Alarms from links cause both the link and the node. The following are indications of the icons for an INS. This map points to a physical file describing the actual shape of the background map. The normal state of a device is INS (busy/unlocked.

the subscription lists that control alarm and state changes. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The map display An OOS RXCDR Additional information Refer to the OMC Online Help facility for a complete description of the network map display. EMOTOROLA LTD. and icon colours.

The alarms subscribed to in the subscription list. A single click on the alarms icon will stop any audible alarms that are ringing. Alarm display window The alarm display window can be opened by double clicking the alarms icon on the front panel with the mouse (Figure 3-3). Figure 3-3 Alarm display window Additional information Refer to the OMC Online Help facility for more information on the alarm display window. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 3-3 shows the alarm display with an alarm highlighted. Refer to Operation Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100-201).The alarms icon ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The alarms icon Overview to alarms icon The Alarms icon is a network level indicator that flashes and emits an audible warning (where available) when new alarms are received at the OMC. and the popup menu that is available when the user clicks the right mouse button in the alarm display window. where the operator can handle faults. The alarm summary situated to the left of the Alarms icon is simultaneously updated when alarms are received. All the active alarm messages originating from the selected NE or SITE in the network will be displayed in the window. can be changed. 3–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. which routes alarms to the display window.

1. This list updates continuously to reflect incoming alarms.6. ALARM SUMMARY GSR 4.1 – 1. Display The Alarm Summary (Figure 3-4) is displayed on the right side of the GUI front panel. It contains the following: S An up-to-date count of the different severities of the alarms in the Network. or if the handling state of an alarm changes to Clear.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The alarm summary The alarm summary Overview of alarm summary The alarm summary lists alarms of different severities in the network. changes in alarm severity. S The number of unhandled alarms at the OMC.0 Figure 3-4 The alarm summary EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . and the number of unhandled alarms.

MAP ON ICON REPRESENTING BTS1 ON OPERATOR THE MAP CHANGES TO OOS STATE WORKSTATION MMI MAPNODE (BTS1) MMI FRONT PANEL PROCESSOR GUIState MAP INS UNKNOWN OOS MAPNODES (BTS1) MAPLINKS BTS1 OOS OpState: Enabled Disabled Busy Shutting Down | AdminState: Locked Unlocked Not Equipped CM GUIState: INS OOS Unknown NETWORK OMC MSC MIB BSS1 RXCDR BSS2 BTS1 MSI1 REPRESENTS PREVIOUS ATTRIBUTE SETTING MMS1COMMSLINK REPRESENTS NEW ATTRIBUTE SETTING EM PROXY StateChangeEvent SYSTEM MAP_EVENTS PROCESSOR ACTIVE NSS SUBSCRIPTION LISTS StateChangeEvent (OPERATIONAL STATE OF BTS1 CHANGES TO DISABLED) Figure 3-5 State changes on the map 3–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 3-5 illustrates how the icons representing the SITEs or links are changed to reflect the change in state of the physical device.How administrative and operational state changes work ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How administrative and operational state changes work State changes Administrative and operational state changes are only relevant for SITEs and links on the map.

ALARMS SUMMARY WINDOW UPDATED. OPERATOR WORKSTATION 2. it denotes the presence of unhandled alarms for the device or devices it represents. MMI PROCESSOR MapNode (BTS1) Colour Red Yellow MMI FRONT PANEL GUIState Blue Pink Turquoise Green MAP Flashing MAPNODES (BTS1) Yes No MAPLINKS BTS1 ALARM 001 AlarmState: Being Handled | Not Being Handled CRITICAL AlarmSeverity: Critical | Major | Minor | Warning | Investigate | Clear NOT HANDLED [message fields] ALARM 002 AlarmState: Being Handled | Not Being Handled CM AlarmSeverity: Critical | Major | Minor | Warning | MIB Investigate | Clear [message fields] ALARM INFORMATION ALARM 003 AlarmState: Being Handled | Not Being Handled AlarmSeverity: Critical | Major | Minor | Warning | EM PROXY Investigate | Clear [message fields] CRITICAL ALARM EVENT MAP_ALARMS ALM_ALARMS Represents the previous attribute setting ACTIVE NSS Represents new attribute setting SUBSCRIPTION LISTS (ALARM RECEIVED CRITICAL ALARM FROM BTS 1) SYSTEM EVENT PROCESSOR Figure 3-6 Alarms and how they change on the map EMOTOROLA LTD. If an icon on a map is flashing. ALARMS ICON ON MMI FRONT PANEL STARTS FLASHING. 1.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How alarms work How alarms work Alarm icons Incoming alarms are reported by a flashing MapNode or MapLink icon. coloured to represent different alarm severities. Alarms from links cause both the MapLink and the MapNode containing the faulty MMS to flash and change colour. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ICON REPRESENTING BTS1 ON THE MAP CHANGES COLOUR TO RED MAP ON AND STARTS FLASHING.

How alarms work ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Colours The colour of any displayed icon or link reflects the severity of alarms in the device or group of devices represented by the icon. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Table 3-1 Colour Alarm Severity Default Red Critical ON Yellow Major ON Blue Minor OFF Pink Warning OFF Turquoise Investigate OFF Green Clear (no alarms) n/a (always on) When an icon represents a group of devices. 3–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. The icon colour will automatically be reset to the Clear colour when the operator clears the alarm or an alarm clear message is received from the network. In the event of alarms of different severities existing for the same device. a BSS represents all the devices in the BSC and BTSs within the BSS) an alarm occurrence in any device within the group will be shown at the displayed icon. (for example. The default colours are defined in Table 3-1. or group of devices the display colour reflects the most severe alarm condition.

GRAPHIC MAP MAP MAP LINK OBJECTS NODE NETWORK CONFIGURATION OMC OBJECTS BSS RXCDR MSC SITE MSI MMS RTF DRI CELL COMMSLINK Figure 3-7 The CM MIB showing the different groups of managed objects Two object groups There are two different groups of objects needed for maps: S Graphic objects. EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How maps are configured How maps are configured Introduction to the CMMIB The CM MIB stores a series of managed objects to which relevant configuration data is assigned. Hold all the data about the physical network. S Configuration objects. For example. All the MMI processors that run the Network Map communicate with the CM MIB using an internal process called cm_mib. both a BSS and a Map are considered to be managed objects requiring different data. and which take their data from the configuration objects. Used to build the different maps. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . There is a containment relationship between the different managed objects.

It defines the map name and the background map used with it.Graphic objects ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Graphic objects Graphic objects There are three graphic objects in the CM MIB. 3–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Figure 3-8 shows the containment relationship between the graphic objects. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . MapNode The MapNode graphic object specifies the type of NE or SITE to be represented on the map. A MapNode can represent any of the following configuration objects: OMC BSC MSC BSC–BTS RXCDR BTS MapLink The MapLink graphic object represents one or more CommsLinks. MAP MAPNODE MAPLINK Figure 3-8 The containment relationship for the graphic objects Map The Map graphic object represents a map which appears in the Map List Display menu on selecting the Maps icon from the front panel.

SurrndCellHC ** The Power Control Objects are : RxlevDlPC. RxlevDlHC. For example. and Radio Frequency. namely. The objects are grouped into four logical groups. This reflects the physical configuration of the devices in the network. Map ProxyCell UserProfile MapNode MapLink Network CM MIB BSS RXCDR CommsLink MSC OMC SWInventory PCU NESoftware SITE SoftwareLoad Hardware Software Logical Radio Devices Functions Links Frequency BTF LCF OMF RSL PATH RTFGroup DRIGroupCELL RTF DRI Cabinet CAGE EAS Processors COMB KSWpair GCLK IAS LAN TDM MSI GPROC BSP CSFP FreqHopSys SMSCBmsg Neighbour TestNeighbourHandover/ TRX Power Control * The Handover Control Objects are: RelTimAdvHC.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Configuration objects Configuration objects Configuration objects The containment relationship between the different configuration objects is shown in Figure 3-9. Hardware Devices. RxqualUlHC. RxqualDlHC. and determines the upward propagation of alarms. RxqualUlPC Figure 3-9 The containment relationship for the configuration objects Network The Network configuration object represents the overall network being managed. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. an alarm from an MSI object will also be propagated to its parent SITE. which in turn is propagated to its parent BSS. Logical Links. RxlevUlPC. RxqualDlPC. and it is already configured on delivery. RxlevUlHC. Software Functions. There is only one Network configuration object in the MIB.

There is usually only one OMC object in the MIB. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Configuration objects ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC The OMC configuration object represents the Operations and Maintenance Centre. and the MSC. MSC The MSC configuration object represents the Mobile Switching Centre. or a collocated BSC-BTS. There are usually only two of these objects in the MIB. The remaining SITEs may only be configured as BTSs. There are as many of these objects as exist in the physical network (maximum of 120). PCU The Packet Control Unit (PCU) configuration object manages the packet radio interface. Hardware configuration All the different hardware cages in a SITE are connected by a LAN. and also enables the interface from the BSS to the Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN). RXCDR The RXCDR configuration object represents the Remote Transcoder. a BTS. SITE The SITE configuration object represents a BSS SITE in the network. but manages the links between the BSSs. The OMC does not directly manage the MSC. There are as many of these objects as exist in the physical network (maximum of 100 per BSS). SITE 0 must always contain the BSC functionality. Each BSS in the physical network (maximum of 120) is represented by an object. A maximum of 2 147 483 647 SoftwareLoad objects can be contained within a SWInventory object. BSS The BSS configuration object represents the Base Station System. CommsLink The CommsLink configuration object defines the two MMS ports in the different SITES that establish the 2 Mbit/s link between the SITES. An RXCDR can also have a SITE 0 associated with it. RXCDRs. 3–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. SoftwareLoad The SoftwareLoad object is used to point to a BSS or RXCDR software load currently stored in the OMC. and configured as a BSC. and is configured as a BSC or a BSC–BTS. The functionality of any given SITE depends on the devices it contains.

EAS The EAS configuration object represents the detection of a single External Alarm System device within the site. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . It provides a grouping for the GPROC (Generic Processor Boards) BSP (Base Site Control) and CSFP (Code Storage Facility) processors within the site.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Configuration objects Hardware Devices The Hardware Devices represent an abstract logical container class. IAS The IAS configuration object represents the detection of an Internal Alarm Systems such as a power supply failure. There is a maximum of 101 MSIs at SITE 0 and 51 at other SITES. Processors The processors object represents a logical container class. MSI The MSI configuration object represents a Multiple Serial Interface (MSI) board which controls two MMS ports. There is one per site. TDM The TDM object represents a single Time Division Multiplex highway within a site. KSWpair The KSWpair object is used to represent a pair of KSW (Kiloport Switch board) devices which manage a single TDM highway. LAN The LAN object represents a single Local Area Network within a site. EMOTOROLA LTD. There is one IAS device per cabinet. Cage The cage object describes a single cage within a cabinet. It is used to group the different hardware devices on the BSS. Cabinet The cabinet object class describes a single cabinet within the site. GCLK The GCLK object represent a Generic clock board.

It contains one or more DRIs which are connected to the same antenna and use the same portion of the TDM highway. Radio Frequency The Radio Frequency represent an abstract logical container class. A maximum of 25 RTF objects can be contained in an RTFGroup object. RSL The RSL represent a Radio Signalling Link. BTF The BTF object represents a Base Transceiver Function. There is a single instance of this class in BSC site 0. LCF The LCF object represents a Link Control Function. There is a single instance of this class in BSC site 0. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . It is used to group the different software functions on the BSC. There is a single instance of this class in BSC site 0. RTFGroup The RTFGroup object is used to represent a single RTF function grouping within a site. There can be a maximum of 10 PATH objects contained in a SITE object. The path connection is described as a series of MMS connections between sites. DRIGroup The DRIGroup object is used to represent a single DRI device grouping within a site. A maximum of 6 RTFGroup objects can be contained in a SITE object. It provides the grouping for the various links present at the site.Configuration objects ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Software Functions The Software Functions represent an abstract logical container class. PATH The PATH object specifies the path connection between a BSC and a specific BTS site. 3–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. This provides the grouping for the various radio related objects. OMF The OMF object represents a OMF GPROC Function. A maximum of 6 DRIGroup objects can be contained in a SITE object. RTF The RTF object is used to represent a single RTF function within a site. Logical Links The Logical Links represent an abstract logical container class. The RSL can only be contained within the remote BTS in which it terminates.

ProxyCell The ProxyCell object represents CELLs outside the current PLMN. One instance of this class represents one test neighbour cell. Only one InterferAlg object can be contained in a CELL object. CELL The CELL object is used to describe the cells within a BTS site. RxqualDlHC. A maximum of 250 CELLs can be contained within a BSS. FreqHopSys The FreqHopSys object is used to represent a single frequency hopping system within a cell. A maximum of 256 UserProfile objects can be contained in an OMC object. Up to 6 CELL objects can be created under a SITE object. It provides the interface between the (D)RCU and the digital portion of a BSS. those cells to which it can handover calls. SMSCBmsg The SMSCBmsg object is used to represent a single Short Message Cell Broadcast (SMS CB) message within a cell. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 3–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . InterferAlg The InterferAlg object is used to represent a single interference algorithm in a cell. For more details refer to the OMC Online Help. Power Control Power Control objects are RxlevDlPC. These objects describe the handover algorithms based on certain criteria. A maximum of 64 Neighbour objects can be created under a CELL object.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Configuration objects DRI The DRI object is used to represent a single Digital Radio Interface (DRI) device within a site. RxlevUlPC. UserProfile The UserProfile object represents an OMC user who uses the OMC GUI. RxqualDlPC and RxqualUlPC. These objects describe the power control algorithms based on certain criteria. RxlevDlHC. RxlevUlHC. Neighbour The Neighbour object is used to identify a neighbour cell for a specific cell. RxqualUlHC and SurrndCellHC. TestNeighbour The TestNeighbour object is used to describe the test neighbour cells for a specific cell. EMOTOROLA LTD. For more details refer to the OMC Online Help. A maximum of 500 ProxyCell objects can be contained in a SITE object. that is. Handover Control Handover Control objects are RelTimAdvHC. A maximum of 25 DRI objects can be contained in a DRIGroup object.

is created. RXCDR or SITE object is created and must be associated with an object of the relevant type. MMS An MMS object is automatically created when an MSI object is created. TRX A TRX object is automatically created in a CELL object when an RTF object of type BCCH is created at a SITE with its carrier attribute assigned to the relevant CELL. Otherwise. MapLink A MapLink object is automatically created when a CommsLink object is created.Configuration objects ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Automatically created network objects The network objects which the cmMIB process creates automatically are as follows: NESoftware An NESoftware object is automatically created when a BSS or RXCDR object is created. a Source object is automatically created when the CELL object is created. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . MSC. Source A Source object is automatically created when a Neighbour object is created if the CELL it identifies exists. OMC. Automatically created map display objects The map display objects which the cmMIB process creates automatically are as follows: Map A Map object is automatically created when a Network. with the active flag set to TRUE. 3–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. BSS or RXCDR object is created. SWInventory An SWInventory object is automatically created when an OMC object. MapNode A MapNode object is automatically created when a BSS.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Chapter 4 Map and Tree Procedures EMOTOROLA LTD.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–7 Colour legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–4 Map display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 No connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–5 Map modes . . . . . 4–14 Viewing map levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Using the map: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Printing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Further information . . . . . . . . . . 4–5 Subscriber mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9 Device states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–5 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Logging in remotely from a map . . . . . . 4–11 Node detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–6 Device mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 Remote login to a NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Expanding an NE map node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3 Closing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14 Using the Organize Nodes function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–8 Alarm severity colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Procedure list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync a node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Zooming out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–16 Zooming in . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 4 Map and Tree Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Printing a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–17 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1 Introduction . . . . . . . 4–13 Contained devices report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Moving a node on the map . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15 Zooming a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–13 Organizing map nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11 Expanding a node cluster . . . . . . 4–12 Contracting a map node . . . . 4–3 Opening a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9 Moving and expanding nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2 Opening and closing a map . 4–1 Shared procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–18 Resync from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 No connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–19 Resync logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reset a device . . . 4–34 Shutdown a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reassign a device . . . 4–22 Viewing node OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Viewing alarms from popup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Prerequisite . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing alarms from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–28 Procedure list . . . 4–28 Opening and closing a navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Moving levels on a navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–35 Reset a Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–33 Lock a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Moving from a map to the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Closing the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–33 Introduction . . . 4–32 Fault management from navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–28 Further information . . . . . . . . 4–27 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–23 Viewing a detailed view from a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–22 Viewing network OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–27 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Viewing a detailed view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–29 Opening the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . 4–34 INS a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–40 Procedure . . . . . 4–22 Viewing OOS devices from popup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–30 Using the autoclose function . . . 4–36 Swap a device . . . . . . 4–30 Panner and porthole . . . . . . . . 4–33 Unlock a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–26 Before deleting a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–32 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–27 Using the navigation tree: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–24 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–25 Deleting a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–37 Devices supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–20 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–38 Checking device status from the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–21 Viewing OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–43 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–42 Printing a navigation tree diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–41 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–41 Viewing OOS devices via the popup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations v FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–43 Prerequisite . . . 4–43 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–42 Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–41 Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Displaying OOS devices from the navigation tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 vi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

S Load management. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .map be manually altered. set up. User-defined maps are ordered. S Moving and expanding map nodes. S Logging in remotely from a map. S Performing a resync from a map. S Printing a map. User-defined maps are typically set-up with a background geographical map of a particular region. S Moving from a map to the navigation tree. BSS and RXCDR objects can be expanded to view SITEs. A full network map displays BSS. The list includes default maps and user-defined maps. EMOTOROLA LTD. RXCDR. Alteration of these files will cause serious errors. S Viewing next and previous map levels. A full network map. S Viewing channel status. Procedure list The following is a list of general procedures for using maps: S Opening and closing a map. OMC. S Viewing events and alarms. The network map overlaid on the background geographical map contains the NEs of that specific region. S Viewing alarms from a map. S Deleting a map. Maps may be either geographical or logical (no background). NOTE Under no circumstances should the files SITE. S Fault management. Shared procedures The following procedures may be performed from either the Navigation Tree or the Map using the same methods.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the map: overview Using the map: overview Introduction Selecting the Maps icon from the front panel displays the Map list. The Map list window contains a list of network map names.map and NE. MSC and Commslinks. and maps for each RXCDR and BSS in the network are created by default. S Organizing map nodes. S Viewing a detailed view or node status from a map. S Viewing contained devices. S Viewing OOS devices. Default maps are automatically generated by the system when the NEs are created using the configuration application. S Zooming a map. and configured by the operator.

4–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Information on how the Network maps are set-up and configured can be found in Installation & Configuration: GSM System Configuration (GSM-100-403). 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Using the map: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Further information Further information on using the Network maps can be found in Online Help.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Opening and closing a map Opening and closing a map Opening a map To open a Network map: 1. Refer to Online Help for an explanation of the difference between user-defined and automatically created maps. Figure 4-1 Map list window The list includes both user-defined. and automatically generated maps. EMOTOROLA LTD. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to open a Map List window (Figure 4-1). 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

4–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Double click on a map name to open a map (Figure 4-2). Figure 4-2 Map view window Closing a map Select File – Close to close the map.Opening and closing a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 2.

See Figure 4-3. which display different information about the impact of faults: – Subscriber mode.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Map display Map display Introduction A map display consists of icons which represent GSM entities that are involved with the radio section of the GSM network. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . – Device mode. The links between these entities are also shown on the map display. Figure 4-3 The Map display View menu EMOTOROLA LTD. Map modes are selected from the View menu. Map modes There are two map modes.

Figure 4-4 Map in Subscriber mode An asterisk pattern on a node represents reconfigurations that are in progress. for example. New alarms cause icons to animate if the alarm impacts the node. service.Map display ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Subscriber mode A map in this mode (see Figure 4-4) displays alarm severities according to the impact of faults on subscribers. capacity. 4–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. As a result. but the result of the reconfiguration is still pending. or redundancy loss. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . alarms from a different node that impact the selected one are included in the display. Opening an alarm window from a map in this mode results in alarms impacting the node being displayed. In this situation the colour represents the last known severity. A question mark on a node indicates that the OMC has lost contact with it and does not know the correct severity.

New alarms cause icons to animate if the alarming device is on the node. if the problem has not been fixed the subscriber map still displays the subscriber impacts. As a result. for example. A question mark indicates that the OMC has lost contact with a site and does not know the correct severity. If an alarm is cleared the device map is updated accordingly. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . For example. are displayed. a critical redundant device will produce a critical severity. Device mode A map in this mode displays severities according to the impact of faults on devices. including alarms that do not impact it.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Map display Functional Unit severities on the subscriber map Functional Unit (FU) severities are a snapshot of impacted sites or cells at the time of an alarm. they update the subscriber map. Figure 4-5 Map in Device mode EMOTOROLA LTD. However. all alarms on the node. See also Consolidated alarm reporting in Chapter 3. In this situation the colour represents the last known severity. an operator can clear an alarm manually and the alarm information is removed from the alarm window. FU severities on the subscriber map are independent of the alarm window.

If the devices have different alarm severities. or minor severity in Subscriber mode. or redundancy always displays as. Refer to Table 4-1. For example. Alarms associated with devices at each end of the link determine the link colour. capacity. a critical. major. It represents different information depending on whether the map is in subscriber or device mode. Map links can also have colours associated with them. The map icon colour will automatically reset to green when the operator clears the alarm or an alarm clear message is received from the NE.Map display ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device map icon colours The colour of a map icon will change depending on the level of alarm severity. Select View – Colour Legend to display the colour legend bar on the map. 4–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Colour legend The colour legend bar is used to explain the fault condition of each node. a fire alarm will display as a critical alarm in Subscriber mode. there are certain categories of alarms which the system determines as critical/major/minor even though there is no loss of service/capacity/redundancy to the subscriber. the highest severity device alarm associated with the link determines the link colour. respectively. However. Table 4-1 Colour legend severity levels Severity level Subscriber mode Device mode Critical* signifies a loss of service signifies that a device is in a critical state Major* signifies a loss of capacity signifies a device that has a major alarm Minor* signifies a loss of redundancy signifies a device that has a minor alarm Warning signifies a potential problem signifies a potential problem Investigate signifies an ambiguous affect signifies an ambiguous affect that should be investigated that should be investigated Normal signifies that there are no signifies that there are no alarms on a node alarms on a node NOTE *A loss of service.

or a shutdown command in the case of a DRI/RCU. on both subscriber and device maps. EMOTOROLA LTD. Device states A map icon can represent one of three states: S INS The normal state of a device is INS (busy/unlocked. S UNKNOWN The link to the node has been lost so the OMC is uncertain of its current severity.that is all activity on the device is terminated when the command is executed. A shutdown command permits traffic to be handed-off before the device is locked. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . or enabled/unlocked for a redundant device). by performing an intra-cell handover for the cells associated with the Transceiver unit being shutdown. NOTE A lock is intrusive. S OOS An operator or the NE fault management software can take a device out of service (OOS) by issuing a lock command.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Map display Alarm severity colours Table 4-2 Colour Alarm Severity Red Critical Yellow Major Blue Minor Pink Warning Light Blue Investigate Green Normal (no alarms) Alarm severity colours on map icons. are usually as shown in Table 4-2.

Map display ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Icon name INS UNKNOWN OOS  .

 .

.

  ?  .

 ? .

.

? .

  ? .

 .

 ?  .

 ?  .

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . on a node icon represents nodes in a pending state. 4–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. .  ?  How State is INS determined UNKNOWN OOS OpState: Enabled or Busy Any or Unknown All other & & & & combinations AdminState: Unlocked Unlocked Unknown Any Options: OpState: Enabled | Disabled | Busy | Unknown AdminState: Locked | Unlocked | Shutting Down | Not Equipped | Unknown Figure 4-6 Map icons Pending state An asterisk.

2. Release the mouse button. Select View – Full Zoom Out to contract any expanded nodes. 3. Moving a node on the map To alter the position of a node on a map.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Moving and expanding nodes Moving and expanding nodes Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to move the nodes on a map. they will be displayed in a cluster. 2. Select View – Expand to expand the node. NOTE Expanding a map node may create a cluster. Hold down the SHIFT key. and then hold down the centre mouse button and drag the node to its new location. Expanding an NE map node If the required node is contained within a cluster. Release the SHIFT key. 4. which will then need to be opened as described earlier in this section. To expand a node cluster out use the following procedure: 1. perform the following procedure. Expanding a map node is only valid for BSSs and RXCDRs. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 1. use the following procedure: 1. Opening and closing a map. Select the required node. See the procedure Expanding a node cluster. 5. EMOTOROLA LTD. Double click on the cluster to view the clustered nodes in more detail. point to the node. Expanding a node cluster If nodes have been added to a map without entering the X Y co-ordinates on the individual detailed views. Click on the node to be expanded. Select File – Save to save the new location. 2. keeping the mouse button held down. To expand a map node. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. See in preceding chapter.

Moving and expanding nodes ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Node detailed view If the required node is contained within a cluster. Click on the node to be expanded. See earlier procedure Expanding a node cluster. 3. Select Edit – Detailed View to open the Detailed View. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 4-7 Detailed View form 4–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. use the following procedure: 1. 2. To open a node detailed view. The Detailed View form will display (NO TAG).

Contained devices report If the required node is contained within a cluster. 1. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. 2. Figure 4-8 Contained Devices report EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Moving and expanding nodes Contracting a map node To contract a map node perform the following procedure: NOTE A node must be initially in expanded form before it can be contracted. The Contained Devices report is displayed (Figure 4-8). See the procedure Expanding an NE map node. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2. Refer to Online Help for a description of the columns in the Contained Devices report. Select a node (at least one node must be selected). Select View – Contract. Click on the node to be expanded and select Display – Contained Devices from the menu bar. To open a node detailed view use the following procedure: 1. All expanded nodes return to their original form.

Select the map name to organize. The Organize Map Nodes function does not take account of geographic backgrounds. Select Edit – Organize Nodes from the menu bar. 2. NOTE Ensure that the map to be reorganized is not open. type: /usr/gsm/current/sbin/OrganiseMapNodes <map_name> where. existing locations. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . <map_name> is the name of the map to be organized. This avoids map nodes becoming clustered on the display. existing coordinates. use one of the following methods. From an Xterm window In an Xterm window at the command line prompt. 4–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. To organize map nodes. or the relationships between them.Organizing map nodes ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Organizing map nodes Using the Organize Nodes function The Organize Nodes function evenly distributes the nodes on a map over the map view. From the Map List In the Map List: 1. so that they are clearly visible.

the cluster must be expanded to view that node. 2. To view next and previous map levels: 1. Click on a node. 3. Select View – Next from the menu bar to view the next map level of the node. Opening and closing a map. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Procedure NOTE The OMC Redraw Environment variable must be set for the View Map levels procedure to work correctly.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing map levels Viewing map levels Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to expand a node to view contained elements. . For further information please refer to Operating Information: OMC System Administration (GSM-100-202). See the procedure. If the required node is contained within a cluster. EMOTOROLA LTD. See procedure Moving and expanding nodes. Select View – Previous from the menu bar to view the previous map level of the node.

Hold down the CTRL key while pressing the middle mouse button. Zooming out To zoom out on a map use select View – Full Zoom Out. The selected area is displayed in zoomed format. Release the mouse button and CTRL key. The map window returns to the original view. See earlier procedure. 4–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Zooming in To zoom in on a map: 1. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Zooming a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Zooming a map Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to zoom the map. Drag a rectangle over the area of the map to be zoomed. Opening and closing a map. 3. 2.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . NOTE Printing may take a few minutes. Opening and closing a map. EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Printing a map Printing a map Introduction A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to print the map. The diagram is printed to the default printer. The print process is documented in the status bar at the bottom of the window. See earlier procedure. Printing a map To print a map select File – Print from the menu bar.

Logging in remotely from a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging in remotely from a map Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to login to a node on that map. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. 4–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. If the required node is contained within a cluster. The text changes colour. A remote Xterm window logged in to the selected Network element is displayed. Click on a node representing the required Network element. Press CR to close the window and return to the map window. No connection In the case where a connection cannot be made with the selected network element. Select Options – Remote Login. Opening and closing a map. a window opens containing an appropriate error message. See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. See procedure. which is greyed out for omcread users. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2. Remote login to a NE To remote login to a Network element from a map: 1.

Further information Information on Resync and accessing Resync Logs is contained in Administration procedures. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. 2. Opening and closing a map. Figure 4-9. The text changes colour. Click on the node representing the Network element to be resynchronized. Figure 4-9 Resync Logs window Resync network To resync the Network from a map select Options – Resync Network from the menu bar.Look at Resync logs for status Resync logs To view Resync logs from a map. Select Options – Resync Selected Node from the menu bar to resync the Network element. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. opens. EMOTOROLA LTD. The Resync Logs window. If the required node is contained within a cluster.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Resync from a map Resync from a map Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to resync a node on that map. The following message is displayed in the status bar at the end of the screen: Resync Initiated . a failure is indicated in the resync logs window.Look at Resync logs for status No connection In the case where a connection cannot be made with the selected Network element. Resync a node To resync a selected node from a map: 1. select Options – Resync Logs from the menu bar to resync the logs. See procedure. The following message is displayed in the status bar at the end of the screen: Resync Initiated . Chapter 6.

Close the window by selecting File – Close. Close the window by selecting File – Close. Click on a node representing the required Network element. The text changes colour. See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. The Alarms window for the selected node is displayed. The Alarm window Figure 4-10 opens. Click on a node representing the required Network element. Select Display – Alarms from the menu bar. The text changes colour. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. 3. Viewing alarms from popup menu To view alarms from a map popup menu: 1. Click the right mouse button and select Alarms from the popup menu.Viewing alarms from a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing alarms from a map Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to view alarms at a node on that map. 2. See procedure Opening and closing a map. 3. Figure 4-10 Alarm window 4–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2. and is dynamically updated as alarms occur. or double-click on the node. The Alarm window contains all the alarms for the selected Network Element and is dynamically updated as alarms occur. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Procedure To view alarms from a map: 1. If the required node is contained within a cluster.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing alarms from a map Further information Information on alarm handling is contained in Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501). EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

.

4–22 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Click on a node representing the required Network element. To view any OOS devices. (GSM-100-202). the cluster must be expanded to view that node. See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. The text changes colour. ensure resync is enabled. Viewing network OOS devices To view the network OOS devices: Select Display – All OOS Devices from the Map menu bar. Opening and closing a map. See earlier procedure. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 4-11 OOS devices window for a network Viewing node OOS devices NOTE If the required node is contained within a cluster. To view OOS devices at a Node: 1. The procedure to enable resync is detailed in Operating Information: OMC System Administration.Viewing OOS devices ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing OOS devices Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to view out of service (OOS) devices for that map. The OOS Devices window for the network is displayed (Figure 4-11).

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing OOS devices 2. The text changes colour. See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 3. 3. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. Close the window by selecting File – Close. EMOTOROLA LTD. Select Display – OOS Devices from the menu bar. Close the window by selecting File – Close. The OOS Devices window for the selected node is displayed (Figure 4-12). Click on a node representing the required Network element. To view OOS devices at a Node: 1. The OOS Devices window for the selected node is displayed (Figure 4-12). 2. Click the right mouse button and select OOS devices from the popup menu. Figure 4-12 OOS devices window for a node Viewing OOS devices from popup menu NOTE If the required node is contained within a cluster.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on a node representing the required Network element. Viewing a detailed view To view a detailed view window from a map: 1. (In the case of a Comms Link detailed view. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. select Options – Detailed View).Viewing a detailed view from a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing a detailed view from a map Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to view a detailed view of a node on that map. 2. The text changes colour. The Detailed View window for the selected node is displayed (Figure 4-13). See procedure Moving and expanding map nodes. See earlier procedure. If the required node is contained within a cluster. Opening and closing a map. Select Edit – Detailed View from the menu bar. 4–24 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

(GSM-100-403). 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–25 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing a detailed view from a map Figure 4-13 Detailed View window Further information Configuration of Network elements and completion of the Detailed View forms are dealt with in Installation & Configuration: System Configuration. EMOTOROLA LTD.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Procedure To delete a map: 1. Click on the name of the map to be deleted. Deleting the map will not otherwise alter the configuration of a network. 4. The name is highlighted in inverse text. Click OK button to confirm. 4–26 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 3. This is the recommended mode of access for many functions.Deleting a map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Deleting a map Before deleting a map It is important to note that deleting a map will delete the access to network elements contained within that map via the Maps icon on the front panel. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to display the Map List window (Figure 4-14). Such Default Maps may not be deleted. The following message is displayed in the status bar at the bottom of the screen: Element Deleted NOTE Certain maps displayed within the Map List are Default Maps. Figure 4-14 Map list window 2. A delete confirmation box is displayed. Select Edit – Delete from the menu bar.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Moving from a map to the navigation tree Moving from a map to the navigation tree Prerequisite A Network map must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to move to the Navigation tree from that map. See procedure Moving and expanding nodes on a map. The Navigation tree window is displayed with the selected node as the root NE. Opening and closing a map. Procedure To move to the Navigation Tree from a map: 1. the cluster must be expanded to view that node. EMOTOROLA LTD. See earlier procedure. it may be easier to access the Navigation tree for the entire network by selecting the Config Mgmt icon from the Front Panel. 2. Select Display – Navigation Tree from the menu bar. The text changes colour. If the required node is contained within a cluster. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–27 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . NOTE If a map is not currently open. Click on a node representing the required Network element.

S Viewing available Comms links. Further information Further information on using the Navigation Tree can be found in On-line Help. Information on how the Navigation tree is set-up and configured can be found in Installation & Configuration: GSM System Configuration (GSM-100-403). 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Moving levels on a Navigation Tree. 4–28 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Using the autoclose function.Using the navigation tree: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the navigation tree: overview Procedure list The following is a list of procedures available from a Navigation Tree window: S Opening and closing a Navigation Tree. S Viewing neighbour data for a cell. S Checking device status. S Viewing and printing cell configuration.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–29 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . select the Config Mgmt icon to display a Navigation Form window as shown in Figure 4-15. Figure 4-15 Navigation Form window Closing the navigation tree To close a Navigation Tree: Select File – Close from the menu bar. EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Opening and closing a navigation tree Opening and closing a navigation tree Opening the navigation tree To open a Navigation Tree: On the Front Panel display.

assuming the tree is in the form shown in Figure 4-16: 1. an empty Navigation Form is displayed and a special option exists to create a network. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . To close the branch of a tree under a button. click on the folder icon next to the Network object. See Installation & Configuration: GSM System Configuration (GSM-100-403). click again on the folder icon beside the button. 4–30 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Release the mouse button. The various class buttons are displayed. these represent classes of objects in the Configuration Management MIB. To display different portions of the tree. Click and hold the left mouse button within the panner region. 2. The tree is displayed in the porthole region. Procedure To move levels on a Navigation Tree. 2.Moving levels on a navigation tree ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Moving levels on a navigation tree Prerequisite A Navigation Tree must be open and displayed on the user terminal before attempting to move levels on that tree. Panner and porthole When the Navigation Tree diagram becomes larger in size than the display area of the Navigation Tree window (Figure 4-16) a panner/porthole arrangement is used to control what is being displayed. and what is displayed is controlled by means of a panner. use the following procedure to move the panner: 1. NOTE In the event that the Config Mgmt MIB has no network object created. click on the folder icon beside the button. See procedure Opening and closing a navigation tree. 3. To open the branch of a tree under a button. To expand the Navigation Tree to the second level. and move the mouse until the required area is in view within the porthole.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Moving levels on a navigation tree Panner region Figure 4-16 Navigation Form diagram. showing panner. EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 4–31 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

Using the autoclose function ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Using the autoclose function

Introduction
The Navigation Form supports an autoclose feature. When this feature is turned on, then
expanding a certain branch of a tree results in the automatic closing of any other
branches that might be open at that level. With the feature turned off, multiple branches
of a tree at any given level might be open.

Prerequisite
A Navigation Tree must be open and displayed on the user terminal before setting
autoclose. See procedure Opening and closing a navigation tree.

Procedure
To use the autoclose function:
Select View – Auto Close On/Off from the menu bar to toggle the function. The default is
Off.

NOTE
The Autoclose function is a menu option, when selected the alternate state will
be shown in the menu window, that is, with Autoclose On selected, Autoclose
Off will display in the View menu.

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ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management from navigation tree

Fault management from navigation tree

Introduction
The facilities exist to perform fault management operations on certain devices from the
Navigation Tree.

NOTE
Fault management can also be carried out from the Map, contained devices
window,detailed views, MMI alarm windows, and via remote login to a BSS.

Lock a device
To lock a specific device from the Navigation Tree, proceed as follows:
1. Select the specified instance from the Navigation Form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Lock from the menu bar.
A confirmation box opens with the following message:
Do you wish to lock device <device name> at site <site name>?

3. Click OK. The following message is displayed in the status bar:
Locking Device....

NOTE
In certain instances, for example, if the operator attempts to lock the last in
service RSL between a BSC and a BTS, warning text is also displayed, similar
to this example: Warning: Last Busy/Unlocked or Enabled/Unlocked RSL
(RSL:0) will go out of service.

A lock command is sent to the BSS. On receipt of a lock message from the OMC, the
BSS attempts to lock the specified device and informs the operator of the success or
failure of the operation within the status bar at the foot of the Map window.
In the case of a successful operation, the Detailed View form is updated to show the new
Administrative state. When the operational state of the device has been changed, the
BSS informs the OMC of the success of the lock operation via the existing state change
mechanism.

NOTE
Locking a BSS device immediately removes that device from service.

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Unlock a device
To unlock a specified device from the Navigation Tree, proceed as follows:
1. Select the specified instance from the Navigation Tree form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Unlock from the menu bar.
An OMC dialogue box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to unlock device <device name> at site <site name>?
3. Click OK. The following message is displayed in the status bar:
Unlocking Device...
An unlock command is sent to the BSS. On receipt of an unlock message from the OMC,
the BSS attempts to unlock the specified device and inform the OMC of the success or
failure of the operation.
In the case of a successful operation, the Detailed View form is updated to show the new
Administrative state. When the operational state of the device has been changed, the
BSS informs the OMC of the success of the unlock device operation via the existing state
change mechanism.

Shutdown a
device
To shutdown a specified device (allow no new traffic to be accepted by the device) at a
BSS from the Navigation Tree, proceed as follows:
1. Select a device instance (DRI or MTL) from the Navigation Form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Shutdown from the menu bar.
3. A confirmation box (Figure 4-17) is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to Shutdown device <device name> at site <site name>?
The timer value associated with the shutdown operation can also be entered in the
confirmation box.

NOTE
The timer value cannot be entered if the specified device is an MTL.

Shutdown of MTL performs an inhibit and not a shutdown.

Figure 4-17 Shutdown timer confirmation window

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4. If the device is successfully shutdown, a message similar to the following is
displayed in the status bar:
Shutting down device...

The result of the operation can be viewed in the Detailed View form.

INS a device
To INS a specified device from the Navigation Tree, proceed as follows:
1. Select the specified instance from the Navigation Form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – INS from the menu bar.
3. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to INS device <device name> at site <site name>?

NOTE
In certain instances, for example, if the operator attempts to INS a
busy/unlocked DRI associated with a Cell, warning text is also displayed,
similar to the following:
Do you wish to Reset device <device name> at site <site name>?
Warning: Capacity at Cell <Cell name> may be temporarily reduced.

4. Click OK.
The result of the operation can be viewed in the Detailed View form.

Reset a device
To reset a specified device from the Navigation Tree, proceed as follows:
1. Select the specified instance from the Navigation Form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Reset from the menu bar.
3. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to reset <device name>?

4. Click OK.
The result of the operation can be viewed in the Detailed View form.

Reset a Site
An OMC operator can select an MCell Site object and perform a hard or a soft reset on
the Site. (If the operator selects a Site that is not an MCell, then only a hard reset can be
performed.)
A soft reset means that only the currently running processes are re-started. A hard reset
means that the entire Site is reset. To reset a Site from the navigation tree, carry out the
following procedure:
1. Select the specified Site from the navigation tree form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Reset SITE – Hard from the menu bar, refer to Figure 4-18.
If the Site is MCell then Fault Mgt – Reset Site – Soft can also be selected.

NOTE
The Reset option on the Fault Management menu is greyed out for Site
devices.

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3. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to Reset site <site name>?

4. Click OK.
The result of the operation can be viewed in Detailed View form.

Figure 4-18 Navigation tree with fault management menu

Reassign a
device
The reassign action is used to reassign control of one device to another, it is valid for
DRIs, SITEs, CBLs and MTLs. To reassign a specific device from the navigation tree,
carry out the following procedure:
1. Select the specified instance from the navigation tree form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Reassign from the menu bar. The Reassign window opens.
Refer to Figure 4-19.

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3. Select a device in the window and click the Reassign button.
4. A confirmation dialogue box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to reassign <device1> from <device2> to <device3> at <SITE>?

5. Click OK.

Figure 4-19 Reassign window

Swap a device
Some devices operate in an active/standby mode, where the standby device acts as a
backup to the active device. When the active device goes OOS the NE may
automatically bring the standby device into service. Or an operator can force the standby
device to be the active device, and vice versa, by invoking the swap operation.
The swap action is valid only for GCLK, COMBproc, LAN and TDM devices. To swap a
specific device from the navigation tree, carry out the following procedure:
1. Select the specified instance from the navigation tree form.
2. Select Fault Mgt – Swap from the menu bar.
3. A confirmation dialogue box is displayed with the following message:
Do you wish to Swap <device name> devices at <SITE>?

4. Click OK.

NOTE
The devices have to exist and also be in the correct state for the swap to
succeed. If the devices are not in the correct state the following message is
displayed in the status bar of the Navigation Form: Devices in incorrect
state.

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Devices
supported
The following table lists those devices which can be managed from the navigation tree
and the functions which can be performed on them. All the logical groupings are
contained in the SITE object.

Table 4-3 Devices managed from navigation tree
Logical Device Lock Un- Shut- INS Reset Swap Re-
Group- lock down assign
ing
NA SITE n n n n n
NA PCU n n n
n
(GPRS)
Hard Cabinet
ware CAGE
Devices
n n n n
DHP
EAS n n n n
IAS
COMB

COMBp
roc n n n n n

KSW
air
pair
KSW n n n n

GCLK n n n n n
LAN n
TDM n
MSI n n n n

n n n n
MMS
Pro CSFP n n n n
cessors BTP n n n n n
M-Cell
GPROC n n n n
DPROC n n n n
(GPRS)
BSP n n n n
PSP
(GPRS)

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Logical Device Lock Un- Shut- INS Reset Swap Re-
Group- lock down assign
ing
Software BTF
Function LCF
OMF
Logical CBL n n n n n
Links MTL n n n n n n
OML n n
XBL n n n n
RSL n n n n
PATH n n n n
GBL n n n n
(GPRS)
GDS n n
(GPRS)
GSL n n n n n
(GPRS)
Radio CELL
Freq Freq
HopSys
SMSCB
msg
Neigh
bour
Test
Neigh
bour
RTF
Group
RTF
DRI
Group
DRI n n n n n n
NA Assoc_
BSC
Conn_
Link

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Checking device status from the navigation tree ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Checking device status from the navigation tree

Prerequisite
A Navigation Tree must be open and displayed on the user terminal before checking
device status using this method. See procedure Opening and closing a navigation
tree.

Procedure
To check device status from the Navigation Tree:
1. Double click on a device instance to open the relevant Detailed View.
2. Select View – State from the menu bar.
The Detailed View window scrolls to the area in which status information is
contained.

NOTE
If an instance other than a BSS, RXCDR or SITE instance is selected then a
message is displayed to select the appropriate instance.

Further
information
See also the procedure contained in this chapter for Viewing a detailed view from a
map.

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ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Displaying OOS devices from the navigation tree

Displaying OOS devices from the navigation tree

Prerequisite
A Navigation Tree must be open and displayed on the user terminal before displaying
Out Of Service(OOS) devices using this method. See earlier procedure, Opening and
closing a navigation tree.
Ensure that Resync has been enabled by the System Administrator before checking for
OOS devices. The enabling procedure is contained in Operating Information: OMC
System Administration (GSM-100-202).

Procedure
To display OOS devices from the Navigation Tree:
1. Click on the required network instance. The icon changes colour.
2. Select Display – OOS Devices from the menu bar.
An OOS Devices Display window for the selected network instance is displayed.
This window displays the OOS devices for the selected network instance.

NOTE
If an instance other than a BSS, RXCDR or SITE instance is selected then a
message is displayed to the user to select an appropriate instance.

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Viewing OOS
devices via the
popup
To display OOS devices from the Navigation Tree:
1. Click on the required network instance. The icon changes colour.
2. Click the right mouse button and select OOS devices from the popup menu, as
shown in Figure 4-20.
An Out Of Service Devices Display window for the selected network instance is
displayed. This window displays the OOS devices for the selected network
instance.

Figure 4-20 Navigation Form window

Further
information
See also the procedure contained in this chapter for Viewing OOS devices.

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ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Printing a navigation tree diagram

Printing a navigation tree diagram

Prerequisite
A Navigation Tree must be open and displayed on the user terminal before printing the
diagram. See procedure, Opening and closing a navigation tree.

Procedure
To print a Navigation Tree diagram:
1. Open the Navigation Tree to the required level.

NOTE
See the procedure on Moving levels on a navigation tree in this chapter
for information to help with this.

2. Once the required Network elements are displayed on the Navigation Tree, select
File – Print from the menu bar. The diagram is printed to the default printer.
The print process is documented in the status bar at the end of the window.

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Chapter 5

Fault Management

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Chapter 5
Fault Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Fault management: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
Definition of fault management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
Principles of FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
FM and the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
Other FM indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
Fault management at the NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
FM process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
Local maintenance terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
Device status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4
Introduction to status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4
Two states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4
Device states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4
Administrative states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–4
Operational states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–5
Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–5
Alarm categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–6
Alarm category overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–6
Alarm severities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
Alarm severity overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
Save alarm context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8
Buffering alarms and state change events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8
Fault indication at the OMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9
Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9
Multiple alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Introduction to alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Intermittent alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
FMIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
OIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
CERM feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
Definition of resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
When to perform a resync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
The resyncState process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
The resyncAlarm process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
Periodic Supervision of Accessibility (PSA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12
Definition of PSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12
PSA failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12
Disk usage exceeded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13
System Processor partition full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13
Further information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13
Fault handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
Handling: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
Fault handling process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
Alarm priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
Changing device states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–15
Parent device relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–16
On-site personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–16
Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–16

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Clearing at the NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–20 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–20 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–17 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Intermittent alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–18 Clearing at the OMC . . . . . . . . 5–19 Fault escalation procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Viewing alarm throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–17 Remote login interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–19 Introduction to alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault handling and remote login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–17 Alarm clearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Figure 5-1 shows an illustration of fault management at the OMC. Both the NEs and the OMC contain FM features which ensure that any faults occurring keep service disruption to a minimum. S Ensure that disruption to service (caused by the fault and any associated corrective action) is kept to a minimum. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Isolate the faulty element. S Take corrective action to rectify the faulty device. thereby enabling the network to operate efficiently. by running tests on the NE devices to determine their ability to function correctly. by re-routing traffic and taking the faulty element out of service.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management: overview Fault management: overview Definition of fault management Fault Management (FM) provides the means to isolate and minimize the effects of faults in the network. EMOTOROLA LTD. FM and the OMC The OMC provides fault indication facilities using event management to inform the operator of faults in the GSM network. Principles of FM The principles of FM are as follows: S To pin-point the cause of a fault.

Fault management: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Other FM indications Performance statistics also provide useful information for analyzing fault conditions. (GSM-100-523). NAVIGATION TREE. 5–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Refer to Maintenance Information: BSS/RXCDR. for complete fault handling procedures at the BSS. The current health of the network (from the latest performance statistics reports) can be ascertained from the key statistics. ALARM Center WINDOW AND pager CONTAINED DEVICES FORM System PROCESSOR Modem RLOGIN SESSION BSS MMI COMMANDS/RE- SPONSES VIA REMOTE LOGIN ACTIVE X. MENU D OOS DEVICE REPORT D AUTOMATIC SWITCHOVER BY NE TO D REMOTE LOGIN TO NE REDUNDANT DEVICE WHEN CRITICAL D CONTAINED DEVICES REPORT ALARM RECEIVED. GSM-100–501. Paging D LOCK/UNLOCK OF DEVICES AVAILABLE FROM MAP. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . FM FEATURES: FAULT INDICATION: FAULT HANDLING: D PERIODIC SUPERVISION OF D MMI FRONT PANEL D FROM MAP ACCESSIBILITY OF OML (OMC-BSS) LINKS. D NETWORK MAP ICONS D FROM NAVIGATION TREE D ALARM BUFFER TO SAVE UP TO 100 D EVENT/ALARM DISPLAY D FROM CONTAINED ALARMS IF OML LINK IS LOST.25 EVENTS MMI TABLE EVENT & ALARM ACTIVE MMI PROCESSOR EM ROUTER SUBSCRIPTIONS MESSAGES BSS/RXCDR EVENT LOGFILES (CONTAINS INHERENT FM FEATURES) Figure 5-1 Fault management using the OMC Additional information Refer to Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC. for complete fault handling procedures at the OMC. WINDOWS DEVICES REPORT D PERIODIC RESYNCH WITH ACTIVE D PM REPORTS D ALARM HANDLING POPUP ALARM LISTS AT THE BSS’S.

are detected by FM software on the NEs Generic Processor (GPROC) boards. where they are displayed on the operator SPARCstation according to the subscription criteria. The resultant event/alarms are placed in the NEs active alarms table (AET). EMOTOROLA LTD. Red light emitting diodes (LEDs) on individual boards and cabinets provide a visual warning of fault conditions. the FM software at the NE automatically takes the device out of service. only alarms from that site can be viewed.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management at the NE Fault management at the NE FM process Faults at an NE (BSC. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . (RCU BUSY/UNLOCKED) ALARM & STATE CHANGE EVENTS BUFFER ACTIVE ALARMS LIST X. A visual presentation of BSS fault management is shown at Figure 5-2. BTS or RXCDR. LEDs at the network elements (NE) also provide information on fault conditions at the board level. attached to the maintenance port of a BSC. and switches in a redundant device (if available). and sent to the OMC. D OUT OF SERVICE (OOS): – ANY OTHER STATE. also known as a Local Maintenance Terminal (LMT). On receipt of a critical alarm. At a BTS or RXCDR. BTS or RXCDR). or on the links between them. Alarms from the whole BSS can be viewed at the BSC. DEVICE STATUS: MS D IN SERVICE (INS): – BUSY/UNLOCKED – ENABLED/UNLOCKED.25 TO OMC (VIA 2MB LINK) BSS/RXCDR Figure 5-2 BSS fault management Local maintenance terminal Alarms can be viewed using a personal computer.

5–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. where it is supporting (or able to support) user traffic. Device states Table 5-1 Determining different device states State In Service (INS) Unknown Out of Service (OOS) OP State: Enabled Busy Any Unknown All other combinations ADMIN Unlocked Unlocked Unknown Any State: Administrative states Administrative states are set by the operator using the GUI.Device status ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device status Introduction to status The status of any device at the BSS determines whether it is In Service (INS). The device status is determined by these two states. S Not equipped This state indicates the device entry in the NEs configuration database has been removed. S Unlocked The unlocked state is the normal operating state of the device. S Operational. or Out Of Service (OOS). This is done via an entry being made in the NEs configuration database. the remote login facility at the OMC or locally at the site using a PC. The normal state of a device is busy/unlocked (or enabled/unlocked for a redundant device). An operator can remove a device from service or make a device available for service by changing its administrative state. S Equipped This state indicates a device in the equipped state has been made known to the system. S Locked The locked state indicates the device is unavailable for normal operation. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . where it is unable to support user traffic. Two states The two device states are: S Administrative.

The three operational states are: S Enabled In the enabled state. EMOTOROLA LTD. the device cannot support user traffic. S Disabled In the disabled state. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device status Operational states Operational states are controlled by the NE fault management application. S Busy In the busy state. the device is not supporting user traffic. Further information Operating Information: System Operation (GSM-100-201) describes how to change device status during fault handling. the device is supporting user traffic.

An environmental failure is an alarm associated with the room where the equipment is housed (for example smoke detection. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . fire etc). This is an alarm associated with an equipment fault. S Environmental Failure. The alarm type field indicates the general category of system operation affected by the detected alarm condition. S Equipment Failure. The different alarm types which can be generated by the NEs or the OMC are: S Communication Failure. A processing alarm failure is a software or processing fault (for example corrupt data or out of memory). 5–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. This is an alarm associated with a degradation in the quality of service (for example excessive response time or reduced bandwidth). S Processing Failure. This is an alarm relating to a fault in the transfer of data from one point to another (for example loss of signal or call establishment error). S Quality Of Service Failure. transmitter failure or power problem.Alarm categories ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm categories Alarm category overview There are five possible failure categories for alarms.

This occurs when the faulty device rectifies itself). while the detected alarm condition is not currently degrading. Indicates a service-affecting fault has occurred. S Major. the severity of an FMIC alarm changes from Critical to Clear upon receipt of a new alarm from the network. Action should be taken to diagnose and correct the problem to prevent it from becoming a more serious service-affecting fault. Indicates the existence of a non-service-affecting fault. Indicates the clearing of a reported alarm. This alarm clears all alarms for a managed object having the same device type. device identifier. and alarm code (for example. Immediate corrective action is required (for example. Indicates a service-affecting fault has occurred. the alarm severity field of the message previously sent is dynamically updated (for example. severe degradation in the capability of a resource. S Investigate. an alarm is cleared from an NE. Corrective action should be taken to avoid a more serious fault (for example. If the severity of an alarm changes at the NE. requiring its full capability to be restored). Urgent corrective action is required (for example. Analysis should be carried out to determine the cause of the degradation.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm severities Alarm severities Alarm severity overview There are six alarm severities. S Warning. the service capability of the resource may eventually be affected). EMOTOROLA LTD. which in turn causes the severity level at the OMC to be set to CLEAR). Indicates the detection of a potential or impending service-affecting fault (before any significant effects have been noticed). a resource is completely out-of-service and its capability must be restored). 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The different types of alarm severities reported in the alarm severity field are as follows: S Critical. S Clear. Indicates the degradation of system performance in one or more sites or cells. S Minor.

When the buffer is empty normal event processing resumes at the BSS. it starts sending the events/alarms in the buffer to the OMC in chronological order. automatic resync of the BSS on OML restoration. 5–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. it generates an event to notify the OMC that event information has been lost. that is. The event buffer can store up to a maximum of 100 events/alarms. The overflow event buffer contains counts of the number and severity of events that were lost due to the overflow.Save alarm context ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Save alarm context Buffering alarms and state change events If the BSS detects that communication with the OMC has been lost it routes all BSS critical and major alarms. S OMC has been stopped and restarted and is set up to do a resync on startup. If the BSS event buffer overflows. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The purpose of this event is to inform the operator that event/alarm information has been lost and it is necessary to perform manual actions to determine the status of the BSS. This feature is known as save alarm context. When the BSS detects that communication with the OMC has been re-established. When the OMC is reconnected to an NE an automatic resync of alarms/events occurs if the: S OMC had been operational and the OML link had been lost and restored. This event is sent as soon as communication with the OMC is re-established. NOTE When the buffer is full the oldest buffered information is overwritten. and all state change events to a buffer.

and the icon representing the faulty node on the map changes to reflect the alarm of highest severity. The incoming messages in the open alarm and event display windows provide the operators with information on the exact source of the fault. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . its severity and time of occurrence. may generate more than one alarm. for example a link failure. ALARM SUMMARY ALARMS ICON GSR 4. EMOTOROLA LTD. For example.1.1 – 1.6.0 Figure 5-3 Alarm reporting at the OMC Multiple alarms A single fault. Figure 5-3 illustrates alarm notification at the OMC.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault indication at the OMC Fault indication at the OMC Notification The alarms summary on the front panel of the GUI is updated to reflect any new alarms received by the OMC. Subscription lists can be set up to display alarms of particular severities from selected sites to simplify fault detection. an operator could monitor all critical and major alarms from a group of cells in a particular geographical area.

The alarm identifies the RCI (Radio Channel Identifier) or CIC (Circuit Identity Code). the operator initiates the repair or replacement procedure for that device. or as warnings of potential service-affecting faults. The BSS does not keep track of these alarms. and therefore a new alarm must be sent to clear a previously faulty RCI or CIC. and the path where the error is detected. 5–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. The three alarm types are: S Intermittent alarms. no alarm clear message should be expected. OIC alarms Receipt of an OIC alarm indicates that operator action is required to correct the fault. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Fault Management Initiated Clear alarms (FMIC). If notified that a device is out of service. RCI and CIC alarms are treated as FMIC alarms at the OMC. FMIC alarms If an FMIC alarm is received. the operator must initiate the repair or replacement procedure for that device. S Operator Initiated Clear alarms (OIC). Intermittent alarms are indicated in the alarm message displayed at the OMC. Intermittent alarms If an Intermittent alarm is received. the fault management software of the NE clears the alarm when the problem is solved. Events/alarms are also generated by the OMC. The operator expects either an alarm clear message to be displayed or the device is taken out of service. for example in the case of OML failure. When repaired or replaced the device must be returned to service. CERM feature The Circuit Error Rate Monitor (CERM) feature is used to identify when discontinuity is detected in a circuit. Receipt of an alarm clear message indicates the alarm condition no longer exists. An alarm is generated and sent to the OMC when the error count exceeds an operator specified threshold. If the alarm occurs too frequently the operator may want to throttle the alarm by using an MMI command.Alarms ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarms Introduction to alarms Alarms and state change events provide indications of faults resulting in loss of service or degradation of service. and operator action is dependent on the type of alarm received. There are three types of alarms. Additional information Refer to Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) for complete procedures on clearing alarms. If the fault is serious.

The resyncAlarm process If the result from the resyncState operation is positive. The NE sends the active alarms on its active alarm list to the OMC. The different types of entries in this field are described in the following table: Entry Description [R] Alarm first seen at OMC after being sent due to resync. If there are any differences. Performing a resync one site at a time reduces the possibility of having a backlog of events at the OMC. S The OMC periodically requests a system-wide alarm and state re-synchronization of every site in the managed network. and when an out-of-service OML to an NE comes back into service. previously sent during a resync. [?] Alarm in OMC active event table. but at the end of subsequent resync is no longer in the BSS active alarm list. or by any event display window with the appropriate subscriptions to indicate if NE sites and links are operational. It is possible to use the Resync Scheduler to set up scheduled resyncs on either the network. or on individual NEs. When to perform a resync Resyncs should be performed in the following situations: S The resync operation needs to be performed when a link to a site has been down. a resyncAlarm operation is invoked. [R?] Alarm. and involves the processes resyncState and resyncAlarm. the alarm messages in the AET are updated to include a resync indicator field.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Resync Resync Definition of resync Resync (alarm and state synchronization) enables the alarm and device state information at the OMC to be updated to reflect the actual device state and alarm information at the NEs. This information is used by the Network Status Summary (NSS) feature. but no longer in BSS active alarm list. EMOTOROLA LTD. S A re-synchronization can be performed on OMC startup (user-configured). The alarms sent are compared with the alarms currently in the AET of the OMC. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The resyncState process The NE sends up information on the state of all CM MIB supported devices from each of its sites. These alarms can be handled as a group. Resync is automatically performed when an OOS device comes back into service.

On receipt of a response message from the BSS. On being informed that the BSS has returned to operating correctly. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The OMC continues to send messages periodically to the BSS requesting its status. This alarm indicates that the BSS failed to respond to a message requesting its status. An alarm is also generated when the BSS informs the OMC that it is not operational. and may be indicative of a problem at the BSS. the OMC changes the alarm severity of the message to Clear. The OMC continues to send messages periodically to the BSS requesting its status. This verifies if the BSSs are operational or not. 5–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. PSA failure If a BSS fails to respond to a PSA request for its status.Periodic Supervision of Accessibility (PSA) ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Periodic Supervision of Accessibility (PSA) Definition of PSA Periodic Supervision of Accessibility (PSA) periodically sends messages to BSSs requesting information on their current state. the OMC will generate an alarm for that BSS. the OMC changes the alarm severity of the message to Clear.

see Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC. The System removes any logfiles older than three days from the $OMC_TOP/logs directory using routine maintenance cron jobs.the /home. (GSM-100-501). EMOTOROLA LTD. and the /usr/gsm/ne_data partitions of the System Processor.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Disk usage exceeded Disk usage exceeded System Processor partition full An alarm is raised when either of two (upper and lower) threshold values of disk usage are exceeded on the /.CNFG contains the values that are used for setting the timers for each audit and disk usage limits. These values are set at installation time and can only be changed by the system administrator. The file $OMC_TOP/config/global/FM_audit. the /usr. or if the upper disk usage threshold is exceeded. Further information For information on setting the related parameters. The threshold value should return to the default value of 90%. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . For example. it is possible to have an operator who cannot handle. clear or remove alarms). an operator can change the state field from NEW to HANDLED by pointing to the alarm message text. The changes in alarm state are routed back to the Active Events Table (AET). Figure 5-4 The alarm handling popup menu Alarm priority Refer to Technical Description: GSM Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) for a listing of the order of priority in which alarms should be handled. For example. un-handle. therefore all operators who have subscribed to that alarm are aware of its state. This change is routed back to the AET via the OMC MMI. (Command partitioning is used to specify which users can perform which operations at the OMC. 5–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. as shown in Figure 5-4. Fault handling process Each alarm display window contains an alarm handling popup menu. when an alarm is first displayed. its source and severity. and is then said to be handling the alarm.Fault handling ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault handling Handling: defined Alarm messages arriving at the OMC contain information on the type of fault. and all windows displaying this alarm message update the alarm state field. clicking the right mouse button and selecting HANDLE. Having selected one alarm (using the left mouse button) other alarms can be selected by clicking on them with the middle mouse button. that the operator uses to change the state of the alarm as fault management procedures are performed. Any operator may handle any alarm not being handled by another operator. When the operator begins handling an alarm the operator field is changed to the name of the operator handling the alarm. or which relate to the same fault is possible. When the alarm is first displayed an operator takes responsibility for fixing the problem causing the alarm. Only the operator currently handling a particular alarm may clear it. Group handling of alarms of the same type.

or from the Fault Mgt menu on the Contained Devices report (Figure 6-5). and MTLs. and vice versa. This facility not available for all devices at an NE. LAN and TDM devices. the Navigation Tree. This can be done from the Navigation Tree or the Contained Devices form. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . This can be done from the Map. in that all activity on the device is terminated when the command is executed. and selecting the Fault Mgt menu. An operator can reassign the control of one device to another. Or an operator can choose the standby device to be the active device. Some devices operate in an active/standby mode. CBLs. The reassign action is only valid for DRIs. Shutting down a device permits traffic to be handed off before the device is locked by performing an intra-cell handover for the cells associated with the RCU being shutdown. GSM-100-201 for a list of these devices. This can be done from the Navigation Tree or the Contained Devices form. OMC operators are informed of all state changes at NEs by an event message. EMOTOROLA LTD. by invoking the swap operation. where the standby device acts as a backup to the active device. Figure 5-5 Contained Devices report Locking the device is intrusive. When the active device goes OOS the NE may automatically bring the standby device into service.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault handling Changing device states An operator can take a device Out Of Service (OOS) by issuing a command to lock or shutdown the device. COMBProc. The swap action is valid only for GCLK. See Operating Information: System Operation manual. SITEs.

5–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. the problem could possibly be solved by changing the state of the parent device. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . All work performed at operational NEs by site engineers or technicians should be co-ordinated. Details of device and parent relationships are shown in Figure 5-6. Additional information Refer to Maintenance Information: Technical Description: GSM Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) for fault handling procedures at the OMC. monitored. logged and controlled by the OMC operators. DEVICE RSL 1ST PARENT 2ND PARENT MTL MMS MSI OML 3RD PARENT XBL CAGE CAB SITE BSS COMB 1ST PARENT 2ND PARENT DRI RCU Figure 5-6 BSS device/parent relationships On-site personnel Sometimes it is necessary to send personnel on-site to replace faulty devices. Refer to Maintenance Information: BSS/RXCDR (GSM-100-523) for complete fault handling procedures at the BSS. when managing faults on BSS devices.Fault handling ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Parent device relationships If changing the device state does not clear the alarms.

(GSM-100-201) for information on the various Rlogin access methods.BSS remote login interface Additional information See Operating Information: System Operation.25 X. such as interrogating the faulty device using BSS MMI commands to find the cause of the fault. Navigation Tree. Contained Devices window. alarm windows or from the GUI Front Panel.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault handling and remote login Fault handling and remote login Remote login interface The operator can remote login to an NE from the OMC and perform various FM functions.2 5 PROCESSOR SYSTEM OPERATOR TERMINAL MMI PROCESSOR BSS/RXCDR Figure 5-7 OMC . X. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Remote login can be accessed from the Map. EMOTOROLA LTD.

This informs other operators subscribing to alarms from that device or node that the problem has been fixed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 5–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. see Command Partitioning). Clearing at the OMC OIC and Intermittent alarms can be set to clear by the operator. FMIC alarms are re-sent to the OMC with their severity set to clear by the NEs FM software when the fault has been rectified. OIC (Operator Initiated Clear) and FMIC (Fault Management Initiated Clear) alarms are deleted from a BSC/BTS active alarm list by the NEs FM software once the cause of the fault has been rectified (for example after a reset). when the fault has been rectified. The NE then re-sends an alarm message to the OMC with its alarm severity set to clear. Clearing at the NE Intermittent alarms are cleared from the BSC/BTS active alarm list once they have been sent to the OMC. The alarm state field can be set to clear using the alarm handling popup menu (dependent on the operator level. and the alarm message can be removed from the AET at the OMC using the Remove option. The message may then be removed (using the alarm handling popup menu) from the AET of the OMC. and the active events table at the OMC. but no longer in BSS active alarm list after a resync) are deemed to be inactive alarms.Alarm clearing ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm clearing Requirements When a fault has been rectified its associated alarm message must be cleared from both the active alarm list at the NE. and can be handled and cleared as a group. in the state field of the alarm display window. Resync alarms with a [?] entry (alarms in OMC active event table.

it is reported. EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 5–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . These alarms may occur frequently.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm throttling Alarm throttling Introduction to alarm throttling Alarm throttling allows the operator to specify a throttle time period (minimum number of minutes) between reports for a particular intermittent alarm. The number of times that alarm. but their non-serious nature means that the operator may wish to restrict the reporting of them to a pre-defined rate. Throttle time period The throttle time period is set on a per (intermittent) alarm code. created. Viewing alarm throttles Alarm throttles can be viewed for BSSs or RXCDRs by selecting Alarm Throttles from the Config Mgt menu in the Navigation Form. Intermittent alarms Alarm throttling can only be applied to alarms that belong to the intermittent alarm category. Throttling is done for each device and for each of its intermittent alarm codes For example. but would still use the same throttle time period defined for DRI alarm code 1. The operator can change the time period for an alarm throttle for a device. from that device is throttled in the previous time period is included in the alarm message displayed. In GSR4 alarm throttles can be viewed. throttling for DRI 0 0 0 alarm code 1 is handled separately from the throttling for DRI 0 1 0 alarm code 1. edited and deleted from the Navigation Form. per device type. Subsequent such alarms from the same device which occur in the same time period are throttled. per BSS basis. If an intermittent alarm from a device is the first alarm from the device to occur in that throttling period. except for alarms with a severity of critical.

Fault escalation procedure ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault escalation procedure Purpose A fault escalation procedure should be established whereby any service-affecting fault condition existing on the network for longer than a predetermined threshold should be reported to the next level of management. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 5–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. but this period is at the discretion of the user. A typical level for the first threshold would be one hour. If the fault persists longer than a second predetermined threshold the next higher level of management should be informed.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Chapter 6 Event Management 1 EMOTOROLA LTD.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Event/alarm subscription procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Introduction to consolidated alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–15 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Blocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Subscription criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Differences between event and alarm windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Events and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Alarms: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 Alarm clearing . . . . 6–8 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–2 How event and alarm management works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 The Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11 Consolidated alarm report format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Thresholding . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8 Two types of windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Naming convention . . . . . . . . 6–12 Alarm handling options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Blacklist subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 The subscription process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Primary functions . . . 6–1 Event Mgmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 The handling process . 6–14 Logfile procedures . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 6 Event Management 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Reading the display . . . . 6–11 Alarm handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 The event display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1 Alarm display window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–12 Additional information . . . . . . . . . 6–9 Subscription procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–13 Example display . . . . . . 6–13 The event logfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–15 Logfile rollover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Overview of EM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Logfile location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4 The difference between events and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Troubleshooting events and alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Logfile creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Alarm handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–3 Event routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Events: defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7 Event/alarm display windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 Subscription functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6 Events in alarm subscription lists . . . . . . . i Event and alarm management . . . . 6–10 Example display . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5 Event/alarm subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10 Consolidated alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–14 Introduction to event logfile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–17 Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line . . . . . . . 6–18 Utility listing . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 Purpose of event logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging events . . . . . . . . . . . 6–16 Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . 6–16 The search event log window . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . 6–18 How the event log utilities are used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18 Post-processing of event logfiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–19 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–19 Online printing of alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

in event windows invoked from the OMC console or the network map. using the OMC MMI and utilities invoked from the UNIX command line. Alarms are a special type of event. and specified alarms. This is used to automatically notify on-call personnel of certain alarms or events that have been reported to the OMC. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . that allow operators to perform alarm handling. S Display events. the Alarm Notification via paging feature is available. Primary functions The main functions of Event Management are as follows: S Collect and log all events and alarms sent to the OMC. and for monitoring the status of the Network. S Enable users to customize alarm and event windows using subscriptions to display particular events or alarms. EMOTOROLA LTD. Event Management monitors events and alarms generated by the NEs. Groups of events and alarms can be routed to the same display window through subscription lists. S Provide post-processing facilities to aid in the analysis of event logs. an NE issues an event to the OMC to indicate that a statistics file is ready for collection. Events and alarms Network elements (NE) report to the OMC through events. As an enhancement to the Event Management functionality. Alarms are sent to indicate a fault condition.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event and alarm management Event and alarm management Event Mgmt OMC Event Management provides a centralized facility for reporting network-wide generated events and alarms. For example. invoked from the network map or the OMC console of the MMI. such as a communications failure. Events and alarms are presented to operators according to specific subscription and threshold criteria. S Display alarms in alarm windows.

1.1 – 1.Event and alarm management ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm display window Figure 6-1 shows how incoming alarms are displayed on an operator workstation. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .0 Alarms icon Figure 6-1 Alarm display window invoked from the Alarms icon 6–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Alarm summary 4.6.

The event routing process allows the event log files to be accessed by both the OMC MMI and command line utilities. indicate that the X. It also processes input from the operator.25 link has failed. for example. Standardized events are then sent to the event routing process. This converts events into a single standard format recognizable by other event management processes and applications. The NE translates them into standardized messages. Notification Events and alarms are generated by all the devices in different NEs in the network. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The process routes events and alarms that are subscribed to in an active subscription list in the Active Events Table (AET). also receives alarms and events data. and forwards them to the OMC. Event routing The event routing process automatically sends all events and alarms to the event log. and directs them to the appropriate subscribers.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 How event and alarm management works How event and alarm management works Overview of EM Figure 6-2 shows how event and alarm management functions. EMOTOROLA LTD. and are reported to the NE Fault Management (FM) software. The OMC also generates internal alarms which. There is also the optional Alarm Notification via paging feature which automatically notifies on-call personnel of certain alarms or state changes that have been reported to the OMC. such as the network status summary application software (CM MIB) and performance management. All events and alarms that arrive at the OMC from the NEs are collected and standardized by the event manager. The OMC application software.

The event routing process sends this information to the AET. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .How event and alarm management works ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm handling The operator can change the state of some of the fields while performing Alarm Handling. OMC MMI FEATURES: COMMAND-LINE INTERFACE: S EVENT & ALARM WIN- DOWS S POST-PROCESSING OF EVENT LOGS S SUBSCRIPTION MENUS S REAL-TIME PRINTING S EVENT LOG SEARCH & OF EVENTS/ALARMS PRINT pager MAINTAINS ALL Paging Center STORES ALL ACTIVE EVENTS SUBSCRIPTION LISTS & ALARMS modem EM SUB-SCHEMA (OMC DATABASE) ACTIVE EVENTS TABLE EM STANDARDIZATION/ COLLECTION ROUTER MMI MMI PROCESSOR X.25 ACTIVE Event & Alarm SUBSCRIPTION CM MIB Messages LISTS EVENT LOGFILES SYSTEM PROCESSOR BSS/RXCDR (CONTAINS INHERENT UPDATES THE NETWORK FM FEATURES) STATUS SUMMARY FEATURE STORES ALL RECEIVED EVENTS & ALARMS Figure 6-2 Event/alarm management 6–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. This indicates the current handling state of the alarm to subscribers.

EMOTOROLA LTD. device change of state). S Indication of communication failure. Alarms: defined Alarms are events of a special category.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The difference between events and alarms The difference between events and alarms Events: defined Events are used to transfer information from NEs to the OMC. Troubleshooting events and alarms For complete information on clearing events and alarms refer to Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) manual. and only these are displayed in alarm display windows. Only six event types fit into the alarm category. S Indication of file transfer. S Test result information. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . and can be displayed in the event display windows at the operator workstations. or information on the beginning of a file transfer from an NE to the OMC. Since alarms are a type of event they are logged in the event log. The following points summarize the main functions of alarms: S Generated by the OMC and the NEs. S Indication of processing failure. An event could be information relating to the state of a particular operation or device in the NE (for example. S Indication of quality of service failure. S Information on traffic conditions. S Indication of environmental failure. S Indication of equipment failure. The following points summarize the main functions of events: S Indication of a device change of state at an NE. that report failures of different severities in the network to the OMC. S Indication of faulty device condition at an NE (alarm). S Indication of measurement result.

Default subscriptions are set up for OMC management applications when the system is started. Blocking It is possible to block alarms/events for a specific subscription list. and existing subscriptions can be modified or deleted. or an Auto Initiate file for each operator. This subscription list can be created using the same procedure to create other subscription lists.Event/alarm subscription ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm subscription The subscription process Event/alarm subscriptions enable certain events to be routed to specific operators or software applications according to certain criteria. communications failure). Thresholding The event subscription process allows thresholding of events.config file paging functions are accessible. S Error ID. S Time. For example. All events/alarms specified in this subscription will be blocked when the subscription list becomes active (is opened in an event/alarm display window). or when the name of the subscriber is defined in the pager. S Event type (for example. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . It is possible to create a system-wide Auto Initiate file which is common to all operators. or event display window. that will automatically open the required windows at the start of an MMI session. Events that operators or application software can subscribe to can be defined in subscription lists. Thresholding is used to specify how many times an event must occur before it is reported to the operator. It overrides the active subscription list for these windows. Subscription criteria Typical subscription criteria are: S Device class (for example. A management application is one part of the OMC software. This does not affect event/alarm subscriptions specified for other subscription lists. when the Performance Management (PM) application subscribes to fileNEavailable events it will have access to statistics files. The procedure for creating a BLACKLIST subscription list is described in Operating Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100-201). BTS). Blacklist subscriptions A subscription list called BLACKLIST can be created to prevent specified alarms/events being displayed in an alarm display window or event display window. Thresholding information is defined within the subscription criteria. S Severity type. All alarms/events subscribed to in a BLACKLIST subscription are switched off in any active alarm display window. A subscription list can contain several different event/alarm subscriptions. New subscriptions can also be created. The operator can modify the list by changing the event/alarm subscriptions already defined for that list. 6–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

in certain circumstances event messages are also subscribed to. This allows event messages in alarm display windows to be handled with operator IDs assigned to the messages. when a SITE is first installed. This is carried out by Motorola personnel. However. Events can be made eligible for alarm subscription lists by changing an MMI configuration file known as a Management Information Tree (MIT) file.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm subscription Events in alarm subscription lists Normally. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . For example. This allows greater traceability. the subscription lists selected for alarm display windows only subscribe to alarms. some operators may want to include state change events from SITE resets with alarms in the alarm display windows. EMOTOROLA LTD.

messages. than once it is displayed again at the it is not displayed again at the OMC. be configured to display specific events. or until the first messages in the window are a clear alarm message is received from its dropped to make room for incoming device of origin. 6–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Can hold up to 512 event/alarm An alarm remains in the alarm window messages.Event/alarm display windows ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm display windows Two types of windows The OMC MMI provides two types of display windows for monitoring subscribed events and alarms at the OMC. Closing and opening a window has no effect on active alarms displayed. until it is removed by the operator. If the same event message arrives more If the same alarm arrives more than once. The two types of display windows are as follows: S Event display windows. Alarms that are cleared are removed. Alarm messages have a standard format. Event windows Alarm windows Usually subscribe to both event and alarm Should only subscribe to alarm messages. The events displayed in each window depend on the subscription list selected for that window. Windows are emptied if they are closed. S Alarm display windows. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . but may. OMC. Before opening an event or alarm display window. Event messages have many formats. in certain cases. messages. All incoming events and alarms subscribed to will be displayed in the window. When 512 has been reached. Additional information Refer to the OMC Online Help facility for more information on the alarm display window. the operator assigns a subscription list to the window that defines which event/alarm messages will be displayed in that window. Alarm messages can be handled. Differences between event and alarm windows A summary of the differences between event and alarm windows is shown below. Event/alarm messages cannot be handled.

modify. delete.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm subscription procedures Event/alarm subscription procedures Subscription procedures Refer to Operating Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100-201) for complete details on event/alarm subscription procedures. S Create. Subscription functions The event subscription management process can perform the following functions: S Create. S Store and retrieve subscriptions and subscription list details from the OMC database. rename and display subscription lists. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . rename and display subscriptions assigned to active subscription lists. delete. S Maintain subscription lists from management applications. modify. EMOTOROLA LTD.

The alarm state field of each message is initially set to NEW and the operator name field to NONE. S From the Maps or Alarms icons.The Alarm display window ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The Alarm display window Access The alarm display window can be opened: S Automatically on startup using autoinitiation files. 6–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. major and/or minor alarms arrive at the OMC. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Refer to the OMC Online Help facility for a full description of all the alarm message fields. Alarm messages in the alarm display windows differ from the messages in the event display window. namely. A variable in the system can be set to cause a bell to ring at the OMC terminal when critical. and cleared alarms can be removed from the window. More than one alarm can be selected by clicking on them with the middle mouse button. In the alarms display window the operator can interact with two fields when handling alarms. Group handling of alarms of the same type. and thus the AET. This change is routed back to the AET via the MMI. The menu options allow the format of the alarms displayed in the window to be changed. All active alarms that are subscribed to in the selected subscription list are displayed in this window. the alarm state changes from NEW to SEEN. Fault management operations are greyed out if more than one alarm is selected. to see what type of fault has occurred and its severity. S From the Event Management icon. By selecting the alarm. or alarms that relate to the same fault is possible. Example display An example alarm display window with the popup menu displayed is shown in Figure 6-3. and all windows subscribing to the alarm message receive an update to the alarm state field. the alarm state field and the operator field. Figure 6-3 Example alarm display window Reading the display The format of the alarm message enables the operator to identify the faulty device (origin of alarm message). Subscriptions can also be changed.

and devices that are out of service will generate alarms. Cause – Operation – Outcome – Outage Time – Secondary Status – Config. A consolidated alarm can display: 1. Info. OOS device information. Failures that require operator action. #Id – State – Operator – Comment Alarm Type – Device Class – Device Instance – Time Device Alarm Alarm Code – Device Severity – Clearing Info. Functional Unit severities. 3. – Cage/Slot – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –––– Reconfig. State – Reason OOS Device – Operation State – Admin. Alarm reconfiguration information. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 6-4 shows the format of a consolidated alarm report. 2. NOTE A reconfiguration is an operation that results in a BSS device changing state. 4. Consolidated alarm report format Consolidated alarms are generated when a reconfiguration occurs at a BSS. and consolidates all information relating to a failure in a single report. Failures that are quickly recovered by the system and require no operator action will not generate alarms.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Consolidated alarm reporting Consolidated alarm reporting Introduction to consolidated alarms Consolidated alarm reporting provides information about the OMC GUI map so that an operator can identify and prioritize further investigation of problems in the network. State – Reason Figure 6-4 Format of a Consolidated Alarm Report Additional information Refer to Operating Information: GSM System Operation (GSM-100–201) for complete information on consolidated alarms. Alarm information. Refer to Network maps in Chapter 2. Tag – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –––– Affected FU – FU Severity Impacted FUs Affected FU – FU Severity ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OOS Devices – OOS Device – Operation State – Admin. This feature reduces the number of alarms reported to the operator. Alarms on map nodes can be viewed in terms of their impact on subscribers or devices. EMOTOROLA LTD.

that is. Alarm handling options The alarm handling options in the alarm display window available by clicking the right mouse button. When the operator has rectified the fault causing the alarm. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . the alarm state can be set to clear. all operators subscribing to that alarm will know its state. Any operator may handle any alarm(s) not being handled by another operator. any alarm in the alarm window that has a state field of NEW or SEEN. and the active alarm list at the NE. therefore. The changes in alarm state are routed back to the AET. Otherwise the Fault Management menu from the menu bar can be used to clear the fault. a GSM network operator takes responsibility for fixing the problem causing the alarm. its associated alarm message must be cleared from both the AET at the OMC. and the options available from the Fault Management window are listed in the below table. Clearing the alarm depends upon the alarm being classified into one of three categories: S Fault Management Initiated Clear (FMIC). However. 6–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Alarm handling ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm handling The handling process When an alarm is first displayed. using the alarm handling popup menu. Each alarm display window contains an alarm handling popup menu (refer to Figure 6-5) that the operator can use to change the state of the alarm(s). S Intermittent alarm. only the operator currently handling a particular alarm may clear it. S Operator Initiated Clear (OIC). this allows the alarm to be removed. Popup menu options Fault Management menu Handle Lock Unhandle Unlock Clear Shutdown Remove INS Comment Reset Lock Reset SITE> Hard or Soft Unlock Reassign INS Swap Help Alarm clearing When a fault has been fixed. Additional information Refer to Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100–501) for complete information on clearing alarms.

NOTE Events lost to the events display window will be stored. When an event window is opened it is initially empty. sequentially displayed according to subscription criteria. Example display Figure 6-6 An example event display window The first line of an event/alarm message on arrival is always: #0 – NOT APPL – *NONE* Event messages can have many different formats depending on the type of information they contain. all incoming messages from a particular NE for instance.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The event display window The event display window Access Event windows are usually configured to display both events and alarms. EMOTOROLA LTD. An example event display window is shown in Figure 6-6. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . in the events logfile. The operator can then monitor changes developing in the network. Handling of event or alarm messages is not possible in event display windows. Additional information Refer to the OMC Online Help facility for a full description of all the alarm message fields. By subscribing to both events and certain alarms. with all the other events. events/alarms at the top of the list are lost as new events come in. Event windows are opened by selecting the Event Mgt icon from the front panel of the OMC MMI. can be monitored. A maximum of 512 events/alarms can be displayed in a scrollable window. When a window is full.

An operator can choose to examine events/alarms from the log. time of occurrence or source. Logfile creation Event logfiles may be created in two ways: S Automatically. For example. The OMC system administrator decides how many logfiles can remain in the file system before they are archived. The contents of the event logfiles are read-only and cannot be changed. changes to an alarm state field when alarm handling are displayed and updated. S Manually. while doing this events arriving at the OMC will be lost. as well as events generated internally by the OMC. then enable a new event log. This includes events generated by a BSS.The event logfile ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The event logfile Introduction to event logfile All events/alarms are routed into an event logfile. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Logfile location All events and alarms generated in the network are logged at the OMC to ensure complete traceability within the GSM network. After 5000 events/alarms the file becomes full. Refer to Operating Information: OMC System Administration (GSM-100-202) for further details of logfile maintenance procedures. it is then closed and a new logfile is opened with a new date and time stamp. which can contain up to 5000 events. Logfile procedures The event logfiles can be accessed using the MMI. Full event logs remain in the file system until the OMC system administrator archives the existing logfiles. This process is known as rollover. There is a menu option within the MMI that the OMC system administrator can use to disable an event log. This directory can also be accessed directly on the MMI processor using $EM_LOG variable. 6–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. However. This is called post-processing of event logs. or event log processing scripts. All types of alarms/events are stored in the event logs. based on criteria such as type. as it is mounted using Network File System (NFS). This takes place at midnight even if the previous event log is not full. Event logs are stored in the $OMC_TOP/ne_data/ev_logs directory on the System Processor.

This process is known as rollover. it is closed and a new event logfile is opened with a new date and time stamp. The file name format is: ev<YYYYMMDDHHMMSS> Where: YYYY is: Year MM Month DD Day HH Hour MM Minute SS Second Example The following example event logfile was created on February 12. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2000 at 09.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The event logfile Naming convention Event logfiles are named using the creation date and time stamp. EMOTOROLA LTD.00: ev20000212090000 Logfile rollover When the event logfile becomes full.

Event logging cannot be enabled or disabled by a read-only user.Logging events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging events Event Logs All events sent to the OMC are stored in Event Logs. for example. The event logs option is invoked from the Event Logs icon on the Front panel and allows access to: S Search the event logfiles. all events and alarms arriving at and produced by the OMC are lost. An OMC system administrator can disable logging. It is possible to process Event Logs using this application. S Enable or disable event logging. It is important to understand that when event logging is disabled. This is accomplished by loading up to eight event logfiles into an event log search window. during a maintenance period. and performing searches on the events stored in the files using specified filter criteria as shown in Figure 6-7. Logging of events can also be enabled or disabled from this application. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 6–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging events The search event log window Figure 6-7 shows the search event log window that has been opened from the Event Logs icon of the front panel. When the search window is opened. Figure 6-7 Search event log window EMOTOROLA LTD. the search criteria can be set so that only specified event messages are displayed.

S sld (Subscription List Daemon). cel qfes* ces* STDOUT POST EM ROUTER EVENT PROCESSING LOGFILES sld qfes* ces* dpr* PRINTER REAL-TIME * Denotes Optional PROCESSING Figure 6-8 Overview of the event log processing utilities available 6–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Reads an event stream on stdin (which can be the output of cel or sld) and filters the events based on a single event filter. such as the print command lp. The output is written in ASCII format to stdout. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S qfes (Quick Filter Event Stream). S Printing critical alarms (real-time processing). Processes OMC event logs. Provides an interface between a continuous stream and UNIX file oriented commands. Receives events from the OMC event management process in real time and writes the events to stdout in ASCII format. S ces (Clean Event Stream). S dpr (Direct Printing). and writes the events to stdout in ASCII format.Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line Purpose of event logfiles The event logfile processing utilities are invoked from the command line and are used for two main purposes: S Post-processing of stored event logs. removes the start and end tags and writes the output in ASCII format to stdout. Utility listing The utilities are defined as follows: S cel (Cat Event Log). which are in binary format. Reads an event stream on stdin. How the event log utilities are used An overview of the way the event and alarm processing utilities can be used is shown in Figure 6-8.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 6–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. These scripts can be run daily as cron jobs. This can be achieved using the sld and dpr utilities. Online printing of alarms The most useful application of real-time processing is directing events/alarms to a printer. The qfes utility may be used to filter events but as sld takes a subscription list as an input parameter.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line Post-processing of event logfiles The post-processing utilities allow scripts to be written which automate the search functionality provided by the OMC MMI. this may not be necessary. Event tags can be filtered using the ces utility.

Event/alarm utilities invoked from the command line ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 6–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Chapter 7 Event Management 2 EMOTOROLA LTD.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

. . . . . . . . . . . 7–16 Displaying NSS subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–29 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17 Blacklist subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–1 Events and alarms . . . . . . 7–7 Consolidated alarm report format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–3 Further options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–10 The Log Search menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 Viewing available subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–24 Accessing subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–14 Managing subscription lists . . . . 7–8 OOS devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–21 Modifying a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12 Entering an alarm comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–26 Adding a subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 Subscription lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15 List of procedures . . . 7–24 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–20 Blacklist selected event from all devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12 Viewing or adding to an alarm comment . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–22 Renaming a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–18 Blacklist all events from selected device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–4 Creating a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–26 Adding GPRS subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Purpose of the Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–20 Creating a new subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–16 Opening a subscription list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7 Reconfiguration information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–1 Subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–3 Opening an alarm window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6 Consolidated alarm reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–8 Functional Unit severities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Event management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–19 Blacklist this event from selected device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–11 Using the alarm comment field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23 Deleting a subscription list . . . . . 7–3 After detecting an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–25 Displaying subscriptions . . . . . 7–5 Adding a utility to the CDE menu . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 7 Event Management 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23 Managing subscriptions . . . . . . 7–9 The View menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2 Checking alarms from the network map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Creating an option in the Tools menu . . . 7–3 Alarms: the basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–1 Alarm types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6 Adding a utility to the CDE menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5 Creating a Tools menu . . . . . 7–24 Subscriptions . . . . . . 7–7 Introduction to consolidated alarms . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Purpose of the Events From Now function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–40 Connectivity summary window . . . . . . . . . . . .CNFG file . . 7–43 Deleting an alarm throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–30 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Alarm windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 Searching of event log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–32 Acknowledging an alarm arrival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–30 Personalizing the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–59 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . 7–44 Logging of events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 OIC alarm clearing . . . . . . . . .CNFG template files . 7–58 AutoInit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Event windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–42 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . 7–33 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–34 Handling an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–46 Loading event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Purpose of the Events With History function . . . . . . . . 7–57 Creation of auto initiation files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–50 Filtering event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–34 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–49 Setting the sort criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–33 Checking the subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38 CIC alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Fault management actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–45 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–34 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–31 Opening an alarm/event window . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 When to handle an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35 Further details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–55 Enabling event logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–44 Intermittent alarm throttling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–42 Changing the alarm throttle time period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–36 Displaying events with history or from now for an NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–47 Changing format . . . . . 7–38 RCI alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–48 Sort criteria . . . . . . . 7–30 Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–58 Creating an AutoInit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . 7–54 Printing event log search window . . . . 7–33 Alarm logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm handling: overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–42 Viewing alarm throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–56 Disabling event logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37 Displaying events with history or from now . . . . . . . . . . . 7–58 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–41 Throttling alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–50 Reloading event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–53 Displaying current active event logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–70 OMC alarm paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–74 Defining the contents of the pager configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–66 sld example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 ces example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–75 Stopping paging . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 Using cel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–75 Sending alarms to an e-mail address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 Creating an e-mail alarm option in the Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 Using qfes . . . . . . . . . 7–71 Truncated severity types . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–71 Contents of a page message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–75 Starting paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–70 Setting up a cron job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Paging error handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–65 sld example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–66 Using dpr . . . 7–71 Overview of paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 List of procedures . . . . . . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations v FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Content of the paging configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 ces example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–62 Using ces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–67 Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–69 Introduction to cron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–76 Prerequisite: a Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–72 Paging: how it works . . 7–68 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the event logging utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–64 Using sld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–63 Input parameters . . . . . . . . . 7–64 Output format . . 7–73 Installing the paging modem at the OMC . . 7–71 Paging performance . . . . . 7–76 Description of e-mailing alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–60 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 vi NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

S Intermittent. OIC An OIC alarm indicates that an operator action is required to correct the fault. then the alarm is again displayed at the OMC following the next alarm resynchronization. If an operator is notified that the device has been taken out of service. This chapter shows how to monitor network events and alarms at the OMC. EMOTOROLA LTD. S OIC – Operator Initiated Clear. When the fault has been investigated and resolved. If an FMIC alarm occurs. the operator can use the del_act_alarm MMI command to manually clear the alarm at the NE. such as a communications failure. An NE can issue an event to tell the OMC that a statistics file is ready for collection. Event management has the following main functions: S Collection and logging of all events and alarms reaching the OMC. the alarm is again displayed at the OMC following the next alarm resynchronization.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Event management overview Event management overview Events and alarms Event management provides operators at the OMC with a means of managing events and alarms generated by network elements (NEs) on the network. either an alarm clear message is displayed or the device is taken out of service. if the fault condition has not been resolved and the alarm not cleared locally at the NE using the del_act_alarm command. but a warning message is displayed. the procedure for handling alarms (detailed further in Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501)) and how to obtain information from the event logs. S Presentation of all events and alarms according to subscription criteria. FMIC FMIC alarms are not cleared by operators but by the actual software at the NE (BSS or RXCDR) when the alarm fault has been resolved. Alarm types There are three alarm types: S FMIC – Fault Management Initiated Clear. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The consolidated alarm reporting feature is designed to guide the OMC operator to the most important alarms in terms of impact to the customer. then the operator must initiate the repair or replacement procedure for the device. However. It is further used to guide the operator to the source of those alarms. It is possible to clear OIC alarms in alarm displays at the OMC. Receipt of an alarm clear message indicates that the alarm condition no longer exists. has occurred. An alarm is a special type of event used to inform the operator that a fault condition. In cases where an FMIC alarm has been cleared at the OMC but the fault condition still exists at the NE. An event is a means by which an NE can report to the OMC. An OMC Administrator can clear FMIC alarms at the OMC.

a device instance.Event management overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Intermittent Intermittent alarms refer to transient non-serious alarms. delete. Events are then sorted according to these criteria. No alarm clear messages should be expected from the NE for these. an event type. error ID. the number and type of occurrences of the event. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Create. 7–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. modify. Refer to Throttling Alarms. This is done using alarm throttling at the NE. A subscription to an event specifies a device class. delete. Subscriptions Operators at the OMC must ensure that subscription lists are configured to monitor all BSSs and RXCDRs in the network. Intermittent alarms can be cleared in alarm displays at the OMC. This chapter also details procedures to explain how to manage subscriptions: Procedures are included to: S Create. Reporting of intermittent alarms (except those with a severity of critical) can be restricted to a predefined rate. severity of the event. rename and display subscription lists. as well as the OMC. rename and display subscriptions. modify.

see Chapter 2 of this manual. See Viewing OOS devices and Displaying OOS devices from the navigation tree. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Further options Chapter 2 contains procedures for opening windows from the Network map and Navigation Tree. see the Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) manual. EMOTOROLA LTD. the related location icon on the network map changes in colour from green.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Checking alarms from the network map Checking alarms from the network map Alarms: the basics When a Critical or Major alarm occurs. if the Maps feature is enabled. For information on the meaning of the State fields. and. to red (critical) or yellow (major). this is indicated both by a flashing Alarm icon on the GUI Front Panel. refer to What to do when an alarm occurs in Chapter 8 of this manual. For more information on the general operation of the Network Maps feature. where Status and Out of service (OOS) devices can be checked. After detecting an alarm For more information. For information on accessing Alarm Context Sensitive Help. This is the default setting. refer to Online Help.

From the Map list window. select File – Close from the menu bar. A map window is displayed. (GSM-100-501) for procedures on handling alarms. use the following procedure: 1. NOTE It is possible to open a map which has no Network Elements displayed. Figure 7-1 An alarm window 7–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 6. Select the Maps icon from the Front Panel. 2.Checking alarms from the network map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Opening an alarm window To open an alarm window from the Network Map. Select Display – Alarms from the menu bar. 3. Double click on the map name. To close an open alarm window. 7. Refer to the manual Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC. 4. An Alarm window opens as shown in Figure 7-1. it is impossible to open an Alarm window using this method. 5. A map list window opens. Once selected the icon changes colour. If there are no current alarms the window will be empty. In this case. Click on the node of Network Element for which an Alarm window is required. click on the map on which the required Network Element can be found. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The selected map name is highlighted.

Create a file with a meaningful name in the directory: omcadmin /usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subscription/tools The name of the file will appear as an option in the Tools menu. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . to create a menu option called COP Tools to initiate the COP Tool.sh.tcl 4. 3. ensure that the file has write permissions for all users. For example. the OMC creates an iconized window. type: #! /bin/sh xterm –iconic –e /usr/gsm/ne_data/OTG/start_gui. Creating a Tools menu To create a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows. the option to access one of the suite of Cell Optimization Tools. Log in as the omcadmin user. If the COP tools set is not displayed. The omcadmin user can then add useful functions to the Tools menu as menu options. the option appears in the Tools menu. EMOTOROLA LTD. Log in as the omcadmin user. follow these steps: 1. to follow the COP Tools example above. When the operator opens the window it displays the COP tool set. type the UNIX command to be executed when the option is selected by an operator.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Creating a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows Creating a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows Purpose of the Tools menu The omcadmin user can create a Tools menu which can be selected by an operator from an Alarm or Event window. In the example given above. For example. 2. Create the following directory: omcadmin /usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subscription/tools When the GUI is restarted. such as. Event Counting Tool (ECT) can be added to the Tools menu. In the file. Save the file. create a file called COP_Tools. For example. Creating an option in the Tools menu To create a menu option in the Tools menu. 2. either the COP tools are not installed or they have been installed in a different directory. The menu options can then be quickly and easily selected by an operator. when the user selects the COP Tools menu option. follow these steps: 1. the Tools menu appears in the Alarm and Event windows. When the GUI is restarted. Now add a menu option to it. NOTE If the menu option is to be used by all users.

exec Status” ”/usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subsc ription/tools/DRI_Status. Log in as the omcadmin user. For example.nonGUIServer. and select Restart from the popup menu. see NO TAGReporting utilities in Chapter 9.sh” no–label f. to add the utilities dri_status and Network Reports to the CDE menu. Press the left mouse button.separator ”DRI f. The utilities now appear in the CDE menu for an omcadmin user.separator ”Network f.sh” For further details on the utility dri_status. enter: no–label f.dt 3. edit the file dtwmrc. 5. If the machine is not a GUI server.GUIServer. Save the file. 6. use a text editor such as vi to edit the file dtwmrc. omcadmin 2. Enter the utility text into the Right Menu Description in the file.Adding a utility to the CDE menu ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Adding a utility to the CDE menu Adding a utility to the CDE menu To add a utility to the CDE menu for an omcadmin user. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . If the machine is a GUI server. 4. This restarts the workspace. Type the following in the command line window: cd /home/omcadmin/.exec Reports” ”/usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subsc ription/tools/Network_Reports. follow these steps: 1. 7–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

This feature reduces the number of alarms reported to the operator and consolidates all information relating to a failure. – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –––– Affected FU – From FU Severity To FU Severity Impacted FUs Affected FU – From FU Severity To FU Severity . Figure 7-2 shows the format of a consolidated alarm report. making it accessible in a single report. Tag Reconfig. Info. 2. #Id – State – Operator – Comment Alarm Type – Device Class – Device Instance – Time Device Alarm Alarm Code – Device Severity – Clearing Info. Alarm reconfiguration information. 3. – Cage/Slot – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –––– Cause – Operation – Outcome – Outage Time – Secondary Status – Config. Refer to Map display in Chapter 2. State – Reason OOS Devices OOS Device – Operation State – Admin.. State – Reason Figure 7-2 Format of Consolidated Alarm Report EMOTOROLA LTD.. Consolidated alarm report format A consolidated alarm can display: 1. 4. OOS device information. Functional Unit severities. Alarm information.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Consolidated alarm reporting Consolidated alarm reporting Introduction to consolidated alarms Consolidated alarm reporting provides sufficient information on the OMC GUI map so that an operator can identify and prioritize further investigation of problems in the network. Alarms on map nodes can be viewed in terms of their impact on subscribers or devices. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OOS Device – Operation State – Admin.

Disable–Enable–Soft. Disable–Enable–Hard Outcome Outcome of the Alarm. and remain critical after the alarm. which links all alarms and state changes associated with a reconfiguration. Remote Operation Name of the operation taking Unequip. Initialization. Clear. The list of impacted functional unit severities shows the severity before and after the reconfiguration so that an operator can determine if the alarm caused the severity to change. NOTE A reconfiguration is an operation (manual or fault management initiated) that results in devices within a BSS changing state. Lock–Unlock. Recovered outage. OMC request. reconfiguration. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . depending on whether the alarm is associated with a reconfiguration or not. Config. Unlock. The severity is not necessarily caused by the alarm as a functional unit may be critical before an alarm occurs.Consolidated alarm reporting ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Reconfiguration information The details shown for a consolidated alarm vary. Lock. Functional Unit severities Functional Unit severities are a snapshot of impacted sites or cells at the time of an alarm. Secondary Status Indicates that an alarm is not the main alarm associated with a reconfiguration. These alarms have a tag. Disable. or number. Enable. Fault. Restoration. Tag A number that links together all alarms and state changes associated with a reconfiguration. Shutdown. Reset. 7–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Alarms that are associated with reconfigurations are called tagged alarms. Swap. Table 7-1 Reconfiguration information Field Name Description Types Cause Cause of the reconfiguration. Pending Outage Time Outage time for recovered outages. Equip. place. LMT request. Table 7-1 describes the fields in a consolidated alarm that contain reconfiguration information. Advisory.

In an alarm window click on an alarm that contains a list of OOS devices. or from the alarm window popup menu. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on an OOS device in the list appended to the end of the alarm. An operator can select a device from the OOS device list in an alarm window and perform fault management operations on it. 2. 3. The selected alarm background is highlighted. Figure 7-3 Alarm with OOS device EMOTOROLA LTD. Refer to Figure 7-3. Use the following procedure to perform fault management operations on OOS devices in an alarm window: 1.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Consolidated alarm reporting OOS devices OOS device alarms display a list of up to twenty OOS devices associated with a reconfiguration. Fault management operations can now be selected from the Fault Mgmt menu on the menu bar. The selected OOS device is highlighted.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . an operator can use the View menu options to exclude or include parts of a report from the display.Consolidated alarm reporting ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The View menu In an Alarm window. Figure 7-4 View menu 7–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Refer to Online Help for a description of these options.

Runs a report which searches the event logs for devices that went out of service as a result of a reconfiguration and remain OOS. Figure 7-5 Log Search menu EMOTOROLA LTD. Runs a report which searches the event logs for associated alarms and associated state changes that occur as a result of a reconfiguration. S Associated Events. Runs a report which searches the event logs for all devices that changed state due to the reconfiguration associated with the selected event. they may provide the operator with useful information regarding the fault condition. Selecting this option runs a report which searches the event logs for all alarms. S Associated State Changes. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . both primary and secondary that are linked to the reconfiguration associated with the selected event. NOTE Secondary alarms are associated with a reconfiguration but do not cause it because they occur as a result of the reconfiguration. However.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Consolidated alarm reporting The Log Search menu An operator can select an alarm that occurs as a result of a reconfiguration and use the Log Search menu to run reports which are retrieved from event logs: S Associated Alarms. S Associated OOS Devices.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . In an open alarm window. Right-click on the alarm. The selected alarm background is highlighted. Entering an alarm comment To enter an alarm comment. click on the alarm to be commented. clearing). 2. and methods of solution (handling. Figure 7-6 Opening the alarm comment window 7–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. perform the following procedure: 1. A popup menu is displayed as shown in Figure 7-6.Using the alarm comment field ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the alarm comment field Introduction The alarm comment field is used during alarm handling for the recording of causes of alarms.

Any relevant comments can now be entered in this area. Select the Comment option and release the button. Click on the Comment area of the window. click Cancel.) EMOTOROLA LTD. click OK to save the comment and return to the alarm window. 5. When the comment has been typed. To cancel the comment. Figure 7-7 Alarm comment window 4. A comment window is displayed as in Figure 7-7. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The cursor is highlighted and starts flashing.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the alarm comment field 3. (Help is available by clicking on the Help button.

When the comment has been typed. click Cancel. which can be viewed. 2. as required. 1. The cursor will flash. click OK to save the comment and return to the alarm window. 3.Using the alarm comment field ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing or adding to an alarm comment To add a comment to an alarm field. click on the Comment area. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . this is indicated by the addition of the field COMMENT in the first line of the alarm description in the alarm window. Comments can be added. 4. To cancel the comment. To add to the comment or edit the contents. use the following procedure: NOTE If an alarm already has a comment entered.) 7–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. edited or deleted. Open an Alarm Comment window. (Help is available by clicking Help.

This allows several windows to be set up simultaneously on the SPARCstations to monitor different parts of the network. When created. Subscriptions are added to a subscription list to define the filter criteria for the events/alarms displayed in that window. all events and alarms are logged in the event log at the OMC. The name given to the subscription list is the name which displays in the title bar of the related alarm/event window. a subscription list contains no subscriptions. All subscription lists (except hidden subscriptions) are available to all operators. subscriptions are used to select the group of events/alarms which are displayed in that window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Creating new subscription lists. Alarm lists gather alarms or events. whether open or closed. and are empty when first opened. Event lists are for display purposes only. Each subscription list may be defined as an event or alarm list and is given a unique name. The following sub-sections describe how to set up and manage subscription lists. Subsequently. and each alarm or event must be responded to by the operator. S Deleting a subscription list. S Renaming a subscription list. S Modifying a subscription list. S Displaying NSS subscription lists.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscription lists Managing subscription lists Subscription lists A subscription list is used to define a window for monitoring events and/or alarms. List of procedures The following is a list of procedures for subscription list management: S Viewing available subscription lists. EMOTOROLA LTD. S Opening a subscription list. for example. See the Logging of events section in this chapter. The subscription lists are stored in the OMC database. Each subscription list is given a unique name specified by the operator and may be displayed as an Event or Alarm window on a SPARCstation. Regardless of subscription list settings. Related subscriptions may be grouped together into a single subscription list. All subscription list commands are entered by menu selection. to monitor all events from a group of base stations. These options can only be performed by an operator with read/write permission.

2. Subscription lists are displayed in a scrollable window as shown in Figure 7-8. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 7–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Select the required Subscription List window.Managing subscription lists ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Viewing available subscription lists A list of Subscription Lists which are currently configured can be obtained as follows: 1. Figure 7-8 Display Subscription Lists window NOTE Operators should each be allocated a number of windows to monitor events and alarms for a specific set of NEs. Select the required subscription list. Open a Display Subscription Lists window as detailed in the previous procedure. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the Front Panel to open the Display Subscription Lists window. 2. 3. Opening a subscription list To open a subscription list use the following procedure: 1. Click the Open button to open the subscription list.

12. Enter the password when requested. At the SPARCstation. NOTE Under no circumstances should NSS subscription lists be deleted.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscription lists Displaying NSS subscription lists The following procedure makes the subscription lists associated with the Network Status Summary (NSS) map feature temporarily visible. 4. Select the Subscription option from this window. exit the GUI by clicking the Exit button on the Front Panel display. Open a UNIX shell window and set the environment variable MMI_FILTER_CHARS_ADMIN by typing the following command: setenv MMI_FILTER_CHARS_ADMIN ”” 5. 11.$ALM_ALARMS are completed. Shut down the GUI that is automatically started by clicking the Exit button on the Front Panel display. then the OK option. Close the UNIX shell by typing the following command: exit 13. Click the subscription list to be modified/displayed. Logout of the MMI processor by holding down the left mouse button and selecting the Quit. omcadmin To display the NSS subscription list.$MAP_ALARMS and . log in to the MMI processor as omcadmin by using the user id: omcadmin 2. Under no circumstances should these subscription lists be modified or deleted. 9. the OMC will not function as described.$ALM_ALARMS subscription list. and enables changes to be made to these lists. 8.$MAP_ALARMS. the NSS feature will not function as described. Otherwise the NSS feature may not function properly. Run the GUI by executing the following command: gui 7. If they are. $ALM_ALARMS and $ALM_Clear_Alarms are visible with some hidden event and application subscription lists. The three subscriptions lists . Subscription lists used internally by the OMC application software become visible during this procedure. EMOTOROLA LTD.$MAP_ALARMS subscription list should also be made to the subscriptions in the . Any changes to subscriptions in the . Verify that the environment variable is correct by entering the following command: env | grep MMI_FILTER_CHARS_ADMIN The output should be as follows: MMI_FILTER_CHARS_ADMIN= 6. If they are. Select the Event Mgmt option from the Front Panel. The Open Alarm Display window displays all alarms from the selected subscription list. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The Display Subscription List dialogue window is displayed. 10. perform the following procedure: 1. Click the Open button to display the Open Alarm display window. 3. When the required modifications to .

All alarms/events subscribed to in the Blacklist Subscription List are switched off in any active alarm display window or event display window. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Once the Blacklist Subscription List has been created. 7–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. subscriptions can be displayed. A Blacklist Subscription List can only be created by an omcadmin user. added. deleted or renamed by omcadmin.Managing subscription lists ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Blacklist subscription lists The Blacklist Subscription List is created to prevent specified alarms/events from being displayed in an alarm/event display window. The blacklist overrides the active subscription list for these windows. All alarms/events subscribed to in the Blacklist Subscription list are switched off in any active Alarm Display window or Event Display window. NOTE Do not set-up the Blacklist Subscription list in BLOCKING mode. modified.

3. these devices can be blacklisted until they are installed. Refer to Creating a new subscription list in this chapter. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 1. The confirmation window. EMOTOROLA LTD. Example Where alarms are generated for sites or devices which are equipped in the BSS database. Figure 7-9 Subscription Blacklist options 2. Follow steps 1 to 3 of procedure Opening a subscription list. Select an event. Refer to Figure 7-9. Events from this device are not seen in the event/alarm window. to avoid unnecessary impact reports being displayed in an alarm/event window. Close the subscription window by selecting File – Close. Figure 7-10. otherwise create blacklisting of events. Click OK to proceed. Figure 7-10 Confirmation window 4. is displayed. but not yet physically installed in the network.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscription lists Blacklist all events from selected device To blacklist all events from a selected device use the following procedure: NOTE Ensure blacklist subscription is available within display subscription lists. the event background is highlighted. This option blacklists all events from the selected device. Select Options – Blacklist – All events from selected device. 5.

3. 3. Figure 7-12 Confirmation window 4. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the desired event. Select Options – Blacklist – Selected event from all devices. The subscription list. The confirmation window. The subscription list. Figure 7-9 is displayed. the event background is highlighted. Blacklist selected event from all devices To blacklist selected events from a selected device use the following procedure: 1. Figure 7-12. Click OK to proceed. 5. This option blacklists the highlighted event from the issuing device. This option blacklists the highlighted event from the device that the event emanated from. 5. is displayed. Click OK to proceed. Select an event. 7–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Managing subscription lists ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Blacklist this event from selected device To blacklist selected events from a selected device use the following procedure: 1. Close the subscription window by selecting File – Close. The confirmation window. is displayed. the event background is highlighted. 2. Follow steps 1 to 3 of procedure Opening a subscription list. Figure 7-11. 2. Figure 7-9 is displayed. Open a subscription list. Close the subscription window by selecting File – Close. Select Options – Blacklist – This event from selected device. Figure 7-11 Confirmation window 4.

5. and click OK. NOTE Subscription lists used internally by the OMC application software are only visible to the omcadmin user. login as omcadmin. Check the entries. click OK. and proceed as follows: omcadmin NOTE At any stage in this procedure the operation can be cancelled by clicking the Cancel button. enter descriptive user information (maximum of 31 alphanumeric characters). select Cancel. the subscription list name must be BLACKLIST and must be entered in upper case type. NOTE For a Blacklist Subscription list. Select the type of subscription list (Alarm or Event. re-enter the information. Alarm is the default). The Display Subscription Lists window is displayed. 1.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscription lists Creating a new subscription list To create a new subscription list. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . EMOTOROLA LTD. using the procedure entitled Displaying NSS subscription lists. 4. Figure 7-13 New subscription list box 3. Enter the required List Name (maximum of 31 alphanumeric characters). Click the New button to open the New Subscription List box Figure 7-13. When correct. This may help later in identifying the list. If entries are not correct. If required. 2. 6. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the Front Panel.

Click on the subscription list to be modified. the operation can be cancelled by clicking the Cancel button. 3. Make the required changes to User Information (maximum of 31 alphanumeric characters). The List Name cannot be changed using the Modify Subscription List option. If entries are not correct. 5. select Cancel. 7–22 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. NOTE At any stage in this procedure.Managing subscription lists ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Modifying a subscription list To modify a subscription list proceed as follows: 1. Check the modifications and if correct. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. 2. Click the Modify button to display the Modify Subscription List box as in Figure 7-14. re-enter the information. click OK. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . then click OK. Figure 7-14 Modify Subscription List box 4. Refer to the Renaming a subscription list procedure to rename the list.

EMOTOROLA LTD. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on the subscription list required. If incorrect. Deleting a subscription list To delete a subscription list proceed as follows: 1. re-enter the information. Click the Delete button. Figure 7-15 Rename Subscription List box 4.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscription lists Renaming a subscription list To rename a subscription list proceed as follows: 1. 2. select Cancel. Enter the desired new name (maximum of 31 alphanumeric characters). The List Name is displayed. NOTE Delete will fail if the subscription list is open or contains active alarms. 3. If the new name is correct. NOTE Rename fails if the subscription list is open. Click the subscription list to be renamed. 4. Click Cancel to abort the deletion. The Display Subscription Lists window opens. click OK. 3. 5. Click the Rename button to open the Rename Subscription List box as in Figure 7-15. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. a confirmation dialogue box is displayed. Click OK to delete the subscription list and clear the dialogue from the workspace. then click OK. 2.

BSC06. On installation. 7–24 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Deleting a subscription. For example. These could then be grouped into a subscription list.Managing subscriptions ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscriptions Subscriptions An operator subscribes to events by adding a subscription request for those events. S Modifying a subscription. a separate subscription request is required for each BSS/RXCDR. For example. to all NEs. S Adding a subscription. the Performance Management (PM) application needs to subscribe to fileNEavailable events. or to a device or process within a NE. It is not possible for a single subscription request to be made to a range of NEs such as BSC01. deleted or renamed. an operator could subscribe to all alarms with a severity level of Minor from BTS23. S Renaming a subscription. default subscriptions are set up for OMC applications. S Viewing associated reconfiguration information. S Displaying subscriptions. All operator and OMC application subscriptions are maintained in the database on the system processor. BSC02. modified. More than one subscription list can contain subscriptions to the same event/alarm. A subscription request can be made to a single NE. List of procedures The following is a list of procedures for subscription: S Accessing subscriptions. to be aware of the availability of statistics files. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . In this case. The Front Panel allows existing subscriptions to be displayed and subscriptions to be added.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscriptions Accessing subscriptions The following procedure outlines how to access subscriptions: 1. Figure 7-16. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–25 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the Event Mgmt icon on the front panel. The Display Subscription Lists window opens. Select the subscription list to be displayed. Figure 7-16 Display Subscription Lists window 2. Click the Open button to display the selection (Figure 7-17). The opened Event (or Alarm) window displays all events (or alarms) from the selected event list. The selection is highlighted in inverse text. 3. Figure 7-17 Alarm window EMOTOROLA LTD.

4. The Add Subscription box is displayed (Figure 7-18). Toggle to Normal or Blocking Subscription Type where: – Normal displays all events/alarms specified in this subscription. do not use Blocking mode. Click on the Add button at the bottom of the window. NOTE For the Blacklist subscription list (omcadmin operators only). click on the Close button.Managing subscriptions ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Displaying subscriptions The following procedure outlines how to display subscriptions: 1. 2. Adding a subscription To add subscriptions to a subscription list carry out the following procedure: 1. and Delete windows associated with subscriptions using the subsequent procedures. when the subscription list becomes active. Select the required subscription in the text area. to open the Display Subscriptions window. Each name must be unique within a subscription list (maximum of 31 alphanumeric characters). 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . In the Subscription Name field enter the name of the new subscription. – Blocking does not display the events/alarms specified in this subscription. Refer to the Accessing subscriptions and Displaying subscriptions procedures to open a subscription window. 5. Modify. Event/alarm subscriptions specified for other subscription lists are not affected. The default is Normal. Rename. 7–26 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 3. 3. Select Subscriptions – Display Subscriptions from the menu bar. Open the relevant alarm/event window as detailed in the previous procedure Accessing subscriptions. To close the Display Subscriptions window. Access the Add. 4. 2. when the subscription list becomes active.

Event and Severity types and Error IDs. See On-Line Help for listings of the available Device. From the Device Class field select the required device (using the scroll bar if necessary). EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–27 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscriptions Figure 7-18 Add Subscription window 5.

This will include all types but the one selected. From this list. 13. The Error Id area of the screen contains a list of known error id names. The Event/Alarm Type area of the screen contains a list of known event types for example.Managing subscriptions ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 6. 15. which signifies continuous). Click OK to add the subscription to the subscription list and clear work area. The Severity Type area of the screen contains a list of known severity types. – Not Equal means that the subscription will subscribe to all Events which do not have the same Error Id as that selected from the Error Id scrollable list. Select the required Error Id name from the scrollable list (default is allErrors). 12. Select one event type from the display (default is allEvents). – Not Equal means that the subscription is not equal to the event type selected. determine those severity types to be included in the new subscription. max value is 999.999). From this list. – Not Equal means that the subscription is not equal to the event type selected. Toggle the Severity Type to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal means that the subscription is equal to the event type selected. To set the time (hr:min:sec) schedule for the subscription. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 9. 14. Click on the increasing/decreasing arrows until the desired start and end times are displayed (default is 00:00:00 -> 00:00:00. 11. select one of the Time areas of the display. Enter into the Occurrences field an integer number that specifies how many events/alarms must be received before being displayed (default is 1. 8. 7–28 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Select one severity type from the display (default is allSeverities ). or all classes. – A specific instance of the Device Class selected in Step 5. communications failure. processing failure. determine those event types to be included in the new subscription. 7. Toggle the Event/Alarm Type to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal means that the subscription is equal to the event type selected. 10. This will include all types but the one selected. From the Device Instance field select: – A network entity within the PLMN or the entire PLMN. Toggle the Error Id to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal means that the subscription will subscribe to all Events which have the same Error Id as that selected from the Error Id scrollable list.

as relevant: All PSP Types PSP-Motorola MPROC PSP-Unknown MPROC Some GPRS specific hardware types have been added to the list available when creating an alarm or event filtering subscription based on the existing MMS device.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Managing subscriptions Adding GPRS subscriptions It is possible to add a subscription based on any of the GPRS devices. The Hardware Type field in the Alarm Subscription window (Figure 7-18) can be set equal or not equal to one of these. the Hardware Type field in the Alarm Subscription window (Figure 7-18) must be set equal or not equal to one of the following. the Hardware Type field in the Add Subscription window (Figure 7-18) must be set equal or not equal to one of the following. GDS. as relevant: MMS-ARTESYN NIB MMS-FORCE NIB MMS-Unknown NIB Some GPRS specific hardware types have been added to the list available when creating an alarm or event filtering subscription based on the existing MSI device. PSP. To create an alarm or event filtering subscription for a DPROC. that is: PCU. GSL or NSVC. The Hardware Type field in the Alarm Subscription window (Figure 7-18) can be set equal or not equal to one of these. DPROC. as relevant: All GDS Types TRAU-GDS LAPD-GDS To create an event filtering subscription based on the PSP device. GBL. the Hardware Type field in the Alarm Subscription window (Figure 7-18) must be set equal or not equal to one of the following. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–29 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . as relevant: MSI-ARTESYN NIB MSI-FORCE NIB MSI-Unknown NIB EMOTOROLA LTD. as relevant: All DPROC Types DPROC-PRP DPROC-PICP DPROC-FORCE DPROC DPROC-Unknown DPROC To create an event filtering subscription based on the GDS device.

Alarm handling: overview ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Alarm handling: overview Personalizing the display To monitor events and alarms open the required event and alarm windows. S Handling an alarm. Refer to Online Help for information on the structure of the event/alarm messages. which can open the required windows automatically on commencement of a GUI session. and the grades of alarm severity. It is possible to create an Auto Initiate file either globally or for each individual user. Some alarms can be easily handled using fault management operations detailed in Chapter 2. Refer to Creating auto initiation files. S Checking subscriptions. S Acknowledging an alarm arrival. 7–30 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S Throttling alarms. List of procedures The following is a list of procedures for alarm handling: S Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt Alarm windows When an alarm window is opened the window is dynamically updated as alarms occur. Move and size the alarm/event window to a convenient position on the screen. EMOTOROLA LTD. If the alarm window is iconized. Select a subscription list. 3. alarms are still collected in the iconized window. as events continue to be collected when the event window is iconized. The selected alarm/event window is displayed. carry out the following procedure: 1. Event windows When opened. moving and sizing for the required number of alarm/event windows. or a device contained by a PCU. An iconized event window changes its appearance from a quiet alarm clock symbol to a ringing alarm clock symbol when an event is received. Select the Event Mgmt icon on the front panel. 4. NOTE It is not possible to display a Detailed View of a PCU device. Repeat the highlighting. An iconized alarm window changes its appearance from a quiet alarm clock symbol to a ringing alarm clock symbol when a new alarm is received. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–31 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . from the Alarm or Event windows at this release. an event window is empty. A Display Subscription Lists window opens as shown in Figure 7-19. 5. It is recommended that event windows be iconized. Opening an alarm/event window To open an Alarm or Event window. Figure 7-19 Display Subscription Lists window 2. Click the Open button. Five or six alarm or event windows can be displayed simultaneously.

the operator will be prompted to perform a PCU reset. If a fault management action (for example. INS. Lock. INS. If a fault management action (for example.Opening an alarm/event window from Event Mgmt ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Fault management actions If a fault management action (for example. Lock. and it is not feasible. Reset) is attempted for any GPRS device from the device instance of an alarm or event window. and the device does not exist at the BSS. Unlock. a message is displayed to inform the operator that GPRS service will be lost as appropriate. the operator will be prompted to perform a PCU resync. INS. 7–32 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Reset) is attempted for any GPRS device or link from the device instance of an alarm or event window. Reset) is attempted for any GPRS device from the device instance of an alarm or event window. and it is already in the specified state. Lock. Unlock. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Unlock.

The status field is initially set to NEW and the operator name field to NONE. 3. Open an Alarm window. Figure 7-20 Alarm handling popup menu EMOTOROLA LTD. all Critical and Major Alarms are displayed on the map and in alarm windows invoked from the map. Use the middle mouse button to select any additional alarms. For a critical alarm. All other Alarm severities are set to zero. The status changes to SEEN. and displayed on any SPARCstation which has a matching subscription for that alarm. The Alarm total displayed on the Front Panel shows only Critical and Major Alarms. More than one alarm can be selected at the same time. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–33 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Acknowledging an alarm arrival Acknowledging an alarm arrival Alarm logging When an alarm arrives at the OMC. An alarm can be removed from the window when the state has been set to clear. See the procedure Handling an alarm. The highlighted alarm changes colour. Figure 7-20 is displayed. the alarm text is displayed in black on a dull red background. The status is set first to HANDLING and subsequently to CLEAR as the operator deals with the fault which caused the alarm. Procedure To acknowledge an alarm: 1. it is logged providing event logging is enabled. NOTE By default. Select an alarm.

Checking the subscriptions ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Checking the subscriptions Introduction To check what is being monitored in an Event or Alarm window. Refer to the Managing subscriptions section in this chapter for a list of relevant procedures. select Subscriptions – Display Subscriptions from the menu bar. select the Subscription option. Procedure To check the subscriptions in an Event or Alarm window: In the open Event/Alarm window. The Display Subscriptions window opens as shown in Figure 7-21. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 7-21 Display Subscriptions window 7–34 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

Once the Clear option is selected from the Alarm handling popup menu.. If the alarms clear successfully. Only the operator currently handling a particular alarm. 2. and the state of the alarm at the OMC is changed to Cleared at the NE and in the Active Event Table (AET) at the OMC. or omcadmin user may clear it. an error box is displayed. If more than one Alarm is selected at the same time. The Alarm windows are then updated to show the alarm changing from Handled to Cleared. add comments. (active only if Operator field indicates current operator). OIC alarm clearing Operator Initiated Clear (OIC) alarm clearing automatically clears OIC alarms at the BSS. or times out after two minutes. A warning message is displayed if an operation could not be propagated to all the selected Alarms or Events. Click the right mouse button to bring up the Alarm handling popup menu. Un-Handle. Comment add a comment in the comment field. (active only if the Operator field indicates current operator or user is omcadmin). Select an alarm to change the Alarm state from NEW to SEEN. Procedure Use the following procedure to handle an alarm: 1. then: Select. the BSS generates a confirmation message for the clear.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Handling an alarm Handling an alarm When to handle an alarm Any operator may handle any alarm not being handled by another operator. the OMC sends a clear request to the NE.. Clear change the State field from HANDLING to CLEAR. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–35 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The background of a CLEAR alarm is green. and the AET is not changed. If the clear at the BSS fails.. Un-Handle change the State field from HANDLING to NEW. Handle change the State field from SEEN to HANDLING. A maximum of 30 OIC alarms can be cleared simultaneously. Remove remove the Alarm from the text display area. To. (enabled only if the State field indicates CLEAR and user is omcadmin). Clearing the alarm at the NE prevents the recurrence of the alarm at the OMC following a Resync.. Clear or Remove alarms). any option chosen is applied to all selected alarms. NOTE The above items are greyed out for read-only users. (A read-only operator cannot Handle. when they have been cleared at the OMC. EMOTOROLA LTD.

7–36 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Handling an alarm ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Further details Information on action which should be taken to investigate and clear alarms is given in: Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501).

follow these steps: 1. which displays any events that occur for the device. Alternatively. An operator can select this function from a map display or the navigation tree. The OMC displays the With History window. select Display – Events – From Now to display future events for the network element. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–37 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The OMC displays the From Now window. An operator can select this function from a map display or the navigation tree. EMOTOROLA LTD. which contains a list of the event history for the device. This function is useful when the operator is troubleshooting a problem and needs to know the sequence of event activity on the device up to the present time. Select Display – Events – With History to display historical events for the network element. Displaying events with history or from now To display events With History or From Now for an NE. Purpose of the Events From Now function The Events From Now function allows an operator to open a window showing events that occur from the time the window is opened for a selected network element.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Displaying events with history or from now for an NE Displaying events with history or from now for an NE Purpose of the Events With History function The Events With History function allows an operator to open a window showing the recent event history for a selected network device. This is useful when an operator is waiting for responses to actions that result in events. The OMC retrieves the recent events from the event log files. 2. Select the network element for the required event details.

Select Options – Show Connectivity from the menu bar. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the RCI alarm. The alarms specify RCI/CIC path details. Use the following procedure to investigate an RCI alarm with Remote BTS: 1. Not all the device information is included in the alarm window. therefore the operator will need to investigate further to obtain specific BTS information. 2. see Figure 7-22.The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature Introduction The Circuit Error Rate Monitor (CERM) feature enables RCI (Radio Channel Identifier) and CIC (Circuit Identity Code) alarms to be generated when an error count threshold is exceeded. 7–38 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Refer to Managing subscriptions. S RCI alarm with Remote BTS. Information on CERM configuration is given in: Installation and Configuration: GSM System Configuration (GSM-100-403) RCI alarms There are two types of RCI alarms: S RCI alarm with Collocated BTS. All device information is included in the alarm window. the Path Detailed View for the Path opens. NOTE RCI and CIC alarms are treated as FMIC alarms at the OMC. so further investigation is not required. A subscription list can be created to monitor RCI and CIC alarms.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–39 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Information on RCI alarm troubleshooting procedures is given in: Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) EMOTOROLA LTD.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature Figure 7-22 Path Detailed View Specific information relating to the RCI path alarm can be obtained in the Detailed View.

Select Options – Show Connectivity from the menu bar. S CIC alarm with Remote Transcoding (Figure 7-23).The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 CIC alarms There are two types of CIC alarms: S CIC alarm with Local Transcoding. Figure 7-23 CIC alarm 7–40 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. All device information is included in the alarm window. 2. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . the Connectivity Summary window opens. therefore the operator will need to investigate further to obtain specific remote transcoder information. Use the following procedure to investigate a CIC alarm with remote transcoding: 1. Not all the device information is included in the alarm window. Select the CIC alarm. so further investigation is not required.

NOTE Double-clicking on a row with device information opens the devices Detailed View. and the BSC–>RXCDR MMS. INS. When only MMS information is displayed. The operator can Lock. select View – Parent MSIs and the list expands to display the parent MSI and its State Information for all rows for which MMS information was retrieved. Single-clicking selects a row. Unlock. Information on CIC alarm troubleshooting procedures is given in: Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501) EMOTOROLA LTD. Remote login to the parent NE is available when either an MMS or MSI row is selected. the RXCDR–>BSC MMS. These devices are the RXCDR–>MSC MMS. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–41 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 The Circuit Error Rate Monitor feature Connectivity summary window The Connectivity Summary window lists the three MMS devices of the CIC part of the circuit. and Reset devices using options on the Fault Mgt menu. The MSI (Multiple Serial Interface) or MMS Detailed View or Parent Detailed View can be opened from the Edit menu. along with their State Information. Select the Parent MSIs toggle button option on the View menu to display/hide Parent MSI information. If this option is selected when both MMS and MSI information is displayed then the list contracts to display only MMS information. this allows access to the menu options relevant to that device. Select Options – Remote Login and a RLogin window is displayed.

.

Select the Config Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. Viewing alarm throttles To view alarm throttles use the following procedure: 1. 3. edited. Select the required BSS or RXCDR on the Navigation Form. and deleted from the Navigation Form.Throttling alarms ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Throttling alarms Introduction Reporting of some alarms can be restricted so they are only reported if they exceed a pre-defined rate. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . For GSR4 BSSs only alarm throttles can be viewed. a Navigation Form is displayed. the Alarm Throttles window opens (Figure 7-24). Figure 7-24 Alarm Throttles window 7–42 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. This is called alarm throttling. 2. Select Config Mgt – Alarm Throttles from the menu bar. created. Alarms and alarm types are described in Maintenance Information: Alarm Handling at the OMC (GSM-100-501).

Use the following procedure to change the time period: 1. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–43 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 2. the Alarm Throttle Detailed View is displayed. Select the required alarm throttle from the list. Refer to Figure 7-24. The time period defines how many times. Select Edit – Detailed View from the menu bar. 4. Refer to Figure 7-25. Figure 7-25 Alarm Throttle Detailed View EMOTOROLA LTD. a specific alarm can occur before the operator is informed. The alarm throttle time period can be changed in the Alarm Throttle Period field. within a minute.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Throttling alarms Changing the alarm throttle time period An alarm throttle time period can be changed for a device. Follow steps 1 to 3 in the procedure Viewing alarm throttles to open an Alarm Throttles window. 3.

Intermittent alarms are transient. remote login to a BSS and enter the following MMI command: chg_throttle <device_name> <alarm_code> <throttle_count> The throttle time period is set by defining how many times. Intermittent alarm throttling For pre-GSR4 BSSs intermittent alarms the throttle time period can be changed only from the command line. To set the throttle time period for intermittent alarms. To display the current throttle time period for an alarm. 2. 3. 2. non-serious alarms. 1. a specific intermittent alarm can occur before the operator is informed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Follow steps 1 to 3 in the procedure Viewing alarm throttles to open an Alarm Throttles window. within a minute. NOTE Parameters displayed within square parenthesis [] are optional. Refer to Figure 7-24. alarm code 1 to 10 minutes: chg_throttle mms 1 10 Where: mms is: device_name 1 alarm_code 10 throttle_count The system response is: COMMAND ACCEPTED Example displaying the throttle time period This example displays the throttle period for device DRI. remote login to a BSS and enter the following MMI command: disp_throttle [<device_name> <alarm_code>] Example setting the throttle time period This example changes the throttle period for device MMS. Select Edit – Delete.Throttling alarms ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Deleting an alarm throttle To delete an alarm throttle use the following procedure: 1. alarm code 66: disp_throttle dri 66 Where: dri is: device_name 66 alarm_code The system response is: Hardware version number: 3 Alarm Alarm Throttle Source Code Time Alarm Description DRI 66 5 Host Counter Mismatch 7–44 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Select the required alarm throttle. The message Deleting object is displayed in the status bar.

events arriving at the OMC are lost and cannot be recovered. S Filtering event logs. When the Event Log is enabled all Events (and Alarms) arriving at the OMC or produced by the OMC are logged in a log file. for example during maintenance periods. Event logging can only be enabled or disabled by an omcadmin user. view and print the contents of the Event Logs. all Events and Alarms arriving and produced by the OMC are lost. CAUTION If the Event Logging function is disabled. S Displaying event logs. S Loading event logs. It is important to note that when Event logging is disabled. EMOTOROLA LTD. S Reloading event logs. When a log file becomes full (5000 events) it is automatically closed and a new file opened with a date/time stamp. S Sorting event logs. S Disabling the event log procedure. Logging options enable the user to open. S Changing the Event Log Search window format. S Enabling the event logging procedure. List of procedures The following is a list of procedures for event logging: S Searching event log files. An operator can disable logging.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events Logging of events Introduction Click on the Logging icon to open the Event Log Search window. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–45 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Different search criteria can be applied through optional filters to enable post processing of selected Events. using certain criteria. S Auto initiation files. The normal and default state of the Event Log is enabled. S Printing an event log. The Event Log Search window provides a means to search through events stored in the event log files.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . At the Front Panel display select the Event Logging icon to open an Event Log Search window as shown in Figure 7-26. Multiple event log files can be loaded in this window. To open up to eight Event Log Search windows. select File – Open New Window from the menu bar. 7–46 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Searching of event log files Use the following procedure to search event log files: 1. as shown in Figure 7-26. Windows initially have no open event log files and the text area is blank. Each new window opened is sequentially numbered in the title bar of the Event Log Search window. Figure 7-26 Event Log Search Window 2.

Select a directory in the Directories list. EMOTOROLA LTD. 3. NOTE Up to eight Event Log files can be loaded at any one time. to open the File Selection window (Figure 7-27). Use the Event Log Search window scroll bars to view the events in the Event log. carry out the following procedure: 1. the most recently defined filter is applied to its contents. 5. either in one Event Log Search window. 4. Click OK to load the selected Event log into the Event Log Search window. then an Event log filename in the Files list. Refer to the Filtering event logs procedure for more information on Event Log filters. When the File Selection box is first displayed. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–47 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Event messages from this file that satisfy the filter criteria are then displayed in the window. or in up to eight different windows. to specify the base directory to be examined and the search pattern. NOTE The Filter field in the File Selection box enables a directory mask to be used to limit the number of files displayed. within one MMI session. With an Event Log Search window open. select Options – Load Event Log from the menu bar. Figure 7-27 File Selection window 2. When the new file is loaded.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events Loading event logs To load Event Logs into an Event Log Search window. the directory mask defaults to the value specified by the environment variable $EM_LOG. Edit the directory mask string in the Filter field.

Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Changing format Event Log messages can be displayed in one of two formats. Refer to Online Help for a description of the formats. Figure 7-28 Full Format Event Log Search window Wide Format Select View – Wide to display messages in Wide format. 7–48 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Full Format Select View – Full to display messages in Full format (Figure 7-28).

S List Order In either Ascending or Descending order. Figure 7-29 Event Log Search .Sort menu options EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–49 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events Sort criteria Information is displayed in the Event Log Search window. There are two sort criteria as follows: S Sort Field Any one of the nine Event message fields. according to sort criteria selected using the Sort option (Figure 7-29).

Click on the appropriate radio button in the Sort menu to select Ascending or Descending order. Use the following procedure to select filter criteria that can then be applied to Event log searches: 1. 7–50 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. With an Event Log Search window open and an Event log loaded. 3. 2. Refer to the Searching event log files procedure to open an Event Log Search window. The sort fields are mutually exclusive. selecting one sort field automatically deselects all others. Select All and De-select All options. click on the radio button associated with that field (Figure 7-29). See Online Help for information on the Select.Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Setting the sort criteria To set the Sort criteria. that is. carry out the following procedure: 1. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Filtering event logs Event log files can be filtered to enable only selected event log information to be displayed. NOTE Operations can also be performed on groups of events shown in an Event Log window. To select a sort field from the Sort menu. select Sort from the menu bar.

Select Options – Filter to open the Define Filter Criteria window (Figure 7-30).ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events 2. Click on the Normal or Exclude radio button to select Normal or Exclude type filtering. The default setting is Normal. When Exclude is selected. where the filter checks for Event log titles corresponding to the information defined in the following steps. EMOTOROLA LTD. the filter checks for all Event log titles which do not correspond to the information defined. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–51 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 7-30 Define Filter Criteria window 3.

or all classes. determine those hardware types to be included in the new subscription. Event and Severity types. processing failure. Toggle the Severity Type to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal this filters for logs containing the hardware type selected. 8. Using the left mouse button. From this list. 7. – Not Equal filters for logs not containing the event type selected. determine those severity types to be included in the new subscription. Select the required Error Id name from the scrollable list (default is allErrors). 6. The Hardware Type area of the screen contains a list of hardware types. Use the Device Class. Device Instance. – A specific instance of the Device Class selected in Step 5. – Not Equal filters for logs not containing the hardware type selected. This will include all types but the one selected. 13. If not required. if required. 11. simply omit these steps and enter a filter string commencing at step 15. From the Device Class field select the required device (using the scroll bar if necessary). These are selected as described in steps 5 to 7. select one event type from the display (default is allEvents). 12. Severity Type and Error Id areas. Hardware Type. to select Equal/Not Equal error criteria for which to filter. The Error Id area of the screen contains a list of known error id names. 10. The Severity Type area of the screen contains a list of known severity types. 5. Select one severity type from the display (default is allSeverities). Toggle the Event Type to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal filters for logs containing the event type selected. From this list. Event Type. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 7–52 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. NOTE It is not essential to select any of these criteria. communications failure. This will include all types but the one selected. Using the left mouse button. From this list. See Online Help for listings of the available Device. Toggle the Severity Type to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal filters for logs containing the severity type selected. 9. From the Device Instance field select: – A network entity within the PLMN or the entire PLMN. Error IDs and Hardware types. select one hardware type from the display. This will include all types but the one selected. The Event Type area of the screen contains a list of known event types. determine those event types to be included in the filter criteria. for example. – Not Equal this filters for logs not containing the severity type selected.Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 4.

16. bss03... By selecting the wildcard option the Filter String will contain a wildcard. select one of the Time areas of the display. click OK in the Define filter criteria window. for example. – Not Equal this filters for logs not containing the Error ID selected. The filter is also applied to new event log files loaded into the window if it is the last filter defined before the file is loaded. Figure 7-31 Event Log Search . carry out the following procedure: With an Event Log Search window open. 17. the search string bss with wildcard selected finds all entries containing bss.. bss01. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–53 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on the increasing/decreasing arrows until the desired start and end times and dates are displayed (default is 00:00:00 -> 00:00:00. enter the string in the Filter String text box.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events 14. To define a filter string.Options menu EMOTOROLA LTD. NOTE For subsequent searches. 15. This will include all types but the one selected. The string must be alphanumeric with a maximum of 31 characters (the string is case sensitive). To set the time (hr:min:sec) and date schedule for the subscription. Toggle the Error Id to Equal or Not Equal where: – Equal filters for logs containing the Error ID selected. To reload the Event Log files. bss02. select Options – Reload Event Logs (Figure 7-31).. the previously defined filter criteria are used as the default filter string. All the loaded Event Logs are reloaded with applied filters removed.. which signifies continuous). To apply the filter criteria to the event messages currently displayed in the Event Log Search window. Reloading event logs The complete contents of all loaded Event Log files can be reloaded into the search window.

as shown in Figure 7-32. Click on the Reload button and refer to the Reloading event logs procedure to reload Event logs. NOTE The Currently Loaded Event Logs window also enables more Event Logs to be loaded and the already open event logs to be reloaded. Click on the Load button and refer to the Loading event logs procedure to load more Event Logs. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 3. Figure 7-32 Display Event Log List window 7–54 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. To display a list of currently loaded Event Logs. A list of all the Event Logs that are currently loaded in the active Event Log Search window are displayed in a Currently Loaded Event Logs window (Figure 7-32). 2. select Options – Display Event Logs List.Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Displaying current active event logs A list of all the Event Logs that are currently loaded in the active Event Log Search window can be displayed. With an Event Log Search window open. carry out the following: 1.

Figure 7-33 Command confirmation window A confirmation window is displayed with the following message Printer Job has Been Submitted. 2. Select File – Print All. EMOTOROLA LTD. NOTE Select File – Print Selected to print selected alarms and/or events in the window. or. Refer to the Changing format procedure. A menu of available printers is displayed. Click OK to continue. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–55 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . if a number of windows are already open. Figure 7-33. the command confirmation window opens. 3. 4. Select a printer from the printer menu. Click Yes to include comments in the print out. NOTE The output of an Event Log Search window is always printed in full format.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events Printing event log search window To print the contents of an Event Log Search window carry out the following procedure: 1. click the left mouse button with the mouse pointer in the window to be printed. Perform the procedures in the Loading an event log procedure.

When the pathname and filename are correct. and also the filename. click OK to indicate that the file specified is to be used for event logging. if required. If nothing is entered. At the Front Panel display select the Event Logs icon to open an Event Log Search window. using alphanumeric characters ( the maximum length for the pathname. The Options – Enable Event Log selection is greyed out for other users. 2. Select Options – Enable Event Log to open the Enable Event Log confirmation window (Figure 7-34). Enter the pathname and filename. 7–56 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.Logging of events ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Enabling event logging This procedure can only be performed by omcadmin level users. click OK. 3. To enable event logging. This enables entry of a pathname and a filename (both are optional). Figure 7-34 Enable Event Log confirmation window 4. and the default Event Log File is enabled. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . proceed as follows: 1. is 31 characters). as follows: path = /usr/gsm/ne_data/ev_logs /ev<YYYYMMDDHHMMSS> filename = ev<ddmmyyyy-hhmm> Where: ddmmyyyy is: the date of enable hhmm the time of enable 5.

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Logging of events

Disabling event
logging

CAUTION
If the Event Log is disabled, events and alarms are routed to appropriate
operator windows, BUT no events are logged at the OMC and the event
history information is lost. Therefore the Event Log should normally be
enabled and only disabled for specific maintenance tasks.

This procedure can only be performed by omcadmin level users. The
Disable Event Log menu option is greyed out for other users.

To disable Event logging, perform the following procedure:
1. At the Front Panel display, select the Event Logs icon to open an Event Log
Search window.
2. Select Options – Disable Event Log from the menu bar. The confirmation box
(Figure 7-35) is displayed.
3. Click OK to disable all Event logging.

Figure 7-35 Disable Event Log box

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–57

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Creation of auto initiation files ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Creation of auto initiation files

Introduction
To enable operators to define which subscription lists they subscribe to, an ASCII file is
placed in their home directory. The file must be named AutoInit.CNFG. This ASCII file is
also used to specify which icons or open windows display automatically at the beginning
of each MMI session.
The AutoInit.CNFG file will be opened and parsed on initiation of an MMI session. At the
same time the alarm/event windows listed in the file will be created and displayed.
An Auto Initiation file may be created, either for global usage, or for individual operators.
In each case the file format is identical. The globally accessible file can be used to define
windows which should appear for every operator. Such a file for global use should be
placed in the directory: $(OMC_TOP)/config/global .
On initiation of the MMI, the system will search for global and local examples of the
AutoInit.CNFG file. If either is found, the system will attempt to load it. If both are found,
then both will be loaded.

AutoInit.CNFG
template files
Template AutoInit.CNFG files are contained in the directory
/usr/gsm/config/global. These can be used to create a single standard
AutoInit.CNFG file, or specific versions of AutoInit.CNFG for individual users.
The template AutoInit.CNFG files provided are:
S AutoInit.CNFG.map
This template file contains instructions to create a file containing maps, which are
automatically opened when the GUI starts:
# Fill in the name of the maps to be opened and uncomment the line

# OpenMapDisplay “<mapname>” –geom 188 98

S AutoInit.CNFG.status
This template file contains instructions to create a file containing device status
displays, which are automatically opened when the GUI starts:
OpenUploadStatusDisplay –geom 261 124

OpenDownloadStatusDisplay –geom 144 478

S AutoInit.CNFG.logs
This template file contains instructions to create a file containing log displays which
are automatically opened when the GUI starts:
OpenAuditLogDisplay –geom 40 500

OpenResyncLogDisplay –geom 214 152

S AutoInit.CNFG.nav
This template file contains instructions to create a file containing an entry for the
Navigation Tree which are automatically opened when the GUI starts.
OpenConfigMgtDisplay –geom 188 98

7–58 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Creation of auto initiation files

Creating an
AutoInit.CNFG
file
To create a AutoInit.CNFG file carry out the following procedure:
1. Use a text editor to create a file named AutoInit.CNFG.
2. Create file records for each window to be automatically displayed. Each record
must consist of a command specifying which type of window to display, along with
the name of the display as follows:
For an alarm display, use the command
OpenAlarmDisplay ”<alarm subscription list name>”
For an event display, use the command
OpenEventDisplay ”<event subscription list name>”
If the first field is not as shown in either of these examples, the operator is notified
and file loading will continue with the next line.

NOTE
The alarm/event subscription list name must be specified exactly as the list
name displays in the MMI. The name must be contained within double
quotes. If the name does not exist, an error message is displayed, and file
loading will continue with the next line. Any duplication of alarm/event
display names within the files will not result in duplicate windows being
opened.

3. An optional geometry co-ordinates field can be added to specify the position of an
Event/Alarm window. This field takes the format:
–geom <Geometry>
where Geometry is in the following format:
<width>x<height>{±}<xoffset>{±}<yoffset>
If a –geom field does not exist, positioning of the window will be determined by
the OSF-Motif software.
4. Add the following optional field to iconize the Event/alarm window:
–iconised
5. Repeat Steps 2 to 4 for each window to be opened automatically on initiation of the
GUI.

NOTE
Initiation of the GUI will continue regardless of any errors in the
AutoInit.CNFGfile.

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–59

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Using the event logging utilities ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Using the event logging utilities

Introduction
The following utilities can be used to display and manipulate event logs.
A full description of the utilities is given in Online Help.

List of
procedures
The following is a list of procedures for utilities:
S Using cat event log (cel).
S Using quick filter event stream (qfes).
S Using clean event stream (ces).
S Using subscription list daemon (sld).
S Using direct printing (dpr).
S Setting up a cron job.

Using cel
The Cat Event Log cel utility converts binary event logs to ASCII, and prints each event
from each of the specified event logs (in full ASCII format) to stdout. It takes one or
more arguments, the name(s) of the event log(s) to print and the date.
The cel utility is found in /usr/gsm/current/bin. Run cel in the directory
/usr/gsm/ne_data/ev_logs.

NOTE
A cron job should be created to generate an event report at regular
intervals, using the cel, qfes and ces utilities (see Setting up a cron job).

Use the ces, sld and dpr utilities for on-line printing of alarms.

Format
At a SPARCstation login as omcadmin. The cel input format is as follows:
cel ev<YYYYMMDDHHmmSS>

7–60 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the event logging utilities

Examples
In the following example cel is used to process an event log that was created on 5th
February 1993, at 14.00. The event log contains events/alarms generated after that date
and time. (Only a sample of the output is shown):
cel ev19930205140000
Startup

BeginEvent
#0 -NOT APPL -*NONE* .
linkFailureEvent -BSS -Cork_1 -05/02/93 14:00:24
[30003] x25CircuitDown -Critical
EndEvent

BeginEvent
#0 -HANDLING -.
updateAlarmDisplayAddrEvent -omc -omc -05/02/93 14:52:43
EndEvent
:
:much more output
:
BeginEvent
#0 -CLEARED -*NONE*
linkFailureEvent -BSS -Dublin_1 -05/02/93 -15:30:02
[30003] xCircuitDown -Critical
EndEvent

Shutdown

In the following example cel is used to process two event logs:
cel ev19930205140000 ev19930205183000
In the following example cel is used to process all event logs from the 5th February
1993:
cel ev19930205*
In the following example cel output is redirected to a file:
cel ev19930205* > ascii_log

NOTE
ev19930205* will match all event logs that start with ev19930205.

EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–61

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY

Using the event logging utilities ISSUE 18 REVISION 0

Using qfes
qfes filters events based on a single filter, then output in ASCII.
After accessing the specified event logs using the cel utility, the operator can look for
specific events in the accessed event logs. Use the qfes utility (found in
/usr/gsm/current/bin) to implement this.
The qfes utility filters an event stream read from stdin against a single subscription
specified on the command line. For an event to pass through the filter it must meet the
criteria of the subscription record. It takes from 5 to 10 arguments. If the event meets the
subscription criteria, it is printed (in full ASCII format) to stdout, or may be directed to a
file.
NOTE
The first five arguments of the qfes command are mandatory arguments
entered between quote marks. A null argument can be used for any of these
arguments. A null argument must include the enclosing quote marks with no
spaces between the quote marks. All arguments, including null arguments
are separated by a space.

Format
The format for a subscription record is as follows :
”event_type” ”device_type” ”device_instance” ”startTime”
”endTime” [ ”infostring” [”infostring” [....]]]

Examples
In the following example qfes is used to filter all BSS Critical alarms from the Event Log
which was created on 12th February 1993, at 21.00. Note that ”Critical” is an infostring
parameter. (Only a sample of the output is shown):
cel ev19930212210000 | qfes ”” ”BSS” ”” ”” ”” ”Critical”
Startup

BeginEvent
#0 -NOT APPL -*NONE*
linkFailureEvent -BSS -Cork3 -12/02/93 21:34:56
[30003] x25CircuitDown -Critical
EndEvent

BeginEvent
#0 -NOT APPL -*NONE*
linkFailureEvent -BSS -Cork5 -12/02/93 22:14:26
[30003] x25CircuitDown -Critical
EndEvent

Shutdown

In the following example qfes is used to filter linkFailureEvent for an RSL device on
Cork_1 on 5th February 1993 between 09.00 and 09.30:
cel ev19930205* | qfes ”linkFailureEvent” ”RSL” ”Cork_1”
”19930205090000” ”19930205093000”
In the following example qfes is used to filter all DRIS stateChangeEvent’s on Dublin_7,
SITE Blackrock, from event log generated on 1st January 1993:
cel ev19930101* | qfes ”stateChangeEvent” ”DRIS”
”Dublin_7(Blackrock)” ”” ””

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Using ces
The ces removes header information which comes from filtering event logs, and output
in ASCII.
The ces utility takes an event stream read from stdin (as produced by cel, sld or qfes)
and prints the events to stdout without the <Startup>, <Shutdown>, <BeginEvent>,
<EndEvent> tags. The utility takes no arguments. The ces utility is located in:
/usr/gsm/current/bin/ces.

Format
ces takes no arguments.
The ces utility must be run from the MMI processor. ces does not have any specific
environment requirements but accepts input generated by cel, sld or qfes.

Input parameters
None.

ces example 1
The ces utility filters <Startup>, <Shutdown> , <BeginEvent> and <EndEvent> tags
from the event stream.
cel ev19930212210000 | qfes ”” ”BSS” ”” ”” ”” ”Critical” |
ces
Only a sample of the output is shown below:
#0 – NOT APPL – *NONE*
linkFailureEvent – BSS – Cork3 – 15/02/93 10:34:56
[30003] x25CircuitDown – Critical

#0 – NOT APPL – *NONE*
linkFailureEvent – BSS – Cork5 – 15/02/93 11:14:26
[30003] x25CircuitDown – Critical
:
:

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ces example 2
This is the same as Example 2 of sld (see Using sld section in this chapter).

sld ”DRI_Alarms” | ces | dpr –i ”lp” –s ”lp –onofullbreak”

Using sld
The sld utility receives events from the OMC Event Management process in real time,
and output in ASCII.

The sld utility provides a command line interface to OMC Event Management (EM). The
sld utility obtains events/alarms from EM in real-time, via the EM subscription
mechanism, and outputs this information in ASCII text to stdout.

The sld utility is located in: /usr/gsm/current/bin/sld

The sld utility obtains alarm and event information from the EM process on the system
processor based on a specified subscription list. The subscription list may be an Event
List type, or update events may be forwarded to an alarm list type. The information
received from EM is then translated to ASCII text and written to standard-output.

CAUTION
Do not handle Alarms using sld; this must be done using the Front Panel.
If sld is used for this purpose, there is a risk of AET filling up, in which case
any further Alarms would not be treated as such, but as Events.

The sld utility must be run on the MMI Processor.

sld requires the OMC to be running so that it can receive events from the OMC Event
Management.

sld also uses OMC environment variables such as $OMC_IPC_CONFIG (used to locate
the OMC processes).

It is recommended that sld is only run after sourcing the OMC environment variables file
mmiCommon.sh which is located at:

/usr/gsm/current/config/mmiCommon.[c]sh

Add /usr/gsm/current/bin to the shell search path, $PATH, so that the full path to sld
does not have to be specified as part of the command line.

Format

The sld utility takes a single parameter, a subscription list name. The subscription list
name must be a valid Event/Alarm List type. The syntax for invoking the sld utility is as
follows:

sld <subscription_list_name>

NOTE
Stopping the OMC will not stop sld processes. If the OMC is stopped the
sld process should be killed or interrupted. Use the keyboard command
CTRL-c to shutdown the sld. The sld may be restarted once the OMC is
functioning again.

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Output format
The output format from the sld utility is as follows:
Startup
BeginEvent
<Event information>
EndEvent
BeginEvent
:
:
Shutdown

The contents of the output format are as follows:

Where: is:
Startup Text signifying that the sld
utility has started.
BeginEvent Text signifying the
beginning of Alarm/Event
information. This is printed
for each event in an event
log.
<Event information> The text of the event.
EndEvent Text signifying the end of
Alarm/Event information.
Shutdown Text signifying that the sld
utility has terminated.

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sld example 1
To monitor RCU alarms as they occur, open up an xterm window and input the
command sld All_Alarms.
For this to work the following must be true:
S The OMC must be up and running.
S A subscription list called All_Alarms must exist and must contain a subscription (by
class) to all DRI events.
The sld utility obtains real-time Alarm and Event information from the EM process on the
system processor based on the All_Alarms subscription list. The information received
from EM is then translated to ASCII text and written to stdout. A sample of the output is
as follows:
Startup

BeginEvent
#0 – NOT APPL – *NONE* .
linkFailureEvent – BSS – Cork_1 – 05/02/93 14:00:24
[30003] x25CircuitDown – Critical
EndEvent

BeginEvent
#0 – HANDLING – Thames .
updateAlarmDisplayAddrEvent – omc – omc – 05/02/93 14:52:43
EndEvent
:
more output
:
BeginEvent
#0 – CLEARED – Thames
linkFailureEvent – BSS – Dublin_1 – 05/02/93 – 15:30:02
[30003] xCircuitDown – Critical
EndEvent

Shutdown

In the above example the output is sent to stdout

sld example 2
The sld utility is usually used with dpr to direct its output to an on-line printer:
In this example, the sld utility directs incoming events/alarms subscribed to by the
DRI_Alarms Subscription List through the ces utility and via dpr to the default printer.
The ces utility is described in the ces section in this chapter, while the dpr utility is
described in the dpr section in this chapter.

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Using dpr
The dpr utility provides an interface between a continuous input stream and a UNIX
system command. The primary purpose for the dpr utility is to interface to file oriented
commands such as lp.
The commands used by the dpr utility are termed interface commands. The dpr utility
reads data from stdin and writes the data to the interface command via a UNIX pipe.
This type of data flow necessitates that the interface commands specified read data from
stdin. The dpr utility is designed to operate with the the UNIX lp command for directing
data to a dedicated line-printer device. The utility monitors the data input rate and
attempts to produce the output at a rate which will not render the system inoperative. The
dpr utility allows for output page formatting. It assumes the dedicated line printer device
may be configured such that form feeds between files may be disabled. For devices on
which form feeds may not be disabled, the dpr utility allows for output based only on fully
formatted pages.
The dpr utility must be run on the MMI processor and may be executed without any
special set-ups to the environment, providing the interface commands are
accessible/locatable during the dpr execution.
The dpr utility takes several optional parameters. The dpr parameters may be used for
controlling the operations of the dpr utility including page formatting.

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Format

The following must be typed as one line with no carriage returns:

dpr [–i <cmd>] [–s <cmd>] [–h <header>] [–f <footer>]
[–p <page_length>] [–t <top_margin>] [–b <bottom_margin>]
[–r]

Where: is:
–i <cmd> The initial interface
command. The default
command is cat. Usually the
initial interface command
begins the printing process,
for example, –i “lp
–onofilebreak”
–s <cmd> The subsequent interface
command (optional). For
example, –s “lp
–onofilebreak
–onobanner”
–h <header> The page header. The
header text is printed after
the top margin. A single line
is automatically skipped after
the header is printed. The
header can contain
embedded carriage returns.
The header can also contain
the symbol %d that prints
page numbers.
–f <footer> The page footer. The footer
text is printed before the
bottom margin. A single line
is automatically skipped
before the footer is printed.
The footer can contain
embedded carriage returns.
The footer can also contain
the symbol %d that prints
page numbers.
–p <page_length> The number of lines per
page. The default is 66 lines.
–t <top_margin> The number of lines that are
reserved for the top margin.
–b <bottom_margin> The number of lines that are
reserved for the bottom
margin.
–r Restrict the output to full
pages only.

Any combination of parameters is allowed.

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Example
In this example, the sld utility directs incoming events/alarms subscribed to by the
DRI_Alarms subscription list through the ces utility and via dpr to the default laser
printer.
sld “DRI_Alarms” | ces | dpr –i “lp” –s “lp –onobanner” –h
“DRI Alarms” –f “%d” –r
The initial interface command (–i “lp”) begins printing.
The subsequent interface command (–s “lp –onobanner”) sets the banner page of
subsequent files off.
The page will be printed with a header on each page reading ‘DRI Alarms’ (–h “DRI
Alarms”) and a footer giving the page number (–f “%d”).
The –r option restricts the printouts to full pages only, which is suited to laser printers.
The ces utility is described in the ces section in this chapter, while the sld utility is
described in the sld section in this chapter.

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Introduction to
cron
A file cron allows commands to be executed automatically by scheduling their execution
at a certain time and date, or on a regular time period. An example is shown as follows:

Example
To scan an event log for MTL, RSL, DRIS and OML alarms and save in four ASCII text
files for later analysis.
cel ev19930212* | qfes ”” ”MTL” ”” ”” ”” | ces > mtl.txt
cel ev19930212* | qfes ”” ”RSL” ”” ”” ”” | ces > rsl.txt
cel ev19930212* | qfes ”” ”DRIS” ”” ”” ”” ”RCU” | ces > dris.txt
cel ev19930212* | qfes ”linkFailureEvent” ”” ”” ”” ”” | ces > mtl.txt

These commands could be put in a script file and submitted to cron. This script file
needs to source the OMC environment.

Crontab file
A crontab file consists of lines of six fields each. These fields are separated by spaces
or tabs. The first five are integer patterns that specify the following:
minute (0 -59)
hour (0 -23)
day of the month (1 -31)
month of the year (1 -12)
day of the week ( 0 -6 with 0 = Sunday)

Each of the patterns may either be an asterisk (meaning all legal values) or a list of
elements separated by commas. An element is either a number, or two numbers
separated by a minus sign (meaning an inclusive range).

Setting up a cron
job
Information on cron is supplied in Chapter 2 of the manual Operating Information: OMC
System Administration (GSM-100-202).

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and logs in to a paging terminal.. number of alarms dropped from the page. the OMC reduces the size of the alarm details so that they fit into a page (usually 80 characters long). The Alarm severity is resolved as follows: Alarm Severity Is resolved to. The OMC then looks in the pager.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC alarm paging OMC alarm paging Overview of paging The OMC alarm paging feature automatically notifies on-call personnel of certain alarms or state changes which have been reported to the OMC. When a match is found. Critical Cr Major Ma Minor Mi Investigate In Warning Wa Unhandled Un EMOTOROLA LTD. only 80 characters) the character strings representing the error message. the OMC creates an sld process which continually checks incoming events to see if any match the subscriptions specified in the paging subscription list.config to find the telephone number and PIN number of the pager to be contacted. All pages are logged in the file: /usr/gsm/logs/PagingLog Contents of a page message A page message contains the following alarm or event details: S Device id. When alarm paging has been set up and started. S Severity – a two digit truncated alarm severity type.. The omcadmin user can start and stop the paging function using the pager command line utility. are truncated. dials the number. – a unique five digit alarm error identifier. S Error Message – up to 236 characters. Each transmitted page contains details of one alarm/state change. S State of alarm – whether the alarm has been Handled (HA) or Cleared (CL). The alphanumeric message is then transmitted through the paging terminal to the alphanumeric pager of the on-call OMC operator. – includes the site number and device number where the alarm occurred. but is dependent on the maximum page length of the pager model in use. The OMC then connects with the modem. Truncated severity types Due to the constraints in the number of characters which can be displayed on an alphanumeric pager (in some cases. Alarm paging requires a modem at the OMC and a TAP/IXO alphanumeric pager to receive the paging details. S Error id. S If the paging buffer is full. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–71 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

config file. This subscription list is one of the entries displayed when the Event Management icon of the GUI is clicked. the modem is initialized and the alarms are sent out to the pager which is specified by the PIN number and the Pager Service Provider number. In the event of subscribed alarms which occur within a very short space of each other. In the case where Paging Service Providers do not use PIN numbers. can be found in /usr/gsm/config/local/pager. or only support numeric pagers. S Acknowledgement of PIN. A description of each parameter follows: 7–72 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. The OMC transmits one page per minute. the OMC will buffer at least 10 alarms and subsequently issue the pages which contain the important details of the alarms. which is used for setting the parameters used by the pager. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The delay incurred is because the following processes are involved: S Dialling into the service.config and is constructed as follows: set TelephoneNum set PIN set SubscriptionListName PAGING set LocalAccess 9 set PageLength 80 set ECDC 1 set Timer 20 The values above are the default settings supplied in the pager. S Disconnect. S Transmission of page.OMC alarm paging ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Paging performance Sending a page through any paging system always incurs a delay. Content of the paging configuration file The paging configuration file. different parameters in the configuration file must be specified. whether the paging transmission is automatic or manual. S Logging into the service. An event subscription list exists called PAGING. S Connecting with the service. This type of delay limits the number of pages which can be transmitted in a given time frame. Paging: how it works Once alarms in the Paging list occur. This subscription list contains the set of alarms and state changes which trigger the pager to be contacted and the alarms sent to it. An empty PAGING subscription list is set up by default and the OMC administrator can then add the necessary alarms which are to generate pages. S Confirmation of transmission. The Paging Service Provider must comply with the TAP/IXO protocol. omcadmin users have permission to subscribe events and alarms to this window.

If the paging service does not use Error Correction and Data Compression. then set ECDC 1 must be specified in pager.config is used to specify the length of time the modem is to hold the line before releasing it. but have some form of identification number which is required to log into the paging service. Some paging services do not use PIN numbers. S Unable to log into paging service. If the paging service does use Error Correction and Data Compression. This identification number can be used instead of the PIN number and is set by filling out the set PIN line of the configuration file. set SubscriptionListName The subscription list which is used to drive the pager. S Modem Error Conditions. set ECDC The set ECDC line sets up the modem to switch on or off Error Correction and Data Compression. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–73 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Unable to connect to serial port. S Unable to spawn sld process. is specified by completing the set SubscriptionListName line of the pager. set Timer The set Timer line in pager. The OMC modem settings must match the modem settings of the paging service.config file.config. then set ECDC 0 must be specified in pager. set PageLength The set PageLength line allows the user to specify the number of characters which the pager is capable of receiving. in cases where the modem is unable to connect with the paging service. set PIN This is the Personal Identification Number which the person carrying the pager requires in order to log into the paging service. Paging error handling The following conditions generate errors which are logged in /usr/gsm/logs/PagingLog: S Invalid field in the pager initialization file. set LocalAccess The set LocalAccess line allows the user to specify what number is required to dial out of a building which contains a PABX switch.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC alarm paging set TelephoneNum This is the telephone number of the paging service provider’s automatic answering paging terminal. The default subscription list which is used is the PAGING subscription list. You are advised to use this list and to subscribe the necessary alarms to this list. EMOTOROLA LTD. in the default case it is 9.config.

S A standard 25-pin straight-through serial cable which can be used with a SUN SPARC machine. Press the following button on the front panel until the modem displays Reinit Memory: 3. Press the following key to reinitialize the modem memory: 7–74 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. S An appropriate telephone cable. Reinitializing the alarm paging modem Once installed. Installing the modem for alarm paging To install a modem at the OMC for alarm paging. This should also be provided with the modem. Connect one end of the serial cable to the DTE port on the back of the modem and the other end to the serial port marked A/B on the back of the SUN SPARC. Press the following button once: The modem displays: Reinit all Mem? 4. This should be supplied with the modem. Check that the modem can connect to pagers via the Paging Service Providers. follow these steps: 1.OMC alarm paging ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Installing the paging modem at the OMC Prerequisites The following equipment is needed for alarm paging: S A Motorola Codex 3265FAST modem. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Connect one end of the telephone cable to the Dial Line port on the back of the modem and the other end to the telephone line outlet connector. 2. the modem should be reinitialized to delete any stored telephone phone numbers and reset to factory defaults. Press the following button on the front panel of the modem twice: 2. To do this follow these steps: 1.

In the command line. create the subscription list you want the paging function to use. In the command line. Log in as the omcadmin user. Please make sure the pager is switched on in order to receive page. Log in as the omcadmin user. If it does not already exist.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 OMC alarm paging Defining the contents of the pager configuration file To define the contents of the pager configuration file. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 7–75 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . follow these steps: 1. follow these steps: 1. Specify the specific requirements for each parameter in the pager. 2. 5. the OMC displays the following message: The message has been successfully transmitted. Log in as an omcadmin user. the OMC displays an appropriate error message.config. If the test is unsuccessful. Save the file. omcadmin 2. This command starts the script: /usr/gsm/current/sbin/pager Stopping paging To stop the alarm paging process. follow these steps: 1. such as vi. Use a text editor. and the OMC displays the following message: A test message id being transmitted. Starting paging To start the alarm paging process. to edit the file /usr/gsm/config/local/pager. type: pager stop This command stops the script: /usr/gsm/current/sbin/pager EMOTOROLA LTD. type: pager start At initialization a test page is transmitted to ensure that the modem and service are working correctly. omcadmin 2. See Managing subscription lists for further details. 3. please wait If the test is successful.config 4.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . If you want to strip out the <BeginEvent> and <EndEvent> delimiters from the alarm. $1 e-mails the selected alarm or alarms. the option appears in the Tools menu. NOTE If the menu option is to be used by all users. 3. For example. Creating an e-mail alarm option in the Tools menu To create an e-mail alarm option in the Tools menu. Log in as the omcadmin user. omcadmin). 2. If you do not want to strip out the <BeginEvent> and <EndEvent> delimiters from the alarm. enter the following command in the file: #! /bin/sh mail <username> < $1 where. See Creating a Tools menu in the Alarm and Event windows for further details. <username> is the e-mail address of the user or an OMC login username (for example. follow these steps: 1.sh. Prerequisite: a Tools menu A Tools menu must have been created before a menu option can be added to it. Save the file in the Tools menu directory: /usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subscription/tools When the GUI is restarted. ensure that the file has write permissions for all users. to create a menu option called Mail Alarm. 7–76 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Create a file with a meaningful name in the directory: omcadmin /usr/gsm/config/global/menus/motorola/subscription/tools The name of the file appears as a menu option in the Tools menu. enter the following command in the file: #! /bin/sh cat $1 | ces >/tmp/al_mail mail <username> < $1 rm /tmp/al_mail 4. create a file called Mail_Alarm.Sending alarms to an e-mail address ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Sending alarms to an e-mail address Description of e-mailing alarms A highlighted alarm or alarms appearing in an Alarm window can be sent to a predefined e-mail address using a menu option in the Tools menu.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Chapter 8 Device Management EMOTOROLA LTD.

2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 ii NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD.

. . . 8–15 Call trace statuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Logging in remotely . . . . . . . . . 8–8 Locating an NE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Three interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Introduction to Remote login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–6 BTS reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–7 Device reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–25 Deactivating an active trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 Unlocking a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–10 Examples of using find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 EAS alarm objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–16 Call Trace Detailed View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Chapter 8 Device Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2 Resetting a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–8 Find feature overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 Purpose of a Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–20 Trace Record View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–29 Multiple Rlogin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 Locking a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–25 Deleting a trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–18 Invoked Instances window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–20 Abort Trace on Call window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–9 Locating the parent of a Site or Cell . . . 8–6 BSC/RXCDR reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–30 EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . 8–27 Creating a Tools menu in the Trace View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–4 Resetting an NE from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–28 Remote login . . . . 8–21 Using the Call Trace function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–27 Creating an option in the Trace View Tools menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–12 Overview of the Call Trace function . . . 8–28 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site or Cell . . . . . . . . i Device management from the map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Viewing trace records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2 Contained Devices window . . . . . . . . . . 8–23 Aborting a trace . . Site or Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Viewing call trace details . . . . 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations iii FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–16 Trace View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–7 Finding a Network Element. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–28 Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–1 INS a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Viewing a call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–22 Creating a call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–10 Additional operations . . . 8–15 Description of the Call Trace windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15 Introduction to call trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–26 Creating a Tools menu in the Trace View window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 8–35 Using Batch . . . . . . . 8–42 Exit codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Changing security levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Associated environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Batch access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Batch login exit codes . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Terminating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 Exiting a Forms session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–37 Creating command files . . 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Beginning a TTY session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–35 Terminating a TTY session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–42 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–41 Associated parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 Disabling Forms logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–34 Change level procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–31 Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 BatchOutput file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–39 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–42 A batch_rlogin example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Ending a BATCH session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Displaying circuit status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using TTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–36 Beginning a BATCH session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–48 Enabling Forms logging . . . . . . . . . . 8–33 Security level 2 activity . . . . . . . . 8–31 Introduction . . . . . . 8–37 Using batch from the command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Forms session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–45 Using Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 BatchInput file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–38 The batch_rlogin utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–39 Command file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Worksheet cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–49 iv NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–32 Security level 1 activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–46 Displaying channel status . . . . . . . 8–39 Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–44 Format . . . . . . . . . . .

Open the Detailed View form to check whether the Site has changed state.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device management from the map Device management from the map Introduction The device management feature supports fault management and configuration management activities at the OMC. Click OK. 3. The OMC supports most hardware devices and software functions located at the remote network element. On receipt of a lock message from the OMC. 4. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to open a Map List window. NOTE The Detailed View facility is not available for the PCU device or any of its contained devices at this release. The detailed view is available for the SGSN device. From the Map list. From the Map list. 2. The detailed view is available for the SGSN device. Select the required Network Element. A lock command is sent to the device. The selected NE icon changes colour. use the following procedure: 1. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . A confirmation box is displayed with the following message: Do you wish to lock site <site name>? 5. double click the network map on which the required device is located. NOTE The Detailed View facility is not available for the PCU device or any of its contained devices at this release. Locking a device To lock a specified SITE device (a lock cannot be performed on SITE 0) from the map use the following procedure: 1. EMOTOROLA LTD. The operator can lock. Select Fault Management – Lock from the menu bar. Unlocking a device To unlock a specified SITE device from the Network map. the BSS informs the OMC of the success of the lock operation via the existing state change mechanism. the BSS attempts to lock the specified device and informs the OMC of the success or failure of the operation. 2. INS and reset SITE devices from the Map. When the operational state of the device has been changed. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to open a Map List window. unlock. double click the network map on which the required device is located.

2. the BSS informs the OMC of the success of the lock operation via the existing state change mechanism. 3.Device management from the map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 3. The detailed view is available for the SGSN device. the BSS informs the OMC of the success of the lock operation via the existing state change mechanism. When the operational state of the device has been changed. Select the required Network Element. From the Map list. Click OK. NOTE The Detailed View facility is not available for the PCU device or any of its contained devices at this release. Open the Detailed View form to check whether the Site has changed state. carry out the following procedure: 1. On receipt of an unlock message from the OMC. When the operational state of the device has been changed. Select Fault Management – Unlock from the menu bar. 7. Select the required Network Element. NOTE The Detailed View facility is not available for the PCU device or any of its contained devices at this release. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to open a Map List window. Resetting a device To reset a specified SITE device from the Network map. Open the Detailed View form to check whether the Site has changed state. Select Fault Management – INS from the menu bar. 4. 5. Select the Maps icon on the Front Panel to open a Map List window. INS a device To bring a specified SITE device into service (INS) from the Network map. 4. 8–2 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. An unlock command is sent to the BSS. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message: Do you wish to INS site <site name>? 6. The selected NE icon changes colour. Click OK. The colour of the selected NE icon changes. Close the window by selecting File – Close. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message: Do you wish to unlock site <site name>? 5. the BSS attempts to unlock the specified device and informs the OMC of the success or failure of the operation. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . default is purple. double click the network map on which the required device is located. carry out the following procedure: 1. The detailed view is available for the SGSN device.

The detailed view is available for the SGSN device. 4. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the required Network Element. When the operational state of the device has been changed.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device management from the map 2. double click the network map on which the required device is located. the BSS informs the OMC of the success of the lock operation via the existing state change mechanism. 5. 3. 7. A confirmation box is displayed with the following message: Do you wish to Reset site <site name>? 6. Open the Detailed View form to check whether the Site has changed state. default is purple. Close the window by selecting File – Close. The colour of the selected NE icon changes. NOTE The Detailed View facility is not available for the PCU device or any of its contained devices at this release. EMOTOROLA LTD. Click OK. Select Fault Management – Reset from the menu bar. From the Map list.

software functions and links (except for Circuit Identity Code (CIC) circuits) contained in the CM MIB can be displayed in the Contained Devices window (Figure 8-1). Click on the Save As Default button to save the filter criteria as the default for the Contained Devices window. Click on the Apply button. When the Remove Default button is clicked. Select the required filter criteria. 3. the Contained Devices window changes to reflect the filter criteria selected. or state. Refer to Figure 8-2. operator. use the following procedure: 1. A filter can be applied on the basis of device. Figure 8-1 Contained Devices window Filtering devices The operator can also exclude or include specific devices in the Contained Devices window. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . 8–4 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. In a Contained Devices window select View – Filter On. All GPRS devices. The following message is displayed in the status bar: Filter has been saved as default. 2. No filter will be applied when you open a Contained Devices window. software functions and links are fully supported by the Contained Devices window facilities. the following message is displayed in the status bar (but only if a default filter had been selected previously) : The default filter has been removed. the Filter Dialog window opens. This filter will be applied whenever you open the Contained Devices window. All devices in a specified NE can be displayed in the Contained Devices window by selecting View – All Devices from the menu bar.Device management from the map ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Contained Devices window All hardware devices. Refer to Online Help for a description of the columns in the Contained Devices window.

2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Figure 8-2 Contained Devices: Filter Dialog window EMOTOROLA LTD. Click on the Close button to close window.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Device management from the map 4.

proceed as follows: 1. Message Transfer Link (MTL). A simpler facility exists for resetting devices from the network map. the NE or devices may require resetting. n=no) ? 6. and voice channels for all associated BSC for the period of the reset (approx. 7. BSC/RXCDR reset NOTE omcadmin Resetting the RXCDR will break the Operations and Maintenance Link (OML). if correct the BSS will respond with: Current security level is 2 5. 2. The BSS then responds with: site reboots now! The MTL and OML links drop out shortly afterwards. but is only valid for certain device types. 3. Online Help contains details of the types of devices which may not be accessed from the map. Click the TTY button to open the TTY interface to the NE. Answer y to this question. Use the following procedures to reset devices not available from the map. 8. To reset a BSC or Remote Transcoder (RXCDR) from any SPARCstation. Enter the following command: reset_site The BSS responds with a message WARNING: Command will reboot site 0 Are you sure (y=yes. Carry out an Audit of the BSS as detailed in Chapter 6. 4. Click on the node to be reset. 8–6 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. five minutes). See Using the map: overview in Chapter 2 for procedures using the Network Map. Observe sites coming back on line using the Event window for this BSC. See Device management from the map at the beginning of this chapter for procedures on resetting certain devices from the Network map. Select the Remote Login icon on the Front Panel to display the list of Network nodes. Change level to level 2 by typing the following MMI command: chg_1 The BSS will then respond with: Enter password for security level you wish to access Type in the password. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Resetting an NE from the command line ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Resetting an NE from the command line If problems occur in the network.

Reset the device as follows: reset_device n <DEVICE_NAME> x y 0 Where: n is: location number of the site with the faulty device (n=0 at BSC or RXCDR). For further information on <DEVICE_NAME>. Reset the BTS as follows: reset_site x Where: is: x BTS site number Device reset To reset a device. Click the TTY button to open the TTY interface to the NE. 3. proceed as follows: omcadmin 1. 3. Select the Remote Login icon on the Front Panel to display the list of Network nodes. x is the first device identifier. (GSM-100-321). Click the TTY button to open the TTY interface to the NE. Select the Remote Login icon on the Front Panel to display the list of Network nodes. <DEVICE_NAME> unique identity for the device. refer to Technical Description: BSS Command Reference. 4. proceed as follows: omcadmin 1. 2. Change level to level 2 by typing the following MMI commands: chg_l The BSS will then respond with: Enter password for security level you wish to access Type in the password. EMOTOROLA LTD. y is the second device identifier. Click on the node to be reset.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Resetting an NE from the command line BTS reset To reset a BTS. if correct the BSS will respond with: Current security level is 2 5. if correct the BSS will respond with: Current security level is 2 5. Change level to level 2 by typing the following MMI commands: chg_l The BSS will then respond with: Enter password for security level you wish to access Type in the password. 2. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–7 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Click on the node to be reset. 4.

8–8 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Sites or Cells. Site or Cell ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Finding a Network Element. S Finding a Cell with a LAC. S Open a Contained Devices window for a node. S Site Name. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . This section also contains examples of using the find feature: S Finding a Site using BSS name and Site Id. The following information can be entered to find an NE. S Site Id. S Open a Detailed View for a node. Site or Cell: S NE Name. S Perform a TTY Rlogin to a BSS. Site or Cell Find feature overview The Find feature is used to find NEs. Click on the Find icon on the OMC Front Panel to open the Find window. S Finding the BSS parent of a Cell. S Cell Name.Finding a Network Element. Site or Cell has been found the operator can: S Open the Navigation Tree with the node as its root. S GSM Cell Id. S Open a Map for a BSS. Then when the NE.

Site or Cell To locate an NE. The search is not case sensitive. For example. The text string SS1 is matched with BSS1 and BSS10. or Cell carry out the following procedure: 1. Site. An Id can be entered for a Site or Cell in the relevant Id field. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . NOTE The search performs an exact match on Site Id or Cell Id and a partial match in all other fields. Click on the Clear button to remove the text from all the fields. 2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Finding a Network Element. Site or Cell Figure 8-3 Find window Locating an NE. Site Id: 1 is matched with site 1 but not site 10. Site. Enter the name of the NE. EMOTOROLA LTD. or Cell in the relevant Name field. Select the Find button from the OMC Front Panel. the Find window opens (Figure 8-3).

or Map. Contained Devices window. Find CELL(s) will display the Cells that match the criteria in all fields. The heading indicates the class of objects found. double click on an NE. If a Cell name is entered it will find the NE containing the Cell. 2. Select an NE. Sites. Site. such as opening a Navigation Tree. Additional operations When an NE. the parent of the selected Site or Cell is displayed in the Find Results box. or Cells in the network. Click on the Find Parent button. NOTE If no text has been entered the search will display all NEs. A Navigation Tree opens with the selected NE. an information box is displayed with the following message: No matching <object> was found. Find Site(s). Network Elements. Site or Cell ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 3. In the Find Results area of the Find window select the required Site or Cell. Site. or Cell in the Find Results box to open a Navigation Tree. NOTE If no match is found. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Site Name/Site Id. Locating the parent of a Site or Cell The parent of a Cell or Site can be found using the following procedure: 1. Navigation Tree A Navigation Tree can be opened from the Find window using the following procedure: 1. that is. NOTE Alternatively. Find NE(s) will display the network elements that match the criteria in all fields. The result of a search is displayed in the Find Results box of the window. or performing a Remote Login. Click on the Find NE(s).Finding a Network Element. 2. or Cell at its root. Detailed View. Follow steps 1 to 3 of the procedure Locating an NE. 3. Site. Where <object> is the Network Element. Site. Site or Cell. or Cell in the Find Results box. or Cell has been located additional operations can be performed from the Find window. Site or Cell. 8–10 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. In the Open section of the Find window click on the Navigation Tree button. or Find Cell(s) button. Find SITE(s) will display the Sites that match the criteria in all fields. or Cells.

2.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Finding a Network Element. A Map opens for the selected NE. Site. Select an NE. A Contained Devices window opens for the selected NE or Site. EMOTOROLA LTD. 2. Select an NE in the Find Results box. Contained Devices A Contained Devices window can be opened from the Find window using the following procedure: 1. Site or Cell Detailed View A Detailed View can be opened from the Find window using the following procedure: 1. Select an NE. 2. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . In the Open section of the Find window click on the Detailed View button. In the Open section of the Find window click on the Contained Devices button. In the Open section of the Find window click on the RLogin button. 2. An Xterm opens from where a TTY remote login operation to the parent BSS can be performed. Map A Map can be opened from the Find window using the following procedure: 1. Select an NE or Site in the Find Results box. or Cell in the Find Results box. or Cell in the Find Results box. Site. A Detailed View for the selected node opens. In the Open section of the Find window click on the Map button. RLogin An Rlogin session can be started from the Find window using the following procedure: 1.

the Find window opens. then enter the Site Id in the Site Id field. 2. Enter the BSS name in the BSS Name field. Figure 8-4 Find window with BSS name and Site id 8–12 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Select the Find button from the OMC Front Panel. Finding a Site using BSS name and Site Id To find a Site at a BSS by specifying the BSS name and the Site Id use the following procedure: 1. 3. Site or Cell ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Examples of using find Below are typical examples of where an OMC operator might use the Find feature. Click on the Find Site(s) button. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Finding a Network Element. the result of the search is displayed in the Find Results box (Figure 8-4).

Click on the Find Parent button. 2. 6. or its Id in the GSM Cell Id field. Select the Site and then click on the Find Parent button again. Enter the name of the Cell in the Cell Name field. 4. EMOTOROLA LTD. 3.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Finding a Network Element. the result of the search is displayed in the Find Results box. 5. Site or Cell Finding the BSS parent of a Cell To find the BSS parent of a Cell use the following procedure: 1. Click on the Find Cell(s) button. the parent Site of the Cell is displayed in the Find Results box. Select the Cell in the Find Results box. the parent BSS of the Cell is displayed in the Find Results box. the Find window opens. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Select the Find button from the OMC Front Panel.

Site or Cell ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Finding a Cell with a LAC Cells with a particular Location Area Code (LAC) can be searched for. NOTE Additional information about GSM cell ids can be found in Technical Description: BSS Command Reference GSM-100-321 and Installation & Configuration: GSM System Configuration GSM-100-403. the Find window opens. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .Finding a Network Element. 2. Figure 8-5 Find window with Cell LAC 8–14 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Enter the LAC in the third field of the GSM Cell Id. Select the Find button from the OMC Front Panel. using the following procedure: 1. Click on the Find Cell(s) button. all Cell(s) with the specified LAC are displayed in the Find Results box (Figure 8-5). 3.

which calls are to be added to the trace log. From the OMC an operator can: S Create a trace. or preventing an active trace from triggering any more new invoked instances by permanently deactivating the trace. S Completed – a terminated trace. RTF) for events associated with a particular subscriber or equipment. S Deactivated – means either: – Has been deactivated by the operator at the BSS or OMC. For example. CELL. Call trace statuses A Trace can have one of the following statuses: S Active – can still invoke new instances. – Has been deactivated internally by the BSS. SITE. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . – The current time is outside the triggering period for the trace. Care should be taken when creating traces to prevent the OML becoming flooded. Managed objects for it does not exist at the BSS. Each trace has certain criteria associated with it. S View the trace records associated with each trace. S Perform other actions such as terminating a trace on a particular cell. S Delete a trace from the OMC. or selected cells. Call trace expansion is detailed in Installation and Configuration: GSM System Configuration (GSM-100-403). which the operator is required to specify to create a trace. EMOTOROLA LTD. They are included so that the operator has access to the trace record for completed traces. NOTE Only one trace can be active on a specific call at any instant. The user should delete and recreate trace criteria if LCFs are added or reset. S View the trace criteria for active. deactivated. An operator at an OMC. NOTE An operator can only create a call trace if the Call Trace function has been enabled in the User Profile List.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Overview of the Call Trace function Overview of the Call Trace function Introduction to call trace The call trace function enables an operator to trace the activities of various network elements (BSS. MSC or BSS can create a trace. and completed traces. NOTE Active and deactivated traces have call trace managed objects in the MIB (and at the BSS).

S Selector Value The value for the particular selector type chosen. TMSI. MMI or both. OMC or MMI. IMEISV. then select Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. SCCP Number or nth call. ‘Deactivated’ or ‘Completed’. Contents of the Trace View window The Trace View window (see Figure 8-6) displays basic details for all the call traces for a specific network element. S Selector The type of trace selector. S Active calls The quantity of active calls. The Trace View window contains the following information for each trace: S Name The name assigned by the operator for the trace. CELL or RTF). S Record Destination Indicates the destination for the trace data. for example. NOTE Alternatively. 8–16 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. ‘Active’. S Creation Time The date and time when the trace was first created. IMEI. the Trace View window can be invoked from an NE detailed view by selecting Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. S Trace Origin Indicates whether the trace has been activated from the MSC. S Completed calls The quantity of completed calls. S Status The status of the trace. for example. SITE. IMSI number for IMSI. S Scope The scope of the trace (BSS. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . The operator can select one trace on which to perform other activities. IMSI. OMC.Description of the Call Trace windows ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Description of the Call Trace windows Trace View window Displaying the Trace View window To display the Trace View window. select the network element required from the Navigation tree.

or completed trace.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Description of the Call Trace windows Sorting traces By default all traces are sorted by status. for the selected active trace. Figure 8-6 Trace View window EMOTOROLA LTD. S Display the Abort Trace window to abort a trace on a particular call. S Deactivate the selected active trace. S Delete the selected active. S Display the Call Trace Detailed View window to view the details of the trace criteria for the selected trace. but the operator can sort traces by: S Trace Origin S Status S Creation date and time Tasks available from the Trace View window The following tasks are available from the Trace View window menu bar: S View the trace records of one invoked instance of the selected trace. S Display the BSS Detailed View to view call trace related attributes of the BSS which contains the selected trace criteria. deactivated. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

The scope (BSS.Description of the Call Trace windows ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Call Trace Detailed View window Displaying the Call Trace Detailed View window The Call Trace Detailed View window can be displayed using one of the following methods: S Select a trace from the Trace View window and select the appropriate menu option. CELL or RTF) of the trace is carried through to the Call Trace Detailed View window. the scope of the trace is not populated. In this case. SITE. S From the Trace View window by selecting the appropriate menu option. S From the Trace Record View window and select the appropriate menu option. 8–18 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .

NOTE Maximum number of simultaneous calls can only be greater than 1.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Description of the Call Trace windows Contents of the Call Trace Detailed View window If the Call Trace Detailed View window is displayed for an existing trace. The trace criteria is a follows: S Trace Name The name of the call trace. The default record type is set to Basic. if Nth Call is selected in the Trace Selector field. – IMEI The operator can enter the IMEI Number to be traced. The operator can select the following: – Nth Call Every nth call is traced. the operator can enter a value for each of the attributes of the trace criteria. S Trace Selector Determines which calls are added to the trace log. – SCCP# The operator can enter the SCCP# Number to be traced. EMOTOROLA LTD. The default is 1. the maximum number of calls to be traced. The operator can change this to either Radio or Handover. If the Call Trace Detailed View window is displayed for a new trace. – TMSI The operator can enter the TMSI Number to be traced. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . – IMSI The operator can enter the IMSI Number to be traced. the window displays details of the call trace criteria. and the start and end time of the trace. This field is optional. The operator can enter a value. S Record Details Defines the type of details logged in the call trace record. – IMEISV The operator can enter the IMEISV Number to be traced. S Trace Details Defines the event that triggers the trace.

S Abort a trace on a call. Calls in Progress. 8–20 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. Selecting this option displays the Abort Trace on Call window if there are still calls in progress for the trace criteria.Description of the Call Trace windows ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Tasks available from the Call Trace Detailed View window The Call Trace Detailed View window contains menu options which enable the operator to perform functions on a particular trace. The window will display a list of the calls currently in progress for the selected trace criteria. S Deactivate a trace. or calls in progress options are not applicable for completed trace criteria. The title bar of this window displays the name of the BSS for the trace criteria. Abort Trace on Call’ menu option from the Trace View window. Completed Calls. The status of each instance (‘Active’ or ‘Completed’) is displayed along with the date and time that the first trace record was received at the OMC. The title bar of this window displays the name of the BSS for the trace criteria. NOTE The all calls. If the Invoked Instances window has been displayed to view trace records for a completed trace. The date and time that the first trace record was received at the OMC is displayed. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . or completed calls for the trace criteria. the window displays a list of the SCCP numbers of all traces which were invoked during the lifetime of the selected trace. This is only available for active traces. along with the trace criteria reference number. the the window displays a list of the SCCP numbers of currently invoked instances (sorted by invocation time) followed by a list of the completed instances (again sorted by invocation time) of the selected trace criteria. It enables the operator to select one or more calls in order to abort the active traces on those calls. All Calls. Abort Trace on Call window This window is displayed by selecting the ‘Options. S View all calls. Calls in Progress or Completed Calls). If the Invoked Instances window has been displayed to view trace records for a call. The functions which can be performed include: S Activate a trace using the File – Create menu option. along with the trace criteria reference number and the option selected (All calls. S View. S View. This is only available for active and deactivated traces. The first call in the list is selected by default. Selecting this option displays the Invoked Instances window. calls in progress. Invoked Instances window This window is displayed by selecting any of the following options from the Trace View window: S View.

S Display the Trace Criteria window to view the trace criteria associated with an invoked instance. S Print the trace record. The Trace Record View window contains menu options which enable the operator to perform functions on a particular invoked instance. 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . S Save the contents of the Trace Record View window to an ASCII file. EMOTOROLA LTD. this option displays a list of available tools. The display includes both the header and the body of the trace records. When selected. The display is dynamically updated to append the most recent trace records received by the OMC for a particular invoked instance. The functions which can be performed include: S Terminate an invoked instance.ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Description of the Call Trace windows Trace Record View window The Trace Record View window displays the trace records for an invoked instance. in chronological order. S Enable the integration of external call trace data processing tools.

SITE. Editing call trace details Only the Trace Name field and Additional Information field can be modified. Select File – Create from the menu bar to activate the trace. Select Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. Select the Config Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. Enter the appropriate values in the Call Trace Detailed View window fields. 3. 2. Select the Config Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. Select Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. 2. CELL. 4. view call trace details from an NE detailed view by selecting Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. The OMC displays the Navigation tree. 2000 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY . Viewing a call trace To view an existing call trace follow these steps: 1.Using the Call Trace function ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the Call Trace function Creating a call trace To create a call trace follow these steps: 1. NOTE Alternatively. 2. the Navigation tree is displayed. 8–22 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations EMOTOROLA LTD. the Trace View window opens. Select the Config Mgmt icon on the Front Panel. Select Options – Call Trace – Create Trace from the menu bar. Select the required network element (BSS. The OMC displays the Navigation tree. 4. RTF). follow these steps: 1. Select a trace and then select Edit – Detailed View from the menu bar. The OMC displays the Call Trace Detailed View window. SITE. the Trace View window opens. The OMC displays the Call Trace Detailed View window. CELL. all other fields are read-only. The detailed view window displays the criteria that the operator specified when the trace was set up. In the Navigation tree. 3. Refer to Figure 8-6. 3. 5. RTF). select a network element for the call trace. Viewing call trace details To view call trace criteria for an existing trace. Select the required network element (BSS.

RTF).ISSUE 18 REVISION 0 Using the Call Trace function Viewing trace records To view trace records for a call. the Trace View window opens. 5. SITE. follow these steps: 1. or Completed Calls. 6. 3. Calls in Progress. Select Options – Call Trace – View Traces from the menu bar. the Invoked Instances List window opens (Figure 8-7). 2000 NET01 (OMC02): OMC Network Operations 8–23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY .