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CONTENTS

Rationale Proforma #1 Proforma #2 Timetable Unit Overview Resources Discussion

3 4 11 13 14 28 30

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RATIONALE We Are One is a SOSE based unit of work that has been developed according to the ACT curriculum document ‘Every Chance to Learn’. The unit has been fashioned for a Year 2 class, and is guided by the early childhood band of development of the aforementioned document. The host ELA is ELA 21 ‘The student understands about Australia and Australians’. This ELA focuses on developing student’s understanding of the concept of identity, symbolism and diversity (ACT, DET, 2007). The unit follows the inquiry based approach (Murdoch, 2009) which allows students to construct their own understanding of the topic and actively seek out more information to strengthen this understanding.

We Are One has been designed to be implemented in the first term of the school year to aid students in deciding who they want to be in this new space and what it means to be part of the class. The activities within the unit endeavor to promote a sense of community with the class and school. The unit comes at a time where students are beginning to see themselves as unique individuals with the human desire to belong; the themes in the unit are cohesive with this and are aimed to foster the students’ moral and social development. The unit allows them to study themselves and others starting with an internal understanding of identity and moving to the final broad understanding of Australian identity and diversity. We Are One not only supports students’ development as SOSE learners but also supports their growth as citizens of the 21st century society and members of their community.

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PROFORMA #1 Name: We Are One Overarching Guiding Question: What does it mean to be an Australian? Year/Term: 2, Term 1 Duration: 6 weeks GUIDING QUESTIONS Module 1 – Me and my family: How do our individual identities contribute to our class identity? What makes you special? How are we different to our friends & family? What is a family? Are all families the same? Module 2 – Class and School Identity How do our individual identities contribute to our class identity? Why is diversity important? What makes our class unique? What makes our school different to other schools? What factors contribute to our school identity? Module 3 – Australian Identity Why is Cultural Diversity important? How are Australians linked to places? What makes an Australian? How are your differences valued in Australia?

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TRANSFERENCE

Knowledge People are unique (appearance, abilities, likes, dislikes etc) Individuals & families have similarities & differences ‘Family’ can be defined in various ways Connection between people (e.g. family) Individual identity contributes to group identity People belong to groups ie. Class, house, school etc Schools and classes have similarities and differences Cooperation is an important part of group behaviour The diversity of Australians (including Indigenous people) Australian identity Concepts of Australian geography

Skills and Abilities Describe and compare graphs Graph information Identify and practice cooperative behaviour Identify components of a school community Identify and describe the roles within the school community Compare schools Compare classes Identify factors contributing to class and school identity Analyse why these factors contribute to the community identity Questioning Predicting Comparing & Contrasting Presenting Ideas to Others Making Choices Designing Revising Speaking Clearly Justifying Organising Estimating Reading Interpreting Information Explaining Reflecting Working to a Timeline Working Independently Listening Observing Working Co-operatively Analysing Reporting Self Assessing Repsonding to the Work of Others Performing

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Values and Attitudes Value the contributions of all the people working in the school community Value cooperative behaviour Appreciate the similarities and differences of communities Citizen Action Objectives Work cooperatively in small group and class group tasks Conduct interviews Demonstrate actions that reflect positive attitudes towards the school community

GENERIC SKILLS Skill Focus Research Communication Problem-solving Using Technology Critical Thinking Expression Task management Cooperation Citizenship Description Locate, select and evaluate information from a variety of sources Present and communicate information according to purpose, situation and audience Apply a range of problem solving strategies to achieve an accepted solution Select and use most appropriate technology for a given task Make personal judgements and informed choices Respond emotionally and imaginatively through creative and expressive activities Use time and resources effectively Work cooperatively with others Develop awareness of personal, class and school responsibilities

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INDICATION OF INTEGRATED KLA’s/ELA’s
ELA 1: Uses a range of strategies to think and learn ELA 2: Understands and applies the inquiry process ELA 3: Makes considered decisions ELA 4: Acts with integrity and regard for others ELA 5: Contributes to group effectiveness ELA 6: Uses Information and Communication Technologies effectively ELA 7: Creates, presents and appreciates artistic works ELA 8: Listens and speaks with purpose and effect ELA 9: Reads effectively

/ / / X X / / / /

ELA 10: Writes effectively ELA 11: Critically interprets and creates texts ELA 12: Takes action to promote health ELA 13: Is physically skilled and active ELA 14: Manages self and relationships ELA 15: Communicates with intercultural understanding ELA 16: Understands and applies number ELA 17: Chooses and uses measures ELA 18: Recognises and represents patterns and relationships

/ X

ELA 19: Understands and applies scientific knowledge ELA 20: Acts for an environmentally sustainable future ELA 21: Understands about Australia and Australians ELA 22: Understands and values what it means to be a citizen within a democracy ELA 23: Understands world issues and events ELA 24: Makes informed choices about money and finance ELA 25: Designs, makes and appraises using technology

/ X

X / / I

Interdisciplinary
Opportunities to1.EC.1 think about relevant situations and problems individually and in groups 1.EC.2 ask questions and look for answers 1.EC.3 explore thinking tools or processes to think about and solve problems 1.EC.4 talk about their thinking and how it has changed 1.EC.5 use imagination, pictures and diagrams to help thinking and learning 1.EC.6 explore the use of ICT as a tool for thinking and learning 1.EC.7 practise their learning 1.EC.8 describe how they learnt something. 2.EC.1 explore inquiry as a useful process for creating knowledge and understanding the world around them 2.EC.2 contribute to planning and conducting simple investigations by asking questions and seeking answers through observing, experimenting, engaging with information in texts, discussing ideas with others and using ICT 2.EC.4 make predictions or conjectures related to their everyday experience and think through ways to test them 2.EC.5 make observations about what is happening around them using their senses 2.EC.6 follow suggestions to collect and record data or information from a small range of sources 2.EC.9 follow suggestions to order and present data or information 2.EC.10 revisit their questions in the light of results or information collected, talk about the way in which the investigation could be changed and begin to consider the fairness of tests 2.EC.12 share and communicate observations, findings, ideas and understandings.

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4.EC.5 identify positive role models 4.EC.7 appreciate the diversity of their family, school and locality 4.EC.8 demonstrate respectful behaviours towards people whom they identify as different. 5.EC.1 ask questions and seek clarification from peers 5.EC.2 play and work with others in pairs or small groups 5.EC.3 make decisions in small groups to achieve common goals 5.EC.4 listen actively when working in groups 5.EC.5 show care for and encourage other members of a group or team 5.EC.6 communicate feelings and needs appropriately in a group situation 5.EC.7 take turns and share equipment in pairs and small groups 5.EC.8 talk about their role in completing a group task. 6.EC.1 experiment with the use of ICT to assist in inquiries 6.EC.2 experiment with ICT as a creative tool to represent their ideas and create imaginative responses to problems and tasks 6.EC.4 share learning experiences and develop new technical skills in operating ICT 6.EC.5 use terminology for describing common ICT devices 6.EC.6 apply basic keyboard skills

The Arts
Learn about7.EC.1 visual arts, dance, drama, music and media 7.EC.5 basic musical concepts Learn to7.EC.7 view, observe, experience and listen to a range of artistic works including those created by peers 7.EC.8 create artistic works that tell a story 7.EC.12 sing songs and play music exploring basic music concepts 7.EC.13 talk about their responses to artistic works and express opinions about what they like or dislike.

English
Learn about8.EC.1 good listening and speaking behaviours and the need to take turns 8.EC.2 listening and speaking as providing opportunities to exchange information, to share and explore ideas, and to express opinions and listen to the opinions of others. Learn to8.EC.3 listen and speak in discussions, conversations and oral presentations in small and large groups, which are usually informal 8.EC.4 listen attentively through showing interest in a speaker’s tone or presentation and appropriate body language to emphasise and clarify meaning 8.EC.5 identify opinions provided by members of the group in discussions and conversations and make judgements about whether they agree or disagree 8.EC.6 make oral presentations of personal recounts or reports about people, places

and things related to their own experience, understand the topic, provide some relevant ideas and information, and include events in sequence 8.EC.7 ask questions, contribute information and ideas, express opinions relevant to the topic, and use statements, questions and commands 8.EC.8 speak audibly, with some sense of addressing an audience and the needs of listeners Learn about9.EC.1 a range of imaginative and information texts Learn about10.EC.1 how writing communicates a message for a variety of purposes to different audiences 10.EC.3 structures and features of imaginative texts Learn about11.EC.1 different modes used in the texts they view, listen to and read and the ways each Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332) 8

mode communicates meaning

Health & Physical Education
Learn about14.EC.1 similarities and differences between themselves and others 14.EC.6 different types of families and the range of family roles and activities. Learn to14.EC.8 describe the characteristics that make them similar to others and unique 14.EC.10 describe their families and other groups to which they belong 14.EC.12 identify those people and things that are special to them and explain

Languages
Learn about15.EC.1 similarities and differences in the ways individuals and families live according to their cultural backgrounds 15.EC.2 the cultural background of people they know in their local community 15.EC.3 languages that are used in the community 15.EC.4 features of other cultures 15.EC.5 events that celebrate different cultures in their Learn to15.EC.6 describe cultural practices and traditions in their own family and compare them with those of their peers 15.EC.7 identify aspects of cultural diversity within the community 15.EC.8 listen and speak respectfully, recognising that others may speak and interact differently to them

Mathematics
Learn to16.EC.16 talk

about their observations and ideas about situations involving number in their own words. Learn to17.EC.10 collect, display and interpret data about themselves and their lives in meaningful contexts and make simple statements about the data collected.

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INDICATION OF APPLICATION OF QUALITY LEARNING MODEL

Intellectual Quality Deep Knowledge Deep Understanding Problematic Knowledge Higher-order Thinking Metalanguage Substantive Communication X X X X X

Significance Background Knowledge Cultural Knowledge Knowledge Integration Inclusivity Connectedness Narrative X X X X X X

Quality Learning Environment X Explicit Quality Criteria Engagement High Expectations Social Support Student’s self-regulation Student Direction X X X X X

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In this unit students will learn about and understand various aspects about Australia and Australians.

21.EC.6 The students have opportunities to understand and learn about individuals and groups in the community (e.g. through simple information texts, family histories, Dreaming stories, folk tales) 21.EC.8 The students have opportunities to understand and learn about the diversity of Australians (e.g. people may look and speak differently from each other and come from a variety of backgrounds) 21.EC.10 The students have opportunities to learn to recognise Australia’s shape (e.g. in images and on maps) and some of its places (e.g. relevant to students’ experiences or classroom focus) In addition to this students will also be able to integrate their knowledge with other ELAs to help students understand the interconnectedness of their education. ASSESSMENT The six week unit has been divided into 3 equally important and spaced categories to assure maximum learning for all students. In accordance with Vygotski’s ‘zone of proximal development’ theory the unit starts with the student and branches out. The first two week module looks at the student as an individual and their family, the second module focuses on the student’s class and school and the third module culminates the unit by delving deeper into the concept of identity and diversity within the Australian context. Diagnostic Assessment To assess the students knowledge and understanding of individuals and groups in the community (21.EC.6) and to assist the teaching in setting appropriate learning tasks, the teacher will lead a class discussion and create two mind maps as a class with the focus being ‘individual’ and ‘family’.

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Formative Assessment Throughout the unit students will constantly be informally assessed through conversations with the teacher and through teacher observation. In addition to this informal assessment the unit provides a number of formal formative assessments. Each of these activities are available through each modules Pirozzo grid.

Summative Assessment There are three summative assessment tasks in this unit, one in each module. These specific activities are denoted in each of the modules Pirozzo’s grids by the symbol: #.

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TIME

MONDAY Admin ENGLISH

TUESDAY Admin P.E

WEDNESDAY Admin MATH

THURSDAY Admin P.E

FRIDAY Admin HEALTH

9.00

10.00

LOTE

MATHS

ENGLISH

SOSE

ENGLISH

11.20

MATH

SOSE

ENGLISH

SOSE

ENGLISH

12.20

MUSIC

ENGLISH

P.E

MATHS

MATH

2.00 SOSE 2.30 ART

LIBRARY DRAMA MUSIC

ASSEMBLY

CLASS BOOK

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ELA
21. The student understands about Australia and Australians

Learn About
EC.6 individuals and groups in the community EC.7 some official and unofficial symbols used to represent Australia and Australians EC.8 the diversity of Australians

Learn To
EC.10 recognise Australia’s shape and some of its places

Values and attitudes
Appreciate and respect the diversity of Australia and the lives of Australians at different times Develop a sense of identity as an Australian

Key Questions

ELA Indicators

Key Learning Experiences
Hook: Play people bingo- Find someone who…

Resources

ELA Assessment

Reflection

TUNING IN

What makes you unique?

21.EC.8

Activity 1: Y chart: What do I like to eat, play (hobbies), learn about at school (favourite subject) Activity 2: Paired Interview. With a partner come up with a list of things you have in common. Then come together as a class and make a class list.

Paper Pencils/Pens/Textas

Student reflection – “Will everybody’s charts be the same?” Student reflection – “Imagine if you did this exercise with someone from another class, would you still have similar things in common?” Student reflection“Does everybody think of cultural diversity in the same way?”

What makes our class unique? Why is diversity important? How do our individual identities contribute to our class identity?

21.EC.8

Butchers Paper Interactive Whiteboard – Examples of questions to ask partner displayed

Why is Cultural Diversity important?

21.EC.8

Activity 3: Define ‘cultural diversity’ in your own words.

Exercise books and pencils

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Key Questions
What is a family? How can families differ?

ELA Indicators
21.EC.8

Key Learning Experiences
Activity 1: Read a text about children & families & discuss the characteristics that people share and how people are different Activity 2: Interview someone working in the school community. Record: Who they are, what they do, what we gain from them and what the school would miss without them.

Resources
Books: -The Family Book -Who’s in a Family? -Heather Has Two Mommies Interview Template Tape Recorder

ELA Assessment

Reflection

FINDING OUT

How do our individual identities contribute to our class/school identity?

21.EC.6

How are Australians linked to places?

21.EC.10

Activity 3: Sketch a major landmark in the local area; these could include temples, statues, places of interest etc. Write a sentence about why this place is important

Photos of major landmarks or computers with appropriate images for students, pencils and paper.

Teacher reflection (reflection in action): Accompany the students for one of the first interviews to determine level of scaffolding necessary Student reflectionstudents have inbuilt activity reflection“why this place is important”

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Key Questions

SORTING OUT

ELA Indicators
21.EC.6

Key Learning Experiences
Activity 1: Venn Diagram- Compare yourself & another class member to find similarities & differences Activity 2: Role Play – Introduce yourself to the class as the subject of your interview, relay information collected in interview.

Resources
Paper- Venn Diagram template Pens/pencils/textas Costumes and Props

ELA Assessment

Reflection
Student reflectionintrinsic self reflection through discussion Students as a class discuss the many people who contribute to the school community and what they do to shape our school Students self reflection and peer review of movies

How are people similar and different?
What factors contribute to our school identity?

21.EC.6

What makes an Australian?

21.EC.8

Activity 3: Make an i-movie (or Windows movie maker movie) of Australian life.

Computer with chosen application

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Key Questions
How are people connected?

ELA Indicators
23.EC.6

Key Learning Experiences
Activity 1: Create your family tree of family timeline

Resources
Cardboard Pens/pencils/textas Examples of family tree/ family timeline: Computer Lab Questionnaire template on word

ELA Assessment

Reflection

GOING FURTHER

What makes our school different to other schools?

21.EC.6 21.EC.8

What makes an Australian?

21.EC.8

Activity 2: Design a questionnaire to send to our buddy school to try and find out what their school is like. What is the same as our school and what is different. Activity 3: Write a new verse to the song “WE ARE AUSTRALIAN”, in this verse you can write about the future or your class mates and why they are Australian.

Copy of “We Are Australian”, exercise books and pencils

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Key Questions
What is a family?

ELA Indicators
21.EC.6

Key Learning Experiences
Activity 1: In groups discuss and invent a definition of ‘the Australian family’ as represented by the class. Make a banner of the definition. Activity 2: Judge the value of diversity within the school. Write what you think would be different if we were all the same (with an accompanying picture).

Resources
Calico material Paint Brushes

ELA Assessment

Reflection

MAKING CONCLUSIONS

Why is diversity important?

21.EC.6 21.EC.8

Lined and blank paper

Reflection Activity: For a day you are called by a number based on what number your name is on the roll. At the end of the day discuss as a class how this made you feel and what impact it had on your individual and the class identity.

Who were the first Australians?

21.EC.5

Activity 3: Look at the first verse from “We are Australian” (Bruce Woodley and Dobe Newton, 1987) and write a paragraph explaining each line

Copy of “We Are Australian”, exercise books and pencils

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Key Questions

ELA Indicators
21.EC.8

Key Learning Experiences
Activity 1: In small groups create a roll play about families- include some ‘values’ that you have learnt about families & perform them to younger students to teach them about ‘values’

Resources
Family Books (to revise): The Family Book by Todd Parr, Who’s In A Family? By Robert Skutch, Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman. Computer lab Video Camera Voice Recorder Script Template Article Template

ELA Assessment

Reflection

REFLECTION / TAKING ACTION

Are all families the same? What makes families different?

Why is diversity important? What makes our school different to other schools? What factors contribute to our school identity? How do our individual identities contribute to our class/school identity? What makes an Australian?

21.EC.6 21.EC.8

Activity 2: Devise an advertisement to entice people to join our school highlighting our individuality. Can be done via any medium (student choice).

21.EC.7

Student class reflection, what advertisements made you want to join the school and why. If you had to do an advertisement for our buddy school what would you change?

21.EC.8

Activity 3: Review what you have learnt and one interesting fact about Australians. You will share your interesting fact at assembly.

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We Are One – Identity (Me)/ Family (Module 1)
Bloom’s Taxonomy Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Read a text about children & families & discuss the characteristics that people share and how people are different (* The Family Book or Who’s in a Family?) Make a poster about a story that your Grandparents liked to tell to your parents & your parents have shared with you

Year 2
ApplyingAnalysingCreatingEvaluating-

Remembering-

Understanding-

Verbal/Linguisticpoetry, debate, storytelling, essay, checklist, journal Write a poem about yourself

Write statements about the special events that you and your family celebrate

Distinguish & compare the children in the story Clive Eats Alligators, by Alison Lester. Make a list of their similarities and differences.

Write a journal article about yourself and your family. Are you all the same?

Visual/Spacialdrawing, model, poster, photograph, storyboard, illustration, board game

Class Mind Map: Individuals, Family *

Make a class book of important family stories.

Venn Diagram: Compare yourself & another class member to find similarities & differences. Investigate student’s posters about themselves and then make a graph that shows the similarities & differences in the class.

Design/draw/colour a poster about you. Include your hair & eye colour, birth dates, favourite colours, foods and activities.

Logical/Mathematical
diagram, outline, timeline, chart, critique, graph

Y chart: What do I like to eat, play (hobbies), learn about at school (favourite subject)

Use questionnaire to find out about class members & their families

Using info gathered, make a tally & then graph the info.

Create your family tree or family timeline.

Make a page for our class book about yourself, written in the form of a poem, a story or a list. Include an illustration & same/different statements # Take/bring pictures in of things that are important to you. Cut and paste them together in a collage. Why aren’t everyone’s photos the same? Evaluate your graph, if you did this graph in your community would it be a fair representation of the rest of Australia? ~

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Naturalistclassification, collection, solution to problem, display, observation, forecast, investigation, simulation, exhibit, identification

L5334 Super! The family: family members Listen to a boy introduce his members of his family. Match each person to their family relationship. Score points for each correct answer.

Learning Object: (6 to choose from) L8303 Just like me: Mana, Rose and Zeina Students evaluate the similarities and differences between themselves and the three characters.

L5333 Super! The family Students identify the names of members within a family and phrases used to describe family members and their occupations.

L1454 My family [English] Students use vocabulary and basic sentence structure to describe family relationships. Students explore the composition of a range of families.

Investigate why/why not you believe it is good to be unique (*That’s What Makes me Special)

Musicalsong, rap, lyrics, composition, jingle! slogan, melody Learn a song about families.

Explain what the song is about and what it tells us about families

Revise the lyrics of the song. Either change them or write 2 additional versus.

Choose a friend & appraise each other’s versus. What do you like/ think you should change.

Using ideas discussed with friend compose a rap, jingle or slogan about families. +

Bodily/Kinestheticrole play, skit, pantomime, dance, invention, lab, improvisation, prototype

Play grouping game. Where teacher calls various things out and the people that like them form a group.

Play people bingoFind someone who…

In small groups make up a skit about yourselves with the purpose of teaching that it is good to be unique.

Space Jump- Using ‘special’ words related to identity, self & family

Create a skit about either what makes you special or what the word family means to you

Intrapersonal- journal,
log, goal statement, belief statement, self- assessment, editorial

Read the various definitions of a family. Which one best describes your family?

Write an editorial about why people sometimes want to be like someone else

After looking through a couple of books about families- Write a

Analyse the information you have gathered. Write a belief statement

Imagine you are part of a different family. Write a journal article about

Scenario: 2 children are bullying a student because he/she is different. How would you solve this problem? (*The Sandpit War or It’s OK to be Different) ~ Evaluate the first family song and the one you created? If you could only choose one for children to learn about families which would it be, why? + In small groups think about some ‘values’ that you have learnt about friends and family & perform them to younger students to teach them about ‘values' Write a contract detailing something that you will do to assist/contribute to

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or want to change themselves and about expectations people have- where do these come from? ~ In pairs take turns to interview each other to find out your similarities & differences. (example questions and checklists provided) In small groups discuss what you know about Australian families. Think both facts & myths. Divide a poster into 2 columns- FACT and MYTH. Complete

journal article about all the things you know about families. (* Heather has 2 Mommies) Interview people in the classroom to try and find out where the myths come from. Were they ever ‘real’? ~

about what an individual is & what makes up a family. #

the things you might do and the members of the family.

your family.

Interpersonaldiscussion, roundtable, service learning, conversation, group activity, position statement, interview

Brainstorm with other students to compile a list of the countries of origin of class members, their parents, grandparents and ancestors. Distinguish the most common place of origin

In groups discuss and then invent a definition of ‘the Australian family’ as represented by the class. Make a banner of the definition.

Each child swaps names for a day. (Teacher picks). Critique how this made you feel- did it feel weird- why?

Multiple Intelligences & Bloom’s Taxonomy (devised by Ralph Pirozzo, 1997)

* Assessment for Learning Task # Assessment of Learning KEY
Tuning in Finding out Sorting out Going further Making conclusions Reflecting and Taking action

~ Extension Activity + Scaffolded Learning Activity

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We Are One – Classroom and School Identity (Module 2)
Seven Intelligences Verbal I enjoy reading, writing & speaking Knowing
As a class read “My School, Your School” And then: *Rocket Writing. Write as much as you can in 5 minutes about our class.

Year 2
Applying Analysing
Design a questionnaire to send to our buddy school to try and find out what their school is like. What is the same as our school and what is different. Create a graph showing the amount of students in each class within the school

Bloom’s Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels Understanding
+ Concept Attainment – School. True/False yes/no statements

Creating
In small groups create a booklet of class rules and why they are important.

Evaluating
~ Using your yes and no statements and definition of school create a list of criteria to judge the school by.

Write statements about the most important thing about our class and how you contribute to that

Mathematical I enjoy working with numbers & science

Collect data on the amount of students in each class within the school

Fact Finding. using the internet and plaques around the school gather school based facts. Eg. When the school first opened etc.

Compiling the facts from the fact finding activity. As a class create a school timeline.

Using tessellating patterns recreate a pattern you see around the school.

Visual/Spatial I enjoy painting, drawing & visualising

+ Use a Y-Chart to explore what our class room looks like, sounds like and feels like. AND As a class using the interactive map, plot where each student is from.

~ Choose colour that you think represents what our class is like (using Y chart information) and create a class logo.

+ Students compile their “important” statements and create a class “important” scrap book

Venn diagram compare our class to another year 2 class within the school

Design a new classroom to suit our class – label.

For a day you are called by a number based on what number your name is on the roll. At the end of the day discuss as a class how this made you feel and what impact it had on your individual and the class identity. Putting you in the picture. Draw a picture of our school and draw how they see yourself fitting in to this.

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Kinaesthetic I enjoy doing hands-on activities, sports & dance Musical I enjoy making & listening to music

* Pass the ball. As a class a ball is passed around. As the ball is thrown to you, offer a word to do with school

+ Learn the school song

Class ceremony. Explain your puzzle piece to the class then add your piece to the class puzzle. In groups then present class song Explain what the song is about, how it relates to our school and why it might have been chosen. In small groups discuss the ways in which class is like a family

# In small groups make the board game based on the school

Role Play – Introduce yourself to the class as the subject of your interview Using one word describe how the school song makes you feel when you sing it. Interview someone working in the school community. Record: Who they are, what they do, what we gain from them and what the school would miss without them. Contracts. Fill out a contract with something that will contribute to the a) class community b) school community # In small groups: If you could choose any animal to be our class mascot, what would you choose and why?

Make a soundscape based on arriving at school. Soundscape is recorded and played back to class # In small groups design a board game based on the school

Write an advertisement to entice people to join our school highlighting our individuality. +In small groups compose a class song

In small groups devise a role play choosing one of the class rules and demonstrating what our class might be like if that rule wasn’t a rule. Class debate. In two groups, groups are given either for or against changing the school song. ~ In small groups play the board games created and evaluate them

Interpersonal I enjoy working with others

Paired Interview. With a partner come up with a list of things you have in common. Then come together as a class and make a class list.

# In pairs respond to a teacher given simile eg. How is our school like a train? Then create your own simile and explain why it is like our school.

Intrapersonal I enjoy working by myself

Make an acrostic poem for the name of our class

Naturalist I enjoy caring for plants and animals

As a class meet and be introduced to the school mascot and read a short story about the animal.

* + Create a definition for school (scaffolded by listing key words on the board). Definitions are displayed in the classroom. Creating the school mascots character, what do you think it is like?

Decorate your blank puzzle piece in a way that you think represents you.

~ Create a class text book instructing others on what makes a good school mascot

~ Imagine that you go to our buddy school. Make a day plan of what you think a day at that school might be like. Create a powerpoint slide on your chosen new mascot. With dot points as to why it should be our new class mascot

~ Judge the value of diversity within the school. Write what you think would be different if we were all the same, accompanying picture. As a class, create a list of criteria that a mascot has. Judge each of the proposed class mascots and vote on which will be the new class mascot

Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332)

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Multiple Intelligences & Bloom’s Taxonomy (devised by Ralph Pirozzo, 1997)

* Assessment for Learning Task # Assessment of Learning KEY
Tuning in Finding out Sorting out Going further Making conclusions Reflecting and Taking action

~ Extension Activity + Scaffolded Learning Activity

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We Are One – Australia & Australians (Module 3)
Seven Intelligences Verbal I enjoy reading, writing & speaking Knowing
Define ‘Cultural Diversity’ in your own words.

Year 2
Bloom’s Taxonomy: Six Thinking Levels Applying
~Write a letter to the Minister for Education, Julia Gillard, telling her why Australia is so culturally diverse and how that helps you at school. ~ Research how the population of Australia has grown over the last 200+ years.

Understanding
Discuss some of the different cultural groups in Australia.

Analysing
Discuss the benefits of a multicultural society.

Creating
# Create a page for a book on a cultural group in Australia. We will put these together to make a class book.

Evaluating
#Review what you have learnt and one interesting fact about Australians. You will share your interesting fact at assembly.

Mathematical I enjoy working with numbers & science Visual/Spatial I enjoy painting, drawing & visualising Kinaesthetic I enjoy doing hands-on activities, sports & dance

Graph how many people live with each member of your class

Survey and graph how many people live with each member of your WA buddy class.

* Y chart- what does Australia look like, sound like and feel like

Sketch a major landmark in the local area; these could include temples, statues, places of interest etc. Write a sentence about why this place is important Choose one place on the map of Australia; describe the culture of this place through a collage.

Analyse the graphs in ‘knowing’ and ‘understanding’. You may like to make a Venn diagram to help you. Make a Venn Diagram of yourself and a famous Australian Compare and contrast the place you have chosen with Canberra.

Design a survey to find out where different generations came from in various families. Research Australia’s current coat of arms and create a new one.

Evaluate your survey, if you did this survey in your community would it be a fair representation of the rest of Australia? Write a paragraph about why your new coat of arms is more relevant to Australia than the current one. Review the lyrics to ‘We are Australian”, do you think the words are true to Australians?

-see Intrapersonal Knowing

+ Create a board game where cultural diversity is valued.

Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332)

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Musical I enjoy making & listening to music

As a class learn the lyrics to “We are Australian”

Look at the first verse from “We are Australian” (Bruce Woodley and Dobe Newton, 1987) and write a paragraph explaining each line + In a small group discuss the term ‘a normal Australian’. Do you think such a person exists?

Listen to a piece of music in the listening corner, Could it be Australian?

~Compare modern and older community songs.

Interpersonal I enjoy working with others

*In a small group, discuss how people lives in the classroom differ and how they are similar

Discuss some ways of explaining what it means to be Australian. As a group, explain these to the class. ~Describe what it would be like to move to Australia from another country.

In a group, write 10 reasons we know we are Australians.

Write a new verse to the song “WE ARE AUSTRALIAN”, in this verse you can write about the future or your class mates and why they are Australian. Create a brochure for people in the community informing them of how and why we are multi-cultural.

(As above)

Intrapersonal I enjoy working by myself

-On a map of Australia, label all of the major cities as well as all states and territories. Now try to label anything else you can think of.

*Make a Y Chart on what it looks like, sounds like and feels like to be Australian.

Make a Mind Map of what it means to be Australian

Make an i-movie of Australian life.

# As a group discuss the pros and cons of each person’s brochure. Remember to be a good group member and be respectful of others while doing this. Justify your i-movie. Do you think it is an accurate representation of Australian life?

Multiple Intelligences & Bloom’s Taxonomy (devised by Ralph Pirozzo, 1997)

* Assessment for Learning Task # Assessment of Learning
Tuning in Finding out Sorting out Going further Making conclusions Reflecting and Taking action

~ Extension Activity + Scaffolded Learning Activity

Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332)

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ACT Department of Education and Training. (2007). Every Chance to Learn. Canberra: Publishing Services for the Department of Education and Training. Birnbaum, B (1990). My school, your school. Milwaukee: Raintree Publishers. Costain, M., & Smith, C. (2002). The Sandpit War. Camberwell: Penguin Gardener, H. 1997. Reflections on multiple intelligences: myths and messages, paper presented at Using Your Brain conference, World Congress Centre, Melbourne, January 22-44.

Germeine, R., & Bancroft, B. (2003). Leaving. Camberwell: Penguin Going to school: two cities of the world. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewMetadata.action?id=L2711&q=school&topic=&start=0&sort =relevance&contentsource=&v=text&field=title&field=keyword.text&field=description&field=id&field=topics. all.text&contenttype=%22Interactive%20resource%22&userlevel=all&kc=any&lom=true&scot=true&follow=tr ue&topiccounts=true&rows=20&fromSearch=true

Going to school: two regions in Australia. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewMetadata.action?id=L2713&q=school&topic=&start=0&sort =relevance&contentsource=&v=text&field=title&field=keyword.text&field=description&field=id&field=topics. all.text&contenttype=%22Interactive%20resource%22&userlevel=all&kc=any&lom=true&scot=true&follow=tr ue&topiccounts=true&rows=20&fromSearch=true Just Like Me. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewing/L8303/index.html Lester, A. (2006). Clive Eats Alligator. Hachette Livre Murdoch, K. (1998). Classroom Connections. Prahran Victoria: Eleanor Curtain. Murdoch, K. & Hornsby, D. (2000). Planning curriculum connections. Victoria: Eleanor Curtain. My Family. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewing/L1454/index.html Newman, L. (2000). Heather Has Two Mommies. CA: Alyson Wonderland Parr, T. (2004). The Family Book. Little, Brown Books For Young Readers Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332)

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Parr, T. (2009 ). It’s Ok To Be Different. Little, Brown Books For Young Readers Peyton-Wood, T. (2008). That’s What Makes me Special. IGI Press Skutch, R., & Nienhaus. (1995). Who’s in a Family. Berkeley: Tricycle Press Super! The Family: family members. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewing/L5334/index.html Super! The Family. The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation (2008). Accessed on 15th October 2009 from http://econtent.thelearningfederation.edu.au/ec/viewing/L5333/index.html Woodley, B., & Newton, D. (1987). We are Australian. Melbourne: Blue Martin Records.

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EVALUATION ‘We Are One’ is a unit based strongly on the values and strategies in the ACT framework ‘Every Chance to Learn’ (ACT Department of Education and Training, 2007) and Classroom Connections by Kath Murdoch (Murdoch, 1998). In uniformity with this, the evaluation should also be based on Murdoch’s philosophies.

Murdoch suggests a number of ways in which unit planners should reflect during writing their units. She uses 9 questions; 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Did I cater for a range of thinking styles? Did my questions encourage a range of responses? Did everyone have opportunities to experience success? Did my resources provide sufficient clarification of issues and values? Did my resources demonstrate sufficient diversity, points of view and perspectives? Did I make the purpose of the activities clear to the students? Did I allow time for student talk? Did I encourage risk taking and exploration of ideas? Did I provide time for student reflection and self assessment?

In addition to this, evaluation of any unit should be a continuous process that involves individual reflection and peer reflection. Doing this in weekly team meetings to make sure teachers accurately and consistently inform their practices when they reassess the unit at the end of the term is the most valuable and reliable way of evaluating a unit (Murdock and Hornsby, 2000; p 126).

Student response to the lessons is also one of the most vital evaluation techniques (Murdock and Hornsby, 2000; pg 125). Student behaviours is an important and influential evaluation tool in regards to assessing the level of information and the complexity of a concept presented to a class

Furthermore, teachers must always consider their teaching and their class as a significant factor in the outcomes of any specific unit. A unit that works for one class or one teacher may not always work for another and teachers must always make concessions for their individual students.

Chelsea Kaylock (U3011024), Kate Maynard (U3013535) and Vanessa de Jager (U3011332)

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